Fukushima Industries unveils new mascot with an unfortunate name

Fukushima Industries unveils new mascot with an unfortunate name

TOKYO —

Meet the newest mascot at Fukushima Industries. This cute, winged egg is the perfect face for a company that manufactures the kind of industrial refrigerators, blast chillers, freezers and refrigerated showcases that you might find in a restaurant or a supermarket.

The name they chose for this little egghead, though, probably needed a bit more work…

The image below reads: “Hi! Nice to meet you! I’m–” Now wait just one second, can we really post this on such a family-friendly website??

That’s right, the new face of Fukushima Industries is named “Fukuppy,” which sounds just like the nickname you’d give a particularly clumsy puppy. 

If you’re wondering how the company could choose a name so inappropriate, you’re actually reading it wrong. As you’ve probably deduced, the “Fuku” comes from “Fukushima,” which is pronounced as “Foo-koo.” Unfortunately, when native-English speakers looks at this, we can’t help seeing it as, um, well, you get the point, right?

Either way, the correct way to read this would be “foo-koo-pii,” which sounds very cute in Japanese. It probably would have been better if they’d simply written the name in one of the two phonetic Japanese scripts, katakana or hiragana–you can’t really get the pronunciation wrong that way.

The company also provided a short profile for their new mascot, letting us know what its job is – besides making all the English speakers blush and giggle.

What are Fukuppy’s job and special skills?

According to Fukushima Industries, Fukuppy says: “I fly around on my awesome wings, patrolling supermarket showcases and kitchen refrigerators. I can talk to vegetables, fruit, meat, and fish and can check on their health!”

Where was Fukuppy born?

Fukuppy’s answer to this question is: “I was born in a Fukushima refrigerator!”

The egghead described himself thus: “I love eating and I’m full of curiosity. I think of myself as kind, with a strong sense of justice, but my friends say I’m a bit of a klutz. But I’m always working hard to make myself shine!”

Is Fukuppy a boy or a girl?

Providing the most diplomatic answer ever, Fukuppy replied: “I’m still an egg, so I don’t know which I am! But I refer to myself as ‘boku.’”

For those who aren’t familiar with the word, “boku” is the masculine, first person pronoun in Japanese, though in recent years some women have started using it as well.

Source: Fukushima Industries Corp

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  • 1

    mikihouse

    f you py...sad indeed

  • 4

    combinibento

    Are you kidding me? Fukuppi? That is certainly what I would nickname many of those involved in calling the shots, informing the public, in those early days of the disaster - so this is the most accurate mascot (and unintentionally hilarious thing) I've seen come out of Japan in a long time.

  • 5

    inakaRob

    Is any one surprised at all. With massive restaurant chains named "moss" Candy called "crunky balls" And all sorts of examples. Had any of these huge companies paid any gaijin off the street 1000 yen and asked, is this name dumb, vulgar, or funny in English? Then there were so be so many products and names that would not be the laughing stock of every English speaker out there.

  • 25

    Jimizo

    Fukuppy from Fukushima. Is his mother working at TEPCO? You know, the mother of all Fukuppys?

  • 5

    AiserX

    LOL!

  • 5

    JTDanMan

    Someone should post this to engrish.com asap...

  • -10

    Probie

    As you’ve probably deduced, the “Fuku” comes from “Fukushima,” which is pronounced as “Foo-koo.”

    No it isn't.

    Anyway, I have no idea how a mutant egg was decided on as a character for an area contaminated by nuclear fallout.

  • 9

    Carcharodon

    fuk up? yes plenty of those going on in Fukushima!

  • 2

    Viclovesdrama

    Lol - but now I understand why I see people in Tokyo wearing this dreadful F*** y** T-Shirts, backpacks and caps. They think probably it means something like Ganbare ;-)

  • 2

    Maria

    Anyway, I have no idea how a mutant egg was decided on as a character for an area contaminated by nuclear fallout.

    The thing is, this has nothing to do with the Fukushima of nuclear disaster fame. This is a 60+-year-old Osaka-based company that sells electrical goods, owned by a man named (wait for it) Yutaka Fukushima.

    It is still an unfortunate name for a mascot: "Make sure your fridge is a FUKUPPY fridge!"

  • 4

    philly1

    Had any of these huge companies paid any gaijin off the street 1000 yen and asked, is this name dumb, vulgar, or funny in English? Then there were so be so many products and names that would not be the laughing stock of every English speaker out there.

