Death row inmates want prior warning instead of being told on day of execution

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  • 19

    Anthony Lee

    Did the people you harm or whatever you did to get on death row get advance warning from you? No, so who cares.

  • 8

    Newsman

    Fair enough. Surely the wardens didn't wake up one particular morning and say, "You know, I feel like hanging someone today," and then went and did it. If the decision has been made to execute someone, why shouldn't everyone (the prisoner, the victims' families, and the public) be advised of that decision as soon as possible? Why should it be a big secret?

    I have no problem with the death penalty for certain crimes -- PROVIDED the public is informed about the execution beforehand. If people want to protest against the death penalty, that's fine; if people get so revolted by the idea of the state executing someone that they wind up abolishing the death penalty, that's fine, too. If we are all informed about the death penalty beforehand, then we all share a certain culpability -- and we thus have to decide whether we are happy with ourselves, and our society, if we choose to accept the death penalty.

    But in Japan, almost nobody knows anything until the execution is over -- and that way, the Japanese public can feel like they had nothing to do with it. They can feel absolved of any responsibility. They can think, "That wasn't me opening the trapdoor, that was the government. Not my doing."

    And that's just wrong.

  • 12

    Keith Tarrier

    Considering the recent people on death row who were found innocent due to new DNA tests there needs to be some review of the system.

    • Moderator

      Readers, please note that this story is not about whether Japan should have the death penalty or not. That is a separate issue. It is about whether or not to inform the death row inmate in advance of the execution date.

  • 2

    southsakai

    Anthony LeeJAN. 03, 2013 - 07:41AM JST Did the people you harm or whatever you did to get on death row get advance warning from you? No, so who cares

    Yeah absolutely agree with you there. The clowns who are guilty of crimes such as murder deserve no warming in advance. I hate to say that the system is not perfect, but for those that are guilty of severe crimes, they should be punished without prior warming to the fullest extent.

    The victims who have been murdered by criminals never received any prior warning, nor did they have a chance to say "goodbye" to their loved ones.

    Always humans rights bla bla blahh, most of the world has forgotten about victims rights who are 6 feet below.

  • 0

    toguro

    "Did the people you harm or whatever you did to get on death row get advance warning from you? No, so who cares."

    @Anthony Lee & southsakai:

    I agree with both of you 100%.

  • -3

    Simp

    Interesting. I never knew they had no warning. Kind of makes sense though when you think about it as Anthony mentioned. However, if this process prevents the victims family from witnessing the execution then it might need some adjusting.

  • -4

    Resurfaced

    I agree 100% with Anthony Lee THEY DESERVE TO BE TOLD A MINUTE BEFORE.

  • 5

    LiveInTokyo

    Society is not supposed to be cruel or unkind. Regardless of what these people have done (or even might not have done), I believe they should know well in advance when they will be executed. If we are saying, "They shouldnt be told at all when they die", then I believe that is just a form of revenge. For any advocate of the death penalty, knowing that the prisoner will die, isnt that enough?

    Surely, having to wait years on death row not knowing when you will be executed, isn`t that even more punishment? The court has decided on the sentence, there is no need for anything extra to be given.

  • 15

    plasticmonkey

    Did the people you harm or whatever you did to get on death row get advance warning from you? No, so who cares.

    If you think the actions of the state should be as barbaric as those of the criminal, then why not execute them in the same manner in which they killed their victims? Is that what many of you posters here are suggesting?

    A justice system is supposed to transcend people's natural impulse for vengeance.

    THEY DESERVE TO BE TOLD A MINUTE BEFORE.

    Well then, do it immediately after the guilty verdict is read. That's how it's done in enlightened places like North Korea and Iran.

    You seem to be forgetting that these murderers have family as well. Are they also to be punished by forfeiting their rights to bid farewell to their son or brother?

  • 0

    Paul Paul

    They got their warnings when they were sentenced. If they are not making the most their days leading up to the actual execution, that's their problem.

    More than likely they will also die in a way more humane than what true victims got. So in that sense they are getting much better than they deserve.

  • -13

    kimuzukashiiiii

    My heart bleeds.

    To be honest, I would be quite happy with having them executed the same way in which they murdered their victims. Less humane is better, in my opinion.

