Tokyo man arrested over mass-killing online threat

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  • -7

    Frungy

    Police analysed the memory card and footage taken by security cameras, coming to suspect that Katayama, a resident of Tokyo, was responsible for the hacking campaign, Jiji Press and other media said.

    So they've arrested this guy without any hard evidence then? How did they get an arrest warrent without any evidence? You'd think they'd have learnt after the last time they arrested people, sweated confessions out of them, and then found themselves publically humiliated.

    ... anyone want to place odds on this happening again?

  • -5

    hoserfella

    wow, an unhinged lunatic who just happens to be a comic book or manga aficionado. whoda thought?

  • 4

    Scrote

    I think the police saw Mr Katayama with the cat on the security camera videos and that gave them the evidence to arrest him. He would have gotten away with it if he hadn't interfered with the cat. Obviously, he's not too bright.

  • 18

    Tom DeMicke

    I think the cat did it.

  • 9

    Cricky

    4 people confessed!!, before they arrested this man....that says a lot about law enforcement , really professional.

  • 14

    humanrights

    >

    The National Police Agency (NPA) was embarrassed after it emerged that officers had extracted “confessions” from four people who had nothing to do with the threats. > What? Embarrassed?? what does 'extracted' Mean? How can you extract a confession? Are we to believe that we could get arrested for no reason and forced to confess? Any video footage in confession rooms? Where were the lawyers? Authority in Japan is very superfluous, no substance, no rights. The whole nation should be embarrassed to continue to tolerate this!

  • 1

    Yubaru

    Looks like a lonely, shy, sad, otaku, whether he is the guilty one or not, I hope this guy gets some loving!

  • 4

    jianadaren

    "embarrassed" - wtf!

  • 12

    shanabelle

    I just hope the cat gets a plea bargin.

  • 5

    cramp

    extracted confessions huh? torture you mean...

  • 1

    kimuzukashiiiii

    The guy looks like quite the Otaku.

    I hope its the right one this time, and he was not just a normal otaku-looking fat guy playing around with a random cat. . .

  • -1

    Elbuda Mexicano

    I saw this fat, balding slob, and he was on tv walking around, smiling, laughing, talking to himself, I thought to myself, yup! The J cops finally got the right nut case criminal! Lock him up and throw away the key!

  • -5

    Frungy

    humanrightsFeb. 10, 2013 - 05:36PM JST What? Embarrassed?? what does 'extracted' Mean? How can you extract a confession? Are we to believe that we could get arrested for no reason and forced to confess? Any video footage in confession rooms? Where were the lawyers? Authority in Japan is very superfluous, no substance, no rights. The whole nation should be embarrassed to continue to tolerate this!

    Extract? Well, the image that first pops up in my mind when I hear that word is Dentist, so perhaps it involves dentists' tools?

    Elbuda MexicanoFeb. 10, 2013 - 07:00PM JST I saw this fat, balding slob, and he was on tv walking around, smiling, laughing, talking to himself, I thought to myself, yup! The J cops finally got the right nut case criminal! Lock him up and throw away the key!

    Because clearly someone bright and obsessive enough to hack several dozen computers while leaving no forensic evidence linking himself to the crime fits the image of someone who goes around talking to himself and laughing at nothing.... I think not. Two possibilities occur, either he's deliberately going for an insanity defence (not a good idea in Japan), or the cops have the wrong guy.... again, and in a couple of weeks the hacker will send yet another message to the police pointing this out.

  • 1

    nandakandamanda

    Although the guy flatly denies it, they have built up quite a strong dossier of circumstantial evidence, according to the evening news. They've found cat footage on his smart phone, and even taken away his favorite pc in the Ne-cafe he frequented. Plus he has previous conviction(s) for similar threatening e-mails, they say.

  • 0

    whiskeysour

    He's not a great hacker, he could of hacked his criminal record and erased it.

  • 0

    Simona Stanzani

    never mess with Enoshima's cats.

  • 0

    nandakandamanda

    The guy's a dweeb.

  • 3

    Farmboy

    a chubby man with glasses

    Scarred forever, poor guy....

  • 0

    lucabrasi

    @Otakaya

    You've misunderstood my post to the point where I can't really begin to help you. Just go back and read it all again, slowly. The hint's in the word "quotation".

  • -2

    Frungy

    whiskeysourFeb. 10, 2013 - 09:34PM JST He's not a great hacker, he could of hacked his criminal record and erased it.

    I don't blame you, I blame Hollywood. Pause to think for a moment about the chain of custody. First a crime is reported, the complainant comes into the station and writes out a statement which is then witnessed and signed on paper. Second he's arrested by the police, who take fingerprints, take a statement and fill out a report, again on paper. Third he's taken to court where the courthouse generates another ton of paper regarding the case. Then if there's a prison sentence there's more paperwork at the prison. Finally there's paperwork sent to the local police to keep an eye on him after he's released.

    Yes, some or all of this paperwork might be scanned into computers at some point, but the paper backups exist, and the cops, judge, prosecutors, jail warders, etc, will probably remember him.

    Even if it was possible to "hack" into the local police station's computers and erase their records you'd then have to hack into the courthouse as well, and the prison, and the parole officers' computers... and then go down to all those places with a paper shredder under your arm and request to see your files, because only then could a criminal record be truly erased.

