• -15

    semperfi

    It depends on how the expression is used . . . . .However, it does irritate me and sadden me when I hear people use the name of the Lord as an expletive . . .

  • 9

    borscht

    Awesome.

  • 22

    Brainiac

    "I could care less" instead of the correct "I couldn't care less." And "My bad." Finally, "loose" used instead of "lose."

  • 1

    oikawa

    "Impact" as a verb. I know there are lots of historic uses of it as a verb and it's technically correct, but it seems to be only pretentious wan*ers in the media who use it as such.

  • 12

    SimondB

    Teenagers saying "whatever" and sneering out "Yeah, right!".

  • 4

    sakurala

    Long story short...

  • 6

    Himajin

    At the end of the day.

  • 9

    irishosaru

    "Going forward" seems to have replaced "in the future" even though it means nothing different.

    "Think outside the box" - horribly overused.

    "folks" is not, in my opinion, a term a president should be using.

    In spelling, using 'of' instead of 'have', in sentences like, "I would of told him to go away".

    Probably plenty more.

  • 0

    nandakandamanda

    Most of the above, plus 'devastated', bored 'of' (instead of with), 'where' for were, item's for items, and would have instead of had, as in "If I 'would have' been there", for "if I had been there". Also 'off of' where the book fell off the shelf. There are many more, such as 'definately'... grrrr

  • 4

    gaijinfo

    "I could care less" instead of the correct "I couldn't care less." And "My bad." Finally, "loose" used instead of "lose."

    That's a common complaint, but it's actually being used correctly. It in this form, it's being used sarcastically. Stephen Pinker explains this in one of his books on linguistics.

    As for me, I don't really get bothered by supposed "incorrect' usage. I get bothered when people actually try to construct conversations and sentences without any actual content.

    "I mean, yea, um, ya'know, it's like, I was, man it was just crazy!"

  • 17

    zichi

    "you know what I mean"

  • 17

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    I despise, "Whatever", which signifies the user is so self-satisfied that he can't be bothered to put together a thought-out rebuttal, yet his reflex grunt will somehow magically trump the points with which he's been challenged.

    "Literally", when used to mean "figuratively - i.e. not literally at all" sets my teeth on edge. "I was literally petrified". No you weren't, you moron.

    "You know what?" seems, in the user's mind, to add weight and majesty to the tritest of mundanities. "You know what? I'm leaving". Then get out, and do us all a favour, you Friends-watching halfwit.

    "I'm outta here" is simply untrue, no matter how badly the listener might wish it to be the case.

    "I was like, 'huh?' and she was like, 'whatever'". When did people start to be like the things they say? And why? And, if neither of the speakers could summon up the wit to put together a thought, how does the confusion arise that it is an anecdote?

    Also, "decimated" instead of "devastated" gets right on my nerves. If you're decimated, you've got 90% left. If you're devastated, you've been laid waste. That's an important distinction. What's the point of blurring it?

    Oh, this is going to be a long list.

  • 2

    smithinjapan

    gaijinfo: "That's a common complaint, but it's actually being used correctly. It in this form, it's being used sarcastically. Stephen Pinker explains this in one of his books on linguistics."

    Actually, most people who use it misuse it as they do not know it is meant to be sarcastic.

    For me I'd have to say people who mean to type 'lose' but type it 'loose'. It is becoming far too widespread and a number of young people don't know they are making the mistake. The only other thing would be the misuse of 'was' in the subjunctive mode, as in: "I wish I was a bird", instead of the correct 'were', but that's now so widespread it's more or less already accepted. Then of course there's incorrect pronoun usage of "I" in place of the object pronoun "me", but hey.

  • 1

    Serrano

    Ivan - I became figuratively petrified as I read your post, and at the end I was totally decimated!

  • 0

    Serrano

    "Cheers."

    "Bottoms up!" is like so much better, you know what I mean?

  • 4

    T-Mack

    "Having said that"..."Any Who"..."She's a Hoot"...."I'm just saying"...."You go girl"....just to name a few.....don't like them...!!!

  • 3

    T-Mack

    Oh yea,... "Thats so gay"...annoying...!!!

  • 5

    JapanGal

    Ebonics in general.

  • 0

    jamurai

    love it!

  • 2

    T-Mack

    "Yada, Yada, Yada",... "DA DA DA",... "and I'm all"...now I can't stop, "Oh Well" that could be one too!!!

  • 5

    nandakandamanda

    'To' when it should be too gets my goat too.

  • 6

    VicMOsaka

    " Be true to yourself (whatever that is supposed to mean ) and " just sayin "

  • 2

    lucabrasi

    "... my friends and I." when it should be "...my friends and me."

    "Disinterested" when it should be "Uninterested."

    "Criteria" when it should be "Criterion."

    Simple mistakes are fine, but the three above are all down to people trying to show how sophisticated they are, and getting it wrong.

  • 2

    BertieWooster

    "I was like," for "I said."

    "Share" for "tell."

    "It's" where it should be "its," and vice versa.

    And why do so many Americans use the past tense in place of the past participle:

    A) I'm looking for Bertie, isn't he here?

    B) No. He must have went home.

    And while we're on the subject, why don't they use adverbs?

    Bertie, I'm like wow! You speak Japanese fluent!"

  • 1

    Noliving

    I could care less

    But that is usually said or is supposed to be said with a degrading or sarcastic tone.

  • 2

    Noliving

    Word that I hate are people that say but especially spell out is Brah.

  • 3

    commanteer

    News hacks who write "enormity" when they mean "enormousness." It's often unintentionally funny, as enormity means hugely evil or terrible.

    In more casual use, phrases like "nuff said" annoy me. It's the equivalent of making an assertion in an argument and then saying it was so clever that no rebuttal is possible. Usually the statement that precedes "nuff said" is several time zones away from clever.

  • 2

    Noliving

    Another one is when someone says Seriously after making a point or something.

  • 0

    BurakuminDes

    "Yeah, nah, yeah..." (Aussie/some British slang for agreement!

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    The misuse of "literally" for "very," as in:

    "I was literally gobsmacked!"

    "I literally didn't have a leg to stand on!"

  • 3

    incognito12

    you know what I'm sayin ?

    where you at?

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    commanteer,

    I understand what you are saying and would be inclined to use "enormity" and "enormousness" as you say, however, the entry for "enormity" in the Oxford dictionary has this note under usage:

    Enormity traditionally means 'the extreme scale or seriousness of something bad or morally wrong,' as in "they were struggling to deal with the enormity of the crime." Today, however, a more neutral sense as a synonym for hugeness or immensity, as in "he soon discovered the enormity of the task," is common. Some people regard this use as wrong, arguing that enormity in its original sense meant 'an extreme wickedness' and should therefore continue to be used only of contexts in which a negative moral judgment is implied. Nevertheless, the sense of 'great size' is now broadly accepted in standard English, although it generally relates to something difficult, such as a task, challenge, or achievement.