    Does this then suggest that English--as well as gaijin response to anything--is largely irrelevant in Japan? (Eggs-ept for some minimal token effort for the sake of tourism?)

    Fuk uppy. Eggs-actly. Then again, but for the splendid blunders, we'd have none of the fun of Japlish Engrish. And I'd not have enjoyed a great laugh this afternoon. Happy (Canadian) Thanksgiving to all. Gotta be grateful for stuff like this.

  • 0

    Deplore

    No it isn't.

    Please enlighten me on how you pronounce the Fuku in Fukushima, Probie.

  • 1

    Baibaikin

    @Probie is absolutely right. It isn't pronounced 'foo-koo'. Fukushima is not ふうくうしま.

  • 1

    Maria

    I think the point they're trying to make about the pronunciation is that it's "fu" as in "book", not "fu" as in "duck".

  • 3

    papasmurfinjapan

    Well the article is correct in stating Japanese would pronounce it Foo-koo-pii, but still, it's a pretty poor effort.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I'm gonna have a drink of Calpis while listening to Kinki kids.

  • 0

    Tokiyo

    fukʊˈʃimɑ

  • 2

    kickboard

    Oh, the irony.

  • 1

    StormR

    The irony of it, good to know some one up there has a sense of humour , the whole thing has been a Fu kup

  • 0

    papigiulio

    LOL, I was having a bad day until I read the name of this mascot. All is well now.

  • 2

    papasmurfinjapan

    @Probie is absolutely right. It isn't pronounced 'foo-koo'. Fukushima is not ふうくうしま.

    Do you understand the concept of phonetics? The article is trying to explain the reading in layman's terms. Most native speakers with no understanding of Japanese would read Fuku as.. well, fuk u. Foo Koo is a simple way to explain that the pronunciation is difficult. Sure they could pull out the IPA, but that isn't very helpful for most people that have no idea how to read it. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Foo Koo. Phonetically, the U in Fukushima in pronounced the same as OO, as in POO. Just because it is a double OO doesn't mean you drag it out Fuuuukuuuushima, just like you don't say Poooooo.

  • 3

    Himajin

    It has nothing to do with Fukushima....Fukushima Industries is an Osaka-based company.

  • -7

    Probie

    @deplore

    Please enlighten me on how you pronounce the Fuku in Fukushima, Probie.

    Fukushima. You say it as it is. It's not Fu-ku-shima.

    @papasmurf

    Do you understand the concept of phonetics?

    Well, judging by this:

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with Foo Koo. Phonetically, the U in Fukushima in pronounced the same as OO, as in POO.

    You obviously don't. Unless you pronounce "poo" as "pu".

    I think the point they're trying to make about the pronunciation is that it's "fu" as in "book", not "fu" as in "duck".

    That would have been better.

  • -2

    hooktrunk2

    Himajin, It doesn't matter that it has nothing to with Fukushima. They are guilty by association.

  • -11

    Fox Cloud Lelean

    Since I'm learning Japanese, I read the name the Japanese way, and found nothing wrong with it. It took me a moment to realise why non-Japanese would find it funny. Namely, they're immature. If you get the giggles every time you see Fukuppy, then how are you going to cope with Shitake mushrooms? Having said that, I think the correct spelling (in Romaji anyway) is Shiitake, but it wouldn't surprise me if I was wrong. The point is, if you're going to read Japanese words as though they were written in English, you're going to make a lot of mistakes and laugh over nothing. It's also worth noting another word that has gotten me into trouble recently: Nigeru: Which means to run away/flee. But unfortunately, I was misheard by someone of African American decent, and I think you can see where this is going.

  • 1

    samwatters

    "Unfortunately, when native-English speakers looks at this, we can’t help seeing it as, um, well, you get the point, right?" As Dave Barry once wrote, "You can't make this stuff up!"

  • 0

    hooktrunk2

    I wonder how long it will take for anyone to notice here in Japan. By that, I mean anyone involved or even the media for that matter...besides this website of course;)

  • 0

    Dennis Bauer

    @Fox, what i don't understand is, why nobody from international sales department or anyone else who speaks english in the company wouldn't give some advice on the name? Let's Fukuppy!

  • 0

    Himajin

    Himajin, It doesn't matter that it has nothing to with Fukushima. They are guilty by association.

    Say what!?

