3 inmates hanged; 1st executions in Japan since July 2010

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  • 4

    Virtuoso

    Woo boy, this is one case where the timing was completely obvious: it's the end of the fiscal year and they had to work it in to the 2011 budget or face cuts in the coming year.

  • -19

    tokyokawasaki

    What an evil backwards society we live in.

  • -2

    Jonathan Prin

    Amazing you don' t get the names, at least afterwards. And why kill people at same time, if they have different past?

  • 11

    ExportExpert

    Shoko Asahara should be next.

    bet these guys on death row look forward to fridays.

    convenience and economic fact is probably why they hang more than one at a time i'd say.

  • -19

    NeoJamal

    Isn't a strange co-incidence that developed countries with good social welfare programs like those in the EU, Canada, Australia and New Zealand no-longer have the death penalty?

    On the other hand, the US and Japan where the homeless are a common sight, the death penalty exists.

    OTTH: Singapore under the benign rule of the Lees leaves no person behind in their welfare but hangs drug smugglers.

  • 8

    couversaka

    I guess it depends on how we'd define "major industrialized democracy," but surely South Korea and Taiwan would qualify, no? Both of those nations have the death penalty.

  • 12

    billyshears

    Apparently the people on death row in Japan never know when they are going to be executed until the morning of the execution, so when they wake up each day they are not sure whether they are going to get breakfast or the rope.

  • -12

    combinibento

    From Wikipedia:

    When a death order has been issued, the condemned prisoner is informed in the morning of his or her execution. The condemned is given a choice of the last meal. The prisoner's family and legal representatives are not informed until afterwards.

    So much for due process...

  • -12

    oginome

    Disgusting.

    Isn't a strange co-incidence that developed countries with good social welfare programs like those in the EU, Canada, Australia and New Zealand no-longer have the death penalty?

    On the other hand, the US and Japan where the homeless are a common sight, the death penalty exists.

    The number of homeless in Japan has actually decreased by more than half over the last decade. The poverty rate in Japan is comparable to most Western countries and is still lower than America, never mind any gaps between rich and poor, which in Japan is still relatively narrow, while in America, there is a veritable abyss between the haves and have nots.

    But I agree, civilised countries don't execute prisoners and Japan is shaming itself.

  • 6

    Okinawamike

    so when they wake up each day they are not sure whether they are going to get** breakfast or the rope**

    Or both.

  • 17

    Okinawamike

    The condemned is given a choice of the last meal.

    Shoko Asahara should be next.

    Guard: Hey, Asahara you want anything special for breakfast today?

    Asahara: What!

    Guard: Dude! Just kidding, here's your fishheads and rice.

  • -10

    gyouza

    Strange logic. You killed someone, killing is wrong. As punishment, we will kill you, but killing you isn't wrong.

  • -12

    The Munya Times

    One another state-organized murder case.

  • 7

    choiwaruoyaji

    It's a pity...

    ... that scum Ichihashi isn't on the list...

  • -6

    rickyvee

    if sending someone to prison is meant to punish them, then there can be no other punishment than death when a murder has occured.

  • 1

    noriyosan73

    An appropriate punishment of the convicted person. It is not a matter of revenge or preventing such criminal actions in the future; it is an appropriate action for a deed that against all of civilization's laws. Prisons were built to rehabilitate a criminal. Some can never achieve it.

  • 0

    papigiulio

    Hmmm im both for and against the death penalty. Its mostly the justice system in Japan that bothers me. Recently there have been quite a few cases of people being locked up innocent due to evidence that got lost or lazy detectives.

    In cases like Ashihara and Ichihashi this seems like a easy and good solution but why not put them somewhere where they actually suffer yet payback something to society. Let them test out new dangerous drugs or make up instead of animals heh

  • 0

    cleo

    An appropriate punishment of the convicted person.

    You can say that without choking, when you have no idea who the people are, what they were convicted of doing, how watertight or otherwise the convictions were - you know nothing about any of the cases, yet you can write it was 'appropriate punishment'?

  • 4

    Darren Brannan

    Watching the amazing 'into the abyss' recently really caused me to think about the death penalty. In that case pretty much all of the victims and the perps were common Texas trailer trash, to be blunt. The fathers were in prison for life and not around, the kids were druggies that had prior convictions and gun offences, their elder brothers were in jail too. It did show that the future for lower Socioeconomic groups was bleak and very sad. Still, as humans we make choices and must accept the consequences of those choices. The interview with the guard who had strapped 120 inmates to the guerney before having to execute a woman and then going into breakdown was heartwrenching. Still, the crimes were callous and it didn't really sway my opinion of the death penalty but it was a very thought provoking documentary. The guy who did the akihabara stabbings was cognisant of his sctions and destroyed many families. Locking up a loner like that for life is basically continuing his preferred lifestyle. Takuma killed all the primary kids in Ikeda.. As a parent I would be satified knowing that he achieved some clarity in his last painful moments.

  • 2

    Hide Suzuki

    Good. They should hurry up and execute more if they more than 100 death row inmates. Not sure why anyone complains. Criminals who commit crimes knowing there are death penalty should expect nothing less.

  • 0

    zichi

    Im opposed to the death penalty. I wonder why they were not named? How do they decide whos next?

  • -10

    escape_artist

    State-sanctioned murder solves nothing in the end.

  • 6

    zichi

    Among the three is Yasuaki Uwabe, a former transport worker who was convicted of killing five people and injuring 10 others in a 1999 rampage at JR Shimonoseki Station in Yamaguchi Prefecture, western Japan, according to the ministry. Uwabe's death sentence was finalized in 2008.

  • 7

    zichi

    Tomoyuki Furusawa, who was found guilty of murdering the parents of his estranged wife and a stepson in 2002 in Yokohama, was also hanged.

  • 0

    DentShop

    I am opposed to the death penalty due to the finality of it. Humans are error-prone and the Japanese justice system has made its fair share of mistakes. Any person wrongly executed is a tragedy.

  • -4

    Mike Hunt

    In a Buddhist country too, oh the irony. State sanctioned murder, no two ways about it. My own brother was murdered nearly ten years ago. His killer has never been caught. I could spend each day consumed with anger and bitterness but that would be two lives lost to one crime. About time Japan stopped this shameful, secretive murderous act. While they are at it they could also start to modernise their kangaroo courts and corrupt, inept, lazy, useless police. Yeah, right.

  • 1

    gogogo

    In a legal quirk, executions—always carried out by hanging in Japan—are banned over the New Year period, with a moratorium between Dec 29 and Jan 3 as well as on weekends and public holidays.

    That is comforting to know for the inmates.

  • 3

    zichi

    Prisons were built to rehabilitate a criminal. Some can never achieve it.

    The Japanese criminal justice system has nothing to do with rehabilitation.

  • 6

    zichi

    Mike Hunt

    sorry for the loss of your brother and hope his killer is eventually caught and made to serve his punishment.

  • -4

    Seavey

    Not sure why anyone complains.

    All you have to do is read the comments. The Japanese police force are like an Inspector LeStrade, blaming the first person handy, where we would all prefer a Sherlock Holmes, someone capable of getting all the facts before accusing. That is a beginning.

  • 7

    zichi

    After about 10 years on the very harsh death row, not knowing if your breakfast is your last one, kept in total isolation, most imates at least by western standards would not be considered mental fit for execution.

  • -7

    tkoind2

    Sick and wrong. Once again human beings use violence to prove that violence is wrong. Idiots!