  • 9

    Tom DeMicke

    "Their" when it should be "There" and vice versa.

  • 4

    BertieWooster

    "Me and her used to hang out together."

    Certainly, "She and I used to hang out together," though grammatically correct, sounds weird. But what's wrong with "We used to hang out together," or "I used to hang out with her."

  • 2

    skroknog

    keepin' it real yo! wuz up dog? Gee whiz flipin' oh shikes

  • 1

    Helvetica

    " '__' Sarcasm "

  • 1

    cracaphat

    Moving forward.

  • -3

    cracaphat

    Ebonics in general.

    Suspect reasoning at best.

  • 1

    nandakandamanda

    Much bankspeak, such as 'robust', now turns out have been just as hollow as it always sounded.

    Use of 'mate' and 'dude' to create artificial friendliness or instant sneering put-down, words suggesting you are in some warm inner circle or outside the pale.

  • 3

    SpeakJaplish

    "EPIC" "Epic Fail". "You know what I'm saying". I once watched an interview on TV and this guy said, "You know what I'm saying," 10 times in one minute... I was thinking, No! I don't know what you are saying because you keep saying "You know what I'm saying" "No Problem". Doesn't anyone say your welcome anymore??? My age is showing.

  • 2

    SpeakJaplish

    Think of that southern Cal surfer accent......Got it? A: thank you B: No problem. Dude. A: what's that on your head. B: oh dude...you don't know what this is? It's a GoPro dude. Check this out dude, I can capture video while shredding man! And I got this App that tells me when the surfs up or when there are fresh tracks to be made in the powder on my snowboard. Check out my YouTube vids dude. A: that's great! B: thanks dude A: you're welcome B: No Way dude! Say, you are welcome again. I will get it on my GoPro and upload you on YouTube.

  • 4

    Maria

    The inability to write English correctly, with either spelling or grammar mistakes, seems to annoy a lot of people here, myself included.

    One of my personal bugbears is how people write "I would of done it..." instead of "...would have done it..."

    In spoken English, messing up adverbs annoys me: "I did it quicker..." instead of "...more quickly..."

    In personal conversation, saying "May I ask you a question / May I ask you something personal?" is deeply irritating. Especially because I am guilty of it myself, yet am unable to change!

  • 5

    Farmboy

    This is a regional difference, I guess, but I just can't get used to, "The meeting is from 3" rather than "The meeting begins at 3." I'm also not fond of people writing "your" rather than "you're," as in, "Your driving me up a wall."

  • 4

    JanesBlonde

    My girlfriend's - "My 2 minute instant noodles last longer"

  • 3

    skroknog

    Friendly fire

  • 0

    SwissToni

    Innapropriate and overuse of "awesome". Nouns as verbs. "Fail" to describe a mistake, error or failure.

  • 2

    risugirl

    "ok"

  • 0

    hoserfella

    Children basically own the Internet and its language, so my list is long. However, no man, or at least a straight male should at any time utter or print the expression "grrr" to show anger. Leave that one to actual dogs or 12 year-old girls.

  • 3

    Serrano

    Grrrr!

  • 2

    Serrano

    Fiscal cliff.

  • 1

    Kabukilover

    Virtual.

    You guys (gender neutral; especially annoying when said by a server in a restaurant).

    It's not my problem.

    Spiritual.

    F*** and S*** when used as noun, adjustive and verb substitutes.

    Have a nice day.

    Nice.

    Have a good one.

    Give back (as when the university who has taken tens of thousands of your dollar for tuition asks for a donation).

  • 4

    kimuzukashiiiii

    Are we talking about native level English used by native speakers?

    Or English used in Japan?

    If its the latter, you can include every Japanese t-shirt with random English words.

  • 4

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    The use of the word "guys" at all adds nothing to a sentence. "Thank you guys" = Thank you. "I can't believe you guys" = I can't believe you.

    When used by an American, it is irritating, but forgivable. After all, they know no better. But when a Briton says "guys", it would not be excessive to throw a bucket of water at him.

    My feared and respected (in that order) tutor at Grammar school, Brother Nicholas, once announced, "Anyone who attempts to speak like an American, without the mitigation of having been born one, deserves to be found in a shallow grave in Wales".

    The man has been dead for twenty years, but I'm not going to risk disagreeing with him now. Don't say "Guys". It makes you look a tool.

  • 5

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Maria - anyone who writes "I would of..." is an illiterate.

    And the middle manager with a jumped-up view of his importance who says, "I expect you to give 110%" needs a bucket of water, too.

  • -3

    nandakandamanda

    "I blame"... this government, the parents, the press, etc.

    Shut up.

  • 2

    Ranger_Miffy2

    ...just sayin' .....just sayin'

    Why not be lazy and actually SAY what you mean, because I do NOT know what you are "sayin"...?

  • 1

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Sorry: "Why not be lazy ..." should be "Why be so lazy and why not actually SAY what you mean, because I do NOT know what you are "sayin'"....?

  • 7

    JonathanJo

    I'm irritated by "less" being used instead of "fewer", as in "this checkout for 8 items or less". You can't have half an item, so it should be "fewer".

  • 2

    Lew Archie

    " . . . And we got to Maccas and like, Johnny is like umm, he's like hungry as and he's like almost pising himself but *like he orders his Quarter Pounder Meal and starts undoing his pants in front of the counter." I don't like LIKE.

  • 2

    JonathanJo

    The English used to "meet people", now they "meet with people". Is that an Americanism?

  • -3

    JonathanJo

    It makes me laugh and cringe to read "Our sandwiches are made fresh daily", implying perhaps they were stale last night. What happened to "freshly"?

  • -1

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    RangerMiffy - I salute you. You spotted a slip and corrected yourself. When I do that - yes, even I sometimes make mistakes - halfwits often accuse me of pedantry.

    To which the response is, "You know what the word 'pedant' means? A pedant is what someone who doesn't know something calls someone who does".

    The word "basically" has no mystical powers to transform the pap someone is spouting into a Wildean epithet. People who say, "basically" very frequently are often arsewipes of the first order.

  • -6

    hoserfella

    One of my pet peeves. "Incidentally". If the dim-witted speaker can not segue gracefully from one thought to the next, this horrible affront to humanity is burped out. people who say "incidentally" are often unhappy bitter little insects and 9/11 conspiracy theorists of the first order.

  • 0

    m6bob

    'New rich', because I can never be or 'Old money', because I've never been.

  • 0

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    "conspiracy theorist" is a good one, which never fails to set the teeth on edge. It really is the laziest sort of insult, often spat out by those who never learned to think for themselves.