  • -3

    lucabrasi

    I've got no time for right-wing nationalism, but I'd support anyone in this case who pointed out that we're in Japan and the fact that a mascot's name might sound a bit laughable in English, a foreign language, is utterly irrelevant.

  • 0

    gogogo

    At least they are being honest, fuk uppy!

  • -1

    ReformedBasher

    "Fukuppy" sounds like it's describing somebody who enjoys bedroom activities, maybe just a little too much.

  • -2

    Ultimateuser1

    Probie I think you've forgotten how English works.... Fu and Ku in English would be pronounced "Fuh" and "kuh"

  • 0

    TheDevilsAssistant

    Is Fukuppy a boy or a girl?

    Well, taking the scientific approach by carefully examining the picture, it seems to have a set of some rather big "Kahunas"....must be a boy.

  • -2

    Marilita Fabie-Fujisawa

    I read it FooKoo puppy right away...kangai sugi desu!

  • 1

    anahorn

    I don't understand the problem, because even English speakers don't pronounce Fukushima as ....ushima, right?

  • -1

    dcog9065

    Yeah, don't really see the issue here, I doubt this silly mascot was made for English speakers. In theory, the same thing could be said for basically every instance of "fuku" or "shita", etc. in Japanese.

  • -48

    Minionion

    I admit I had a good laugh when I saw the name. But I would only consider this a blunder if the intention was to sell these products overseas. For the Japanese market, its a fine name.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I'm gonna have a drink of Calpis while listening to Kinki kids.

    Calpis looks like someone added a few spoonfuls of Creap to Pocari Sweat

  • -2

    lucabrasi

    @Eiji

    It's spelled in English. I guess no one would have cared if the name wasn't written in English. フクッピー。

    But lots of languages use the Roman alphabet; it's not necessarily English.

  • -1

    Jaymann

    utterly priceless! Only the Japanese could come up with something so stupid. LOL!

  • 1

    GW

    Too hilarious!

    JT why don't you do a little blurb on HARDOFFs new division LIQUOROFF hahah

  • 0

    ohayo206

    That egg should have a big crack in the back.

  • 0

    Kapuna

    Jeez you would thing that a company that manufactures refrigeration equiptment would choose something related like, an icicle, snowball or something cold. An egg??

  • 0

    hooktrunk2

    I guess everyone sees something different in this word. I didn't see the ****puppy at first. I saw **** up which, for those who don't know, means to make particularly bad mistake. AND often when you add a 'y' sound to the end of a word it changes the meaning to mean that you have a tendency to do that a lot. i.e. If I am hiccuping a lot one day, I might joke that "I am hiccupy today" or (sneeze-sneezy, runny nose-drippy, etc). If it were just the 'puppy' reference AND if there hadn't been one blunder after another occurring up at the nuclear plant, then I don't think this would be a big deal.

  • 3

    Ian Duncan

    I don't believe this is a mistake. Someone has got to be having a giggle.

  • 0

    philly1

    Okay, all you phonicators out there, time to give it a rest.

  • 2

    Magnet

    LOL!!!! Hhahaahahahaha!!! Well done Fukushima Industries! They should offer that mascot to TEPCO.

  • 1

    dudeyes

    Oh no.. Please tell me someone got this from an Onion article...

    fuk up py,

    ...seriously????

  • 0

    freeWill

    @ philly1

    i did not miss the context. heh.

  • 1

    konjo4u

    Boku? beaucoup...

    Sorry about your home.

  • -2

    ControlFreak

    They should offer that mascot to TEPCO.

    @Magnet--Agreed. Then TEPCO should make a slight alteration and call it "Fukupeeps". Native English speakers with no Japanese ability will surely be reading it correctly then, right off the cuff.

  • -5

    Thunderbird2

    So let's get this straight... unless you've been living on the Moon everyone knows how to pronounce Fukushima. So why is it funny all of a sudden to see Fukuppy? Do people laugh when they see the last five letters of 'hajimemashite'?

    I bet the Japanese laugh at the misuse of kanji in western advertising and media.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    This is so classic I nearly peed myself laughing! Not only did the nation select ANOTHER stupid mascot, but the totally fukkupy'd it! Hope they're going to use this mascot to try and sell the produce that Fukkupy can fly and talk to -- it'll guarantee no one buys the stuff and stays safe. Another colossal fail.