  • 3

    tkoind2

    Mike Hunt, thanks for that post. I wish more people had the social and humanitarian wisdom that you show here. I am sorry for your loss.

  • 3

    BurakuminDes

    After about 10 years on the very harsh death row, not knowing if your breakfast is your last one, kept in total isolation, most imates at least by western standards would not be considered mental fit for execution.

    C'mon Zichi - that is pure luxury compared to the wretched lives of hundreds these scumbags have destroyed. No tears shed for these 3 grubs - I just hope it brings the victims families even a little consolation.

    Rest in Peace to the poor victims of their evil acts.

  • 0

    Dennis Bauer

    Shoko Asahara not yet?, those other persons crimes were from a later date? i don't get the selection process

  • 6

    choiwaruoyaji

    So much sympathy for the criminals... so much concern for their rights and well being...

    So little thought for the victims...

    How wonderful.

  • 3

    zichi

    BurakuminDes,

    I have the highest of compassion for all human beings, even those who have committed evil crimes and Im not opposed to severe punishment but Im opposed to capital punishment and the inmates on death row should be dealt with with humanity as it is in many countries. I find it barbaric not to tell the inmates they will be executed until their breakfast arrives. I think it`s also barbaric not to infrom family members before hand. Making them spend decades in total isolation breaks their spirit and in itself is some kind and unnecessary cruel punishment. No one should have glory from the death of another for whatever reason it happens. We should always hold ourselves to higher standards than those may have done on death row. And lets remember, not all of those on death row are guilty of their crime. In recent times, several have managed to be released on appeal, and in one case, the original judge who sentenced a man to death, has since stated he was not guilty.

    You know of the cases, unless you have studied the cases, attended the courts, listened to the evidence. Your judgement is based purly on media emotions.

  • 2

    zichi

    cholwaruoyaji,

    So much sympathy for the criminals... so much concern for their rights and well being...

    So little thought for the victims...

    How wonderful.

    Just because some of us hold ourselves to higher standards of humanity does not mean we lack any compassion fro the victims and their families. Three times as many countries no longer have the death penalty compared with the number which do. Even in America, not all states have the death penalty.

  • -3

    Aqualung

    Zichi-I agree that leaving them in isolation for decades is wrong. The sentence should state " within a year" and the actual date picked randomly. I do have sympathy for the wrongly accused, about the same amount as for civilian war casualties that were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

  • -1

    escape_artist

    choiwaruoyajiMar. 29, 2012 - 03:05PM JST

    So much sympathy for the criminals... so much concern for their rights and well being...

    So little thought for the victims...

    How wonderful.

    Why do many of those who favor the death penalty think that those who don't don't also care about and feel sadness for the victims of the crimes? These two sentiments are not mutually exclusive. The neanderthal attitude of an "eye for an eye" makes us all blind.

  • 3

    zichi

    All death row inmates who have been there for more than 25 years, and have finished all possible appeals, unless the state has a legal reason to execute them, should have their setences reduced to life in prison. I think the longest serving inmate is 40+ years. In my 20 years here, the numbers on death row have increased from about 100 to 138, including the addition of another woman. I don`t think Japan even executes women?

  • -7

    JapanGal

    Well I hope at least they gave them a good fair well onsen breakfast of Natto, Aji, Raw Tamago and Rice with Miso Shiro. I feel sorry for them. RIP

  • 4

    Pidestroika

    Putting away a killer for life so that they can't harm others means punishment and protection. The death penalty is an indication that a society wants to take revenge. Nothing else. Even if one later proved innocent was hung, who will hang the executioners? If Japan wants to call itself a civilized country not living in the Edo era enforcing Biblical laws, then the death penalty should be abolished and replaced with life sentence.

    On the other hand, since there is comparison with other countries, China kills many more than Japan (for the transplant organ market among other reasons) yet there is relatively little protest. Iran and Saudi Arabia kill with much more cruel methods. Again relatively little protest.

  • 0

    It"S ME

    By Japanese Law Death Sentences are supposed to be executed within 6-months of the sentence being handed down. Problem is that many appointed officials refuse to sign or hanko the execution order.

    Also hanging is not as clean as shown in movies as the people loose control of their bodily functions, etc.

    Many people were interviewed(here and overseas) and said that the execution did nothing to lessen their loss nor bring closure, many were sickened by the execution.

    Japanese system of not setting an execution date is close to daily torture.

  • 3

    zichi

    It"S Me

    ByJapanese Law Death Sentences are supposed to be executed within 6-months of the sentence being handed down. Problem is that many appointed officials refuse to sign or hanko the execution order.

    The appeals courts must be finalized first which seems to take 10 to 20 years, and sometimes longer.

  • 6

    Elbuda Mexicano

    THANK Dog almighty for the DEATH Penalty!! Let these evil, evil bastards BURN IN HELL!

  • 1

    Pidestroika

    THANK Dog almighty

    Brilliant! "Canis Major"?

  • -8

    choiwaruoyaji

    The vast majority of Japanese people wish to retain the death penalty.

    Given that fact, it's good to see that democracy is working and the government is reflecting the wishes of the people on this issue.

    Of course, some of us who are oh-so-much more humane and enlightened than the Japanese people can't possibly agree with democracy working in this fashion.

    As some European countries have done, the wishes of the majority should be ignored and the elite should impose their enlightened view on the rest of us.

  • -1

    choiwaruoyaji

    Just because some of us hold ourselves to higher standards of humanity...

    In your opinion.

    On the other hand, others find little humanity shown to victims families, who have to witness the people who murdered their loved ones get out of prison after a few years and start enjoying their lives again.

    On the contrary, it borders on cruelty.

  • -3

    Kakukakushikajika

    Kill the killer then what? Will it stop twisted minded people killing? Will it stop passion crimes, craziness? Will it help the victims' families to feel better? Fighting fire with fire, how retarded!

  • 4

    zichi

    chowarouyagi

    you are just repeating yourself. There also families of victims who witnessed executions but were held without any feelings of closure. Most people who are found guilty and given life sentences won't be let out after a few years. Which country are you referring to?

  • 5

    zichi

    chowarouyagi

    The vast majority of Japanese people wish to retain the death penalty.

    Given that fact, it's good to see that democracy is working and the government is reflecting the wishes of the people on this issue.

    The majority of Japanese also support whaling does democracy rule for that too?

    A large number of the Bar Association oppose the death penalty.

  • -2

    lostrune2

    Well, at least if they're gonna do it, they're doing it the manly way - hanging. Ironic in herbivore country.

  • -2

    Franchesca Miyara Yang

    Mike HuntMAR. 29, 2012 - 01:24PM JST

    In a Buddhist country too, oh the irony. State sanctioned murder, no two ways about it. My own brother was murdered nearly ten years ago. His killer has never been caught. I could spend each day consumed with anger and bitterness but that would be two lives lost to one crime. About time Japan stopped this shameful, secretive murderous act. While they are at it they could also start to modernise their kangaroo courts and corrupt, inept, lazy, useless police. Yeah, right.

    Well said. Death Penalty is NOT a crime deterrent. It's nothing but legalize MURDER itself! Are these people that retarded? Lock the scum permanently. Let them rot inside cages like animals.

  • -1

    yobi00

    Let the punishment fit the crime. No qualms about removing individuals who have selfishly taken the lives of others. The only valid argument against the death penalty is the possibility of executing an innocent person, that's why in my view capital punishment should only be applicable to cases with direct evidence.

