Glitter starts wearing off for aging 'parasite singles'

TOKYO —

In the decade and a half from 1980 to 1995, the percentage of single Japanese between the ages of 20 to 34 who were still living together with their parents rose by 13.2 points, from 29.5% to 42.7%. Twenty years on, the figure has continued to rise. In 2012, according to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, the percentage for that age group had reached 48.9%. In terms of numbers, that’s an estimated 13.4 million people.

Unmarried status also rose among people in the age 35 to 44 age segment, from a nearly negligible 2.2% in 1980 to 10% by 2000, and 16.1% in 2012, or roughly 3.05 million people.

It was about 15 years ago, recalls Nikkan Gendai (Feb 14) that Chuo University Professor Masahiro Yamada became celebrated for coining the word “parasite singles” to describe these adults who enjoy cozy lives, delaying or refraining from marriage while continuing to live with their parents.

The term “parasite” may seem overly critical, but those who utilize the term often point out that saving on rent and utilities while living with their parents gives such people additional discretionary income to spend on Hermes, Chanel and other pricey foreign brand goods, and take several overseas vacations a year.

The reason for the popularity of this phenomenon is clear enough: a survey of singles living with parents conducted in 2001 by the Cabinet Office found that 60.6% of females said they were either “satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with their unmarried arrangement, as opposed to a considerably lower 16.3% who expressed dissatisfaction. For males, the respective satisfied and dissatisfied figures were 31.3% and 27.9%.

The parasite singles’ happy-go-lucky lifestyles will be coming to an end soon enough.

“About 10 years from now, these single children will be entering their 50s, and their parents will be in their 70s and starting to require care,” warned Yoshimitsu Uehara, who serves as director of the Ikebukuro, Tokyo-based Caregiver Support Association. “From around that time, as the families’ only children, they will have to care for all aspects of their parents’ lives, including financial matters. Problems have already been pointed out in such housing developments as Hikarigaoka and Takashimadaira, where, during the daytime, these single residents have virtually no chance to meet up with nearby neighbors. Once their parents pass away, they will have become completely alienated from the local communities.”

A person with a spouse and children, moreover, can share the tasks associated with caring for an elderly parent, but for singles, this won’t be possible. The implications being that they will have to curtail, or retire, from their jobs. Which means that any financial advantages of living at home they had enjoyed up to that point will be nullified. And as they age, their own physical health also becomes a concern.

A survey conducted by the Cabinet Office in 2012 found that only one out of three female “parasite singles” in their 40s expressed satisfaction with their situations—a decline by nearly from the 25-39 age segment in the 2001 survey. As these singles confront middle age, it’s clear that the appeal of such a lifestyle wears off rapidly.

  • 6

    BBQShogun

    Ha ha. You mean they can't slide through life indefinitely?

  • 15

    mikihouse

    reckoning time...but actually its more of the parents fault. Many Japanese don't want to have their children marry because they are their social insurance, yup, they want them to take care of them when they get old so its a commensalism in a sense

  • 6

    Jimizo

    Do I detect more than a hint of schadenfreude in this article?

  • 17

    jerseyboy

    In 2012, according to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, the percentage for that age group had reached 48.9%.

    Completely insane that 1/2 of all folks between 20 and 34 are still living at home. And it speaks volumes about many of the issues in the country. For starters, it helps explain why the birth-rate is so low. But with rents so ridiculously high in most of the major cities, companies hiring more part-time workers, and wages not rising, it's pretty easy to understand why this is so.

  • 13

    Ed Smith

    The "parasite" singles will naturally adjust from carefree to caretaker roles as their parents age. (I've known real-world examples--my aunt is one.) The value relationship of a single to their parents will change from "parasite" to "provider", from parents supporting the single to the newly single supporting the parents in the home--neither party has any true choice but to change due to the fundamental nature of living. A person in their 50s is existentially different from someone in their 20s, the role changes will be natural. Watching their parents age and eventually die will further adapt the singles for their own elderhood and government will adapt to provide (because it must) for the singles in place of the nonexistent children. The society will have an aging curve for a couple decades and a drive for replenishment of the population and Japan will temporarily be less vital and its population will decline a bit to a sustainable equilibrium. The Japanese are resourceful, resilient, and will adapt as they need to--they always have. Things will work out and Japan will do fine.