  • -9

    Psyops

    I agree with Kimuzukashiiiii. Why should they get to choose how to die, they should die the exact same way their victim died. Also on another note, with the current economic crisis all over the world, using a rope would be the best and cheapest method to rid the world of scum. Lethal injections are way over priced.

  • -1

    Yubaru

    They got their warnings when they were sentenced. If they are not making the most their days leading up to the actual execution, that's their problem.

    And just how are they supposed to "make the most of their days" when in solitary confinement?

    I have no problem with the death penalty for certain crimes -- PROVIDED the public is informed about the execution beforehand.

    As noted in my first quote here, the public was notified when the sentence was handed down. For the purpose of safety, to prevent incidents or rallies, or protests, there is no reason to notify anyone of anything as I see it.

    I do agree that hanging is barbaric and reeks of revenge. Lethal injection is more "humane" if you call taking a life out of desire to satisfy society's desire for justice.

    Consider this, if anyone one of us killed a dog or cat by hanging we would be put into jail for animal cruelty, yet when an execution occurs hanging is ok?

  • -1

    Bartholomew Harte

    At the least in the U.S. the prisoner knows to some advance degree,Last Meal.etc.,, There should be a set date upon losing any appeal(s) involved. As far as method I think the thought of swinging at the gallows has been a deterrent to murder-the needle is Too Easy .

  • 13

    ukguyjp

    Of course these prisoners have the right to be informed when their punishment is to be carried out.

    I am amazed at the cruel and vindictive lust for revenge expressed by some comments above.

    When we decide public policy, we do not look to vengeful, vindictive, " eye for an eye" emotion for moral guidance. Rather, we aspire to a higher morality, one which is considered, sensible, humane and compassionate.

    In Japan, death row inmates may wait, year in, year out, never knowing when their time will come. Though we may despise their crimes, prisoners DO have human rights.

  • 3

    Paul Rinaudo

    I think the person should be told when it is to be done and untill we as humans have evolved far enough, if ever, the death penalty will never go away. I pray for all the souls who have been murdered that they rest in piece.

  • -2

    alliswellinjapan

    Mizuho Fukushima is well known for her anti-execution stance and thus her objective in conducting this survey is clear. Ironically enough however it may also serve those in support of the system well in that through promoting awareness of the public on what those committing criminal acts deserving of death penalty would be up against it may also work to prevent some of the crimes to be committed in the first place as much as it would induce people to reconsider how it should be carried out.

  • -7

    TheDevilsAssistant

    They shouldn't have the right to demand anything

  • 5

    Jaymann

    The present practice in Japan is a form of mental torture (although that no longer seems to upset people from once great countries that always held that "the means were as important as the ends") and (like so much of the horrific justice system here) needs revision.

  • -4

    jinkoenig

    It is difficult to receive their request. They seem to be no regret though they have happened serious crime. I think it cannot be expected a hanging. All their requests are meaningless and we never hear their voice. Because they are already sentenced the death penalty.

  • -9

    BurakuminDes

    Care factor ZERO. They are lucky to have bread and water, never mind being afforded such a luxury as being told when they will swing.

    My heart goes out to the poor innocent victims of these awful, evil people. Bring on the rope.

  • 11

    Yubaru

    They shouldn't have the right to demand anything

    Maybe we could "demand" that people actually read the articles before writing replies?

    They were given a survey and we are just reading and commenting on what was reported in the results. There are no demands anywhere.

  • -3

    noriyosan73

    It was the French tradition that let a person wonder if he/she had another day. If the sun came up, the wish was granted. Don't change the system. Perhaps, the day after the conviction would be appropriate. Execution is not about warning criminals about a potential fate. It is about punishment for a crime.

  • -9

    TheDevilsAssistant

    More than half said they wanted the state to think again about the method of execution

    51 said they wanted to know ahead of time

    saying their preferred choice

    would also like the present method

    want to be told of their execution in advance

    Sounds like demanding to me.

  • 14

    letsberealistic

    Oh dear such vengeful and hate-filled hearts on this board "give them nothing!", "let em hang without warning!" -feels like a "time-slip" back to the middle-ages.

    We live in the 21st century where governments role is not to seek revenge and vengeance and act out of a cruel and primitive eye-for-an-eye mind-set. The system in Japan is nigh on torture; solitary confinement and no warning of your impending execution.

    Amnesty international have appealed to the Japanese government for years to implement more humane practice in their prisons.