  • 8

    borscht

    Doesn't anyone say your welcome anymore??? My age is showing.

    "Your" for "you're" is another one.

  • 0

    Chikuyokei

    Confusion of "lay" and "lie" Bob Dylan got it wrong ("Lay, Lady, Lay") and millions of other people do, too. Grrr!

  • 4

    BertieWooster

    Friendly fire

    Yes, yes. Good one!

    And along with that must go "Freedom Fries!"

    "Fiscal Cliff" is a new one, and we mustn't forget the "War on Terror."

    Which brings us to the mass murderer of the English language, the serial killer of grammar, vocabulary, and logic, none but Mr G.W. Bush himself.

    It is he we have him to thank for the wonderfully "ad lib" grammar in sentences such as "families is our priority," "new" words such as "misunderestimate," and "creative" uses of words we already knew, as in, "Natural gas is hemispheric. I like to call it hemispheric in nature because it is a product that we can find in our neighborhoods."

  • 3

    Kabukilover

    OOPS! Left off the s in dollars above.

    Here is some "words" that a sizable number of Japanese students think are real words:

    gotta

    wanna.

    This is one that too many native speakers think is a real word:

    alright (for all right).

    Another over used and now destroyed word is "sexy." These days anything can be "sexy." Fido eats sexy dog food.

  • 1

    BertieWooster

    Ivan Coughanoffalot,

    "Conspiracy theories" is an excellent one to bring up.

    It slams the door shut on the matter and puts an end to questioning or discussion.

    An extremely annoying English expression!

  • -1

    mangosqueezesbanana

    all English - that is why i am in Japan

  • 4

    smithinjapan

    Bertie: ""I literally didn't have a leg to stand on!"

    I agree with you on the 'literally' thing, to an extent, but surely you can't replace 'literally' with 'very' on the leg thing. "I very didn't have a leg to stand on" just doesn't work.

    "Just sayin'". haha.

    I'm with Chikoyuki on the lay/lie error as well.

  • 5

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    "Ironic" is another one which is used correctly so very, very seldom.

  • 6

    cleo

    Any word that has an apostrophe that shouldn't have, or doesn't that should. Mixing up lose and loose, less and fewer.

    Most people who say I could care less aren't being sarcastic, they're just getting it wrong.

  • -2

    smithinjapan

    Ivan: ""Ironic" is another one which is used correctly so very, very seldom."

    Agreed, though of course it does have two main usages. I remember being asked by a seventh grade teacher to define ironic, and all I could say is that it's when something is the opposite of what's expected, but it's a lot more than that (in the first definition of the word).

  • 2

    nandakandamanda

    Yup, that just about wraps it up, folks. Glad we were able to get all this out and now maybe we can get some closure.

    Like I said... instead of "As I said".

  • 2

    Vast Right-Wing Conspirator

    I literally grind my teeth when I hear/read;

    "Reach out to.." to mean "contact" or "speak to". I reached out to Aoki and ordered a pizza.

    "Ask...to" to mean "force to pay more tax". As in, "We are asking those who can afford it to contribute more to the general welfare". You're NOT asking, it isn't optional. You are using the force of the government and law to enforce compliance. If you were merely asking, then those being asked could refuse.

    "Invest in" to mean "spend public money on"."Invest more in health care." Investments return profits, they don't just suck up cash.

  • 1

    Victoria Maude

    Any variation on the word r etard. We have more than enough words in the English language for you to describe exactly what negative sentiment you're feeling, I think we can stop saying that word now.

  • 2

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Exclamation marks also are a cause of considerable irritation. If you need to indicate, by means of punctuation, that what you wrote is supposed to be funny, then you might be better off checking if it was worth writing at all.

  • 1

    Jan Claudius Weirauch

    If people you don't know call you "Buddy"

    Hey Buddy, how you doi'n?

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    Ivan: "Exclamation marks also are a cause of considerable explanation."

    Ah, they make a point, so to speak. Overuse is a problem, and was even the subject in a funny Seinfeld episode, but there is a reason they exist, same as... ellipses, semi-colons, colons, and what not.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    Kabukilover: "alright (for all right)"

    More unfortunate proof of the fluidity of language. The former is not an actual word, at least it wasn't, but is now considered acceptable and even given a separate definition from "all right". If I say the paper was "all right" it could be deemed as being entirely correct whereas if I say it was "alright" it could be deemed as satisfactory.

  • -1

    BertieWooster

    smithinjapan,

    "I very didn't have a leg to stand on" just doesn't work.

    Weeel, it kinda does:)

  • 0

    LostinNagoya

    I don't get annoyed by any word or expression. But I am can't understand English native speakers using "looser" and not '"loser", "your" and not "you're". But this happens in every language, and this is how words change. I read somewhere that "you" was considered wrong some centuries ago.

  • 4

    Kabukilover

    Yes, I suppose it inevitable that "alright" is gonna be a legit English word no matter what you wanna.

    I noticed I used "is" for "are" in my previous post. That is neither alright or all right.

  • 2

    BertieWooster

    Another, thing that - gets on my nerve's is, in-correct. punctuation n peepl ; writing u in steadof "you n ur ins tead of "you are" .

  • 0

    Onniyama

    "Fail" and "environmentalists".

  • 2

    tapi0ca

    X went "viral." I am sick of hearing this. Also when some media outlet states that X person "did not immediately return calls," as if whoever X is, should be there and at the ready of the media.

  • 2

    smithinjapan

    Bertie: "Weeel, it kinda does:)"

    First time you've made me smile. Thank you.

    "Another, thing that - gets on my nerve's is, in-correct. punctuation n peepl ; writing u in steadof "you n ur ins tead of "you are" ."

    That's a tough one. No language in the world does this kind of thing more than Japanese, though of course you don't see it the same way. Read any Japanese email and you'll see misuse of what you might call 'punctuation'. It is indeed a shame that so much has also pervaded English, but for the most part it's limited to texts and memos. No serious paper would allow that. Hey, we once had shorthand, too!

  • 6

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    When a politician caught with his hand in the till or his pants round his ankles says "mistakes were made", as though his perfidy was an accident, my hackles rise and I start to shout at the television.

  • 9

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    One that irritates and scares me in equal measure is when a group of Americans, when presented with something about which they don't want to think, collectively chant "U.S.A! U.S.A!" as though it's a valid argument.

  • 3

    philly1

    I'm late in the game to this post, but will add the following: Surreal used in place of not real. And hopefully--though few recognize that now as not acceptable. Glad somebody mentioned enormity.

    Interesting list. We could go on and on. How about distinctions between peaked, peeked and piqued? Or reign and rein. Too many people reign in their spending. Then there is using like instead of as.

    But chat a while with a linguist and the reasons for language misused--beyond ignorance, that is--are fascinating.