  • 13

    haafulilly

    I know it's tempting. So tempting, sometimes. I'm young and my standard of life would go up in a number of ways if I moved back in with my parents. I could travel whenever I wanted. I wouldn't be living from paycheck to paycheck. But I LIKE having my own rules, a bike-able commute, et cetera.

    When my parents are older, they're going to want someone around, but not now and hopefully not for some time. If I'm not married and they need help, I'll be there. And if I'm married and they need help, I'll be there, but it'll be much easier with supplemental income and an extra set of arms.

  • 16

    slumdog

    while living with their parents gives such people additional discretionary income to spend on Hermes, Chanel and other pricey foreign brand goods, and take several overseas vacations a year.

    Why do I get the feeling that although the title uses the word 'singles' that it actually is talking about single women?

  • 4

    philly1

    A person with a spouse and children, moreover, can share the tasks associated with caring for an elderly parent, but for singles, this won't be possible.

    Perhaps it is true that tasks can be shared with a spouse if that person is male. His wife will likely do a large share of the work. If the person with a spouse and children is female, however, it is likely that she will carry the load of not only the elderly parent but also the husband and the children.

    Perhaps that clarifies why some females might find it more satisfactory to stay single.

    A person in their 50s is existentially different from someone in their 20s, the role changes [from parasite to caregiver] will be natural.

    I'm not exactly sure how existentialism figures into it, but single people in their 50s are not going to be less interested in living fulfilling lives of their own and trading them in at that youthful age to be a caregiver for their elderly parents. Those singles won't necessarily have the skills to do that work, either. However, they might be smart enough at that point to hire well-qualified elder nannies from abroad who do.

  • 28

    marcelito

    What about the parasite housewives here? Plenty of them around ,married, no kids,no job apart from roaming the gym, coffee shops and the malls and living off their husbands. Not much better in my eyes yet almost no stigma is attached to them by the J-society. Interesting.

  • 3

    tmarie

    **The "parasite" singles will naturally adjust from carefree to caretaker roles as their parents age. **

    I wouldn't count on that. I guess you 've missed the number of adult kids offing their parents recently.

    These parents have no one to blame but themselves. Spoil your child and allow them to live rent free and chore free? Why would they want to move out? Why would a woman want to get married and hve to deal with the running of a house when she can buy brand name bags and have mommy make her bentos. I believe the issue here is the mothers . "mazakon" is a massive issue here. How many parents (mother's) have raised useless kids who don't know how to look after themselves? Poor little rich parents. You don't see this kind of thing in developing nations - they can't afford to look after their adult kids.

    Marcelito, there are so many of those damn creatures here. They aren't just living off their husbands. They get pension and health care as well - paid by us! I have lost count of how many I have met in the past few years who are in their mid 30s who have no desire to have kids either. One thing not to work if you have small kids, another if you don'T even plan on having them. Why the husbands put up with it is beyond me.

  • 5

    roughneck

    What is wrong with staying with parents? It helps the aging parents also? Why everything needs to be "westernized"? There are so many countries which has extended family living under the same roof! Parents take care of the kids, the kids look after the parents when they are old, period. This is an Asian trait, don't judge it with western mind.

  • -1

    sighclops

    @slumdog

    Because it's true. Statistically, women are higher. Anecdotally, in the past 6 years living in Japan, I can't recall coming across a single example of a male still living at home, yet can recall countless examples of women in the same situation.

    It's a serious societal problem, and one that's often overlooked in Japan. Surely this problem is unique to Japan? I'd like someone to dig deeper and find out exactly why this is so prevalent in Japan. I mean 16% of the middle aged population is RIDICULOUS.

  • 4

    tmarie

    What is wrong with staying with parents?

    When they aren't paying rent and not helping around the house? Everything. I don't think anyone has an issue with those pulling their own weight.

  • 5

    slumdog

    Because it's true. Statistically, women are higher.

    That's what my personal experience tells me, too.

    I can't recall coming across a single example of a male still living at home

    I've met some, but they did not have "additional discretionary income to spend on Hermes, Chanel and other pricey foreign brand goods, and take several overseas vacations a year". The women I have met in the same situation often did.

