Factory production up 1.8% in Oct; jobless rate unchanged at 4.2%

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  • -1

    some14some

    well manipulated data that don't match with GDP figures, recheck please.

  • -1

    saidani

    IIRC, in 2010, the percentage of the workforce working less than full time jobs stood at 34%. To be sure, that percentage has grown markedly since then. One would imagine that the total unemployed/underemployed in Japan must be approaching 50% by now.

  • -1

    Peter Payne

    I don't know, but in Gunma it took us 2+ months to find a qualified person for a position out here (a Japanese who could handle the English and have the drive to be our bento buyer). A lot of Japanese are able to choose their desired work and avoid companies where they think the work will be hard,

  • -1

    globalwatcher

    A lot of Japanese are able to choose their desired work and avoid companies where they think the work will be hard,

    Same here in US. Over 3.5 million jobs with skills have been still open and unfilled since 3 years ago.

  • 0

    globalwatcher

    I am previleged to hear what he has to say tomorrow. This is a non traditional approach and I have my pen and paper ready to learn something from his concept in macro economics.

    Robert M. Solow, a professor emeritus of economics at the Massacchussetts Institute of Technology, was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his important contributions to theories of economic growth.

    In the 1950s, Solow developed a mathematical model illustrating how various factors can contribute to sustained national economic growth. Contrary to traditional economic thinking, he showed that advances in the rate of technological progress do more to boost economic growth than do capital accumulation and labor increases.

    In his 1957 article “Technical Change and the Aggregate Production Function,” Solow observed that about half of economic growth cannot be accounted for by increases in capital and labor. He attributed this unaccounted-for portion — now called the “Solow residual” — to technological innovation. From the 1960s on, Solow’s studies helped persuade governments to channel their funds into technological research and development to spur economic growth. A Keynesian, Solow was a witty critic of economists ranging from interventionists such as John Kenneth Galbraith to free marketers such as Milton Friedman. He was awarded the National Medal of Science in 1999.

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