Personal info of over 1 mil smartphone users leaked

TOKYO —

More than a million smartphone users had their personal information sent to a third party by malware apps in March, police said Monday.

According to a cybersecurity firm, about 16 different software programs, designed for Google’s Android operating system, were responsible for the stolen information, Sankei Shimbun reported.

The various programs, introduce game and movie content, were apparently downloaded as many as 66,000 times, police said. 

Japan Today

  • 8

    naruhodo1

    Open means, I can use any application, formats, on android without having to convert into apple format or using iTunes. It's like jailbreaking your iPhone, but with droids, they come jailbroken. Love the fact of draging my files right into my phone without having to go through iTunes or converting them from flac to avi or what have u..media files such as movies is the most pain staking procedure to download on your iPhone from pc, unless you BUY the movie from iTunes. It takes over an hour to convert into playable format on iPhone. That's just one tiny example of open vs closed.

  • 5

    cactusJack

    Only 1 million? Probably much more.

  • 5

    viking68

    Sure, Apple approves every app, but recently iOS apps have been sucking user information too. There was a recent scandal about such an Apple approved app. It resulted in more than a million user's information being disclosed. So, Apple sounds safe, but it depends on the apps you are running. That Apple app sent your contact information back to some server. Apple said the app violated its rules, but Apple doesn't have time to check every line of code for every app. So, there will be more Apple incidents like this one.

    Apple like other OS' is sort of safe.

    As far as the iOS vs. Android, I own an Andriod phone and an iPad. So, I think I know the difference. I will stick with Andriod on the phone side. It is more functional than an iPhone. iPhones and iPads are great consumption devices and are not really suited for use as a real computing device. There are just too many issues with getting to your files. I still don't know how to transfer videos shot from my iPad. I also have an Android tablet. It performs better as a PC replacement than the iPad, but iPad has got it beat on the form factor and content you can purchase. There is nothing like slapping the magnetic cover and have the thing go into sleep mode. The iPad looks good and works great, but it doesn't do much more than display things you purchased.

    Someone commented on file transfer problems on an iOS. With my Andriod, I can log into my local HDD at home from anywhere in the world and transfer any files I want to and from my andriod without any problems. I didn't need to buy a special App or jailbreak my device.

    On the iPad, you basically can only transfer files through iTunes, and you can only play them if they are in the Mp4 format mandated by Apple. I found a way to transfer movie files to the iPad with Goodplayer (it also does a good job of playing non-Apple approved movie formats), but the wireless transfer doesn't always work well and you cannot change the screen or allow the iPad to go to sleep during the download. Even jailbreaking doesn't do much for you. I did it once. The best feature was a You Tube program for $10 that allows you to download videos to your device. I have a similar program for my Andriod. It was free and works on the stock phone.

    Anyway, I'll get a new smart phone in the next couple of weeks, and it will not be an iPhone. (looking at the Xperia NX!!)

  • 4

    some14some

    Smartphones outsmart users (!)

  • 4

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Hoser and 2020, you miss the point that neither are completely safe. As RiffRaff noted, MACs have also become targets of malware. To think that your product is failsafe is only believing in a false sense of security. No OS is impervious to attacks. THAT is the point. User discretion goes a very long way in protecting one's security. Some people prefer to use Android as it offers more user controls. Some prefer iPhone for other reasons. Either is ok. It's not religion, though some seem to treat it as such. As another poster pointed out, with Android it's easier for a user to migrate music or video files directly via pc without having to go through iTunes. We're not talking about pirated content anyway. Use whatever you prefer, but don't berate others who choose differently than you. It's called freedom of choice. Make whatever choice is best for you.

  • 3

    mitoguitarman

    No chance of having the app names show up here?

  • 3

    Beer4me

    list please

  • 3

    Riffraff

    Herve- You are talking hypothetically (wishfully?). Which proves my point about Apple.

    And where have you been lately? This sounds a bit more than hypothetical...........

    Fresh off the news that more than 650,000 Mac computers have been infected with a nasty Trojan horse virus called “Flashback”, another Apple threat is on the prowl.

    According to anti-virus software provider Kaspersky Lab, a Trojan called SabPub — or more formally, Backdoor.OSX.SabPub.a — has recently been spreading via Java and could be infecting computers when people open email messages with suspicious links that direct users to malware.

  • 3

    gogogo

    @tairitsuiken

    So how do you convert movies for Android. Does that take shorter time?

