LG begins sales of next-generation TV

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  • 2

    smithinjapan

    “Sony and Panasonic last year teamed up for joint development but they are nearly two years behind in terms of the technological gap with us,”

    Not surprising.

  • -1

    JeffLee

    Interesting how the Japanese respond to this development in a nationalistic way. Japan's two main domestic competitors team up with the aim of Japanese technology prevailing. It doesn't matter who prevails, as long as it's Japanese, seems to be the thinking.

    LG, meanwhile, doesn't care. It just wants to win out against its main rival, Samsung, despite the fact both are Korean.

    A great parable about how the Koreans are winning in the globalized economy...and the Japanese are falling behind.

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    JeffLee: "A great parable about how the Koreans are winning in the globalized economy...and the Japanese are falling behind."

    Well said. Maybe if they forget about outdated modes of competition and the idea that they should somehow be entitled to be number one they might actually be competitive.

    Anyway, the future of TV is becoming interesting, even though broadcasting is not. Frames will get thinner, and then they'll disappear and be replaced by holographics. I feel sorry for all the suckers who bought the 3-D TVs.

  • 4

    wipeout

    Interesting how the Japanese respond to this development in a nationalistic way. Japan's two main domestic competitors team up with the aim of Japanese technology prevailing. It doesn't matter who prevails, as long as it's Japanese, seems to be the thinking.

    Sony (Japanese) co-developed the CD with Philips (Dutch), and they collaborated with Philips to develop Blu-ray, against the Toshiba-led development of the ultimately unsuccessful HD-DVD.

    DVD itself was developed by Sony, Philips, Toshiba and Panasonic and with input from Time-Warner, Thomson and others (members of the DVD Forum consortium of companies).

    Then Sony went against DVD Audio with SACD, and earlier they competed with Philips by releasing Minidisc as a rival to DCC.

    So there's been both collaboration and competition with foreign companies, as well as intense rivalry between Japanese companies (the history of Bluray, if you need an example).

  • 0

    Fadamor

    While OLED is fine for smartphones (which tend to get replaced every three or four years), I wonder about its use in a TV - especially one that is going to be so expensive. OLED devices have an issue where the blue emitters have a shorter lifespan than the other two colors. The blue emitters are reduced in brightness by half after 14,000 hours of use (5 years at 8 hours of use a day). Are you going to start replacing your TV every five years (assuming you wait for the blue to deteriorate that much)?

  • 0

    Loghorn

    @Fadamor:

    While OLED is fine for smartphones (which tend to get replaced every three or four years), I wonder about its use in a TV - especially one that is going to be so expensive. OLED devices have an issue where the blue emitters have a shorter lifespan than the other two colors. The blue emitters are reduced in brightness by half after 14,000 hours of use (5 years at 8 hours of use a day). Are you going to start replacing your TV every five years (assuming you wait for the blue to deteriorate that much)?

    Agreed. If you're going to be buying a OLED HDTV, you have to make sure that your emitters are either Green or Red. Otherwise, you'll have to replace them constantly throughout every five years, which means more money wasted.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    Agreed. If you're going to be buying a OLED HDTV, you have to make sure that your emitters are either Green or Red. Otherwise, you'll have to replace them constantly throughout every five years, which means more money wasted.

    Umm, was that sarcasm? I can't tell so I'm going to assume not. You DO know that any sort of display needs red, green AND blue for proper display, right?

  • 0

    caffeinebuzz

    This is one beautiful tv. I already started saving cash for an OLED tv (aiming for the $10,000 mark), which by that time they should be far affordable,reliable and possibly improved. That way I'll have leftover dollars to do whatever with.

    I'm actually surprised that the Japanese makers haven't done anything on the OLED tv front lately. Have they given up completely or are there more issues with this technology that LG haven't 'fessed up to yet? The Samsung tvs I've seen are brilliantly clear and vivid in colour, so I hope they get on the bandwagon quickly. While the Japanese models I've seen are very good in terms of clarity, they seemed a bit dull on the colour front, so they'd better get it together and give us consumers some better choices.

  • 0

    caffeinebuzz

    It would be a very embarrassing situation if OLED tvs became a must-have for the cashed-up, and they were the only choice for Japanese consumers. That would hit morale very hard, so come on Japanese makers!

  • 0

    Sparky Santos

    Toshiba is working on glasses free 3D sets. So while they may seem behind — I wouldn't cut any Japanese corporations out just yet.

    Fighting to be top dog among many in a grim war at zero profits seems an odd way to judge tech.

  • -3

    JeffLee

    @wipeout You're off base (again), Your examples are for formats. Creating industry standard formats always requires collaboration among the main players...otherwise your format doesnt become a "standard." .

    This case is different. This is over advancing hardware technology. So, for instance, what happens if Sony gains an inside track on this tech. Is it then obliged to share it with its closest, most direct competitor? I guess it is, in the interests of preserving "Dai Nippon." Banzai!

  • -1

    wipeout

    You're off base (again), Your examples are for formats. Creating industry standard formats always requires collaboration among the main players...otherwise your format doesnt become a "standard."

    You can't separate any of those formats formats from hardware. Sony and Philips had to develop player technology as well as discs for CD. That ultimately led to hundreds of millions of units sold. DVD required new players again. It also convinced a lot of mainstream consumers to get into home theater and surround sound for the first time - so that brought further hardware sales, of televisions, projectors, surround amplifiers, and speakers - and then Bluray comes along, requiring a new player yet again, and now needs a high-definition television or projector to view it at full resolution.

    Incidentally, 'nationalistic' Sony had a longstanding partnership with Samsung - production of LCD panels, and they also agreed to share their patent portfolios with each other back in 2004.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4094087.stm

  • 0

    masonz

    Japaneses companies always on top in the sector of business, Japaneses products are selling all over the world. http://www.hireprofessionalseoexpert.com/

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