Light sodas may hike diabetes risk

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  • 1

    edbardoe

    Like a lot of "studies" promoted in the media, there was really no study at all. Only some rehashing of interviews done by others for different reasons than the claims made in the media report. Anything for a headline, or to space out the commercials that enrichen the media outlet.

  • -3

    JeffLee

    A highly flawed, misleading article.

    It seems the women had health problems early on -- doubtlessly because of high sugar (and fat consumption) -- that's why they had diabetes, and that's why they then switched to the diet drinks.

  • 1

    Paul Arenson

    not so flawed...just not conclusive, but we already know that aspartame has a similar effect on blood glucose levels. plus sugar has been oversimplified as the main cause of type 2 diabetes when we know It is more complex, has much to do with sedentary lifestyle, total diet....

    the food industry would like you to keep consuming their junk, and the safety alone of some of the additives has not been confirmed. meanwhile, I have watched obese relatives and friends stuff their faces with fat-laden, high carb (pasta, etc) food in copious amounts, washing it all down witha Diet Coke and maybe adding a non sugar ice cream for dessert.

    clearly the body is conditioned that it needs all this bombardment, and the fact that most people I know count a walk to the refrigerator as their only exercise other can getting out of bed, it is no wonder that diabetes is a growing problem.

    no, the study is not necessarily flawed, just incomplete. we also need to know what helps people who are already type 2 diabetics. meanwhile, we do know the benefits of moderation and exercise. that we expect quick fixes by food conglomerates who usually work hard to addict us to salt, sugar, and fat--much as the tobacco industry industry worked to addict people to their products--is part of the problem. and there is also some evidence that the artificial sweeteners work much as sugar does to encourage us to eat more.

  • -3

    JeffLee

    **but we already know that aspartame has a similar effect on blood glucose levels. **

    Oh, really? Any science evidence of that? Here's the Mayo Clinic, one of the world's top medical research institutiions: "Artificial sweeteners don't affect your blood sugar level. In fact, most artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods" because they don't count as a carbohydrate, a fat or any other diabetes exchange." http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/artificial-sweeteners/AN00348

    Until there's scientific evidence of a mechanism by which artificial sweeteners cause weight gain, diabetes, etc. then articles in the mainstream media like these are highly misleading and even dangerous. They're based merely on correlation, along the lines of, "People who wear purple neckties are 3 times the chance of having heart attacks. Thus purple neckties cause heart attacks."

  • 2

    Paul Arenson

    The Mayo Clinic is just making a comment,not conducting research, which looks at, among other things, weight gain in people who use artificial sweeteners. While not conclusive, the research should raise a red flag---especially when we have so many obese people living on the sweeteners daily and NOT losing weight. Weight gain is, in and of itself, a risk factor in high blood pressure. It also depends on what people eat--since refined carbohydrates have their own effect on blood sugar.

    Some research:

    "Artificial sweeteners activate sweet taste receptors in enteroendocrine cells, leading to the release of incretin, which is known to contribute to glucose absorption. Recent epidemiologic studies in Circulation (2008;117:754-761) and Obesity (2008;16:1894-1900) showed an association between diet soda consumption and the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome "(and other studies mentioned here http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/704432

    And "The problem with non-nutritive, noncaloric sweeteners is that the body senses them through the same mechanisms used to sense sugar," said Tim Osborne, professor of diabetes and obesity research at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in Lake Nona.

    Our bodies not only have sweet-taste receptors on our tongues, but all through the gut and even in the pancreas, he said. "These receptors detect sweetness and tell the brain and body to get ready for something sweet."

    When these sweet receptors get tripped, studies suggest, they turn on a mechanism that causes the body to absorb more dietary sugar and potentially convert more of that energy to fat, Osborne said."

    as well as

    "Researchers at Purdue University found that rats fed yogurt sweetened with saccharin gained more weight than rats fed yogurt sweetened with glucose (or simple sugar). The saccharin group also ultimately consumed more calories, had bigger appetites and put on more body fat, according to a pair of studies, the most recent of which appeared in April in Behavioural Brain Research.

    Susan Swithers, who co-authored the studies, hypothesized that the sweet foods give the body a strong clue that it's about to get a lot of calories. The body gears up, but when false sweetness isn't followed by lots of calories, the individual is driven to eat more.

    "That might explain in part why obesity has risen in parallel with the use of artificial sweeteners," she said."

    IN

    http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2012-08-29/health/os-artificial-sweeteners-201208291artificial-sweeteners-blood-sugar-metabolic-syndrome

    You say:

    "Until there's scientific evidence of a mechanism by which artificial sweeteners cause weight gain, diabetes, etc. then articles in the mainstream media like these are highly misleading and even dangerous. They're based merely on correlation, along the lines of, "People who wear purple neckties are 3 times the chance of having heart attacks. Thus purple neckties cause heart attacks.""

    Not so---the food industry has a big stake in this, and like the Diet drug makers, they are not interested in your health, only in selling you a product.

    So bottom line is, read the research, observe what you eat, including total carbs and fat, monitor your blood sugar, monitor your weight and blood pressure, take your meds if they have been prescribed, but talk to your doctor about how exercise and Diet change might help. They might enable you to decrease the dosage of insulin, for example Again, under medical supervision only. If you MUST have sweeterners, maybe you can cut back on the amount or frequency, since the sweet tooth is something that may play a part in the vicious cycle. In other words, yes, you CAN experiment, you do not have to be beholden to the food industry. Of course you should not believe that any one study is conclusive,but studies often offer insight into why some people do NOT do well on sweeteners.

  • -1

    JeffLee

    The Mayo Clinic is just making a comment

    The comment is based on extensive medical findings over a long period of time.

    studies suggest, they turn on a mechanism

    Osborne is speculating. Every statement he makes is qualified by a "maybe" or "seems likely" etc., and thus his and the other findings he cites are speculative and inconclusive

    Researchers have looked extremely hard to find a mechanism over the last few decades and haven't found it. In fact, artificial sweeteners are the most heavily tested food substances in history, and there isn't a single medically documented case of a direct physiological link to such ill effects.

    the food industry has a big stake in this,

    The industry has a much bigger stake in sugar. The sugar industry was built on slavery and today thrives through aggressive gov't lobbying and oligopoly control.

    yes, you CAN experiment, you do not have to be beholden to the food industry.

    Yes, indeed I have. I once tried a low-carb diet that allowed limitless amounts of artificial sweetener. I lost 10 kilos in 2 weeks. I wouldn't recommend such an approach, but that would be for other reasons.

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