    You don't have to convert anything, Android phones play any format native like a regular PC without having to convert to some apple format, just copy of the file over USB and it works, 10 seconds vs apples re-encoding which takes 30mins.

  • 3

    namabiru4me

    iPhones are not safe...I have had one (embarrassing) butt dial, as have some of my friends. I have heard about one person who got a divorce due to a butt dial. Turns out that in the heat of passion the phone called the spouse who listened to the whole heated moment.

  • 3

    ExportExpert

    Open minded confident people prefer to use open phones and software, closed minded insecure people prefer to use locked phones and software.

  • 3

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    This article details the fact that iPhones are also susceptible to malware.

    http://m.cnet.com/Article.rbml?nid=10446402&cid=null&bcid=&bid=-245

  • 2

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Hoserfella, you would be incorrect on your logic. Personal info can/has/probably will be "leaked" in some way or another regardless which OS is used. Whether that is manifested by unauthorised CC charges or late-night door-knocking is an entirely different matter. The point of the article is that there were/are some malware out there. The same can happen by visiting dubious websites. Users should exercise caution and common sense. For many, that is actually the problem. JT, so...which apps???

  • 2

    Tomasz Stasinski

    Only 66 thousand downloads , yet over 1 million users exposed. Can someone do the maths for me here?

  • 2

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    2020, as a hobbyist developer I can tell you that my apps will not be available for iPhone, not because of programming issues, but due to apple's approval process. Much friendlier for Android. Apple just limits users' freedom of choice.

  • 2

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    And more recently here from Forbes.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2011/11/07/iphone-security-bug-lets-innocent-looking-apps-go-bad/2/

  • 2

    viking68

    hoserfellaAPR. 17, 2012 - 10:08AM JST

    Personal info can/has/probably will be "leaked" in some way or another regardless which OS is used Herve- You are talking hypothetically (wishfully?). Which proves my point about Apple

    Hoserfella - Not hypothetical, there was an iOS leak similar to this one where your contact info was sent to a server. Another program used information from Fourspaces accounts and information from Facebook to populate its social service. That app was some kind of women near you social app. There has to be others that I haven't seen mentioned. These apps didn't get pulled until people complained.

    Apple approved the Apps, even though they violated some Apple policy.

    Now there is a problem with people breaching iTunes accounts. I heard last week iTunes now needs you to answer security questions and maybe enter your email address to get access to your account. The new security features were being rolled out slowly and started last week.

    So, Apple is not the big prophylactic you think it is, which itself is dangerous.

  • 2

    viking68

    Even Apple itself was collecting your contact information. Some tech guy found out by monitoring the data transmissions. Apple supposedly shut it down, but how would you ever know?

  • 2

    2020hindsights

    Sure, Apple approves every app, but recently iOS apps have been sucking user information too. There was a recent scandal about such an Apple approved app. It resulted in more than a million user's information being disclosed.

    Post a link to back this up. In any case as

    LOL @ the iphone user comments. You guys have WAY too short memories, this has happened TWICE with iphone/iOS in the past. It's even happening NOW. The info leaked from them was much worse!

    Actually it didn't and isn't. But feel free to post a link.

    THIRD PARTY APPS is where the danger lies with Android, stick to the Android Market or Google play as it was rebranded and you will be much more protected.

    I agree. Good advice. I expect over 90% of Android phones have Non Google Play apps. That's where the danger lies and that's why Android will always get way more hammered than iPhones. Fact.

  • 2

    LostinNagoya

    iOs is not perfect, even Apple fans like me are aware of that. Anyway, I feel safe buying online using my iPhone, an action most of my friends dare not doing with their Androids.

  • 1

    hoserfella

    soldave - Ive had an iphone for a year now and an iPad for a few months. Nothings been charged unlawfully to my CC, I get almost no junk mail, and no strangers knocking on my door in the middle of the night with my nude photos and a demand for money. Apple is safe.

  • 1

    ExportExpert

    I would rather have the freedom that comes with using open products even if that means there are some dangers than having to use something that is locked tighter than fort knox and cant freely use it as i please.

    Kind of like being in the kindergarden with the gate locked and bolted.

  • 1

    Dennis Bauer

    install wallpaper, acces to all ok? people must check the what access the app asks before installing

  • 1

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Viking, thank you for the well-informed, balanced posts. You're right on the mark. It's a matter of personal choice, and with Android there's more personal choice. My next phone will likely be either the Xperia AcroHD or Sharp 104SH which is running ICS. I opt for performance and flexibility.