  • 11

    Mocheake

    When I talk to Japanese people here about the homeless , they mostly say they need to go out and find a job and stop being lazy. This 'parasite singles' situation doesn't seem to bother them and most can't see any correlation. At least the homeless are not sponging off their loved ones.

  • 7

    kimuzukashiiiii

    parasite singles are pretty pathetic, really. To get to your 40s and still live with your parents, unmarried and with no children, and only a collection of designer bags to show for your life.

    Yes they will look after their aging parents, but who will look after them when they hit old age? They will be pretty lonely, after their parents die.

  • 3

    tmarie

    **Yes they will look after their aging parents, but who will look after them when they hit old age? **

    Plenty of folks without kids have the money to pay someone to look after them when they get older. Having kids doesn't mean someone will be there to wipe your bum when you're elderly. Japan is finding this out recently with the number of older folks being found months after the've died.

  • -1

    JTDanMan

    The characterization of "parasite children" is and always has been a load of horse crap.

  • 2

    Alphaape

    It seems that here on JT we get articles every day of some case of an adult child killing off a parent due to the fact that they can't handle taking care of a sick elderly parent. If one is staying with their parents while working and at least paying rent or other costs then I don't see an issue. But if they just stay there and don't contribute, and continue to live as if a child then there is an issue.

    It is not just a Japan thing. I have seen cases similar to this when I lived in Hawaii. Many cases I knew of adults living with parents, some contributing and others not, but the mindset was that they didn't want to leave the parents nest at all.

    The real winners in all of this will be the lawyers if the parents have more than one child. When they die off, it will be a mad scramble among the surviving children as to who will get what and the lawyers will be laughing all the way to the bank.

  • 7

    maxjapank

    The day after I gratuated from college, my mom told me I could stay with her for 6 months as long as I was actively looking for a job. But after that, she expected me to get my own place. It felt kinda harsh, and deep down I knew that she would help out if I really needed it, but I understood that she was just kicking the baby bird outta the tree.

    Now as a father, I am not looking foward to my daughter leaving home at all.

  • 9

    ticaile

    this happens in many other countries...In Costa Rica, for example, no one thinks of leaving the family home before marriage...unless the relationship with the family is really bad ....other than that, is seen as perfectly normal to live with the parents...all my siblings and myself got married after 35...and all lived at home nicely.

  • 0

    pointofview

    Kids here are pretty much spoon fed most of their lives hense their narrow mindedness and inability to do hard work or complain about it to no end if a task is slightly difficult to do. They get everything paid for and done for them into their 20s and 30s. Go figure.

  • 2

    Badge213

    I know a few women who still live at home, they work full time jobs and manage to save money by not having to pay rent. Doesn't seem like they are spoon fed to me. Sounds like a pretty darn good arraignment atleast until you are 30. I know many folks back in the US have done the same after finishing university and unable to find full time employment.

  • 9

    Peacetrain

    Okay there are a few things that some of you are missing.

    First, many times it's the parents who don't want their kids leaving. Second, many women only move out when they get married, and there are lots of women who had high standards for who they'd marry so never married- or just never got around to it. Lots of people are waiting for the perfect person (that usually includes top tier university, and salary level) to come along.
    Third if you look at the time line, more Japanese started to get graduate degrees so if you include ronin years, they only started working in their mid twenties. The same high standards problem goes for men too. There are lots of sons who didn't get into a "decent" uni so basically dropped out. Others who dropped out of a company for some reason find it hard to get back in another company, and for many it's too embarrassing getting a low paying job.

    Lots of Japanese can't find a partner naturally - the way westerners would because they hardly meet singles of the other sex. Then if they go to omiai it's a different situation where they have to meet up to criteria and conditions.

    These examples may seem strange, but I hardly know any foreigners. All the people I know are Japanese, and I know person after person who has dropped out, is hikikomori, women who are approaching 40 and not married.

    Oh one more thing. I also know quite a few women who did want to work but their husbands forbid them. Yeah, sounds strange but it's true.

    Regardless of it being 2014, men are still judged on the income earning ability, and women on their ability to run a home.