    Transplanting organs of executed inmates would be a great way to actually save lives, but sadly it is morally unacceptable in today's society, although I've read somewhere that China is thought to be doing something similar.

  • -1

    mrsynik

    Good riddance. In this case, it was used against the most heinous of crimes possible.

  • 7

    plasticmonkey

    The death penalty is largely carried out for political reasons. It's intended to show the populace that the government is in control and tough on crime. There is, however, little evidence to show that the death penalty is a deterrent. In fact, there is more evidence to show that it does not stop killers.

    In my opinion, executions perpetuate a culture of vindictiveness, an ethos in which the complex and painful realities of human nature are to be blotted out by discarding the perpetrator like a piece of trash.

    I agree with the posters here who say opposing the death penalty does not cancel out feelings of sorrow for the victims and their loved ones. There is nothing but everlasting damage when murder is done, including that for the murderer. The death penalty will not relieve the victims' families, nor bring back the dead, nor deter future crimes, nor achieve some magical equilibrium of justice. A portion of the public cry out for blood because it satisfies a thirst for easy answers. A portion of the political world uses this medieval mindset for their own gain. Shame on them.

    The world is no better off with these executions, as the world was no better off with the murders that brought them to the gallows. Nothing is solved.

  • -1

    timtak

    @yobioo and papigiulio I think that the drug testing and transplanting options are far from immoral. Murder for murder sounds just plain daft, counter-productive and wasteful, but making people who take life give their life to save others, that at least has some utilitarian sense to it.

  • -2

    Seavey

    Myoptic

  • 0

    Seavey

    Given that fact, it's good to see that democracy is working and the government is reflecting the wishes of the people on this issue.

    Majority rules should never apply to a human rights issue. If it does, then not only executions but also slavery becomes admissible.

  • -2

    techall

    In an unusual move, Chiba attended the executions and later allowed the media to visit the execution chamber at the Tokyo Detention House in a bid to increase public debate over the death penalty.

    ??????? "splain that to me, Lucy

  • 3

    GaroJ

    I've never understood how people can be against the death penalty but in support of 'life' imprisonment (presuming 'life' actually means 'life'). Are they not functionally the same thing? Just with the former humanely hurrying the process along instead of dragging things out until the prisoner dies of natural causes (or is murdered/commits suicide in prison).

    I understand the opposition to the death penalty regarding the risk of executing innocent people, but in clear cut cases (and yes, these do exist) I think the penalty is justified.

  • 0

    GaroJ

    Kill the killer then what? Will it stop twisted minded people killing? Will it stop passion crimes, craziness? Will it help the victims' families to feel better? Fighting fire with fire, how retarded!

    It will stop those killers from killing again, yes. And what punishment do you think would stop/help all of those things?

  • -1

    GaroJ

    Well said. Death Penalty is NOT a crime deterrent. It's nothing but legalize MURDER itself! Are these people that retarded? Lock the scum permanently. Let them rot inside cages like animals.

    So they shouldn't kill these multiple murderers, but they should lock them up until they die anyway?

  • 1

    Seavey

    Are they not functionally the same thing?

    NO! Because if you later find out you convicted the wrong guy, you can release him from prison if you didn't kill him. And its happened.

    It will stop those killers from killing again,

    So does life in prison!

  • -1

    GaroJ

    And as I mentioned, the penalty should only be used in clear cut cases. It's unspeakably awful to think of an innocent person being put to death by the state in that way. That's why I'm really only talking about the kind of crime that Uwabe committed. There was no question of whether or not that guy went out and murdered 5 people. His innocence was never up for debate, it was always a simple question of punishment.

  • -2

    JacopoMTK

    And here they start again with this death penalty...Really,if there's something i hate in Japan,is death sentence. WTH we're in 2012 and still there's the need of killing someone to punish him. Don't tell me that doing so you have "3 inmates less to pay" the prison.... Death penalty should just be abolished,that's all.

  • 2

    Seavey

    Killing, except in immediate self-defense, is barbaric.

  • 3

    zichi

    Garoj

    And as I mentioned, the penalty should only be used in clear cut cases

    if that is so, the majority of the inmates on death row should be released.

  • 0

    GaroJ

    Yeah, I'm not defending the current application of the death penalty (especially not in the US), I just don't oppose it in principle.

  • 1

    zichi

    The Justice Minister should have to attend every single execution.

  • 4

    choiwaruoyaji

    People talk about the 'barbarism' of the death penalty... well what are their alternatives?

    Locking up people for life in a small cell?

    Well, that's barbaric, too. Most people will slowly and surely go crazy under those conditions.

    That's a worse and more barbaric torment than a quick execution IMHO.

    So presumably you're going to try to offer them books and TV to avoid them going crazy. Maybe even a playstation. Perhaps the opportunity to study for a qualification. Visits from family and friends? Of course!

    Hmm prison isn't looking so bad now...

    And how nice for the murdered victims family to know that, while their loved one has had all opportunities for happiness ripped away and lies rotting in the grave, the actual criminal is enjoying all those things...

    Yes, let's spend all our time thinking about the rights and comforts of these killers, I mean, after all there's nothing we can do for the victim is there...

  • 3

    choiwaruoyaji

    And how about killers who have abducted, raped, tortured and killed innocent little children?

    How comfortable shall we make their life in prison?

  • 1

    Serrano

    "state-sanctioned murder"

    Or, justice, depending on your viewpoint.

  • 9

    butterfly1

    2 years ago, I met the first exhonerated man in Japan, Mr. Sakae Menda. You should read his story. It is shocking but he is an amazing man. He was on death row for 34 years! Now he pushing to abolish the death penalty in Japan.

    I don't believe in death sentences. I believe life in prison without parole should the toughest sentence.

  • 5

    zichi

    choiwaruoyaji

    you should do some reading up on the Japanese prison system which is nothing like those in Europe or America. No ac in the summer, no heating in the winter. No TV in the cells, certainly no playstations, no studying. The Japanese penal system is based on punishment. Its not about making their life comfortable in prison its about treating people with humanity whether they are a convicted murderer, a serial murderer, a SOB evil killer who abused and killed little children or even a Jihadist bomber who took out the lives of hundreds.

    I don't think spending the rest of your life locked up in a Japanese prison would be any source of happiness for any inmate. Some inmates also are made to serve a period of hard labor.

    Society and its individuals needs to rise to higher standards of conduct. Why have more than 150 countries dropped their death penalties.

  • 4

    zichi

    butterfly 1,

    I read his story and there are others on death row in the same position.

  • 0

    italiandream

    If you do not fit into the society either you kill yourself - like 35.000 people per year is doing - or the society kills you. Pritty barbaric indeed.

  • 2

    Eve Aphayboun

    I also don't agree with the death penalty. But I also don't agree with letting them rot in prison at tax payers expense.

    What I think we need to do, is to try and understand these killers/murderers.. Rehabilitate them quickly, and let them return to society quickly too, so they can contribute to the economy and what not. The more compassionate we are, the more likely we are to understand why people act and behave accordingly. Just because they committed an offence once, possibly out of rage, who's to say they are to do it again? What you do is distill this sense of fear, and have all these people living a life of lies; in the shadows of society.

  • 6

    gyouza

    @choiwaruoyaji What zichi mentions is not just for convicts, but for suspects too. If you have been arrested, you are placed in a similar environment to what he describes and denied access to family. The goal is to force a confession, and works in many cases. The suspect are told to sign a paper that will let them back on the street UNDER EXTREME PRESSURE, and with denial of basic human rights. Lets assume that some suspects are guilty, so good job, right? But sadly not all are, and there are some recent cases where people have FINALLY been released before execution after decades. Say for a moment that they were executed, is that OK? Do you think the execution system is infallable? Are mistakes acceptable?