  • 1

    societymike

    LOL @ the iphone user comments. You guys have WAY too short memories, this has happened TWICE with iphone/iOS in the past. It's even happening NOW. The info leaked from them was much worse!

    FYI, there are otehr more informative articles out there on this topic and it involves some shady japanese apps taht are pretty useless anyway. The personal info was just basic stuff like name, phone number, email address.

    When you install an app, it pays to pay attention to what permissions the APP is asking for before you click "OK". The US android market (and other foreign ones) are pretty good and quick about weeding out bad apps on the market. Not so sure about the Japanese android market however.

  • 1

    flammenwerfer

    Herve- if u can't find the apps u want out of half a million offered, well, there's no pleasing you.

    Not all of them are offered in every region, Often the cool ones you want are restricted to US region. Apple youare stuck, Android you have options.

  • 1

    societymike

    @flamemenwerfer - luckily "Market Enabler" app let's you get any app on other markets

  • 1

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Thanks again Viking, and let's reiterate it's about FREEDOM OF CHOICE. I realize that for lovers of Nanny-State mentality, that's too dangerous. Yes, my phone is rooted, bloated-deleted, and permissions-user-controlled. Gingerbread works on Xperia X10.

  • 1

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    That's bloatware-deleted.

  • 1

    KariHaruka

    This wouldn't of happened if you brought a iPhone

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    Herve: "I can tell you that my apps will not be available for iPhone, not because of programming issues, but due to apple's approval process. Much friendlier for Android. Apple just limits users' freedom of choice."

    Yes, clearly Apple is not allowing you to choose malware, but Android seems perfectly okay with allowing anything and everything, including malware. Apple's approval process is why this information leak is limited to Android. Get it?

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    If I was writing malware of course I'd target Android. If I target iOS, I have to register as an Apple Developer and using my iTunes id with all my address and bank details submit the malware application for review. Even if Apple don't find it first time, when somebody does they have all the smoking gun trace back to me. So if authorities wanted to pursue I'm stuffed.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    I think the Android users are saying that nobody's information is safe and the same thing can and does happens on iPhones.

    Fact: While iPhones are vulnerable, Android phones are more vulnerable to malware than iPhones.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    viking

    Responding to the lawsuit and WSJ article:

    The suit claims that the Apple products are set with a Unique Device Identifier, or UDID, which cannot be blocked by users, Bloomberg reports.

    Yet Apple says it does not allow data to be transmitted from its App Store without users' permission.

    "Some apps are selling additional information to ad networks including users' location, age, gender, income, ethnicity, sexual orientation and political views," says the compliant.

    Basically Apple sends a unique id, which in itself isn't personal information. However, some apps will get you to provide this information, which they can then send. I think most people would realize giving such information to an app could be dangerous, but most apps will ask your permission.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    viking

    2020hindsights: I'll pull the same thing as you did, prove your "fact" with a citation or it isn't true.

    It doesn't need a citation, it is based on:

    1.) Apple reviews every app. Google doesn't.

    2.) If Apple finds after the fact that an app is malware they will pull it. This doesn't happen for Android

    3.) Malware authors target Android because of 1. and 2.

    Is that enough?

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    viking

    On response to accessing the address book without permission. I must admit I'm surprised by that. But agree it is true. I would expect Apple to respond by making a permission mandatory. Let's see their response...

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    Android has pulled malicious apps off its website, so I would rather see support for your facts/conclusions.

    Yes, but you don't need to go to Google's website to install apps. With Apple you have to go to App Store.

    Apple's app review is not perfect, otherwise you wouldn't have Apple breaches on their reviewed apps.

    True, but better than no review.

    Apple does not inform you what information or systems an iOS app has access to. I don't think Apple will start showing permissions because it will contradict the marketing that it is safe.

    Actually I checked. iOS now makes access to address book mandatory to ask for permissions. Also other services like push notifications and location services have mandatory permission asking.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    On response to accessing the address book without permission. I must admit I'm surprised by that. But agree it is true. I would expect Apple to respond by making a permission mandatory. Let's see their response...

    I checked. It has been fixed. Good.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    I would also say knowing the permissions before you download an app is better than hoping the Apple app review catches it.

    Yes and no. With iOS you can still use an app that accesses location services or the address book but block those features. The app still works, just not as well. An example could be a train application that tells you how to get somewhere. It uses your location to suggest stations near you. But you are paranoid that so you block sending your location. You just type in the station.