    If only people could think about making a home with someone who is decent, kind, and the kind of person they'd like to raise kids and grow old with - regardless of education etc.

    But, every week I hear some parent or a single ask "Can you introduce someone?"

    As some mentioned, there will be more trouble with older people looking after parents. Esp of single men who had mama cooking for for the last 30 years, suddenly faced with having to cook for her, and not wanting to.

    Someone in govt should be looking into building lots of affordable retirement homes.

  • -1

    Dennis Bauer

    “About 10 years from now, these single children will be entering their 50s, and their parents will be in their 70s and starting to require care,” warned Yoshimitsu Uehara

    expect more news in the crime section then?

  • -2

    ka_chan

    I would think that if the kids are really "parasite", when the parents become a burden, they would find a way to put them in old age homes and have the courts declare their parents as incompetent and they take over the home and bank accounts.

  • 2

    sighclops

    @slumdog

    I've met some, but they did not have "additional discretionary income to spend on Hermes, Chanel and other pricey foreign brand goods, and take several overseas vacations a year". The women I have met in the same situation often did.

    Yeah, the crazy thing is - some of them are on BIG salaries. They could easily afford to live quite comfortably on their own. I therefore think it's more a lifestyle choice where they have zero interest in dating or marriage. This part intrigues me! Wonder if there have been any studies done on this?

  • 8

    AiserX

    This is not unique to Japan. It's becoming more and more common in Europe and North America. As well as other parts of the world. This is largely due to a crumbling economy on every corner of the planet. Inflation is driving the value of the common paper currency in every industrialized country, as a result it's getting more and more expensive just to buy and pay off necessities.

  • 1

    Kimokekahuna Hawaii

    I see those girls coming to Hawaii ... shopping.. always gang of 2 or 4 girls... they buy only brands...$20,000 bags some of them... I think that is why birthrate is so low in Japan .. girls want to be Kawaii whole life...

  • 4

    dcog9065

    Nothing new, you have similar figures in Ireland, midlands UK, Spain, Portugal, Italy, etc. But still no where near as bad as in the Balkans like Croatia where it's over two thirds living with their parents. The main things that puts Japan higher than it probably should be is virtually no career opportunities for women, ageing population, poor economy.

  • -1

    Reckless

    There are no parasite singles in the hood,,, everyone got their own crib when the turn 18,,,

  • 6

    Qamar

    "What? Now? Now? Now that you have a good job and enough money to provide something for this family, you leave? You're such an egoist child!! After what I went through to take care of you!"

    ..is what I've been told.

  • 6

    Tessa

    on the other hand, it would rock to be a japanese girl. could leech off parents forever and some salaryman husband and live a pretty good life.

    I know quite a few Japanese housewives who are married to salarymen, getting almost all of their salaries, and getting regular cash infusions from their own parents. In one case, her parents are paying her phone and electricity bills, and the in-laws are going to pay private school fees for any children (or more likely, lone child) that she plans to have. She's set for life! I sometimes wonder why her parents bothered paying for her university education, when all she uses it for is to decide what shade of nail polish to try next.

    Spoil your child and allow them to live rent free and chore free? Why would they want to move out?

    I have found myself in the bizarre position of teaching a university-educated Japanese woman in her early thirties how to use a rice cooker and a washing machine! She'd never had to use either of these appliances in her life until she came to spend a few days with me. Heaven help her if she ever gets married.

  • 7

    hoanihoani

    Italian and Greeks are like that too ... Why leave home when your mama cleans your laundry, makes your bed and is a kick ass cook? .... it reminds me of a joke Q : What is the difference between a Greek mother and a Pitbull .... A : eventually the Pitbull will let go just a joke guys dont take it seriously

  • 7

    FightingViking

    I guess we're the "wrong way round"... I'm living with my son, who pays for everything and is an excellent cook to boot ! I feel it's because he's taking such good care of me that he doesn't seem to have time to get married...

  • 4

    titaniumdioxide

    There is nothing wrong with living with your parents. You are family! The bad ones are the "NEETS". Those bloodsuckers who only care about themselves and live under their parents' roof without even taking part in society. They're the ones that this article should focus on, not all single people as parasites. Again, this is not limited here in Japan. This is all over the world! The main cause is of course driven by money! No money, little money, saving money etc.