  • 3

    butterfly1

    Zichi - Yes, there is a famous case of Mr. Hakamada. Everyone should read about him. Poor guy. He has been on death row for 42 years! 42. His sister says he has gone mad. So sad.

  • -3

    GaroJ

    I don't think spending the rest of your life locked up in a Japanese prison would be any source of happiness for any inmate. Some inmates also are made to serve a period of hard labor.

    Sorry, which punishment was meant to be cruel and barbaric again?

  • 0

    choiwaruoyaji

    you should do some reading up on the Japanese prison system which is nothing like those in Europe or America.

    I know about the Japanese system.

    You misunderstood my post... what I am asking about is your system of punishment.

    I've noticed that people who criticize capital punishment suddenly become very vague when it comes to explaining exactly what punishment they would enact.

    As I have said, life in prison, locked in a tiny cell is IMHO an extremely barbaric and cruel punishment. More cruel and barbaric than capital punishment I think.

    So come on... let's take my example of killers who have murdered tiny innocent little children... what's your punishment for them, how many rights and comforts are they entitled to under your system? I'd be interested to hear.

  • 3

    zichi

    choiwaruoyaji

    I don't have a "system of punishment" that is the role of the state and the justice system. I don't support the death penalty but I do support life in prison which isn't as barbaric as killing someone just for vengeance.

  • 0

    choiwaruoyaji

    Do you think the execution system is infallable?

    Do you think the life in prison system is infallible?

    As I have said, I think a life in prison in a tiny cell is an extremely cruel and barbaric punishment.

    It would, I believe, drive almost anyone crazy.

    So your oh-so-much more humane system is not perfect either.

    Under capital punishment an innocent man might be killed. Under your system, an innocent man might be left as a raving lunatic.

  • 0

    choiwaruoyaji

    I don't have a "system of punishment"

    You're making my points for me...

  • -2

    jinkoenig

    it goes without saying that the death penalty is really necessary in current Japan's law.

    it's very important, the death penalty system and a false charge (false judge) problem is quite a different matter !! but every an opponent say same sentence, an against death penalty due to risk of false charge. i really don't understand.

  • 0

    zichi

    choiwaruoyaji

    I'm not making any point for you other than individuals won't have systems for penal punishment.

    What are you figures that long term prisoners becoming raving lunatics?

    The execution of a single innocent person plays a greater concern than execution of a convicted murderer.

    The death penalty system can't reverse an execution but it can release a wrongly convicted person which has been happening in countries like America when they are allowed to have access to DNA evidence.

  • -1

    choiwaruoyaji

    individuals won't have systems for penal punishment.

    There's not much point discussing with you.

    As I've noticed before, vocal critics of the death penalty suddenly become very quiet and reticent when asked to explain exactly their own envisaged system of punishment.

    As the Japanese say,it's zurui.

    I've asked you to explain how you would wish to see, for example, murderers of tiny innocent children to be punished.

    Is life really life? They die in jail? Are they allowed TV, books, other comforts?

  • 0

    musha07

    IMHO, death is hardly a punishment for criminals who led meaningless lives already (if their lives were meaningfull they would think twice before commiting crimes). It's more like an easy way out.

    Leaving them rot in prison is not good either: the criminals would just freeload on citzens taxes.

    So, why not make them do hard labor to pay for their food and support the family of their victims? At least their lives would serve for some purpose.

  • 5

    zichi

    choiwaruoyaji

    I have stated that life in prison is my position on multiple murders. The loss of anyone due to murder is always a tragic one and even all of those who suffer such a sad experience don't support the death penalty as one comment here has already stated, and that would be my position too. When the crime involves children, or even old and weak people the story is always that more horrendous but it does not change my opinion on the death penalty.

    Life in prison for these horrendous crimes means that it says, "life in prison". I think in Japanese prisons there are not many comforts.

    Of the Group of Eight industrialized nations, only the United States and Japan use capital punishment.

    The United Nations Human Rights Committee, which monitors civil and political rights, has urged Japan to consider abolishing the death penalty, citing the large number of crimes that entail the death sentence, the lack of pardoning, the solitary confinement of inmates and executions at advanced ages and despite signs of mental illness.” [Source: By Hiroko Tabuchi, New York Times, August 27, 2010]

    “Japan also has a 99 percent conviction rate, a figure critics attribute to widespread use of forced confessions. A series of false convictions have surfaced in recent months, including one of a 63-year-old man who had served 17 years of a life sentence for the murder of a 4-year-old girl. He was released after prosecutors admitted that his confession was a fabrication made under duress and DNA tests showed he was innocent. Critics say there is a high possibility that some of those on death row are innocent.”

    http://factsanddetails.com/japan.php?itemid=806&catid=22&subcatid=147

  • 1

    Fadamor

    Here's the thinking behind capital punishment:

    "Based on the depravity of your crimes, there is no conceivable reason to believe you won't go and do the same thing again even after extensive rehabilitation. Our tools for rehabilitation have never been able to successfully address cases such as yours. For the safety of the general public, our only two options are to lock you up away from society for the rest of your natural life, or to terminate your life prematurely. The cost of your incarceration would greatly exceed your benefit to society so we choose the latter option."

  • 4

    zichi

    There are currently about 135 inmates on Japanese death row who may spend 10, 20, 30 or even more than 40 years there. Some inmates actually die there. Death Row is not part of the general prison system and are keep in special units which cost far more than keeping an inmate in a general prison.

    If people are concerned about the cost then it would cost less to keep death row inmates in general prisons. But death row inmates are subject to a different set of rules and code.

  • 3

    zichi

    The majority of Japanese have a misguided belief that the soul of those killed can't be released until their killer is executed.

  • 2

    gyouza

    @choi

    Well, an interesting twist you introduce. I said...

    Do you think the execution system is infallable?

    and you replied

    Do you think the life in prison system is infallible?

    OK, now consider that if you were wrongly convicted, wrongly sentenced, which of this options would allow you the opportunity of recourse? Well a posthumous pardon may be nice?

    The underlying issue of a very "lax" legal system is only the beginning of why the death sentence should never be allowed here, so please don't bleat on about the difference of the value of the life of an infant vs the value of the life of an adult. If killing is wrong, it is wrong, full stop. There can be no exceptions.

    As I have said, I think a life in prison in a tiny cell is an extremely cruel and barbaric punishment. It would, I believe, drive almost anyone crazy.

  • -2

    timtak

    1) The position put forward by Garoj and choiwaruoyaji that life imprisonment is as bad as the death penalty is interesting. Is it true? What is the difference? If they were crimes, how do we feel about a person that murdered as opposed to a person that abducted others long term?

    2) mushao07's suggestion that they should be made to work sounds sensible, perhaps even more so that the more extreme alternatives mentioned by @yobioo (organ transplants) and papigiulio (experimentation a la vivisection).

    3) The possible connection between the current suicide rate and executions mentioned by italiandream is also an a good point.

    The above interconnect in ways that I am unable to fathom.