    Anyway, I think I've made my point so I'll finish now. Android plus going outside Google Play (90% of Android phones I would guess) and iPhone that is jailbroken (5% by guess) and uses non App Store apps = unsafe. Using non jailbroken iPhone = very safe.

  • 1

    2020hindsights

    viking

    90% is still a guess. My guess is 1%, which is correct? neither.

    Ha ha. Yes, neither is correct, but at least my estimate isn't ridiculous.

    I would say using unbroken iPhones = "safer" As in, nothing can be fully safe.

    Hmmm. I didn't say 'fully safe'. I said 'very safe'. But you can't quite stomach that. iPhone = very safe. Fact. ;-)

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    Good old Android.

  • 0

    ExportExpert

    tairitsuiken

    @ExportExpert,

    Here we go again... Explain what is so "open" about an OS from Google.

    You mean to say you still dont know? Search google for the answer as I cant be bothered explaining it any more.

  • 0

    2020hindsights

    Herve

    No OS is impervious to attacks. THAT is the point.

    Actually you miss the point. I agree 100% that no OS is safe. But the point is that Apple has to approve every app that you can download on your iPhone. THAT is the point. They don't approve malware.

  • 0

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Hoser, you've confused volume or sheer number with variety and freedom of choice. True, about the same number of apps are available.

  • 0

    Nessie

    Can you nullify your service contract if the company leaks your info?

  • 0

    viking68

    Herve, I am with you. I like the personal choices available with Andriod.

    And I think hoserfella is really in love and missing some points in defending the iPhone, e.g., encoding a movie for 30 minutes is what you have to do before transferring a movie file to you iOS.

    I would have walked away with the Xperia NX this afternoon, but it was sold out and they no idea when they will have stock. ICS is nice. I have ICS on my tablet and want it on my phone too. The NX is still ver. 2.3, but it will get ICS this quarter. There are already beta ICS versions built by Sony for the 2011 Sony models on the developers forums.

    Maybe I'll have a look at the ArcoHD and Sharp you mentioned.

    I like the iPhone and Tokyo Disney too, but I can't do much with them when I get home.

  • 0

    flammenwerfer

    THIRD PARTY APPS is where the danger lies with Android, stick to the Android Market or Google play as it was rebranded and you will be much more protected. If you get third party apps be careful - I got skype ( when docomo was blocking it in the past) and Google Books (supposed to be for US only) and Tubemate (be careful of malware infected imitators with this app) for downloading youtube. Use your discretion, research a third party app for issues before installing. Enjoy the flexibilty and freedom.

  • 0

    naruhodo1

    What horsefella doesn't realize that most of us who own droids also have had or do own iPhones or other mac products. I love iMacs, 5 years and not a problem, so ya, reliable. I had an iPhone 3g on the first day. Some things are better on the iPhone vs my HTC but my HTC works more like a computer than a phone which is why I love it being Open. Love the larger screens, and I especially love their browser. You don't need to scroll left or right when u zoom on a web page. Font size auto adjusts to fit perfectly on your screen, so u only need to scroll up and down when surfing. Are there other phones that have such a browser?

  • 0

    Dennis Bauer

    @Tomasz Stasinski hm, large address books?

  • 0

    2020hindsights

    Sorry I was going to say in any case if it arises that Apple find a rogue app after approving they will cut off the developer and pull the app. With Android this doesn't happen.

  • 0

    viking68

    2020hindsight

    Here is a link, true-believer:

    http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/tech/singapore-man-discovered-apple-app-paths-privacy-breach/498913

    http://www.nbcbayarea.com/blogs/press-here/Paths-Privacy-Breach-Exposes-Apples-Flawed-App-Approval-Process-139522823.html

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704694004576020083703574602.html

    From the WSJ: Among the apps tested, the iPhone apps transmitted more data than the apps on phones using Google Inc.'s Android operating system. Because of the test's size, it's not known if the pattern holds among the hundreds of thousands of apps available.

    Apps sharing the most information included TextPlus 4, a popular iPhone app for text messaging. It sent the phone's unique ID number to eight ad companies and the phone's zip code, along with the user's age and gender, to two of them.

    http://www.zdnetasia.com/apple-sued-for-mobile-app-privacy-breach-62205382.htm

    http://news.ninemsn.com.au/technology/8189444/apple-sued-over-alleged-privacy-allegations

    The complaint was filed in California on December 23 and is part of a class action-style suit.