  • 4

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    When someone begins what they are going to say with "I would just like to say...", you can stop listening.

  • 0

    nandakandamanda

    Someone advertising his car for sale and describing it as 'mint'.

  • 0

    Betraythetrust!

    One sign of a bore is someone saying " I''m mad i am" or something similar.

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    Lack of the Oxford comma bothers me.

  • 0

    slumdog

    Exclamation marks also are a cause of considerable explanation. If you need to indicate, by means of punctuation, that what you wrote is supposed to be funny, then you might be better off checking if it was worth writing at all.

    Good one, Ivan!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • 0

    Suzu1

    The use of "brilliant" to describe things that are far from it. And the use of "cheers" to sign off banal emails and letters.

  • 0

    Xeno23

    "Utilize" instead of "use". Utilize has a distinct definition, and it's not just "use"; it means to make something useful, or to use something for other than it's original intended purpose. And here's a common Indian English word: "Updation"; grammatically legal, but geez...

  • 4

    Frungy

    semperfiJan. 05, 2013 - 08:03AM JST It depends on how the expression is used . . . . .However, it does irritate me and sadden me when I hear people use the name of the Lord as an expletive . . .

    This. I was talking to an English second language speaker last week who did this constantly, using it almost like punctuation. I winced each time quite obviously hoping he would get the hint, but eventually had to stop him and point out that while some people may speak like this they usually reserve it for when they're with close friends who they know it will not offend.

    ... and no, I'm not very religious. My objection in this instance is not religious, but rather a desire to avoid diluting the phrase, so that when I really want to make a bible-bashing zealot shut up I can use this phrase. Over-use tends to blunt the effectiveness.

  • 1

    JonathanJo

    Absolutely. (A word overused by TV interviewees.)

  • 2

    lwsydney

    'Time will tell' is usually an excuse for inaction, and so annoys me. But the Utada song is good.

  • 1

    Serrano

    "Buddy"

    How about "Pal"?

  • -3

    cl400

    "I'm fine thank you, and you?"

  • 3

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    "Get a life" is a good one. It means "I have never possessed the wit to think about this matter, and rather than make any effort to do so now, I'm simply going to insult you for having done so".

  • -1

    888naff

    Brit

  • 0

    888naff

    Lol

  • -4

    Pidestroika

    "Native English Speaker" What exactly is that supposed to mean? Any half-illiterate ninny who can barely spell their name can immediately find a job as an English "teacher" as long as they are born in the US, Canada etc

  • 1

    BertieWooster

    smithinjapan,

    Glad I made u smile!

    No language in the world does this kind of thing more than Japanese, though of course you don't see it the same way.

    Oh boy! Don't get me started! You've literally opened up a can of worms and no mistake!

    In actual fact, I wondered whether to post this or not, but since what I'm going to say comes under the heading of this discussion "English words or expressions that really annoy you," I decided to go ahead with it.

    Rather than consult a dictionary, Japanese tend to make a blind guess at the meaning or pronunciation of a foreign word and then it gets fixed. "Rush" means "crowded," because the "Rush Hour" is when roads get crowded. And the automatic nobasu (-) sign in katakana versions of words ending in "-er" is ridiculous when we native speakers :) (wareware gaijin) don't say, "mothaaaa-," "fathaaaaa-" and no one would understand if you tried to order a "lagaaaaa-" in a pub.

    We suffer from the same problem, it is not confined to Japanese. People are often too lazy to open a dictionary and instead just take a stab at the meaning.

    "He's one of the uniquest people I've ever met!"

    "He did his best, you know. He literally put his nose to the grindstone, shoulder to the wheel, kept his pecker up, put his best foot forward, bent over backwards, did his damnedest, went all out, pulled out all the stops, bust a gut, literally broke his neck and moved heaven and earth. It was surreal to watch him!"

  • -4

    m6bob

    'Green', 'Unsustainable', 'Global-warming', 'Anti-whaling' and all these environmental words.

  • -1

    technosphere

    "F***", used mainly by North Americans. Seems that they learn this word much earlier than "mommy" and "daddy".

  • 0

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    "Hot enough/ wet enough/ cold enough for you?" is an infallible marker of a dullard. People who say this always have a kind of gleam in their eye as though they expect me to believe they've just crafted a Bon mot to put Noel Cowerd to shame. How do they reach the conclusion that the expression is even tangentially humorous? They need the bucket of cold water.

  • 1

    Kabukilover

    Britons learn the F word probably at as an early age as the Americans. A British joke: "I got off the fng job and went back to my fing flat and took the wife to the fng fish and chips. Then we went to an f picture show. After that we went back to the f***ing flat and made love."

  • 5

    bicultural

    Read any Japanese email and you'll see misuse of what you might call 'punctuation'

    Example?

  • 2

    Moondog

    My #1 peeve is the misuse of "seen" and "saw." Expressions such as "Have you ever saw Bob and Mary together?" and "Yes, I seen them yesterday" really set my teeth on edge.

  • 0

    Kabukilover

    Vulgarisms used to be daring interjections into otherwise polite conversations. Today they are empty baggage that would probably not shock a maid aunt.

    Tweet speak is eventually going to transmogrify English and other languages. This might be bad for the English language of the future. We might finally rid ourselves of worst of English spelling. You might become yu or simply u, while one will become wun. We will speak of brite lites at nite and wonder how we could have suffered the previous spellings.

    I am hoping that wanna will die the same deserved death as irrigardless. At the same time I have to admit that wannabe as already entered the mainstream and will not go away.

  • 5

    thywillbedone

    "Über..." (I know it's German but it's been adopted in the USA to replace "very") "baby bump" Misuse of: "that begs the question..."

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    Moondog,

    My #1 peeve is the misuse of "seen" and "saw." Expressions such as "Have you ever saw Bob and Mary together?" and "Yes, I seen them yesterday" really set my teeth on edge.

    Quite agree, but it's not confined to "saw/seen." It's any past participle.

    "He shouldn't have did that."

    "We would have went, but it was raining."

    "I'm hungry. You? Have you ate yet?

    "It's wrote on the wall in the classroom."

    (All the above are actual occurrences, spoken by "English teachers.")

  • 5

    BertieWooster

    Kabukilover,

    Britons learn the F word probably at as an early age as the Americans.

    Yes, nowadays.

    But it was a word I never heard until I was about nine or ten years old. In those days, about the strongest you could get away with was "Gosh," or "Crikey." And if dad hit his thumb with a hammer, he might shout, "Bloody hell!" And mum would give him hell afterwards.

    The F word is so folking (misprint) overused that it's even folking shoved it in the middle of words like, "im-folking-possible."

  • 1

    Jimizo

    People gesturing inverted commas with their fingers as they speak with any expression.