  • 0

    Ocgoodtimes

    The problem with the death penalty is that they don't follow through quickly enough. Same is true in the US, a lot of these guys wind up dying of old age before they get to the chamber for their lethal injection. In the meantime, it costs something like $60K per year, per prisoner to keep these guys in their special lock-up. But the appeals process is just excruciatingly long. They should just give the guy one appeal and if he loses, just walk him to the back of the courthouse and take care of business. But the way it is now, victims' families just end up not being able to get closure for years and years. In the US, you always have these protests on days of execution and to all those people, I say, "look, if you care about these people so much, you take them into your households and have them babysit your kids. You pay for their care and feeding, and if they commit some heinous crime, then you pay the damages in civil court". That'll make the crowd go away, because they won't ever put their money where their mouth is. Fact is, society is just better off without these people. Sure, you can talk about their terrible upbringings--their abusive parents, etc., etc., but there are probably more examples of people who come from the same sort of backgrounds and actually do good for society. I don't care who you are--you go on a killing spree, you deserve not to live.

  • -1

    Crazedinjapan

    Well put ocgoodtimes !!

  • 0

    imjdmyo

    Ocgoodtimes and crazedinjapan, I couldn't agree with you more. People talk about it being inhumane but what part of raping and mass murder is humane? Please tell me! Why should we have to pay taxes just to take care of someone that doesn't value life or someone's life for that matter. The world is better off without evil in it...period!

  • 1

    YuriOtani

    Hanging them is very wise, three murderers sent to the pearly gates. Better they did not know what am they would swing. Yes I know in "enlightened" Europe there is no death penalty. That man who killed all of those kids in Norway will be out of jail in 21 years or less. Makes no sense at all.

  • 2

    zichi

    imjdmyo

    if the taking of a life is wrong equally so, the taking of a life by the State is also wrong.

  • 0

    choiwaruoyaji

    What I object to is the holier-than-thou attitude of some of the anti-capital punishment posters here.

    One of them wrote:

    some of us hold ourselves to higher standards of humanity...

    It's this arrogance that they are somehow more civilized than others that sticks in my throat.

    Things are not so simple.

    As I have said, a life in prison, if strictly enforced (no comforts, no visits, etc) would be an extremely cruel and barbaric punishment.

    There's no two ways about it... it's an exceptionally cruel thing to do to another human being.

    It would drive anybody crazy.

    So, presumably, these anti-death penalty people, to avoid the barbarism of driving people crazy, are OK with providing comforts to these disgusting killers... TV, books, visitors, writing materials, newspapers, magazines, internet access, dvds, you name it...

    And given those comforts, life in prison for a horrendous murder isn't looking so bad. In fact it's looking quite comfy.

    And the comfier it looks, the more I think about the victim and the poor relatives of the victim... who have to live in the knowledge that the criminal who murdered their loved one has all these comforts and pleasures, yet their loved one has no opportunity for pleasure, no opportunity for visitors, no opportunity to be hugged and kissed by his/her family... and I'm wondering... where is the humanity in that?

    The anti death penalty people pay lip service to the victims, but it always seems to me that they are more concerned with the rights and comforts of the murderers.

    And when I think of some of the revolting scum who have appeared in the newspapers... people (it's hard to say the word in his connection) like Robert Black who killed at least 4 beautiful little girls in Britain and probably many more there and in Europe... well, I'm starting to ask myself... what kind of comforts do the anti-death penalty people hope he is getting provided with in prison?... what kind of prison regime do they think is suitable for him?...

  • 1

    zichi

    choiwaruoyagi

    you indirectly accuse me of being arrogant because throughout my long life I have tried to live it at the highest level of humanity possible and having compassion and respect for all life.

    I have devoted a large part of my life to helping others like the homeless, the poor, the unemployed, children in need, to name a few.

    The world would be a better place if more people tried to do the same.

    If the taking of a life is wrong then it's also wrong of the state to take the life of another.

    I have lost two of my closest friends to murder and I know they would not have wanted the death penalty for those crimes.

    Abolishing the death penalty and instead dropping people into tiny dirty cells, basically throwing the keys away and waiting until the inmate dies would not be showing any level of humanity.

    But you have attempted several times to suggest that anyone opposed to the death penalty must equally want these "lifers" to have a hilton style cell with the latest 3-D full color TV, bottle of single malt which is just plain stupid on your part.

    So what do I think lifer's should have are nothing more than basic needs. A cell with a flushing toilet, a working wash basin, a bed, a chair and a table. Limited writing material. Access to reading material like books from the prison library. A period of time each day for outside exercise. Depending on the behavior of the "lifer" some time with other inmates. Basic health and dental problems taken care of. Time to work and earn small amounts to buy toothpaste etc. Limited visits, once per month.

    The majority of countries in the world disagree with your stance on the death penalty.

    We don't pay lip service to victims and their families and even many of those are opposed to the death penalty.

    I don't think in your comments on this post you have addressed the issue of innocent people being executed or is that something which don't bother you?

    On this post we are also discussing the Japanese death penalty and life in a Japanese prison which is very different than those found in the west.

  • -1

    YuriOtani

    zichi, if he spends the rest of his life in "prison", it will be in comfort. I saw the "prison" and it looks like a college dorm. 3 squares and a bed plus all of the extra's. While those kids died in panic, pain and suffering. However, Anders Behring is not pleading insane but guilty. He faces a max of 21 years.

    So you feel sorry for these three cold blooded murderers? What about their victims?

  • -1

    Hide Suzuki

    @zichi

    "The majority of Japanese have a misguided belief that "

    That makes no sense. Is there any well guided belief ? A belief is something you believe, but not confirm or prove, so any belief is misguided.

    Lots of "westerners' have a misguided belief that there is heaven and hell, god and stuff.

  • 3

    zichi

    Hide Suzuki

    well I agree with you on those points too.

  • -2

    oberst

    I hope their organs were " donated " ( post dangling ). At least their death served to save a few lives.

  • -4

    YuriOtani

    Hide Suzuki, I stand with my fellow Christians. zichi, in Japan prison is about PUNISHMENT and reform from reflection. In Europe they are so worried about the comfort and health of these vile scum. The three paid the price for their murders and in a way experienced the terror from not knowing when their time will be up. Then one day they came for them. I do not feel in the least bit sympathetic for these three. What would you have Japan do for these villains? King sized beds with large flat screen TV's and catered food? Perhaps allow female visits as well?

  • 6

    zichi

    YuriOtani

    and will you still support the death penalty when they execute an innocent man which could have happened to Sakae Menda, who was eventually released after 34 years on death row or the famous case of Hakamada who has been on death row for 42 years, is sister says he has gone mad. Even the one of the judges who gave him the death penalty has since stated many times that he's innocent.

    Others have been released recently.

    Or do you believe they never execute an innocent man?

  • -2

    mrsynik

    Have the bleeding hearts actually read what this scum did?

    Uwabe drove his car into Shimonoseki Station in Yamaguchi Prefecture and then knifed people nearby, killing five, in 1999. Furusawa murdered his in-laws and stepson in Yokohama in 2002, while Matsuda killed two women in southern Miyazaki prefecture in 2001.

    Scum like this don't deserve to share the oxygen that honest people do.

  • -4

    Patrick Hagger

    Great for Japan not crumbling to the cowards that refuse to accept justice and due process as a realistic part of life. No one made these killers hurt anyone and they are only receiving the punishment fitting their crime. All of these crimes resulted in multiple deaths. Bleeding heart liberals of any society do not want the criminals living in their neighborhoods but they also do not want to finance their incarciration cost. It is amazing that the countries that are on the brink of collapsing also no longer enforce the death penalty.