  • 2

    Fandango Spoonmonkey

    Where I can I buy a T-shirt with this? I must have one.

  • 0

    cleo

    everyone knows how to pronounce Fukushima

    Yes, and pronounced the way it's meant to be pronounced it's still... unfortunate. A particularly bad mistake.

    As in, Oh dear, that was a bit of a Fukuppy.

    Not that I would ever use such language, of course.

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    Fendango: you can probably get one from engrish.com.

    Thunderbird: "I bet the Japanese laugh at the misuse of kanji in western advertising and media."

    Like what, pres tel? How often do the Western media intentionally use Kanji when they have no need to because they want to sound cool and be more Western? I think you fukuppy'd up. See how fun that is? And it's only been a few hours!!

  • -1

    kaynide

    Serious question here... Why do so many companies invest company resources into creating a character mascot? I get groups targeting kids (disney, anpanman) or omiyagi related stuff (as in Barisan).. But why here? Characters like this, the docomo mushroom family or chidashika I could never wrap my head around. Anyone ever look into this?

  • 1

    Lowly

    Refrigerators= food and electricity.

    Fukushima= something that makes us really anxious about food and electricity.

    FUKUPPY= not exactly bringing confidence back to the ideas of food and electricity. Nor to refrigerators.

    A bit of a FUKUPPY indeed!

    Haven't laughed aloud so loud alone at the computer in a long time.

    Thank you FUKUPPY!!!

  • 2

    Tamarama

    That is absolute gold!

    I needed that laugh. Thank you, Japan.

  • 0

    badman

    It reminds me of when I first moved to Japan. I was on the train to Harajuku when nature called, but I was late to meet a friend, then I look up and I was a Kudanshita eki. Which was true at the time. I was relieved when I arrived at Harajuku and saw Takeashita Dori, so I did.

  • 0

    Ranger_Miffy2

    The headline drew me in like a bee to honey, light to a black hole, peanut butter to jam. Was I ever rewarded or what? TEPCO can't do one darn thing right, can it?...Let the good times roll with this one. And, yes, I am desperate to have my own Fukushima Fukuppy of my own. Meanwhile, I will be emailing this gem to everyone I know on Planet Earth. There *is a god...

  • 0

    Serrano

    "Unfortunately, when native-English speakers looks ( look ) at this, we can’t help seeing it as, um, well, you get the point, right?"

    I don't see it as Preston thinks every native English speaker sees it, I just see Fukuppy.

  • 1

    No Miso

    I thought it was a wind-up but the website (if it is real) even has a press release!

    http://www.fukusima.co.jp/upload/pdf_seihin/320%E3%82%B3%E3%83%BC%E3%83%9D%E3%83%AC%E3%83%BC%E3%83%88%E3%82%AD%E3%83%A3%E3%83%A9%E3%82%AF%E3%82%BF%E3%83%BC%E3%83%8D%E3%83%BC%E3%83%9F%E3%83%B3%E3%82%B0%E3%81%AB%E3%81%A4%E3%81%84%E3%81%A6.pdf

    Having said that, I couldn't find any romaji version, so I think someone might be stretching the issue to get a few laughs.

  • 0

    Ranger_Miffy2

    The headline drew me in like a bee to honey, light to a black hole, peanut butter to jam. Was I ever rewarded or what? TEPCO can't seem to do one darn thing right, can it?...Let the good times roll with this one. And, yes, I am desperate to have my own Fukushima Fukuppy of my own. Meanwhile, I will be emailing this gem to everyone I know on Planet Earth. There is a god...

  • 0

    Scnadal.Lova

    the message "hajimemashite" is above, not below. If im not mistaken.

  • -1

    Thunderbird2

    Here's a link to the company's mascot page.
    http://www.fukusima.co.jp/character/index.html

    @ Smithinjapan.. if you watch TV series and films which are supposedly set in Japan you can see all kinds of random kanji splashed about the place.

  • 0

    Himajin

    TEPCO can't seem to do one darn thing right, can it?...Meanwhile, I will be emailing this gem to everyone I know on Planet Earth. There is a god...

    This has NOTHING to do with Fukushima.

  • -4

    Fadamor

    LOL look at all the people who've spent so much time in Japan they think the ONLY pronunciation for "oo" is romaji-related.