    It accuses Apple of encoding iPhones and iPads with devices that allow advertisers to track what application users download and how much they use them. . . . . Yet Apple says it does not allow data to be transmitted from its App Store without users' permission.

  • 0

    lostrune2

    Apple has its own shortcomings too, like this one:

    http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2012/02/apples-failure-lets-developers-steal-your-address-book/

    First, why does Apple allow iOS apps to access a user's entire address book, at any time, without permission? Even Android requires that apps ask for explicit permission to access local contacts. On iOS, every other seemingly private local data source, like location and the camera roll, have strong protections; apps can't even see photos in the Camera Roll unless the user explicitly selects them from the image picker. There is a huge section of the Settings app dedicated to giving people fine control over which apps have access to location information. That Apple provides no protections on the Address Book is, at best, perplexing.

    And smart people can always find a way even around iOS vetting security:

    http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/11/08/apple%E2%80%99s-app-store-security-compromised/

    Having discovered a way to circumvent iOS's code signing restrictions he wrote an app that would bypass Apple's app review process.

    The app was able to pass the review process because it didn't contain anything suspicious for the review to discover. Instead his app downloaded the malicious code later, once it had been installed on a phone or tablet.

    In any other app this newly downloaded code would have been prevented from running because it wasn't signed.

    Any users who downloaded his app, a stock market monitoring tool called InstaStock, would have been unaware that once installed it downloaded a payload of malicious code that gathered up their device's data and sent it over to Miller's server.

    As I always say, nothing is fully secure; smart hackers will find a way. Who knows what other holes that are kept secret. The risk of a malware infection might still be lower than on Android, but it isn't non-existent, and a blase attitude enhances that risk. So always be careful.

  • 0

    hoserfella

    Fadamor - Try 800 yen. the cost of a nama-chu and a half at my local. knowing it will come virus-free sounds pretty cheap to me.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    Apple's "approval process" is the whole problem with Apple. Fact: Apple had a well-documented problem with dark areas on their large monitors. (Why do I know it was well documented? At the time I worked in Best Buy and dealt with many of the returns.) Fact: User's started posting complaints about the dark areas on a user forum run by Apple. Fact: Apple deleted the entire thread. You are NOT allowed to complain about an Apple defect on an Apple-run site. It is not approved. Apple's way of doing business has nothing to do with keeping the customer safe and everything to do with controlling what its customers are allowed to see and hear when using an Apple product. Enjoy your iPhone.

  • 0

    Aqualung

    Online activities should be treated with no expectation of privacy, the OS doesn't matter much. If you need to shop online or use iTunes, use a prepaid credit card or set up a small bank account without overdraft. Lastly, no foreign prince is going to make you rich to help him get his money out of his country, so ignore the email.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    Herve: "Smith, the point I was making is that due to Apple's restrictiveness, many developers opt to not go through Apple's approval process which is part of the reason similar apps appear as paid apps on iTunes, but free for Android."

    And the point I was making is that due to said process this article is all about ANDROID suffering from flaws and resulting information leaks, not Apple. You seem bent on avoiding that and instead deflecting on why you personally prefer Android. Address the facts, my friend, not bypass them for opinion.

  • -1

    tairitsuiken

    @ExportExpert,

    Here we go again... Explain what is so "open" about an OS from Google. This old hag of an argument (closed vs. open) is so pointless.

    スマホ users are gonna experience more and more of this as time passes. That goes for BOTH Android and iPhone users. I guess it's the price we have to pay to be connected to everything, all the time.

  • -1

    gogogo

    This is the world figure and not a Japan figure.

  • -1

    2020hindsights

    Fresh off the news that more than 650,000 Mac computers have been infected with a nasty Trojan horse virus called “Flashback”, another Apple threat is on the prowl.

    According to anti-virus software provider Kaspersky Lab, a Trojan called SabPub — or more formally, Backdoor.OSX.SabPub.a — has recently been spreading via Java and could be infecting computers when people open email messages with suspicious links that direct users to malware.

    A good reason for Apple to avoid having Java and Flash on their OS's. ;-)

    But the point is we are not talking about computers but phones. And Apple vets every app for the iPhone. That's why there is peace of mind. Not because iOS is more secure than Android.

  • -1

    y3chome

    iphone is not so safe either. Thankfully. Was able to copy all the info from the gfs phone to laptop in 2 mins. Lifesaver.

  • -1

    nandakandamanda

    Thsi is where we need the Taliban. They can be in charge of dealing quickly with leakers of personal information.