  • 4

    Henry Geßner

    Wow, if you're against Death Penalry, you get downvoted here -- big surprise. Reactionary thinking still seems to be deeply rooted in our society. In that case, I'm really proud to be an European.

    Just get rid of it, please. It disgusts me.

  • 3

    cleo

    The anti death penalty people pay lip service to the victims, but it always seems to me that they are more concerned with the rights and comforts of the murderers.

    Rubbish. And a strawman argument. I have no sympathy at all for murderers. My objection to the death penalty is that, being done by the state, is in effect being done on my behalf. It not only makes me and mine murderers, it makes us the worst kind - killing in cold blood and by proxy. That some would have us do it to save money is disgusting.

    these anti-death penalty people, to avoid the barbarism of driving people crazy, are OK with providing comforts to these disgusting killers... TV, books, visitors, writing materials, newspapers, magazines, internet access, dvds, you name it...

    Not at all. Another strawman. Invent your own argument, then shoot it down.....people who deliberately kill other people are, in my book, already insane by definition. Whichever side of the law they place themselves.

    The vast majority of Japanese people wish to retain the death penalty.

    Oh well that makes it alright, then.

    Do you know why the vast majority of Japanese people wish to retain the death penalty? It's taught to them in school that it's the right thing. You know, in that education system where there are right answers and wrong answers, where only the right answers get you through the test so you memorise the answers without really thinking about the meaning of the questions. 'Democracy' has nothing to do with it.

  • -3

    GaroJ

    and will you still support the death penalty when they execute an innocent man which could have happened to Sakae Menda, who was eventually released after 34 years on death row or the famous case of Hakamada who has been on death row for 42 years, is sister says he has gone mad. Even the one of the judges who gave him the death penalty has since stated many times that he's innocent.

    That's a pretty bad example. That case highlighted problems with Japan's 'due process' and lazy police officers trying to convict the first person they saw rather than actually investigate a crime. Of course, if the man had been executed, it would've been an even bigger stain on Japan's 'justice' system but it was a pretty extreme case, not the norm.

  • -4

    VicMOsaka

    Reasons for support of the death penalty. If you are not a Bible believer then this is probably not for you. Just to add-- a death penalty should not be given on circumstantial evidence but only where it is without a doubt that the crime was comitted.

    www.biblebelievers.com/.../punish.html -

  • 0

    Rose Kina Kina

    Do not Kill! Its says. hanging is still killing? which is which now?

  • 4

    zichi

    VicMOsaka,

    I don`t support the death penalty nor am I a "Bible believer".

    GaroJ

    in recent years several men have been released from death row after long period because the evidence against them was mostly forced confessions.

  • -2

    GaroJ

    That's still a problem with Japan's justice system, not the death penalty itself.

  • 3

    zichi

    GaroJ

    under current laws, the two can`t be separated.

  • 0

    Kersey23

    Death by hanging? Ouch. It is funny though, when I said how barbaric it was for Japan to still be hanging people, to my wife, she said, "So was what they did". True, true. But I am sorry, as a Christian I can't agree with killing, killers. In the New Testament, it says "Thou Shall not kill". That is all it says. There are no commas after that. Now, I know this is not a Christian country, so I am not trying to install my beliefs. I am only saying, that I can't agree with it because of my own religious beliefs.

    I saw an interesting thing though a few months ago. Maybe you all remember it. Some guy went around in Norway and killed so many people and they showed where the guy would be living and how nice it was. It curdled my blood to see that he was going to be staying at such a sweet place. I thought where is the punishment in all of this? How unfair! But then my preacher told me that we were not supposed to be so aggressive towards these people. Punishment is not what we are supposed to be striving for. That is GOD's business. But we are supposed to show compassion at all costs, because if we can forgive even the worst of people we are on a higher plane. At first, I didn't agree. But that is the reality. We are not supposed to conduct ourselves so harshly as Christians. Plus, Norway does have, if I am not mistaken one of the lowest convict return rates in the world. Many Western countries and Japan have much higher rates of returns than Norway. I wonder if there is something to look at in Norway.

    Now, please all. I am just saying from a Christian standpoint that I can't agree. I am not trying to convert anyone or preach to anyone either. I am just saying. I have a feeling a wave of thumbs down and angry responses will be rolling in, but please remember, I was just saying from my own standing point. But we might want to look at at alternative ways to how we do our justice system. Let's be civil, please. Sorry to offend.

  • 0

    billyshears

    you should do some reading up on the Japanese prison system which is nothing like those in Europe or America. No ac in the summer, no heating in the winter. No TV in the cells, certainly no playstations,** no studying**. The Japanese penal system is based on punishment.

    Not according to this wikipedia entry:< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penalsystemof_Japan> where it states that the Japanese penal system is intended to resocialize, reform, and rehabilitate offenders. "On confinement, prisoners are first classified according to gender, nationality, type of penalty, length of sentence, degree of criminality, and state of physical and mental health. They are then placed in special programs designed to treat their individual needs. Vocational and formal education are emphasized, as is instruction in social values. Most convicts engage in labor, for which a small stipend is set aside for use on release. Under a system stressing incentives, prisoners are initially assigned to community cells, then earn better quarters and additional privileges based on their good behavior."

    Do you have different information?

  • 0

    billyshears

    I should add that, according to the above article: "Amnesty International has cited Japan for abuse of inmates by guards for infractions of prison rules. This abuse is in the form of beatings, solitary confinement, overcrowding, or "minor solitary confinement" (keiheikin), which forces inmates to be interned in tiny cells kneeling or crossed legged, and restrained with handcuffs for prolonged periods of time."

  • 3

    Kersey23

    My father was killed by two teenagers in Florida. I loved my father very much and we were very close. I was asked by a reporter if I wanted them to get the death penalty if it were possible, and I said, "No Way". So, I have dealt with this issue personally. I know how it feels as the victims family. Anger is the first things you feel. And you want to lash out and personally strangle the person yourself if you can get your hands on them. But it wont help anything. It may make you feel better, but it will not change things one bit, and it does bring you down to the killers level as well. Supporting the death penalty for me, would be the same as doing it myself and would make me feel like I am killer as well, maybe indirectly, but I still would be so.

    I am torn between what I believe as a Christian and what I feel as the son of a murder victim, sometimes. For a long time I thought how unfair it was that those boys should have the right to walk around and breathe while my father's right to do so was taken from him. Unjustly and so very unfairly. He will not eat, drink, smoke, meet his only grandchild and so on. But these boys do things all the time that my father is incapable of doing because they put him six feet under. So, I am torn between the two. Compassion and fairness. But I still have to go with compassion because of my religious beliefs and the fact that it will not change where my father's lies.

  • 0

    timtak

    The longest person to still to be on death row in Japan, now for 45 yerars, Mr. Hakama (76) the former pro boxer who was convicted of killing his boss and three members of his bosses family in 1966, has just (two weeks ago on March 14th) given blood for a more accurate modern DNA test to see if his blood matches the blood on the T-shirt found at the scene of the crime, blood that has been argued to be that of the murderer. An earlier test by the defendants' lawyers last year rejected the results of the prosecutors test presented at the appeal trial ("nishin" second trial?). In 2007 Mr. Kumamoto, one of the three judges who originally convicted Hakama came forward to say that he had always believed Hakama's innocence, in breach of a law forbidding the disclosure of multiple judge discussions. This came in partial fulfilment of a promise that Hakama made to his son in 1983 "I will prove to you that your dad never killed anybody, and it is the police who know it best and it is the judges who feel sorry. I will break this iron chain and return to you."