  • 3

    Qamar

    In my country, usually kids will live with parents until kids get married. We're a small country and living alone just isn't worth it, not to mention that parents are quite clingy sometimes. (explaining my previous post)

  • -6

    tmarie

    **Italian and Greeks are like that too **

    Which is why none of my family nor friends would ever marry one - lived in a highly Italian and Greek populated area al the females were well aware of the "mamaboy" issues - not to mention the nasty MILs that go with them. That and Greeks tend to marry their own anyway.

    There is nothing wrong with living at home if you help out - though I certainly wouldn't have seriously dated a guy who had not lived on his own at least once. The article is about parasites, not everyone living at home. HUGE difference!!

  • 0

    GW

    If these numbers are true this is a much bigger problem than I thought, pretty damned dysfunctional if you ask me!

    After Uni the folks let me stay for a bit, but they had long since converted my old room & they said I could sleep on a cot in the laundry room, I kid you not haha & I had to pay some rent & they made sure I was looking for a job & they were happy to help but they wanted my sorry BUTT out of the house hopefully before 6months passed .

    At the time I thought it was a bit harsh but they did me a HUGE favor, I got my a$$ outta there & haven't been back except to visit for around 30yrs now!

    Folks are great for helping us out but for petes sake you parasites don't use your folks as crutches have you no shame!

  • -1

    Saul Schimek

    are these stats accurate? this indicates a severe problem in Japanese society

  • 2

    Thunderbird2

    Why is this a problem? So what if they are living at home with their parents... if the parents are happy, as are their 'kids' then I don't see why it's anyone's business. If the kids were spongeing off their parents, then yes that would be a prob, but if they are paying towards their food, etc I don't see an issue.

    Here in the UK the cause is mostly down to lack of affordable housing. I can't imagine many parents booting their kids out if they have nowhere to live. Maybe it's the same in urban Japan?

  • 4

    BBoppie

    So what you don't do on the front end of life you pay for on the back end of life.

  • 2

    ConnorH93

    21 years old and currently in University, I could find affordable accommodation near my University despite getting maintenance loan and grant and having a part-time job so I'm staying at my mums house. I pay rent, do my own laundry, do my own cooking, etc.

    The benefit for me is that I'm only paying a fraction of what I would have had to pay whilst living on my own or even sharing with my friends from University.

    I'm happy staying here but I want to move out and live completely independent as soon as possible for me, when it is my mums time to be taken care of I will be there of course. But from when I get a good enough job and can afford my own apartment/house and until I found the right woman for me I want it to be just me.

    I can understand the need to stay with your parents if you cannot afford to move out yet or are in University as long as you pay your way and aren't just living off your parent's love and are planning to leave when it becomes financially viable then there's nothing wrong living with your parent until you're 30 in my opinion.

    With the economy the way it is the average age for buying your own house in the UK is 30-35 at the moment anyway.

  • 4

    diuneahma

    In asian societies, it is so normal to be living with your parents before marriage. What's all the fuss?

  • 5

    LBW2010

    Absolutely a massive difference between "living in the family home" and being a NEET. I can't stress that enough.

    If the economy is in the trash (which it is) and rent is through the roof (which it is), then find the best job you can and live at home with your parents (who are from a different generation and are established in a better economic position) and save money on things like rent, food, transportation, etc. It's basic economics and shouldn't be lambasted for "not following cultural mores" or anything like that. I lived with my parents for a year after college while working full-time as a teacher and it was one of the most rewarding, pleasant years of my life in many ways.

    Being a NEET and not doing any work, not looking for work, and not looking to better yourself in any way is the problem. That hurts the economy and society and your family.

  • 1

    kimuzukashiiiii

    tmarie, these parasites spend all their money on bags and holidays! I doubt they will have much left over for retirement.

    I would never have kids so they can "wipe my bum when Im old" but I do hope to think that when Im old my kids and grandkids will come and visit me. Because they love me, and because I was a good mother to them.