  • 2

    BertieWooster

    How about some of the oxymorons that are so frequently seen:

    open secret

    If it's a secret, how can it be open?

    found missing

    'nuff said :)

    seriously funny

    Need I go on?

    Oh yes, and that impossible combination of words, "military" and "intelligence."

    That's a definite maybe!

    It's your only choice!

  • 2

    Frungy

    Serrano Jan. 06, 2013 - 08:52AM JST "Buddy" How about "Pal"?

    Or "friend", or any variation on that theme. if someone needs to tell you or remind you that they're your friend then they're obviously not your friend and they're about to try and con you.

    I also find the phrase " doesn't mind." incredibly offensive. Unless the person in question has actually asked me about my feelings beforehand then they are in no position to know how I feel about the matter, and even if they have asked me about my feelings on the matter beforehand then I'd rather speak for myself. Most often this phrase is, like the term "friend/pal/buddy" used by the very inconsiderate attempting to convince a third party that they should have their way, and attempting to silence you by stating your position for you and thereby leaving you in the uncomfortable position of having to either directly contradict them and say, "Actually I do mind.", or let the matter slide and let them have their way.

  • 2

    JDB829

    Like, you know, WHATEVER !

  • 2

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Thank you Ivan, very kind of you.

    I'll finish off with confirming that "baby bump" is hackles-worthy.

    Lotta fun reading the comments!

  • 2

    Hategobo

    At this moment in time. Share prices are in "negative territory". The over use of awsome, iconic and legendary Measuring the height, weight or area of anything in Jumbo jets, Olympic swimming pools,Elephants, or various States of the USA.

  • 1

    Red Asgard

    "you know" after every other sentence. That I find I have to mock, individuals with there slang. And the yo dawg expression... where all i can do is reply back as " do i look russian. " So much of it these days, that everything in English i've learned seems to be disappearing from lack of proper usages.

  • 5

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Here's one which gets me swearing: anyone who's been on TV quite a lot is a "legend".

    No he isn't. Robin Hood is a legend. Perseus is a legend. King Arthur is a legend, and so are Romulus and Remus.

    • Moderator

      It is not necessary to bombard this thread with so many posts. Most readers can give their answers in one or two posts.

  • 4

    3RENSHO

    "I need you" has yet to be mentioned. I went home a couple of years ago and was dismayed to hear, virtually everywhere I went: "I need you to fill out this form;" "I need you to stand over there;" "I need you to come back tomorrow."

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    Ivan Coughanoffalot,

    anyone who's been on TV quite a lot is a "legend".

    Quite agree.

    Similarly, "tradition" is often used by people from countries that suffer from "roots-envy" for something that's been a practice for a couple of weeks.

  • 3

    irishosaru

    I know that semantic development has to be taken into account, but I still hate expressions which qualify the word 'unique' like 'very unique' or 'really 'unique'.

    Unique means (or used to, at least) completely individual and comparison, so it should not be qualified in any way.

  • 1

    Nessie

    "The meeting is from 3" rather than "The meeting begins at 3."

    "The meeting is from 3" is okay. "The meeting starts from 3" I don't like. "Starts AT 3"; that's the whole raison d'etre of "at".

    @ mr. wooster

    "Open secret" is a useful expression to show something that everyone knows but pretends not to. My employer knows I freelance, but she's cool with it and we don't talk about it: It's an open secret.

  • 0

    Serrano

    "No."

  • 0

    BertieWooster

    Nessie,

    "Open secret" is a useful expression to show something that everyone knows but pretends not to. My employer knows I freelance, but she's cool with it and we don't talk about it: It's an open secret.

    You have a point.

    Thank you.

  • 0

    Simona Stanzani

    I don't recall disliking a particular word [maybe I'm not putting a lot of effort into thinking about it], but I hate to see people write "it's" instead of "its" [as in: the dog ate its favorite meal]. Languages are so beautiful, let's try to preserve them, please.

  • -1

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Serrano - what do you dislike about "no"?

  • 1

    Bad2Dbone

    " I am pregnant" ha ha ha

  • 2

    Ah_so

    Excessive use of "inappropriate" to mean "wrong", "bad" or "naughty" etc. e.g.

    "Put your trousers back on...that is so inappropriate"

    or "That is inappropriate language...we call them Native Americans."

    or... "I am sorry to inform you that your son has been excluded from school due to inappropriate behaviour with a bunsen burner and a classmate."

  • 0

    Stephen Jez

    YOLO and swag

  • -4

    Amir Dewani

    The word 'CLIFF' is boring . It annoys me when used with the word 'Fiscal'. i.e 'FISCAL-CLIFF'.

  • 1

    Sioux Chef

    "[Something] is very unique."

  • -4

    Piotr Gierszewski

    I get furious whenever I read a colloquial sentence with the word "sh*t" in it. And the word "whatever" with emotional emphasis.

  • -2

    Serrano

    Ivan - "No" implies that I can't have what I want.

  • 1

    Ewan Huzarmy

    One of my peeves, which I often see on youtube is theme song instead of theme tune.

    A song has lyrics. The amount of times I've read, "I don't like the new *Doctor Who theme song". It gets my goat.

    *insert name of tv show or film as applicable.

  • 1

    Himajin

    we native speakers :) (wareware gaijin) don't say, "mothaaaa-," "fathaaaaa-" and no one would understand if you tried to order a "lagaaaaa-" in a pub.

    Not unless you're from New England, and then you also drink wataa, and give birth to dottaas. :-P

    'impact' as a verb UGH. Thank all gods that '24/7' is now on the wane. One other usage that I see quite often and that never fails to set my teeth on edge is 'Us men' or 'Us girls'.

  • 0

    Debucho

    i hate "at the end of the day" and anything using the word "synergy" totally lame

  • 0

    hatsoff

    "(so-and-so) nailed it"

    as a response to someone else's opinion on an Internet comments board, as if that person had solved a problem rather than just given an opinion.

  • 1

    megosaa

    YOLO

  • 0

    Thomas Proskow

    "butt-hurt", "whoo-hoo! and "onesy"

  • 0

    Lew Archie

    I hate "foster". Every corporate giant wants to "foster" something, or "bring something to life". Classic examples, "We foster an entrepreneurial culture" or "bringing education to life" even "bringing service to life". Aaagh! Vomit x 11 on a Sunday morning.

  • 2

    akumakoe

    Fragments in formal or semi-formal pieces of writing. (This clearly is acceptable in comments, though!)

    Modification of absolute adjectives. A person cannot be very dead; he's dead or he isn't. Something can't be quite perfect; it's perfect or it isn't.

    Lack of the oxford comma bothers me, though I suppose that one's a matter of opinion.

    It's already been mentioned, but the confusion of it's and its is so common it's ridiculous, and errors like that tend to make me lose focus for whatever it is I'm reading.