  • 14

    Yubaru

    Sounds like demanding to me.

    By your definition then anyone who replies to a survey is making demands?

  • -3

    Disillusioned

    I think the families of their victims should be told in advance. As for the crims, who cares what they think? It is good that they will never know that this weekend could be their last. I also think hanging is a little barbaric in this day and age.

  • 7

    The_True

    Oh dear such vengeful and hate-filled hearts on this board "give them nothing!", "let em hang without warning!" -feels like a "time-slip" back to the middle-ages.

    We live in the 21st century where governments role is not to seek revenge and vengeance and act out of a cruel and primitive eye-for-an-eye mind-set. The system in Japan is nigh on torture; solitary confinement and no warning of your impending execution.

    Amnesty international have appealed to the Japanese government for years to implement more humane practice in their prisons.

    Well said!!

  • -3

    all4faj

    I would have thought that it more cruel to give them and their loved ones a date , for them to know a week , a month or even longer in advance and count down the days, after all they are imprisoned , they can't go and take a last walk along the beach with their pet dog, or go for a coffee and cake with their wife or girlfriend, throw a ball in the park with their children. All they can do is sit in their jail cell and contemplate what they have done and what will happen to them. They could hope that the teachings of Buddha are correct and they will be reincarnated at least giving them a chance to redeem themselves and their previous actions, however if karma is also correct they may still have some punishment awaiting them in their next lives.

  • -5

    T-Mack

    They should tell them nothing at all, they laid in wait to hurt their victims, they can lay and wait to die...that's part of the punishment...I say "NO", they should not be told anything...in the word's of Clint Eastwood..."Hang em' High"!!!

  • 8

    letsberealistic

    @all4faj

    Imagine this; you are going to be killed any day now; dropped from a height with a rope around your neck until you either choke to death or your neck breaks - either way your death will be painful and not not quick. But you never know which day this is going to happen only that it will.

    Every night you go to bed with the same thought, "is this my last night alive?" Then in the morning you wake to the thought, "is today my last day? Will I have to go through the horror of being hanged today?" Now imagine going through that experience every. Single. Day.

    Not seem like torture to you?

    "Prisoners on death row in Japan are being driven towards insanity by harsh conditions" (Amnesty International 2009) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8247319.stm

  • -8

    Yubaru

    Every night you go to bed with the same thought, "is this my last night alive?" Then in the morning you wake to the thought, "is today my last day? Will I have to go through the horror of being hanged today?" Now imagine going through that experience every. Single. Day.Not seem like torture to you?

    Did it ever occur to you that just maybe they should have considered the consequences of their actions before murdering someone that put them on death row in the first place?

  • 11

    letsberealistic

    @Yubaru

    Did it ever occur to you that just maybe they should have considered the consequences of their actions before murdering someone that put them on death row in the first place?

    Criminology 101: People who commit crimes do not consider even for a moment they will be caught. Human psychology doesn't work that way. Serious crimes like murder are very, very rarely thought through logically or rationally, otherwise, obviously, they would never have been committed. They act out of delusion, confusion, mental illness, uncontrollable egocentric rage, or all of the above.

    Either way. torture is torture and unacceptable.

  • -6

    Kapuna

    Patrick Smash, how the heck do you know this?

  • 1

    alliswellinjapan

    Don't think this survey will win the hearts of the people here who are likely to continue to prioritize low crime rates and higher safety relative to other parts of the world.

  • 16

    zichi

    We are a civilised society and like others we shouldn't base our actions by the crimes these condemned criminals have done no matter how horrendous those crimes might be. There's cruel and unnecessary punishment which death row inmates shouldn't be subjected to. Inmates who spend decades on death row in total isolation more often than not go insane and the execution of the insane is both against international law and Japanese law.

    Not being notified of the date of their execution could be considered cruel and unnecessary punishment both for the death row inmates and their families. But it should be noted, executions are usually carried out on Fridays, so its only on that day will the inmate learn whether they are executed or not. Most Japanese families disown any family member on death row and even refuse the corpse after the execution, so I don't think many of the families care to know the date of the execution.

    These death row inmates are not demanding anything, they responded to a poll.

    From what I've read, a proper hanging is quick with an instant broken neck but in Japanese hangings more often than not, the death from hanging is more strangulation with the inmate taking more than 20 minutes to be declared dead.