  • -1

    viking68

    2020hindsightsAPR. 17, 2012 - 05:02PM JST Sorry I was going to say in any case if it arises that Apple find a rogue app after approving they will cut off the developer >and pull the app. With Android this doesn't happen.

    I suppose Apple will cut off "rogue" developers, once the media gets wind of it. However, Apple should cut them off before they get approved. As a result, more "rogue" developers get through the tight Apple screening.

    Andriod requires disclosure of what access an App has. So, we Andriod users do not have Big Brother Apple protecting us. We protect ourselves.

  • -1

    viking68

    One last link on Apple collecting your information. I was mistaken, Apple was only collecting your every waking movement. As I recall, Apple said it will now delete said information rather than keeping it forever, which could have found its way into court rooms to prove infidelity or link you (correctly or not) to a crime.

    http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/04/apple-iphone-tracking/

  • -1

    Fadamor

    All I know is Anki, the best flashcard program EVAH, is free to download for my Android, yet costs you poor iPhone users $19.99 to download. Good luck with the i(nvade your saifu)Phone.

  • -1

    Fadamor

    As of February, there were over 300 million Android devices out there. So to see how bad this violation was:

    66,000 / 300,000,000 = .022% of Android users downloaded this malware. .022% Yeah, those Android devices are SOOOoooo vulnerable!

  • -1

    SpeakJaplish

    Left-RIght Up-Down Liberal-Conservative pro-life-pro choice you stink - I don't fill in here____________ etc. You people never stop. Use whatever the heck you want yes iPhone has been good up to now, but its just a matter of time. Sooner or later we will hear similar story with iPhone. Try to be safe in what way you find that works for you. Personally used iPhone and android and the android crashed, froze and drove me crazy. First had a iPhone3Gs and worked great for 2 yrs. Then went to android and after 6 months with all the trouble broke my contract and went back to iPhone. But hey thats me and you are you. Use what you like and don't try to push your agenda on every one else.

  • -1

    hoserfella

    Fadamor - Your list of "FACTS" is a carbon copy of every similar post I see on JT. When a JT poster starts out a diatribe with "FACT:", you can be sure its the complete opposite. (you can't use "I heard of a guy..." to prove your point) Where are these "well-documented" Apple scandals you mention?? "well-documented" tends to mean that people have actually, well, heard of them.

    Herve - No offence, but every Tom, Dick and Harry out there today are writing apps on their little PCs hoping to strike it rich. (I have two associates who know little about such things doing so now). Its a modern day gold rush with about the same odds of finding a nugget. Quite frankly, I'm happy Apple is weeding out the riff-raff. I have about 5 apps on my iPhone that I actually use on any given day and that is enough.

  • -1

    viking68

    2020hindsight,

    You asked for cites, and I provided them. Any comment or refutation of the news articles? Probably not as evidenced by no comments on them by you or others.

    Then you followed with speculation with your "I expect" 90% of Android users have non-store applications. I have never heard such a statistic, and it doesn't seem realistic. I would put the number at below 20% and would suggest there is a high probability that the number is below 1%. Even then, you would need to find said breached or malicious app, install it, and accept the phone access permissions.

    The ability to use non-store apps on an Android is a freedom. Use it if you want, but beware. Apple users have no freedom outside of Apple's "walled garden". Does that make iPhones safer? Hackers are insidious, and they are in the garden.

    I would buy an iPhone if there were more freedom to use the device the way I want to .... and the screen size is a little small.

  • -1

    viking68

    2020hindsights: I'll pull the same thing as you did, prove your "fact" with a citation or it isn't true.

  • -1

    viking68

    It"S ME: I would say Android users are way more aware and cautious about the dangers than apple users who still live >in an imaginary bubble of it won't happen to us.

    Yes, and that is dangerous.

  • -1

    viking68

    2020

    Android has pulled malicious apps off its website, so I would rather see support for your facts/conclusions.

    Apple's app review is not perfect, otherwise you wouldn't have Apple breaches on their reviewed apps. Apple does not inform you what information or systems an iOS app has access to. I don't think Apple will start showing permissions because it will contradict the marketing that it is safe.

  • -1

    viking68

    2020

    You have to go to Google's store if you want apps sanctioned by Google. From there, you will know if a program can access your address book or other information. You have to override the system by checking a box in the settings menu to install apps outside of the store. The only people who really do that are developers or people getting around regional market restrictions. That is called freedom and a choice.

    iPhones can and are jailbroken to allow all kinds of non-approved apps to be installed (not advocating it, but you supposedly can even steal anything you can purchase on iTunes). That is also freedom and choice.