    (Hint: moon, spoon, soon, cartoon, coop, FOOD)

    If you're speaking English (and not Engrish), the sound for the "u's" in Fukushima is "oo". The two sounds for "u" in English are "uh" (short vowel) and "yew" (long vowel).

    foo- koo- py works just fine for English speakers. Now if this article had been written in Japanese, that's a different intended audience and it would have had to be written differently. (or not written at all because Japanese speakers wouldn't mis-read it).

    All that said, I have to take issue with the following:

    Had any of these huge companies paid any gaijin off the street 1000 yen and asked, is this name dumb, vulgar, or funny in English?

    Why just English? If you're going to go that far, then you need to check ALL the languages. Here's a link to a page listing the 10 most unfortunate car names when read in a different language (and a couple that were just "duh" in English even): http://www.oddee.com/item_93544.aspx

  • -1

    No Miso

    TEPCO can't seem to do one darn thing right, can it?...Meanwhile, I will be emailing this gem to everyone I know on Planet Earth. There is a god... This has NOTHING to do with Fukushima.

    Er, and nothnig to do with TEPCO actually.

  • -2

    smithinjapan

    Thunderbird: "@ Smithinjapan.. if you watch TV series and films which are supposedly set in Japan you can see all kinds of random kanji splashed about the place."

    Your point was that the media seem to misuse Kanji all the time like the media and public here misuse English -- or 'engrish', if you like. So point out where the news misuses Kanji for whatever reason as a substitute for English. That's what you said, so back it up.

  • -5

    nigelboy

    Your point was that the media seem to misuse Kanji all the time like the media and public here misuse English -- or 'engrish', if you like. So point out where the news misuses Kanji for whatever reason as a substitute for English. That's what you said, so back it up.

    There is no misuse of English here for it's not intended to be English.

  • 0

    Thunderbird2

    Smith... I never meant the news... media means TV and films, comics and newspapers, etc... If I had meant news I would have said news. I said media and advertising.
    You want examples? Look at Bladerunner... also Firelfy... plenty of random Japanese characters all over the place there which could end up meaning anything.
    I apologise if I said western media misuse it all the time... I was clearly wrong.

    However, back to the topic at hand and this article is all about how the character's name is pronounced. For the FUK part to sound like people seem to think it should it would need to be written to basically have the speaker saying 'fakku" with the Ks being hard. As it is the word is pronounced as fook, short sounding, not like we would say book or look.
    Then again you already know this ^_^

  • 1

    GW

    Serious question here... Why do so many companies invest company resources into creating a character mascot? I get groups targeting kids (disney, anpanman) or omiyagi related stuff (as in Barisan).. But why here? Characters like this, the docomo mushroom family or chidashika I could never wrap my head around. Anyone ever look into this

    ?

    Simple Japan is many ways is like Never Never Land, a place that never grows up, all the insipid mascots everywhere are a prime example of it

  • -50

    Minionion

    Had any of these huge companies paid any gaijin off the street 1000 yen and asked, is this name dumb, vulgar, or funny in English?

    Is this company planning to do business in English-speaking countries, if not, what's the point? Not everything revolves around English.

    Reminds of an American I saw in Italy many years ago. who requested a pepperoni pizza and started yelling at the waiter when he brought a pizza with peppers. I am sure there must be lots of Americans getting angry in Italian cafes, asking for a latte and getting a glass of milk...

    Not only did the nation select ANOTHER stupid mascot,

    The nation did not select it.

  • 2

    milanese

    These things... only happen in Japan...

  • 4

    smithinjapan

    nigelboy: "There is no misuse of English here for it's not intended to be English."

    It's the use of Roman characters and typical misuse of them. The Japanese language uses more than 20,000 loan words from English, and uses them badly. But if you don't believe me, take a 'guts pose' and prove me wrong.

    "Since smith had expanded his area to media AND PUBLIC, perhaps he should enlighten himself on the Kanji tattooes."

    Last I checked, an individual tattoo was not public advertisement or media coverage or publicity. It's amazing how far you guys will go to side-step the issues to try and compare apples and oranges -- or apples and horse apples for that matter. This Fukuppy is a joke, and one that every single nation will laugh at because the people who made it couldn't be bothered not only to not make a silly mascot, but couldn't be bothered to learn a bit of English or ask someone who speaks it. A definite fukuppy indeed.

  • -1

    Thunderbird2

    Minionion, you hit the nail on the head.

