Louisiana 'Freeze' shooting tragedy remembered 20 years on

TOKYO —

Twenty years have passed since Yoshihiro Hattori was shot and killed in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. On Oct 17, 1992, recalls the Sankei Shimbun (Oct 10), the 16-year-old exchange student from Nagoya, on his way to a Halloween party, was mistakenly dropped off at the wrong house. The panicked householder, a 30-year-old supermarket worker named Rodney Peairs, yelled “Freeze!” but Hattori, clearly misunderstanding the command, kept approaching. Peairs fired a .44 caliber magnum bullet into Hattori’s chest at nearly point blank range, and the boy died before he could be taken to a hospital.

Peairs, charged with manslaughter, invoked the “castle doctrine” defense whereby Americans have the right to apply lethal means to protect their homes, and was found not guilty by a jury. The Hattori family pursued the case in civil court and four years later won $650,000 in damages, of which only $100,000 was paid by Peairs’ insurance company. Half that amount was distributed to various U.S. groups in support of gun control measures.

“He tried his best to adapt to life as an exchange student,” recalls Yoshihiro’s mother Mieko.

“Sometimes I feel like he’s still in America,” his father, Masaichi, remarked wistfully. “Some day he’ll come back home, I say to myself.”

Driven by a combination of grief and determination, the Hattoris circulated a petition calling for more stringent controls on firearms and collected 1.7 million signatures from Americans. In November 1993, they submitted the petition to President Bill Clinton at the White House.

Following the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon in September 2001, however, Americans became more aware of the need for self-protection, and controls on guns lapsed. Recently, the Sankei notes, random shootings with multiple fatalities have occurred in succession.

Japanese were once again reminded of the Hattori incident on March 30, 1994, when two Japanese students at Marymount College in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, Takuma Ito and Go Matsuura, were shot and killed during an attempted carjacking.

Two weeks later, Shukan Gendai magazine ran an article with a headline, stated only half in jest, that read: “Amerika de korosarenai tame no ikikata oshiemasu” (Here’s how to avoid being killed in America).

Should Japanese buy guns to defend themselves? The magazine asked a Los Angeles police official.

“It wouldn’t do any good,” he replied “Guns do not provide effective protection from carjackings. Knowing the area and exercising sensible precautions would work better.”

Shukan Gendai also provided a list of hints for survival in the U.S., including:

- Form friendships with locals and learn their survival skills
- Go native in appearance. (Males should grow facial hair as it will make them look more Hispanic in appearance.)
- Carry your money in two different places, so in case you’re robbed, you’ll still have a stash to get you home.
- Under no circumstances should you put up resistance against an armed robber.

As the 20th anniversary of their son’s death approached, Mieko and Masaichi Hattori were making preparations to travel to Baton Rouge and meet with the American family that had hosted Yoshihiro. Mieko was also preparing a speech to deliver before a gathering.

“I’ve been observing American society for the past 20 years,” she tells the Sankei. “The ongoing situation there has been incomprehensible to Japanese. I want to encourage more ways to adopt gun control.”

Despite the Japanese public’s shocked reaction of the Hattori and Ito/Matsuura killings, the number of Japanese going to the U.S. for study continued to rise, peaking at close to 47,000 in the late 1990s. By 2010, it declined to about half that number, due to factors believed to have very little to do with gun violence.

  • 3

    LiveInTokyo

    “... stated only half in jest, that read: Amerikade korosarenai tame no ikikata oshiemasu” (Here’s how to avoid being killed in America).

    Wow, if someone ran a headline for article like that about Japan overseas, people here would get offended and make it a diplomatic incident. I guess they're lucky not too many people in the world can speak Japanese.

  • 4

    commanteer

    As sad as this case is, it's really not the place of Japanese to demand changes to constitutional rights in the US. There are plenty of problems in Japan that they would be better off focusing on, and American laws are frankly none of their business.