    Android and iPhones sound very similar in this respect.

    (however, jailbreaking will violate your warranty and may brick you expensive device)

    I would also say knowing the permissions before you download an app is better than hoping the Apple app review catches it.

    Apple is fixing things, but to fix something means it was broken initially.

  • -1

    viking68

    Smith, the article had no mention of Apple products. That does not clear Apple or make it the holy grail of phones.

    The security breach doesn't bother me because I realize electronic products leak information, and the data miners (all the facebook, twitter, and other social apps and games) are doing their best to acquire and sell your information.

  • -1

    602miko

    mine is android but i don't have problem. over using maybe some virus attack them...

  • -1

    ka_chan

    Have you consider the possibility that the problem may be with the service provider and their lack of security?

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    namabiru4me: "iPhones are not safe...I have had one (embarrassing) butt dial, as have some of my friends. I have heard about one person who got a divorce due to a butt dial."

    While it's a somewhat humorous anecdote (minus the end result, of course), this is less an issue of security and more one of personal stupidity. Should have had the security lock on... haha. I realize you are probably just being funny, though.

    2020hindsights: "Hmmm. I didn't say 'fully safe'. I said 'very safe'. But you can't quite stomach that. iPhone = very safe. Fact. ;-)"

    Exactly. All these red herrings being brought in to try and deflect from the serious security flaws with Google's Android are a true testament to how far people will go to deny the fact that iPhone is simply safer, bottom line, with Herve in the end being reduced to calling Apple users part of a 'nanny state', and others claiming it happens to Apple, too, but is 'blacked out' as though it's some kind of media conspiracy.

  • -2

    tairitsuiken

    @Naruhodo1,

    So how do you convert movies for Android. Does that take shorter time?

  • -2

    2020hindsights

    This article details the fact that iPhones are also susceptible to malware.

    Mere speculation. I'm happy with Apple reviewing apps. Android phones don't have this luxury and expect to find more headlines like this in the future...

  • -2

    Fadamor

    Try 800 yen. the cost of a nama-chu and a half at my local. knowing it will come virus-free sounds pretty cheap to me.

    Oh? So they've dropped the price to $10, huh? That's still infinity-times more than I paid for mine. As I said, enjoy your violated wallet trying to keep your iPhone in apps.

  • -2

    Fadamor

    Getting back to the subject of the article (not that this whole "iPhone is WAY better" religious mantra is not stimulating):

    More than a million smartphone users had their personal information sent to a third party by malware apps in March, police said Monday.

    Wow, sounds bad, but wait a minute!

    The various programs, introduce game and movie content, were apparently downloaded as many as 66,000 times, police said.

    So each phone that downloaded the file coughed-up the personal info of FIFTEEN PEOPLE? I suppose it's possible... if you only count the email addresses and phone numbers. It's no like their credit cards or bank accounts were given out.

  • -2

    Herve Nmn L'Eisa

    Smith, the point I was making is that due to Apple's restrictiveness, many developers opt to not go through Apple's approval process which is part of the reason similar apps appear as paid apps on iTunes, but free for Android. I've written both, and Android is more "free-market" whereas iTunes is more monopolised. And to slip in malicious code for an iPhone app is easier than you think. But like Windows vs MAC OS, those who would do such a thing gravitate to the largest, most lucrative targets like gamers and pervs and to the larger OS market share. As the global market share for iPhone increased, the attention of unscrupulous programmers turned more to Apple users and has been well documented, though the media tends to black out those reports unless enough people complain. Enjoy whichever you prefer.

  • -2

    viking68

    Smith, **this **information leak is limited to Android because it was an Android app discussed in the article. There have been and will be further Apple and Andriod app information breaches. It is unavoidable.

    Horsefella, any comments on the articles I cited showing Apple Apps and Apple itself collects or breaches user information? Or, do the rose colored glasses you are wearing block sight of all intelligent discussion and critique of Apple products.

    Lostrune, nice even handed post.

    I think the Android users are saying that nobody's information is safe and the same thing can and does happens on iPhones. iPhone users appear to be unable to believe their phone has any faults.

    Herve: We have the same setup, Xperia X10, 2.3.3, and rooted. It is the best phone I have ever owned.