    I'm sorry for all those who have lost a loved one to these cruel crimes.

    I remain against all forms of capital punishment.

  • 4

    Loghorn

    @The_True:

    Oh dear such vengeful and hate-filled hearts on this board "give them nothing!", "let em hang without warning!" -feels like a "time-slip" back to the middle-ages.

    We live in the 21st century where governments role is not to seek revenge and vengeance and act out of a cruel and primitive eye-for-an-eye mind-set. The system in Japan is nigh on torture; solitary confinement and no warning of your impending execution.

    Amnesty international have appealed to the Japanese government for years to implement more humane practice in their prisons.

    This is what the society in my country that I live in (the U.S.), & everywhere else needs to learn.

  • 6

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Have all 133 been DNA tested to confirm their culpability? If so, why does it takes years to carry out the sentence? Frankly, the current system is torture. And I agree with Zichi-san. Not death, but a life sentence, but doing something constructive for society, like cleaning the nuclear power plants, and the destroyed beaches of Japan. That would solve the issue about notifications. I'm from the U.S. and I do not condone the death sentence.

  • 0

    Yubaru

    These people on death row were being asked these questions as Japan has a committee researching whether or not they should continue with the death penalty or not and finding out what the people on death row are feeling or thinking now.

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    I am against the death penalty, and always have been, and likely always will be. I agree that when you think about it there's a bit of a conundrum -- did these people, who are likely all murderers, give their victims the same length of notice they are now requesting? But then, you have to also ask yourself, are you the same as them? If not then how do you justify doling out the same punishment, and only at a few hours notice.

    To be honest, I think a lot of these people, who are going to be killed anyway, wouldn't benefit from knowing earlier, but some would -- and they should be given the option.

  • 1

    Cos

    If there has to be death sentence, do it with rules. It's arbitrary like that, that's no longer justice, it's sadism, torture. They should be told on the day of the sentence. I mean that should be a fixed delay for all of them, allowing enough time for appeal, but not 100 years. Let's say for instance, the first working day one year after the sentence announcement. And if one spends more than 1 year and 1 month in the death row, well call the judges again and transform the sentence from death into life. That should be one or the other.

    did these people, who are likely all murderers, give their victims

    That's debated in their trial. They get the death sentence for that.

  • 0

    nostromo

    an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth.... its good to see that humanity has progressed (not)...

  • 3

    BertieWooster

    Anyone should have the right to a fair trial, and if there is no shadow of doubt that the accused is guilty, and that he/she has shown that reform is impossible, so that the only recourse is to capital punishment, the sentence should be carried out as swiftly as possible.

    Keeping a person in solitary confinement for a long time may have a use in that it in itself is a very severe punishment. With no TV, radio, books to read or even a window to look out of, alone with his/her thoughts, it is hoped that the accused will reflect on his actions and reform.

    But, in the case of capital punishment, reform is out of the question. Keeping a person in solitary confinement until the day of his death and not telling him when it will be until the day of their execution is totally unnecessary.

    Surely the purpose for capital punishment is to remove completely from society those who have caused great and irreparable damage and who will not or cannot reform by any other means.

    If so, it should be done quickly.

    In the old (and not missed) days of public execution, the ultimate punishment of hanging, drawing and quartering must have acted as a deterrent. But adding solitary confinement for an undetermined length of time to the punishment of execution is not a deterrent. Nobody sees it. They may see on the news that a person has been sentenced to death, mutter something about how he deserves to die for such a terrible crime, yawn and turn to another channel for their favourite variety show.

    Therefore there is no reason to prolong the agony.

    Is there?

  • -3

    Jason Stiles

    Just a short story related to this topic.

    Inmate Handson stares at his cell wall thinking back to all the things he has ever done, when he hears the sound of boots coming down the row. The Warden is coming he gulped, quickly sitting up and stands at his cell bars.

    Warden McFarcen stops at Handson's cell.

    "How's it going Inmate Handson?" The Warden ask as he turns to face him, "g,good Warden McFarcen sir" Handson repies nervously. "Now, now you can just call me Warden.....I bet your wondering while I came all the way down here to your cell hmm?" "Yes sir" Handson answers back hoping today will not be that day he fears.