  • 0

    timtak

    Sorry that should be Hakamada, not Hakama.

  • -2

    GaroJ

    under current laws, the two can`t be separated.

    Yes they can. The death penalty exists as a concept in itself. It needs due process in order to be applied appropriately, but it still exists as a standalone idea.

  • 1

    cleo

    Stranger - Both my kids went through the Japanese education system. I remember clearly when my son was in high school, they studied the legal system, civil rights, DP, etc., and the teacher was thrown off-balance to find himself with a class of teenagers a good number of whose essays did not follow the 'official' line that the DP is the obvious and natural way to deal with those convicted of heinous crimes. It bothered him enough that he wrote about it in his monthly newsletter to parents. I was very proud of my son being one of those who refused to write the 'correct' version of the essay. (I should add that this was in a school with academically high standards, where the kids were bright and quite capable of holding their own against an adult in a debate.)

  • 0

    zichi

    billyshears

    I have alreay provided a good link on the prison system.

  • -1

    choiwaruoyaji

    I hope people reading this thread can at least see that things are not as black-and-white as the anti-cp crowd would have you believe.

    They affect to take the moral high ground but, as an alternative to cp they offer life in prison... an undoubtedly cruel and barbaric punishment.

    They then attempt to ameliorate this barbarism through comforts for the murderers.

  • 1

    zichi

    choiwaruoyaji

    how many convicted criminals would choose execution instead of life in prison? You still don't answer the question about executing an innocent person as opposed to releasing them from life in prison?

  • -3

    VicMOsaka

    Rose Kina KinaMar. 30, 2012 - 11:50AM JST Do not Kill! Its says. hanging is still killing? which is which now?

    Well if you read the following site you would find out.

    www.biblebelievers.com/.../punish.html -

  • -2

    choiwaruoyaji

    To decide not to risk killing innocent people is a "moral highground"?

    Let's talk about your system, too.

    You want to punish people using life in prison, right?

    You think it's infallible?

    You think there's no risk of an innocent person spending a life in prison?

    You think because they haven't been executed then, if it turns out that actually they are innocent, they can get out of prison eventually?

    Maybe they can, maybe they can't.

    Let's say they do get out...

    How about their mental health after all those years in prison?

    All those barbaric years locked up in prison.

    Have a look at some of the articles available about the mental health of long-term prisoners.

    Say if your innocent person is suffering severe mental problems as a result of being incarcerated for so long?

    Is that ok?

    Well, at least they are still alive... is that your way of thinking?

    I think you have to accept that there is no perfect system.

    You are suggesting an alternative to capital punishment.

    Fair enough. "each to their own eh"

    But you should take a long hard look at the system you are proposing.

    It is also barbaric and cruel.

    I presume you just think it is, to some degree, less barbaric and cruel than cp.

    Nevertheless, it is barbaric and cruel.

  • -4

    choiwaruoyaji

    My objection to the death penalty is that, being done by the state, is in effect being done on my behalf. It not only makes me and mine murderers....

    Don't be ridiculous. Of course it doesn't. It could equally be interpreted as being that the state is executing people on behalf of the majority who support capital punishment. Presumably you are not in that majority.

    Do you understand how a democracy works?

  • -4

    choiwaruoyaji

    people who deliberately kill other people are, in my book, already insane by definition

    So that means 'life in prison' is a particularly barbaric punishment for you...

    Imagine locking up lunatics! That's beyond cruel...

    For you, they need treatment, not punishment, right?

    That includes Robert Black? The monster who killed all those beautiful little girls in the UK (for those interested, do have a look at his wikipedia page).

    Tell us exactly... how would you go about providing 'treatment' for Robert Black?

  • 3

    cleo

    It could equally be interpreted as being that the state is executing people on behalf of the majority who support capital punishment. Presumably you are not in that majority.

    Sorry, but I'm still in the majority that pays taxes. I don't want people being killed using my tax yen.

    So that means....

    You're making up my arguments for me. Again.

    'life in prison' is a particularly barbaric punishment for you... Imagine locking up lunatics! That's beyond cruel...

    If they're mad and a danger to others, they need to be contained. Nothing particularly barbaric in that.

    For you, they need treatment, not punishment, right?

    Setting up more strawmen? No, they do not need treatment. They are murderers. They need to be contained. I didn't know the case of Robert Black until I looked on wiki. You have to go back half a century to find a suitable case to illustrate your point? And it's more heinous because his victims were 'beautiful little girls'? Would it have been less horrendous if they had been obnoxious little boys? Whoever he killed, if he killed, then he needs to go to prison. I don't see what's so difficult to understand about this.

  • -2

    choiwaruoyaji

    they need to be contained... No, they do not need treatment.

    Mentally ill people locked up for life with no treatment.

    How humane.

  • -2

    choiwaruoyaji

    Whenever this subject crops up there are so many people whose bloodlust and sense of real justice for victims stops their brains from working.

    There are plenty of people who are anti-cp who think they are morally superior but have never considered the cruel and barbaric alternatives they are proposing in its place.

    The point I am making is that there is no perfect system.

    Anti-cp people are also proposing punishments which are barbaric and cruel.

    A poster above believes that all killers are mentally ill... yet proposes locking them up with no treatment!

    Obviously, under that regime, they will become even more mentally sick.

    How's that for humanity?!

    This issue is far from black and white, and it is the holier-than-thou attitude from the anti-cp crowd that I object to.

  • -3

    imap2223

    Interesting points, choiwaruoaji

    Personally, I don't really care for the reasons that someone does something and feel that it really is not that important, but more of an excuse by lawyers and psychologist to make a living out of and to get people out of jams that they have put themselves into. They should still go to jail anyway. But, people who have serious mental problems do need mental health treatment and should never be denied that.

    But I can't agree with the pro capital punishment folk at all. Or should I say the holier-than-thou-if you-don't agree-with-me-than-you-are-wrong-and-know-nothing"pro capital punishment" crowd, which of whom can also be obnoxious as well.

    There needs to be a middle ground. Or some way that we can satisfy all involved without the death penalty. It obviously is not a deterrent to crime. I think I read somewhere that in some states where the death penalty is in place, that crime rates are actually higher when they are actually enforced. For me it just seems more of a "Let's appease the angry mob with a lynching so they can feel that something is ACTUALLY being done" thing going on. But what does capital punishment really achieve? 1. It placates the victims of the family. 2. Gives them a sense of justice. 3. Let's the people falsely feel that the death penalty is protecting us from crime becoming more rampant that it already is.

    But.... Is that all we want? Is that what is most important? How do we make it to where people don't commit similar crimes? Would paying attention to warning signs help?

    Too often we hear of cases where someone didn't do it because DNA evidence comes into play years later. I would rather keep the killers alive than to punish an innocent man. But that is just me.

  • -1

    imap2223

    Personally, I feel that if you kill someone, for whatever reason, you should never walk on the streets again, unless it was a complete accident. The person that you killed can't do anything anymore because that right has been taken from them, by you. So, let them stay in jail. Give them jobs to do and the money that they earn should be given directly to the victims family for the rest of their lives. They need to live a life of repentance for what they have done.

  • -1

    imap2223

    I agree with choi and several things though. There is no perfect system and that is because we all have different opinions on the subject, so this will be debated forever, and ever more.

    The pro-crowd doesn't have it right and neither do we. But the great thing is that we can always try to make the system better and debating about it can help that to happen. But closing our minds to each other will always keep us in conflict with each other.