  • -2

    viking68

    90% is still a guess. My guess is 1%, which is correct? neither.

    I would say using unbroken iPhones = "safer" As in, nothing can be fully safe.

  • -3

    smithinjapan

    Herve: The malware in this instance is only affecting Android users, right? So what are you talking about. Hoserfella is right -- Apple is safe. Clearly, Android is not.

    People can argue all they want about how with Android it's "open" and you can "use any app", but they forget that Apple/iPhone LEAD in apps, and whenever someone creates an app they do it for iPhone first. So what if it's hard to put illegally downloaded movies onto your device -- isn't that how it's supposed to be?

  • -3

    2020hindsights

    Love the fact of draging my files right into my phone without having to go through iTunes or converting them from flac to avi or what have u..media files such as movies is the most pain staking procedure to download on your iPhone from pc, unless you BUY the movie from iTunes. It takes over an hour to convert into playable format on iPhone.

    That's just one tiny example of open vs closed.

    And one that 99.99% of people don't care about. In any case just get VLC and you don't have these problems.

    But 99.99% of people do care about security and most Android users (or jailbroken users for that matter) are not secure.

  • -3

    Disillusioned

    Android? Blah! The iPhone triumphs again!

  • -3

    2020hindsights

    As was said if it has a CPU chip and a OS you are vulnerable. Even my hardcore Apple fans agree just a matter of time and marketshare before any electronic device gets hit with viruses, etc.

    Itunes can vet as many apps as they want, how many jail-broken phones are out there?

    If you jailbreak your iPhone you are an idiot in my opinion. And as I mentioned jailbroken iPhones are just as vulnerable as Android phones.

    But my guess is that there aren't many jailbroken iPhones out there.

  • -3

    hoserfella

    Herve- A quick google search shows that apple offers roughly the same amount of apps as android; around 500000. So there goes your "freedom" theory. Could it be that their filtering out crap apps with a more secure OS works? I'd say so.

  • -4

    soldave

    Yup, with Apple raping your privacy for all they can to start with, there are only tablescraps left for third parties.

  • -4

    hoserfella

    Personal info can/has/probably will be "leaked" in some way or another regardless which OS is used

    Herve- You are talking hypothetically (wishfully?). Which proves my point about Apple.

  • -4

    It"S ME

    Smartphones, pad, etc are still computers but minimised.

    Most often they even run the same OS(stripped down) and it is the OS where the vulnerability comes in.

    As was said if it has a CPU chip and a OS you are vulnerable. Even my hardcore Apple fans agree just a matter of time and marketshare before any electronic device gets hit with viruses, etc.

    Itunes can vet as many apps as they want, how many jail-broken phones are out there?

  • -4

    It"S ME

    2020hindsights.

    Till the hackers can hide it well enough and also lets not forget any online/inter-device connectivity is also a major weak spot.

    And malware apps have shown up in iTunes before.

  • -4

    hoserfella

    Herve- if u can't find the apps u want out of half a million offered, well, there's no pleasing you.

  • -4

    hoserfella

    Viking - Im not so sure you're posts were as "Well-informed" or "balanced" as Herve likes to claim.

    Your sources on Apples now supposedly porous data safekeeping reads like this; "I heard that..", "some tech guy said..." without one bit of evidence.

    As always, the very mention of Apple and its reliability sends some people into a real tizzy. If it was half as horrible as some of you would like to claim, why is it the most successful and valuable company on planet Earth? just sour grapes....

  • -5

    Elbuda Mexicano

    I am with Hoserfella, hopefully this will not happen with our IPHONES!!

  • -5

    hoserfella

    Export expert - open-minded and confident people buy whatever product they want and what's best for them personally. They also are not so silly as to tie someone's personality in with whatever phone they use.

  • -6

    hoserfella

    Well, that's Android for ya. Doesn't happen with iPhones..

  • -7

    It"S ME

    2020hindsights.

    Vulnerable is vulnerable for anything.

    If you get stabbed will you say "hey I was in a less vulnerable area". You still got stabbed and are bleeding.

    I would say Android users are way more aware and cautious about the dangers than apple users who still live in an imaginary bubble of it won't happen to us.

    I use an Apple computer and got virus checks, etc installed as they are on my sons Windows machine. Don't take a risk as ANYTHING connected online is vulnerable.

  • -8

    hoserfella

    10 seconds vs apples re-encoding which takes 30mins.

    gogogo - 30 WHOLE minutes to download a movie?? My god. APPLE products ARE crap.

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