    "Well normally I don't do this to most Inmates in your predicament but, I thought I come down here to let ya'll know that you Day will be this Thursday. I figure a man be told alittle early about his last time on earth rather than just walking you to the door on that day." The Warden paused for a moment, "I figure you may wanted to hear it from me instead of the guards. Are you ok with me tellin ya'll this now or.." "N,no Warden, I thank you for givin me the chance to know when my final day is.....w,will they be there to watch me?" Handson ask as he starts to tear. "Yes son, I'm sure they will, most victim's families never miss these events." The Warden paused one last time, "Just do the right thing this time and give your respect to that family."

    Warden McFarcen walks off, back down the row. Inmate Handson listening to the boots as they fade away, he stare at his bars with tear in his eyes yet somewhat glad to at least know now that his day is about to come.

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    Bertie: "But, in the case of capital punishment, reform is out of the question."

    I agree with you, but even the regular prison system in Japan is not based on trying to reform people.

  • 0

    Brian Wheway

    Antony mate, totally 100% with you, the only thing I would say is, the prisoner could have the choice of how much notice he/she would like, IE you have a piece of paper they fill in that says "I will like to have "....... days, hours notice then there can be no complaints, this way they have time to call whoever and prepare for the time, as I’m sure some one will say its wrong to keep someone in the balance, is it today or tomorrow, that could be deemed cruel.

  • -4

    almxx

    Convicted killers should probably be killed immediately after conviction.....save time and money. Like always, GOD will decide when, how and who will die.

  • 0

    browny1

    Cruelty abounds.

    The "surprise it's death day" often after decades of solitary confinement, is surely an absurdity that has little rationale in a modern state of the 21st century.

    As others have stated, if you want to kill them, well be up front and kill them.

    This clandestine system, cloaking all in secrecy is more befitting of darker non-democracies.

  • -10

    Korlacan Khanthavilay

    I don't think they should get to know at all. I say it should be a surprise. Like they just let them out to have their exercise, then bam. Firing squad lays into them. They can call it "Happy Surprise Execution".

    Course, death row inmates should have been convicted guilty, without a doubt. Like they killed someone and there were several witnesses of the crime, video evidence, or something else that leaves zero doubt.

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    smithinjapan-san,

    Bertie: "But, in the case of capital punishment, reform is out of the question."

    I agree with you, but even the regular prison system in Japan is not based on trying to reform people.

    I'm sure you're probably right, but I wonder what you see it as being based on.

    I'm curious.

  • 2

    Tom DeMicke

    This is morbid! I can't believe such a civilized country still has the death penalty by hanging. Just unbelievable! It's wrong, very wrong.

  • -6

    Korlacan Khanthavilay

    This is morbid! I can't believe such a civilized country still has the death penalty by hanging. Just unbelievable! It's wrong, very wrong.

    Criminals aren't civilized, so why should we treat them as such?

  • 2

    plasticmonkey

    Denying a death row inmate preparation before dying is a deliberate act of cruelty. It is intended to move the boundaries of justice right up against whatever barbarism a society is willing to condone. At those boundaries you hear the rantings of the bloodthirsty, and the intellectually lazy:

    Less humane is better

    Hang em' High

    they should die the exact same way their victim died

    using a rope would be the best and cheapest method to rid the world of scum

    They shouldn't have the right to demand anything

    Criminals aren't civilized, so why should we treat them as such?

    In answer to the last question -- because we purport to be civilized, and we should act as such.

    The aim of justice is to lead a society in a direction in which it can find well-being for as many individuals as possible. Justice is not just a concept, it is a human reality that plays out in everyday life. We need real solutions to crime, not violent fantasies.

    The death penalty fails to deter crime, fails to soothe the victims, fails to reform criminals, fails to instill an enlightened view of justice among the public, fails to solve anything at all. Instead, it perpetuates a societal lust for violence as a solution to problems.

    The issue of denying a prisoner his/her date of execution is a clear instantiation of an unhealthy vision of justice.

  • 6

    zichi

    @Koriacan Khanthavilay,

    Criminals aren't civilized, so why should we treat them as such?

    Because we are suppose to be, civilised.

  • 4

    Cricky

    If the state can not show compassion, it should not expect it from it's members. Leading by example is a management technique that is sadly missing.