    No matter how terrible the crime, all criminals need counseling. If not for anything else, but to be able to understand that what they have done is wrong. Once they understand that they can work on repentance. People who have done nothing wrong need counseling the most though. After spending years upon years in almost any penal system, can be harsh on people, especially if they have not done anything wrong and will amke life in the so-called normal world rally difficult to deal with.

  • 2

    butterfly1

    Timtak - I met Mr. Kumamoto too. He was a man far older than his actual age. This case has ruined him. He is trying to help the Hakamada family, but he too is worried it may be too late and that Mr. Hakamada will die an old man in prison. Mr. Menda and Mr. Kumamoto both believe that they haven't released Mr. Hakamada because the case was so high profile and the evidence was so unconvincing yet he has spent 42 years on death row. It would need a huge sorry from the police.

    May I say the most powerful moment when I met Mr. Menda was when he showed us his 'confession'. Someone held his hand and forced him to write it. Shocking. Mr. Menda has married. Lives in a house with a small garden and enjoys the flowers in his yard. He is happy with his life now. And, I have never seen someone eat a hamburg teishoku as quick in my life! I asked him about it. He said its a habit. In prison he had to shovel his food. seriously, i don't think he looked up or took a breath! and remember he is in his 80's. bless him. an amazing man. and just think how many more must be on death row that are innocent but the system has put them there.

  • -1

    Anna Louise

    Good on Noda! If there is enough proof and evidence that someone has killed for the sake of self gain, they should go to the gallows and stop wasting peoples' taxes just to keep them alive!

  • 3

    zichi

    Anna Louise

    Good on Noda! If there is enough proof and evidence that someone has killed for the sake of self gain, they should go to the gallows and stop wasting peoples' taxes just to keep them alive!

    But that does to actually happen since very few are actually executed. The majority will spend 20, 30 and even more than 40 years on death row most will become insane and the cost of keeping a prisoner on death row is high than keeping them in a general prison with a whole life term.

  • -1

    notasap

    Zichi

    But that does to actually happen since very few are actually executed. The majority will spend 20, 30 and even more than 40 years on death row most will become insane and the cost of keeping a prisoner on death row is high than keeping them in a general prison with a whole life term.

    This is not an economic issue. If it were we would just dispense with the appeals process and carry out the sentence right after it is passed. This is about justice and the time factor you point to as being a negative aspect are actually proof that the state is not operating is some fashion that puts possible innocence out of question. In other words a lengthy time waiting and appealing means that the state is taking it seriously when it comes to their ability to take life in the name of justice.

  • 4

    zichi

    notasap,

    I not only have objections to the death penalty but also the harsh and inhumane conditions on death row which are one of the worse in the world. It is a harsh and unnecessary cruel form of torture and punishment. Keeping inmates under those conditions for 40 plus years, long have their sentences have been finalized and all rights of appeal exhausted.

  • -5

    TrevorPeace1

    The death penalty is not 'barbaric'. It is not 'inhumane'. It is not enforced coercion of citizens by government. It is simply what the majority of people want. If the majority of people want change, it will happen, and then the demented among us who are convicted with no reasonable doubt of heinous crimes against their fellow man should simply be kept in a cage for the rest of their lives...right? But, let's not give them TV, books or any other distractions, rather we should merely allow them to rot in living hell...no?

  • 0

    Jeremy Rigby

    There was recently a story about a Japanese man who was on death row for nearly 20 years...They would march him to the gallows daily and then say, not today....He was found innocent and then released. Another story a few years ago about a mother who took her death row son a birthday cake. They asked her to come back later that day. They executed him! For the people that support execution what do you feel about the innocent people that have been executed? Is that OK? I am so glad I live in Australia where the death penalty written into our constitution can never, ever be re-introduced! It is proven it does not stem crimes.

  • 1

    dolphingirl

    I've never understood how people can be against the death penalty but in support of 'life' imprisonment (presuming 'life' actually means 'life'). Are they not functionally the same thing? Just with the former humanely hurrying the process along instead of dragging things out until the prisoner dies of natural causes (or is murdered/commits suicide in prison).

    The same thing? Uh, no. The death penalty is murder. Dying of natural causes is dying of natural causes.

    Death penalty should be abolished for two simple reasons: 1) It is MURDER and murder is ALWAYS wrong. Murdering a murderer is does not solve anything. Nor does is it a deterrent for murder. 2) There is ALWAYS the possibility of murdering an innocent person who has been wrongly convicted. No matter how 'clear cut' a case may seem, no person is pure evil.

  • -2

    GaroJ

    If you lock someone up and refuse to let them out until they die, it is tantamount to 'murder' (as you put it).

    The end result is the same - criminal goes into prison and an indeterminate amount of time later, leaves in a coffin. It's just that one way, governments are being honest with themselves and their intentions.

    The only valid opposition to the death penalty is the risk of killing an innocent but most of you seem against it regardless of whether the convicted criminal is innocent or guilty so it's hardly a 'sticking point' in the discussion.

  • -5

    peanut666

    The death penalty is a good thing. Such criminals should be hanged.

    1.) It is cruel and unusual punishment for the victims to see the perpetrators allowed to live.

    2.) It is cruel and unusual punishment to give such criminals a life sentence. The best way is to kill them quickly.

    3.) It saves taxpayer's money not to house and secure these types of criminals.

    Japan doesn't execute retarded people like Texas does only known criminals.

  • 2

    mooton

    Not telling them the exact day it will happen is very cruel - there is no excuse for it. The USA does not see the need to do that so Japan should not either.

    Hanging people is also cruel, It does not cause an instant death - it only looks like they are dead because they can't send any nerve impulses below the neck. No one knows if it causes instant unconsciousness. Pain and discomfort must be felt when the head is being forced past its normal movement range. It's a horrible way to die - just imagine what it must feel like when you catch your whole body weight on your neck and then feel your head being forced over to an almost 90 degree angle.

    Why not just give them a lethal opiate injection instead?

  • 2

    nec123a

    sickening and barbaric! It speaks very lowly of those who attempt to justify the death penalty. It serves no rational purpose.

  • 1

    Chaz Ed

    Without reading all the previous comments! Hung? How ass backwards and barbaric! Reminds me of the old Western movies! I suppose next you should bring out the guillotine! That device failed on the first try! How about stoning? You could get all the angry citizens that believe in such an act! Kind of like a flash mob!

  • 0

    cactusJack

    Apparently there are three levers, pulled by three people. No one executioner knows if they killed the person.

  • 0

    MustardKing

    I suppose next you should bring out the guillotine!

    Beats the hell out of hanging for the victim. The only problem with the guillotine is the effect on the audience, which is totally irrational to say the least. Remember, the guillotine was an invention of the Age of Reason.

    How ass backwards and barbaric!

    The method of execution remains secondary to the fact of execution. Human fallability is a fact, and that fact means innocent people will be executed and they cannot be resurrected. And that fact means that a thinking individual will remove execution from the table of choices, because one innocent life is not worth the paltry and debateable "benefits" of execution. And that is why I am suspect of the motives of the pro-execution crowd. They simply must not care that innocent people will die, and that points to a host of inner failings that this website will not allow me to point out, as they are considered insults. But to me they are not insults. They are facts of character.

  • -1

    GaroJ

    And that fact means that a thinking individual will remove execution from the table of choices, because one innocent life is not worth the paltry and debateable "benefits" of execution.

    No, a 'thinking' individual would actually think about the issue rather than take such an easy route out of the debate.

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