  • 2

    lucabrasi

    Whatever

    When my seventy-three year-old father comes out with this, it's seriously annoying : (

  • 1

    all4faj

    6 Good| Bad JonathanJoJan. 05, 2013 - 07:52PM JST

    I'm irritated by "less" being used instead of "fewer", as in "this checkout for 8 items or less". You can't have half an item, so it should be "fewer".

    You actually can have half an item if you halve it....

  • 0

    cracaphat

    Reaching out. Dislike that expression a lot.

  • 1

    all4faj

    Aussie Aussie Aussie , Oi Oi Oi ,

  • 2

    tsukki

    Incorrect usage of "basically", "technically" and "actually". I hear so many people who bombard their sentences with these words even though it's inappropriate. Another one I dislike is "no offense but... insert something totally offensive" Yeah, like I'm supposed to not be offended just because you started with that phrase!

  • 0

    globalwatcher

    Whatever....

  • -1

    technosphere

    OMG and Wow!

  • -1

    Serrano

    "carbon footprint"

    Yes, we should all stop breathing to reduce carbon dioxide output!

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    When people write 'everyday' instead of 'every day'; two very different meanings.

  • 0

    Andrew Diseker

    An old one for me: "Irregardless."

  • 0

    Serrano

    "near miss"

    That means the collision almost didn't happen.

  • 2

    Brian Wheway

    The saying that rattles my cage is when some one is being interviewed or asked a question .there reply is “me myself personally …….“I don’t know if this is poor grammar? But if you referring to your self, me is ok and myself is ok, and so is personally like wise is ok, but to put all three together is stupid and irritating. Its like saying me me me!

  • 1

    Himajin

    Serrano, 'near miss' threw my husband for a loop when her first heard it.

  • 0

    3RENSHO

    "Having said that..." UGH!

    And thanks to Smith for mentioning the frequency adverb/adjective confusion over "everyday" -- double UGH!

  • 2

    maplesugar

    It's not actually English, but an exclamation used by English speakers. I can't stand it when people write "walla" when they mean "voila". Oh, and loose/lose is irksome, not to mention the ubiquitous "fail".

  • 0

    almxx

    Any high ranking Govt. official, military man or Police officer describing any event.

  • 0

    JonathanJo

    all4faj Next time you're at the supermarket, just try to check-out half an item. Can't be done. :-)

  • 1

    philsandoz

    "Literally" when it isn't, as in "I literally exploded", or "The weather was literally boiling."

  • 1

    philsandoz

    In translations from the Japanese, I hate the word "challenge", as seen in an advertisement in the back of a taxi, "Challenge a Taxi Driver!", which meant in Japlish, apparently, "Are you good enough to become a taxi driver?"

  • 2

    Ah_so

    The saying that rattles my cage is when some one is being interviewed or asked a question .there reply is “me myself personally …….“I don’t know if this is poor grammar? But if you referring to your self, me is ok and myself is ok, and so is personally like wise is ok, but to put all three together is stupid and irritating. Its like saying me me me!

    That reminds me - the use of "myself" instead of "me" of "I". You should only use "myself" when you are both the subject and object of a sentence e.g. "I kicked myself". If it is used in other circumstances it is WRONG.

    The other annoyance is the use of "You and I" when the speaker means "You and me" e.g "He will be sending you and I an email". This has clearly come about from incorrectly remembered remarks from school like, 'It's not "me and you" its "you and I".'

  • 2

    JonathanJo

    Ah_so: The easiest way to decide whether it's "you and me" or "you and I" is to (mentally) remove "you and". It's then obvious that you wouldn't say "He will be sending I an email", in this instance.

  • 2

    Fadamor

    It depends on how the expression is used . . . . .However, it does irritate me and sadden me when I hear people use the name of the Lord as an expletive . . .

    I agree. It's SO annoying everytime I hear someone shout "Yaweh!"

    On a perfectly secular note, it's a toss-up between two common misuses that annoy me the most: "like" and "you know". For example:

    "It's like, SO annoying to hear like, every third word is like, the word 'like', you know?"

    or

    "I think, you know, that the reason our team, you know, is doing so well this year is, you know, our team chemistry."

  • 2

    MrDarryl

    'than' for 'then' or vice versa.

  • 2

    midnull

    Not knowing the differences between: then, than there, they're, their it's, its accept, except your, you're where, were, ware ...there are more, a lot more.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    I had a co-worker (back when I worked for GE's Ocean Systems Division) who would write up test platform procedures that were supposed to be delivered to the customer (the navy) and anytime he wanted to use the word "perform" (as in "perform this step") he would instead use "preform". Not a general English use annoyance but one that required us to go behind and proofread any documents he worked on prior to release. Now it would be a simple Find and Replace, but back then it was DOS-based Wordstar. Not as easy. The entire time I worked there, he never broke the habit of using "preform" instead of "perform". Other than that one word, he was fine.

  • 0

    Ah_so

    "Revert" when people mean "reply".

  • 1

    Altruist777

    Flammable and inflammable mean the same thing. Very confusing.

  • 0

    Himajin

    maple sugar, I hate 'walla' too!

  • 3

    buchailldana

    can you use chopsticks?

  • 1

    Dennis Bauer

    I don't like the "you know" at the end of every sentence. I should just walk away when someone just used that. "why are you walking away?" "You just told me i allready know it!".

  • 1

    Spanki

    a snidge

    my colleague always says it meaning a little or a bit

  • 0

    Morry

    .... "lol" is really stupid too. It's used in situations in which the comment being said is not even funny.

  • 3

    akumakoe

    Thought of two more:

    "ATM machine" and "seven a.m. in the morning".

    Unnecessary redundancy that people tend to gloss over.

  • 1

    all4faj

    JonathanJoJan. 07, 2013 - 07:12PM JST

    If you accept a bunch of grapes or bananas as 1 item , then I think I can get away with it...

  • 4

    timtak

    Chatroom (intentional, see below) English is pretty difficult to understand. "LOL" is just the tip of the iceberg. "ASL,"for instance, means, "what is your age, sex, and location?" Chatroom English is like another language entirely. I did not hate it though, rather I felt myself wanting to learn it. Worse still, I am an old codger who sometimes pretends to be young enough to use "app," "awesome," "chatroom," "literally," "pants," (British slang for crap), "the bomb," and "for the win," etc. which, lacking the mitigation of having been born recently, suggests that I deserve to be found in a shallow grave in Wales.

    Ivan's many posts are funny, thank you.

    I used to dislike exclamation marks and THE USE OF capitals, and other attempts to express in graphemes that which would otherwise be expressed in words, but recently I have been getting into smilies :-) and even Japanese emoticons (;^_^), which are the bomb.