  • -3

    Fadamor

    When the sentence is handed out, the defendant knows he is sentenced to death. There is no "surprise" when the sentence is carried out. How much time the convict spends in "solitary confinement" after sentencing is solely dependant on how many appeals his lawyer submits. So it's the convicts who ultimately determine whether they "wait for their executions for many years in solitary confinement."

    Surveying death row inmates... what a joke. Here's an idea - survey the families of the death row inmates' victims.

  • 1

    MissouriUSA

    I disagree-there seems to be a great degree of humane thought by withholding the execution date. Just like none of us really know when we'll die, the prisoner must try to live each day to the fullest and cheerish the moments he/she remaining.

    Afterall-if given the choice would YOU want to know the day you'll die???!!

  • 1

    letsberealistic

    @MissouriUSA

    Afterall-if given the choice would YOU want to know the day you'll die???!!

    Yes, but we are all expecting to die in our sleep in an old-age folks home, not be dropped ten feet with a rope round our necks.

  • 0

    Henry Geßner

    So much middle age Eye for an Eye nonsense in here, it really disgusts me. I'm happy people don't have a voice for such things over here in Europe.

    Of course they have to be told in advance if they're about to die!! Hell, we're talking about human beings and not about murdering and raping monsters, as for the latter just doesn't exist and never will. So long...

  • 1

    Maria Ybanez

    Anthony Lee: Do you want to be as cruel as the criminals were with their victims? I supposse your answer is no, so please don't say that kind of things.

  • 1

    Maria Ybanez

    I had no idea of this kind of threatment to prisioners, it shocked me. It must be the most terrible feeling to know you're going to die at a couple of hours. Even they are murderers, I can't aprove it.

    I consider that this is not only about the criminals, but about their families as well. We have to consider their family members want them to be threated with humanity, even they did terrible things. We can't do things that make us look as cold human beings, because we can be better than that.

  • -6

    ebonyninja

    If the condemned are given prior notice, you would have the same three ring circus that you have in the United States. News correspondents standing outside the prison, hoards of people being paid y300 and hour and a free boxed lunch to wave signs in protest, as the media speculates the outcome.

    Japan has a system that should be adopted in other countries. It's a quiet process, and the criminals get no publicity at all. They are faceless! And should remain as such until the end. Someone lost their life at the hands of the condemned, and they do not deserve to be fore-warned of their execution.

    ..and the method of execution, fits the crime.

  • -2

    Hide Suzuki

    Did they give prior notice to the victims they raped and killed ? If not, then they shouldn't make such request either.

  • 0

    Fugacis

    As for the practice of only letting the prisoners know when their execution will take place when they will be executed, and keeping them in solitary confinement, this is torture, pure and simple.

    First, prolonged solitary confinement IS a form of torture. The psychological effects of it are well documented: extreme photosensitivity, hallucination, paranoia, depression, psychosis, and suicidal ideation are among them.
    http://law.wustl.edu/Journal/22/p325Grassian.pdf Again, there is no deterrent effect in this, and people come out of it more damaged and dangerous than they went in. It is unnecessary and inhumanly cruel: the definition of torture.

    Others, including the brilliant Fukushima Mizuho and Amnesty International, have already explained how cruel it is to keep a person wondering if tonight is their last night for decades, so I won't go over it too much here. Suffice to say that even the worst criminals deserve the peace of knowing when they will be executed, and having their chance to make their peace with themselves and their families, say any last apologies, and set their affairs in order. Not to allow them this is, again, cruel and unnecessary.

  • 2

    Kyoko Sakata

    I can offer mercy in that. Let them know when their last day will be. Let them have lethal injection. Isn't it interesting that after a person serves their time or wants a better way to die society gets upset. They are leaving the planet in punishment of their crime. Why is that not enough? You throw your emotions in the mix and now you want them to hurt or bleed as bad as the victim did. To what end if the person will be executed anyway.

    Nothing is good enough if you are deemed a criminal it seems. Shunned by a society that created you and accused as a law breaker by those who act like saints when they are not perfect themselves.

  • 1

    all4faj

    letsberealistic

    I simply asked a question, I speak only for myself ,unlike quite a few posters here who seem to have inside knowledge, would rather not know my confirmed date of execution if I was on death row.

    I don't claim to know what the prisoners on death row are thinking other than being guided by the article itself, and I am cynical enough to argue that not all would actually want to know.