    The advice given here for safety precautions should be taken with a grain of salt as well. Guns aren't effective at stopping a carjacking? Pretty hard for a carjacker to succeed with a bullet in his head, I would think.

    And there are many circumstances where resistance against an armed robber might be a good idea. If they look ready to kill, for instance, or of they are trying to force you into a car or house where they can take their time with you. One has to balance the risks, but the idea that one should never resist is a canard.

    Lastly, the odd of a Japanese getting killed in the US are actually lower than the odds of getting killed while in Japan.

  • 8

    Triumvere

    Go native in appearance. (Males should grow facial hair as it will make them look more Hispanic in appearance.)

    WTF?

    Like there are no Asians in the US? Latinos don't get robbed?

    Are we to imagine that poor Yoshihiro Hattori would have not been shot if only he had looked "like an American" (whatever that is supposed to mean...)?

    Pro-tip to any Japanese reading this:A beard will not protect you from bullets. Knowing what parts of town are safe and what parts are not will. Ditto for not wandering around alone late at night, and staying alert and focuses while out and about.

  • 1

    Triumvere

    "focused"

  • -5

    Probie

    Should Japanese buy guns to defend themselves? The magazine asked a Los Angeles police official. “It wouldn’t do any good,” he replied “Guns do not provide effective protection from carjackings. Knowing the area and exercising sensible precautions would work better.”

    Knowing what's going on around you and being sensible. You're asking Japanese people to do this? Farewell and adieu to you, Spanish Ladies, Farewell and adieu to you, ladies of Spain...

    Go native in appearance. (Males should grow facial hair as it will make them look more Hispanic in appearance.)

    Yeah, because Hispanic people never get into trouble with anyone, especially not each other...

    “I’ve been observing American society for the past 20 years,” she tells the Sankei. “The ongoing situation there has been incomprehensible to Japanese. I want to encourage more ways to adopt gun control.”

    How does a situation "incomprehensible to Japanese" connect to gun control?

    Besides, the guy who shot their son was had a licensed gun. So it was controlled.

  • 2

    Baibaikin

    Following the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon in September 2001, however, Americans became more aware of the need for self-protection, and controls on guns lapsed

    What? Just in case someone decides to fly a plane into your house or in case one of your neighbours looks like s/he might be making some explosive underwear? Such BS. Ridiculous justification for having a gun in your house that your child might well use to accidentally shoot their school friend.

  • -5

    Eduardo Gonzalez

    Racial battles since the LA Riots of 1992. Now whites are onto racial cleansing of the United States leaving non-whites exterminated this December 21st

  • -9

    Robert Dykes

    When I taught in public Japanese schools the teachers would all tell this story about halloween. Really made me angry. They would always say "oh Halloween is dangrours" Well. I what if I go to shinjuku and go to a yakuza gangster standing in from of his snack club take his glasses and say "cool glasses" i am sure I will get shot in the chest. Then I guess the whole world can say Tokyo is dangrous. Sun glasses are dangrours. Japan is dangrours.

    I never hear anyone say this poor kid was very open uninformed about where to go and not to go. As someone born in new orelans I can tell you first hand every one knows there are some places you just don't go, and some even more so after dark. When my in laws came to visit even they knew to ask is is a safe part of town? Even though you can usually tell. But in Louisiana I wouldn't trick or treat in ANY neighbor hood.

  • -1

    Robert Dykes

    IMHO gun control is a joke and not an answer. There are an estimated 280 million guns in the USA. If you stopped selling guns completely today. There would still be enough guns for every person to have one. I think private owner ship of handguns is pointless, but it is also futile to try and change it at this point.

  • 3

    Triumvere

    Following the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon in September 2001, however, Americans became more aware of the need for self-protection, and controls on guns lapsed.

    Missed this one first time through. Honestly, this is nonsense. For various reasons, gun control has been a losing issue politically for a while now, nothing to do with 9/11.

  • 5

    Virtuoso

    But in Louisiana I wouldn't trick or treat in ANY neighbor hood.