    Finally, I find the use of the liar paradox -- if you say anything that is self-contradictory then you must be speaking nonsense -- by anglophone academics to poo poo anything faintly post-modern, not to say Zen, pretty darn annoying.

  • 0

    timtak

    FadamorJan. 08, 2013 - 03:55AM JST wrote I had a co-worker.... [who when wanted to] use the word "perform" (as in "perform this step") he would instead use "preform". ...Other than that one word, he was fine.

    Perhaps that was because he couldn't, unless he did (by the use of pills, or back then, manual 'preformation,' a neologism for a rude word).

  • 0

    Tawnchan

    Sometimes I get afraid of speaking the English language for fear of being attacked on by dictionary hoarding hooligans. Please study my reasoning more than my English.

    And I dislike the use of... "Speak better English", really?

  • 0

    TrevorPeace2

    LOL 'moving forward' 'fiscal cliff' 'animal rights' 'divine leader' 'competent government'

  • 0

    BlackcatBCB

    So you speak English?

  • -1

    sidesmile

    "dope" as in "This tune is dope, man." And "sick" as in "That tune is sick, yo." Oh, and "library", "cabbage" and "furniture" really urine me off too.

  • 1

    tjguy

    "sucks" or "sucks up to"

    To me it is just crude and impolite.

    So, personally, I don't like it.

  • 0

    Himajin

    'I'm wiped'

  • 1

    cubic

    "technically, that is..." - usually there is nothing remotely 'technical' about what the person is about to say.

  • 2

    Moondog

    I hate being informed that something is happening at 12:00 AM or 12:00 PM. There's no such thing!

    "AM" means "before 12:00" and "PM" means "after 12:00" hence both expressions exclude 12:00. It's better to say "12:00 Noon" and "12:00 Midnight."

    I wouldn't mind 12:00 AM and 12:00 PM if there were uniform agreement of which happens at noon and which happens at midnight. But there isn't.

  • 0

    Nessie

    However, it does irritate me and sadden me when I hear people use the name of the Lord as an expletive . . .

    Oh, Thor!

    I don't see the problem.

  • 1

    Nessie

    AM" means "before 12:00" and "PM" means "after 12:00" hence both expressions exclude 12:00. It's better to say "12:00 Noon" and "12:00 Midnight."

    "Noon" and "midnight" work fine without the 12.

  • 2

    Fadamor

    Iceland (which is mostly green) and Greenland (which is mostly ice). I say we swap their names. WHO'S WITH ME?!

  • 3

    Sophia Friauf-Lemons

    When people say "Only in Japan" especially on a site like this.

  • 1

    nandakandamanda

    New threads on forums that start "OK..." or "So..."

  • 0

    Moondog

    Nessie, I agree that "12:00 Noon" and "12:00 Midnight" are redundant but there are situations where the numbers add a feeling of exactitude, especially with respect to midnight which doesn't always (in some minds) mean exactly 12:00.

  • 0

    Joshua Coleman

    I think its pretty self-serving to be annoyed by others dialects and choice of phrasing. I'm an American and I have lived in Europe and Asia. I find the different phrases to be more interesting than annoying. If you understand what a person means by a phrase, why take offense to how it was spoken. I see this as an issue of some people seeing their own language lexicon as superior to others... And that's just not how language works. You can argue grammar points or spellings, and with spellings like "loose" and "they're, their, and there" there are definite correct usages, but in the end its pretty close minded to tell someone they are unequivocally wrong when using a phrase to express themselves. If you got the meaning of the phrase then obviously the language did its job. Maybe, if a certain phrase gets you upset, its yourself that needs the critique rather than the speaker.

  • 0

    OssanAmerica

    Waiters and waitresses in restaurants who address a table of two or more customers as "you guys".

  • 0

    Joshua Coleman

    What's wrong with "you guys"? What would you prefer? "You all" - "Those in attendance" - "Everyone" Each can sound just as pretentious. What would be the perfect phrase for the waiter to use?

  • -1

    JustinPascoe31

    Every language has their own slang. I find, however, that the way in which Australians speak (not all Australians I must add) to be quite offensive. The term "bogan" comes to mind strait away. Learning proper English should be enforced at schools AND at home. Unfortunately, for the most part, Australian slang has now become deeply integrated into our education system. Slang in itself is not my main issue, however, using constant foul language, which some may say is "The Aussie Way", I find unnecessary and plain rude. Australia has never been, and may never be, a "formal" country when it comes to communication. But better understanding on the history of the language itself would be beneficial.

  • 3

    Joshua Coleman

    Using foul language is a completely legitimate form of communication. Any linguistics professor will tell you that. Its uptight and close minded to find it offensive and rude unless the speaker means it that way. People need to relax a bit and let go of the "rules" of communicating.

  • 0

    nandakandamanda

    Two thirds of the world are uptight and close-minded by that definition. Totally unnecessary swearing is just irritating and annoying, even though the speaker might think it 'normal'. You get people doing it on public transport. I will avoid such a person asap. TPO. But we risk going off topic.

  • 0

    jaseinspace1

    How about, "no problem" instead of "your welcome." That's annoying and rude.

  • 2

    cleo

    What's wrong with "you guys"? What would you prefer? ..... What would be the perfect phrase for the waiter to use?

    I'm not a guy, is the first thing that's wrong with "you guys", plus it's too informal and familiar for a waiter to use when addressing a table of customers. A simple 'Sir', 'Madam', 'Miss' etc., is all that's needed.

  • -1

    whiskeysour

    " campaign "

    " teamwork " over used by lazy & shiftless supervisors

    " team player "

    " wayyyy to much "

    " no way "

    " hard worker " & " work smart " used by clowns who are l-a-z-y

    " straight shooter " people who say they are not liars are usually the worst of the liars

    " fiscal cliff "

    " economy car " another word for death trap and or fill the tank up 2x a week

    " freedom " People who say they have freedom or their country has alot of freedom really does not have the 100% freedom they think they have...... It's just their imagination going wild

    " Southern Hospitality " There is none

    " work fast " used by shotty, and worthless supervisors who are very f-a-t next time a supervisor who is fat tells me to work fast I will tell him/her lose weight fast ( come on you can do it )

    " sextexting " boring word

    " TGIF " boring

    " fees " When your planning a vacation or just going on a short trip... Airlines and all modes of transportation write in the word " FEE " just say what you really mean " steal every drop of money you have "

    " discounts 2% - 5% off " Hahahah !!! Don't make me laugh ( 10% - 50% 1/2 off Great deal )

    " music teacher " music teachers in Japan JHS, High school, Senior High School and etc. Your overrated !!!!

