Switzerland a fertile ground for traditional medicine healers

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  • 1

    Scrote

    With my left hand I detect what is wrong and with my right hand I heal

    So what physical process leads to the "healing" in this case? The only physical interaction appears to be touch.

    I suggest a clinical trial in which we have 200 rats with tumours. Mr Vipret can touch, or "heal" 100 of the rats and the other 100 are left as a control group. How many of you believe that the rats that Mr Vipret "heals" will live longer than those he doesn't? I believe that Mr Vipret will not heal any of the rats.

    Of course, these people refuse to take part in such trials as it would expose their being nothing but fraudsters. I think before these people are allowed to practice they must have their "abilities" confirmed in such controlled trials.

  • -1

    badsey3

    Historically Doctors were very good at diagnosis ==> because they had to be (Chinese and many poorer nations doctors still are). They literally could look at you and with a little work and common sense figure it out. Now Doctors mostly rely on radiation tests (x-rays, MRI) which do increase cancer risk.

    For true health you really need to eat well. =All organic with no pesticides if you can. -This is very hard to do in urban areas and you can actually see the health of people getting worse. You see it in the skin (largest organ) first.

    If you ever go to one of these countries check out a Doctor just to get a check-up and see how they think your body is doing. What is obvious does not always come up on tests.

  • -1

    JeffLee

    Myself, I prefer to consult fairies and elves to deal with my medical issues.

  • 1

    Nessie

    “There is no other place, in Europe at least, where this subject is as accepted,” she tells AFP.

    Doesn't the British health system cover some alternative quack therapies too?

  • -1

    JeffLee

    @Nessie

    Well, maggots and leaches, but those actually work to eat dead skin, drain excess blood . The story talks about "healers" who really are quacks. I'd place more faith in a maggot over them any day.

  • 1

    wipeout

    Historically Doctors were very good at diagnosis ==> because they had to be

    They didn't have to be, and historically, they were lousy at it, because they had a poor and often nonexistent understanding of science.

    (Chinese and many poorer nations doctors still are). They literally could look at you and with a little work and common sense figure it out.

    They could take a guess, and the patient could take his chances.

    Now Doctors mostly rely on radiation tests (x-rays, MRI) which do increase cancer risk.

    X-rays exams use ionizing radiation and can increase cancer risk; MRI scans don't, and don't. You may be thinking of CT.

    And doctors don't "mostly" rely on them; they use them for internal imaging, where they judge that it is required. It's an extremely effective starting point, more so when judged against - for example - chiropractors, homeopaths, and acupuncturists, who will give you wrong information because they're shooting blind. If you need a chest X-ray, a visit to an acupuncturist or a herbalist will not provide a suitable alternative: such people can neither understand through their methods what the X-ray would be able to show, and in many cases, do not even possess an adequate knowledge of human anatomy. It's not required for them to set up in their business.

    For true health you really need to eat well.

    Yes, kind of, and it's called nutrition. It's a science, but diet fetishism isn't. A lot of people choose to confuse the two. However a nutritionist can explain to you that eating well is not a guarantee of health, or a guaranteed cure for disease, injury, or infection.

    If you ever go to one of these countries check out a Doctor just to get a check-up.

    I've been to some of these countries, and a quack is a quack is a quack.

  • -1

    badsey3

    Now Doctors mostly rely on radiation tests (x-rays, MRI) which do increase cancer risk.

    X-rays exams use ionizing radiation and can increase cancer risk; MRI scans don't, and don't. You may be thinking of CT.

    MRI by their nature use radiation as I stated.

    On 31 May 2011 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as** possibly carcinogenic to humans** (Group 2B). ==> This gets into the issue of cell phone use.

  • 1

    wipeout

    You have said that MRI tests "do" increase cancer risks. The IARC does not say that.

    There's a difference between what you say and what the IARC said. A fuller explanation of how they break it down is here

    http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/pr/2011/pdfs/pr208_E.pdf

    You're taking their conclusion that a risk cannot be ruled out - which despite the use of "possibly carcinogenic" reflects an abundance of caution, and does not mean, as you seem to imagine "we think it does increase the risk" - and giving it maximum leverage by applying it to MRI and saying it does increase the risk.

    Where's your evidence for that?

  • -2

    badsey3

    "abundance of caution" ===> "risk"

    It seems some like to hold that cell phone directly against their brain (they like the warm feeling) and there are others that do not. It is your choice and your brain.

  • -2

    badsey3

    http://wtvr.com/2012/11/19/doctors-women-who-store-phone-in-bras-at-risk-for-breast-cancer/

    Is there a link between breast cancer and cell phones? Some doctors say they’re seeing evidence of breast cancer that could be connected to where some women keep their mobile phone–in their bras. Tiffany Franz got breast cancer at just 21-years-old. She had no genetic predispositions or other risk factors–except where she kept her cell phone.

    “It just so happened her tumors were exactly where her cell phone had been against her skin her bare skin for about six years,” Traci Frantz, Tiffany’s mom, told KTVU in Oakland. Tiffany had to have her left breast removed.

    Donna Jayes also got breast cancer. While she was a bit older, her late 30′s, she also had no genetic risk factors. The connection is where the tumors developed. Her doctor says they formed just under the skin, exactly matching her cell phone, and just under the surface of her skin. She says she kept her phone in her shirt for ten years. She later had a mastectomy.

  • 1

    wipeout

    Fascinating as all that is, it's nothing to do with MRI. You said that MRI scans "do increase cancer risk". It appears that your way of supporting that claim is to waffle about cellphones.

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