    To be honest I think living with parents is one issue. Not sooo bad if you are young and at uni, or in a very low paid job. (I have never done this btw - left home at 16) But staying with parents through 30s, 40s, never getting married or never having children. And then dying lonely (although rich) in their old age. Its so sad...

  • 1

    Peacetrain

    Regardless of my last post, I love my kids to bits. I wish I could build a huge house and have them live with me even after they got married.

  • 3

    ReformedBasher

    Reading the above comments, it seems that people from certain countries are under the impression that their culture represents the entire world and ignore the fact that others, from various countries are telling them they are wrong. As for me, I know there are roughly 190 countries in the world, some with more than one ethnicity, and am not surprised everyone has different ways of doing things. I dislike the fact people lucky enough to be born in wealthy countries tell others how they should live their lives, because it's "normal". It's very ignorant.

  • -6

    Reckless

    @tmarie "Which is why none of my family nor friends would ever marry one - lived in a highly Italian and Greek populated area al the females were well aware of the "mamaboy" issues - not to mention the nasty MILs that go with them. That and Greeks tend to marry their own anyway."

    You poor lady, you are missing out on the greatest lovers in the world and by and large the most well endowed,,,

  • 1

    Kurobune

    @Reformed 9:39 AM JST - That is oh, so right ! The arrogance is appalling ! Great post !

  • 3

    ReformedBasher

    @Kurobune

    Thanks.

    Interesting name you have. Perry's black ships are a good example and goes to show some people still think the same way in 2014.

    Red seal ships were good while they lasted. Just goes to show cooperation can go a long way.

  • 1

    HonestDictator

    Cultural "ideals" aside, the reality is economically not viable for the parents nor the adult "children" when they don't have a spouse (no grandkids for the parents) until too late in the game. While it helps to at least have a husband/wife etc. Both of them have aging parents as well. Which can double if not quadruple the financial responsibility (a mom and dad for both spouses...).

    Don't get me wrong, its great for family to look out for each other from generation to generation, but in this day and age some parents don't want to become a "burden" to their children and focus on saving money for retirement which easily helps them have more independence in their senior years, and also helps the children they leave have more financial freedom without living from paycheck to paycheck trying to save for their own retirement, put kids through school, take care of kids, take care of mom x2 and dad x2 until someone passes away, and keep from being overstressed from too much responsibility.

    This is why it is good for the children to move out and learn independence and be responsible for themselves first, and it will be much easier for them to learn to take care of others because they know how to take care of themselves. The parents only have to worry about managing their retirement money. And when they really need help their children would be able to assist, and vice versa, instead of bleeding away that pension/ what have you while the adult child is having a blast on a free dime.

  • 5

    marcelito

    Reckless re. Italians and Greeeks -" You poor lady, you are missing out on the greatest lovers in the world and by and large the most well endowed,,,"

    So I take it you are Italian or Greek then?...lol

  • 4

    Bellpeppers

    Asian parents tend to be emotionally dependent on their children so they want their children living with them like forever. I understand that very well. I'm on my own but I can see clearly how they want to reel me back into living with them.

  • 1

    Martine Müller

    I don't think there is something wrong with children at old age living at home. I think is a PR campaign to get them out to spent money for the economy therefore the bad press about it. What is wrong with family living together? As long as they are living in harmony, who cares?

  • 2

    japanesereds

    Good luck to those people who are happy living at home. Too many bitter people here.

  • -1

    tmarie

    tmarie, these parasites spend all their money on bags and holidays! I doubt they will have much left over for retirement.

    Not sure why that was directed at me - agree 100%!

    You poor lady, you are missing out on the greatest lovers in the world and by and large the most well endowed,,, Um, no one said anything about not DATING Greeks and Italians. My girls just know that most of them are total mama's boys and no one wants to compete with mommy.

    Asian parents tend to be emotionally dependent on their children so they want their children living with them like forever. I think you mean "mothers" not "parents". Dads are too busy working to be emotionally dependent on their kids.

  • 0

    kurisupisu

    I don't think that the singles are with their parents by choice....Japan is so expensive to raise a family!

  • 2

    JoiceRojo

    I'm not sure where this article goes.... whereas it is true that we had an increase in single living with their parents, it is not exclusive to Japan, in my country happens too when the child goes to a local university (there is an important saving issue in living with your parents) as opposite to those who go to an university in another city, these kids have to learn to live alone and doing stuff for themselves since 17-18...