    " proclaimed music teacher " if your a foreigner and you say and proclaim your a music teacher from North America you should know how to play over ten songs on the piano. If you don't know more than ten songs on the piano your not a music teacher but a deceptive l-i-a-r, don't worry your secret is safe with me...... I won't tell the international school you've been working for.

    " English teacher " in Japan, if you complain more than you contribute than you need to find a new occupation..... Whiners !!!!!!

  • 2

    Fadamor

    @Cleo,

    I'm not a guy, is the first thing that's wrong with "you guys", plus it's too informal and familiar for a waiter to use when addressing a table of customers. A simple 'Sir', 'Madam', 'Miss' etc., is all that's needed.

    Cleo, I'm not sure how true it is in other countries, but in America "guys" can be gender-specific OR gender-neutral. You determine which form it is from the context. In the gender-neutral form it is a synonym for "people". So Cleo, while you might not be a "guy", if you're with friends the group of you could very well be called "guys" - even if there's only girls in the group.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    If we're talking incorrectly used sayings, then "(you can't) have your cake and eat it too" is high on the list. You most certainly CAN have your cake (in-hand) and then eat it. What you can't do is eat your cake and then still have it (in-hand).

  • 2

    Fadamor

    Let's add the confusion of "to", "too", and "two" to the list. GD&R (Grinning, Ducking, & Running)

  • 1

    OssanAmerica

    FadamorJan. 11, 2013 - 02:37AM JST @Cleo, "I'm not a guy, is the first thing that's wrong with "you guys", plus it's too informal and familiar for a waiter to use when addressing a table of customers. A simple 'Sir', 'Madam', 'Miss' etc., is all that's needed."

    Cleo, I'm not sure how true it is in other countries, but in America "guys" can be gender-specific OR gender-neutral. >You determine which form it is from the context. In the gender-neutral form it is a synonym for "people". So Cleo, while >you might not be a "guy", if you're with friends the group of you could very well be called "guys" - even if there's only ?>girls in the group

    Only in informal and casual circumstances. Cleo is bang on. A Waiter/waitress serving customers in a restaurant is not the correct time or place to be using "you guys". To the paying customer it's outright insulting. Unfortunately there's a enormous loss of class and manners in my country, and the level of education has gone down the toilet. Oh and I also have a beef with people who axe questions rather than ask them. And last I checked disrespect was not a verb. But I'll leave that aside for now.

  • 0

    Loghorn

    Wow, so many Japanese readers with a lot of dislikes of words, phrases, etc. that most of us Americans use. I'm African-American myself, but wow, LMAO.

  • 5

    humanrights

    Heres one I despise: '' NO Foreigners Please!''

  • 0

    Judith Kelman

    Yes, "off of" "whatever" "how you doing'" "like" between each word ("Ive been "like" "literally" "sad")...the list goes on....

  • 1

    Fadamor

    "literally" is a big one. "He literally blew his top" means there was an extremely bloody mess to clean up afterwards - or at least it SHOULD have if the word was used properly.

    "disrespect" as a verb is fading away, it seems. I guess the gang-bangers are finally realizing that before you can show a lack of respect, there had to have been some respect in the first place.

    Regarding "you guys" from a waiter/waitress, I might be a bit startled if it happened in a 5-star restaurant, but wouldn't ever notice it in a Chili's, TGI Friday's, or Ruby Tuesday's. The whole point of those establishments is a CASUAL dining experience. The waiters/waitresses are not expected to be formal in those establishments.

  • 0

    OssanAmerica

    FadamorJan. 12, 2013 - 05:13AM JST "Regarding "you guys" from a waiter/waitress, I might be a bit startled if it happened in a 5-star restaurant, but wouldn't >ever notice it in a Chili's, TGI Friday's, or Ruby Tuesday's. The whole point of those establishments is a CASUAL >dining experience. The waiters/waitresses are not expected to be formal in those establishments.

    You actually eat in those places? LOL. Seriously, any food establishment where the server EXPECTS a tip from me for doing what they're already paid to do is not casual enough for them to address me like I'm their college buddy.

  • -2

    TheInterstat

    Annoying one for me;

    The American-English phenomenon of using 'go ahead' when explaining things, or giving instructions.

    'OK, I'm going to go ahead and put the coffee cup into the coffee machine, then I'm going to go ahead and switch the machine on".

    Utterly unnecessary, distracting and painful to listen to. Always seems to be a certain type who does this too.

  • 0

    Elbuda Mexicano

    "Freakin Barbie" this really makes me sick!!

  • 0

    Elbuda Mexicano

    Fool, in like " Yo! Wassup fool?"

  • -1

    Elbuda Mexicano

    Pissed?? I still can't believe Brits say this to mean they are wasted, tanked, drunk.

  • 0

    Kris Jensen

    I can't stand when people actually say "LOL" and "I-D-K". It's almost as annoying as those that forget the comma before the "and". It is "red, white, and blue", not "red, white and blue"

  • -1

    humanrights

    @Kris it depends on the context. In your example i think its not necessary to use the comma because the colors are actually all connected in the same context. In typing I omit certain rules because its faster, so I dont care.

  • 0

    cleo

    those that forget the comma before the "and". It is "red, white, and blue", not "red, white and blue"

    No, it's called the Oxford comma or Harvard comma, and it's standard usage to omit it in educated writing. It was drummed into me by a series of English teachers at school that there should be no comma in front of the and in a list. Red, white and blue is correct.

    The Oxford comma is however useful in cases where otherwise the meaning would be unclear or odd, eg

    To my parents, Ayn Rand, and God. = a dedication to 4 people (well, three people and a deity)

    To my parents, Ayn Rand and God. = a dedication to my parents, who are Ayn Rand and God.

    -and its use should be limited to such cases.

  • 0

    TanakaTaro

    Pissed?? I still can't believe Brits say this to mean they are wasted, tanked, drunk.

    I heard "pissed" or "pissed-up" comes from the Australian slang word "piss", meaning a bad brew. Being "pissed" certainly makes you piss more. The British English for angry is "pissed off", so there is no confusion. There are also some colourful expressions that come from the term, such as "he couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery."

    Expressions that annoy me would include Americanisms such as "I did it on accident." I think this came from people mishearing "an accident".

    On purpose <--> by mistake, by accident.

  • 0

    Thunderbird2

    Oftentimes, sidewalk, my bad, whatever, gotten... to name but a few.

    The ones I've listed really do piss me off... I mean, 'oftentimes'? Can't they just say 'frequently'?

  • 0

    Hategobo

    @Thunderbird2 Gotten is one of those words that were originally used in British English like "Fall" that are now regarded as archaic and no longer used in the UK but is still retained and used correctly in the USA. My grandfather used to use the word down in the West Country when I was a child along with other old Anglo Saxon words like "bist as in "deest bist" from the German "Du bist". I do agree with "My bad" though, what nonsense is that?

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