  • -7

    nigelboy

    It's the use of Roman characters and typical misuse of them. The Japanese language uses more than 20,000 loan words from English, and uses them badly. But if you don't believe me, take a 'guts pose' and prove me wrong.

    How does it misue Roma-ji? How should the above character be spelled using Roma-ji? And again, we're not talking English here so I don't give a damn about your "20,000" loan words.

    Last I checked, an individual tattoo was not public advertisement or media coverage or publicity. It's amazing how far you guys will go to side-step the issues to try and compare apples and oranges -- or apples and horse apples for that matter. This Fukuppy is a joke, and one that every single nation will laugh at because the people who made it couldn't be bothered not only to not make a silly mascot, but couldn't be bothered to learn a bit of English or ask someone who speaks it. A definite fukuppy indeed.

    You used the word "public" only. As to apples and oranges, not everything revolves around English. English does not have the exclusive right to dictate how alphabets should be used.

  • 2

    philly1

    So let's get this straight... unless you've been living on the Moon everyone knows how to pronounce Fukushima. So why is it funny all of a sudden to see Fukuppy? Do people laugh when they see the last five letters of 'hajimemashite'?

    I bet the Japanese laugh at the misuse of kanji in western advertising and media.

    Of course, they do. Everybody does. We did it from German to English. Try the surname Kuntz, for example. Bathroom humour and sexual innuendo from mild to gross is a universal human characteristic.

  • 0

    ka_chan

    I think the problem is more than the name. The egg looks too much like a light bulb. Connecting it with FUKUSHIMA and wings make it look like energy flying away.

  • 1

    Bosnitch

    Dear Fellow Readers,

    This new "Fu_k-Up-y" mascot is proof-positive that the "300-euro-per-hour PLUS $1 per word PLUS performance bonus PLUS telephone-access fee" that I charged PR consulting clients in Japan ten years ago was actually grossly underpriced and worth far more than every red cent.

    An error of this magnitude not only requires that heads roll, it requires the swapping-out of entire management groups... to the rice fields!

    In fact, the amount of money that I would have had to charge to come up with a mascot worse than this one would have been immense... as it would have required entire days of thinking about how to conjoin the worst possible imagery and self-maiming wording in a single "Titanic" of a PR-Suicide campaign!

  • 1

    Hawkeye

    I remember a story a long time ago told during a marketing class I took in college about when Chevrolet wanted to sell it's "Nova" named car to Latin America and the Spanish speaking agents told General Motors to change it but they did not listen and the product's sales suffered. The agents point was who would buy a car that's name in Spanish "nova" means "no go".

  • 1

    No Miso

    @Bos

    This new "Fu_k-Up-y" mascot is proof-positive that the "300-euro-per-hour PLUS $1 per word PLUS performance bonus PLUS telephone-access fee" that I charged PR consulting clients in Japan ten years ago was actually grossly underpriced and worth far more than every red cent.

    Would you care to highlight which marketing campaign that you devised for 300eu+$1/word (why different currencies?), etc, that you wrote that gave your clients such a profile boost?

  • 2

    ambrosia

    minionion: I am sure there must be lots of Americans getting angry in Italian cafes, asking for a latte and getting a glass of milk...

    Interesting anecdote but you've just got to wonder why America gets dragged into this rather than say England, Scotland, New Zealand, etc. Is it a confidence thing or are you all just that much more enlightened?

    nigleboy: How does it misue Roma-ji? How should the above character be spelled using Roma-ji? And again, we're not talking English here so I don't give a damn about your "20,000" loan words.

    Why use Roman letters at all? If you're going to use Roman characters you open yourself up to being made fun of for using them incorrectly or in a way that makes others laugh? Why get yourself so worked up about it? Did you get get this defensive for Parker Pen when their marketing campaign, badly translated into Spanish, ended up suggesting their pen wouldn't impregnate you? Or when Electrolux's American campaign translated to "nothing sucks like an Electrolux"? Why get so defensive when people have a bit of a laugh at a Japanese company? They can defend themselves and can surely take a bit of ribbing. They're not delicate little flowers who need big, strong Westerners running to their defense all the time.

  • -1

    billy0722

    um... guys, Fukuppy is a mascot for Fukushima Industries, located in Osaka. It's located in the Fukushima district of Osaka, and is named Fukushima Industries because the owner's surname is Fukushima. It has NOTHING to do with Fukushima Prefecture, Fukushima City, or the Fukushima Daiichi Powerplants. Geez.

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