    We are supposed to believe that all should be forgiven once they have been caught arrested and sentenced and that we should make their passing as humane as possible because we are civilized.

    It appears to me that you have more sympathy for convicted murderers than for posters here who disagree with your opinion.

  • 0

    blendover

    @ 'Did the people you harm or whatever you did to get on death row get advance warning from you? No, so who cares'

    In the case of the victims of murder, they had a life or thought they had one right up to the comparitively short period before their untimely demise. In the case of the death row inmate, they spend half a lifetime knowing each day that they don't have a life and then die suddenly as well. That's a big difference and (whether you think the criminal deserves it or not) a phenomenally epensive one for the state to maintain.

    What's the reason. given the expense, for the big wait? I assume to remove all possibility of innocence from the equation. However, personally, if I were innocent and on death row, I would prefer to be dealt with quickly and unjustly than have to spend that amount of time waiting in solitude for an exoneration that might or might not ever come.

  • 0

    megosaa

    Many said they wanted the chance to say goodbye to loved ones.

    Most victims do not get a chance to say good bye to their loved ones.

  • 0

    martyman

    According to the survey responses provided in this news story by the death row inmates, I believe they should have it their way. They should be able to give the exact date and method of their execution to ensure that that their are no cruel intentions and also enough time to say goodbye to their loved ones.

    The International advocacy groups will no longer have a leg to stand on if the guilty provide the time and method of their sentence. No cruel intentions there, just pro-choice. Japan, China, Iran, North Korea and the U.S. agrees on at least one thing but unfortunately it is not a popular topic by any means.

    Hopefully if there is any action taken on this law, the only ones that will be able to witness the execution would be the family of the victim (if murder was the crime) and the family of the accused to keep the judgement fair for both parties.

  • -2

    Fadamor

    Get over it people. The ONLY reason the convict is spending so much time in solitary confinement is because of the appeals process. Once the final appeal is over, THERE IS NO SURPRISE that the execution will be soon. The end of the final appeal is when the convict should be saying goodbye to relatives, not the day of the execution. Do you want to get Amnesty International to shut up about prisoner executions? Then make Amnesty International start footing the bill for all the murderers whose sentences were commuted to life in prison. I guarantee you they will clam-up as soon as the first month's bill arrives.

  • 0

    cramp

    an eye for an eye - as someone mentioned above, this is the morality at stake here

    do you want the exact same revenge on the convict or do you allow them some dignity since we are talking about a modern evolved society here

    and if you do show mercy, would you be so benevolent if the victim was someone close to you?

  • 0

    Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

    They should be allowed to choose the day of their execution.

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    Fadamor,

    How much time the convict spends in "solitary confinement" after sentencing is solely dependant on how many appeals his lawyer submits. So it's the convicts who ultimately determine whether they "wait for their executions for many years in solitary confinement."

    We're talking about Japan, right?

    In Japan, a person is sentenced to death and then he is kept in solitary confinement until the day of his execution, without being told when that is going to be until the actual day.

    That's the whole point of this article and this discussion.

  • 3

    zichi

    Even after all appeals have been made, the death row inmate don't know when the execution will happen. It could come within one year, it could be ten years or it could be many decades. Some even die from old age waiting. Their entire time will be in solitary confinement.

  • 0

    all4faj

    I am a law abiding citizen, I pay taxes , don't speed , don't drink drive, Don't hurt people , Ask that my Children do the same and expect the same from my friends, I believe that the law is there for a reason and I for the most part respect and believe in it. I am not a gun carrying cowboy, do not believe in the rights to bear arms to protect myself , at least not in the society in which I live , which I also consider to be civilized. I understand the need not to sink to the levels of a murderer who has been caught , tried and put onto death row and I appreciate both arguments for and against showing them any kind of mercy whatsoever. I understand the reason why we don't allow the victims family to decide the prisoners fate as well, because my chosen punishment would be far worse than not allowing them to know the time of their demise.

  • 0

    bajhista65

    Funny request..... you're un death row... expect to be executed anytime. Your victims did not even have to chance to request. Btw, what happened to ASAHARA... the AUM cult leader. Was his death penalty punishment executed for the crime he did,

  • -1

    sidesmile

    Save the taxpayers money and top them as soon as they're found guilty. Right there, on the spot, that instant. Job done.

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