    I agree it is mostly the parents who don't want their son/daughter to leave home, when I came back from the U.S. (I was 29) my economical situation was so critical I could not afford to rent anything, and after I got a decent job I started saving up, I wanted to leave the house of my parents, but it got complicated to get a house or apartment, when I finally landed a good deal my father was furious that I wanted to live alone, he even blamed my mother for "mistreating me" (I never knew where he got that idea from) and he was only appeased when I told him that I would live 1 block away from the house, he could visit me anytime and on weekends I had to eat lunch with them...

    Once I was able to pay for a mortgage i bought my house and moved far, but still, they insist for me to come over for lunch on weekends, i can escape saturday, but there's no way i can escape sunday... so i think the deal with "parasite singles" is more like kangaroo.. both adult and parent want to leech of each other

  • 1

    Dukeleto

    "What about the parasite housewives here? Plenty of them around ,married, no kids,no job apart from roaming the gym, coffee shops and the malls and living off their husbands. Not much better in my eyes yet almost no stigma is attached to them by the J-society. Interesting."

    Not in my gym. If I see someone under sixty I count that as a lucky day! There aint no foot loose and fancy free housewifes in my area.

  • 0

    TakahiroDomingo

    the parasites live off mama's food and clothes washing, and spend their free time in love hotels, ha, that's a really good life

  • 1

    edwardw

    I came to Japan to be away from my parents. What is wrong with these people?

  • -2

    tabana

    At least they had a few years of glitter, instead of getting stuck in a sexless marriage, trying to survive on 2000円 a week, eat nothing else than onigiri and instant ramen, while the spouse is enjoying spa, shopping and dining with friends.

  • 1

    kcjapan

    "In 2012, according to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, the percentage for that age group had reached 48.9%." 49% single Japanese between the ages of 20 to 34 living together with their parents are parasites?

    49% are “parasite singles”? That seems a very harsh judgment on young people. Young people who, in most cases, did University, internships and entry level training. Somehow, these young people are viewed as parasites? Every other 20-34yr old is a parasite? Something sounds fishy.

  • 0

    Yogizuna

    All I can do is shake my head... There is nothing quite like being independent and on your own, even if you have to lower your lifestyle a few notches and not be so spoiled. I left "mommy" at a very young age and sure I struggled, but the freedom to be able to live my own life my way was very interesting.

  • 0

    Tessa

    Not in my gym. If I see someone under sixty I count that as a lucky day! There aint no foot loose and fancy free housewifes in my area.

    They're probably all holed up in the yoga/pilates/hula classes. They don't like hanging around old people any more than you do. Believe me, I hear about it on a daily basis.

    At least they had a few years of glitter, instead of getting stuck in a sexless marriage, trying to survive on 2000円 a week, eat nothing else than onigiri and instant ramen, while the spouse is enjoying spa, shopping and dining with friends.

    You said it!

  • 1

    Strangerland

    Not in my gym. If I see someone under sixty I count that as a lucky day! There aint no foot loose and fancy free housewifes in my area.

    My gym as well. Almost all men, and at least half over 60. Never any cute housewives.

  • 1

    felix88

    Different cultures view things differently, and like some poster said living with your parents doesn't mean you're a NEET. In Asia generally people still value traditional family values, I believe living in one big family where everyone support eachothers is a good thing.

  • -1

    David Foley

    I think this article is talking about children who live with their parents and DO NOT PROVIDE AT ALL (like being a perpetual child). Im not sure if that is the family dynamic of traditional Asia that Asians always talk about (as if it does not exist in the western world).

    When I was 18 my father cut me off financially. I lived single supporting myself for 12 years and now am married and supporting a family. And my dad is my best friend. I plan to do the same for my son (and he is half Japanese living in Japan - so that will be interesting to see what happens).

    People are free to live how they want, but MAN I wish there were more young people to hang out with these days. I live in such a beautiful countryside area full of adventure, but completely neutered with silver zones and unnecessary infrastructure.

    Anyone interested in starting a young people village in northern Aomori???

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