    Also "hacking" these days is pretty darned difficult, mostly it relies on people being sloppy enough to leave wireless connections unsecured, or put virus-infested usb drives into their computer, or volunteer their passwords. Actually bypassing firewalls and encryption on even the most common O.S. (e.g. Windows) is very difficult, because holes in the security are reported pretty quickly and closed in the next update. Generally a new virus or security exploit only has a life of a few days to a week before the hole is identified and fixed.

    So yeah, him not "hacking" his criminal record out of existence isn't a sign of stupidity or incompetence, it's a sign that he's human, not an all-powerful Hollywood fantasy.

  • 1

    Moonraker

    I think the media has followed the party line on this rather too much. He has been portrayed as some kind of threat and loser while his exposure of the iniquities of the justice system have been glossed over. But now the people will be able to sleep safely in their beds again, the bad man has been caught by the intrepid and fair and hardworking agents of the law!

    Amazingly, the former Commissioner of the National Police Agency made a statement after the original suspects were arrested but shown not to be the perpetrators that they were still not necessarily innocent. Sure, they may have been collaborators but for the head of police to presume guilt publicly shows a grave misunderstanding of justice and its workings and reveals a lot about attitudes in his organisation.

  • 2

    zichi

    Seems to be happening in many places. A Brit guy was arrested for threatening to kill 200 American kids on a online site.

  • 1

    Mocheake

    Make sure we get a taped confession out of this cat.

  • -1

    Lowly

    The National Police Agency (NPA) was embarrassed after it emerged that officers had extracted “confessions” from four people who had nothing to do with the threats.

    This is the real news here. Hope it is reported and talked about enough in jpn. Tho I kno it wont be-- still the land of obey the master, actually, a lot of ppl kno the cops are dumb and coercive, but when it is not the land of obey the master, it is the land of sho ga nai. but that all seems to be slightly changing, recently.

    As to whether the guy they got is real, or a set-up.... who can believe them now?

  • 0

    Lowly

    That, and, how the jell did they extract a confession from the cat?

    The National Police Agency (NPA) was embarrassed after it emerged that officers had extracted “confessions” from four people who had nothing to do with the threats.

  • 4

    zichi

    If people make online threats they are going to be held liable which has to be a good thing. The same should happen with those who bully others which too often leads to their suicide.

  • 4

    Argus Tuft

    I can't help but feel that by exposing the 4 coerced confessions that this guy has done some good in the world. As I understand it he contacted the police through a lawyer after the 4 had confessed to clear their names.

    The police released the 4 after the confessions had been signed - which apparently never happens.

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    Lowly:

    Hope it is reported and talked about enough in jpn.

    I watched the news yesterday and the some flaky news/infotainment piece this afternoon and, of course, the big news is the fatso in the glasses and the cat on Enoshima. It is almost as there is some kind of sickness in Japan, where uncomfortable things that occur are actively repressed. Quite disturbing.

    I agree with you that the real news should be why 4 innocent people "confessed". But it is not.

  • 1

    Scrote

    This is an interesting case. If we assume Mr Katayama is guilty and that he is skilled enough not to have left any incriminating evidence on his computer, how can the police prove he is guilty? They can't rely on a confession, because they already forced two others to "confess" to the same crime. Photos of a guy with a cat don't prove anything either.

    Then we read that Mr Katayama was jailed before for sending threats by e-mail. What if he says he was, in fact, innocent in that case and only jailed because the police forced him to confess, just like they did with the two guys last year? The actions of the police should cast enough doubt on his previous conviction to make it inadmissible as evidence.

    Still, he will be found guilty no matter what he says and even if they only find circumstantial evidence. The farcical "justice" system in this country is looking to make an example of someone and it doesn't matter if that person is guilty or not.

  • 0

    Scrote

    Another thing: are the police recording all of their interviews with Mr Katayama? If not, they lay themselves open to more accusations of forced confessions and sloppy investigative procedures. Come on "journalists", ask pertinent questions instead of regurgitating what officials tell you.

  • 0

    Lowly

    Scrote-

    Not bad points, but unfortunately, I think you are making them by using things like "burden of proof", "innocent until proven guilty" and "laws accessible to average ppl and applied in a way that is at least intending to better society" as your mainstays.

    This is not that land.

    This is the land of "proof via cop suspicion", "guilty until proven innocent" and "application of law completely left up to the whim of the magistrate in charge on that day, and primarily intending to punish ppl so they stay in line."

    Once you figure out how to re-orient your moral compass, the whole thing will make more sense to you.

  • -2

    ChibaChick

    Scrote - they can't do that. Any reporter here who seriously questions authority is barred from the journalists club and therefore not able to report on future news, pretty much then losing their jobs. Case in point recently when Hashimoto refused to ever speak to one newspaper again because they dug up some dirt on him. That's why no one is seriously pursuing this outrageous abuse of power. I often wonder what happened to those 4 people. I heard they had lost jobs, families had left them, neighbours ostracized them - all because of this twit. That could have been ANYONE. Doesn't seem so harmless now, does he?

  • 1

    Argus Tuft

    "...Another thing: are the police recording all of their interviews with Mr Katayama? ..."

    As I understand it, the recording of police interviews in Japan is a fairly recent development and not mandatory as yet.

    To anyone interested

    http://castroller.com/Podcasts/Documentaries/3249300

    Is a recent BBC World Service documentary about this very subject including a pre-arrest discussion of this particular case.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p012kzcp

    Is the accompanying article to the documentary.

    I'm not sure if the documentary is still available as a podcast on the BBC World Service site but it is at least listenable at the above link.

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