    He wasn't tricking or treating. His American home stay host mistakenly drove him to the wrong house (got the number jumbled) to attend a costume party.

  • -1

    MoBass4u

    As sad as this case is, it's really not the place of Japanese to demand changes to constitutional rights in the US. There are plenty of problems in Japan that they would be better off focusing on, and American laws are frankly none of their business

    I remember this case very well. I totally agree with the above quote because other than remembering this young man the rest of the article was nonsense. Clean your own backyard before worrying about someone else's.

  • -1

    Za-zaam Flash

    Quote: "Go native in appearance. (Males should grow facial hair as it will make them look more Hispanic in appearance.)"

    As an American I am confused, trust me I can tell the difference it is not the face it is the stance, how you walk how you stand, etc. I can tell if you originate from an OCED country, no disguise will prevail in obfuscation of the personification of such geopolitical origins. But all withstanding it is IMHO horrible that a series of "mistakes" ended a young man's life. I regret even having to imagine what really happened and/or what was is in the heart of the supposed "keepers" of Yoshihiro Hattori.

  • 0

    Badge213

    Sometimes Japanese people and other foreigners will ask me (I'm American) "did you own a gun in America" "it must be dangerous" etc etc.

    Never once have I ever been held up, had a gun pointed at me or shot in America and I lived in a state that had very liberal gun ownership rights (shall issue state AND open carry state) and no I did not own a gun or feared for my life when walking out in the streets. Yes bad stuff happens, but for the vast majority of people who visit nothing happens, bad stuff can happen anywhere in the world.

  • 4

    farstrider

    As sad as this case is, it's really not the place of Japanese to demand changes to constitutional rights in the US. There are plenty of problems in Japan that they would be better off focusing on, and American laws are frankly none of their business

    I remember this case very well. I totally agree with the above quote because other than remembering this young man the rest of the article was nonsense. Clean your own backyard before worrying about someone else's.

    Yeah, America doesn't have any problems at home and has certainly never interfered in the affairs of other nations...

  • 4

    wipeout

    Never once have I ever been held up, had a gun pointed at me or shot in America and I lived in a state that had very liberal gun ownership rights (shall issue state AND open carry state) and no I did not own a gun or feared for my life when walking out in the streets. Yes bad stuff happens, but for the vast majority of people who visit nothing happens, bad stuff can happen anywhere in the world.

    Yes I think most of us realize bad stuff happens everywhere, and probably understand as well that we will usually be safe when we travel to less safe countries like the US.

    However, there are reasons people from outside the US view its gun obsession and crime stats with something like a shudder. To make one comparison, there were 59 firearms-related homicides in the UK in 2006-2007 (1 year). This is for a population of 60 million.

    In the United States, figures over the last decade have been around 11,000 firearms homicides annually. Even allowing for the fact that the UK has a fifth of the population, it doesn't take a genius to see the huge disparity in UK and US gun crime.

    So "bad stuff can happen anywhere in the world" doesn't really cover the situation.

  • 3

    Fadamor

    (The second amendment - as passed by Congress in 1791)

    A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

    I'm a proponent of gun control laws, but in this unlucky student's case, gun control laws would not have helped him. He was approaching a private residence, the owner of the residence verbally tried to get the student to stop approaching the house, when the student didn't stop, the home owner used his last resort to defend his property. Even if the second amendment gets amended itself, this kind of home defense will still be allowed.

    Gun control laws are aimed at the ridiculous argument that the Second Amendment applies to ALL arms. Gun proponents have been arguing that they have a Constitutional right to buy semi-automatic carbines with 30-round banana clips and they use the text of the Second Amendment to back-up their claims.

    The text of the amendment seems to support their claims, so why is it ridiculous? Make note of the year this amendment was passed, then think about what it meant to "keep and bear arms" back then. You had the choice of a muzzle-loading musket, or some form of muzzle-loading cannon. There was no formal National Guard back then, so the states relied on civilian militias in time of need. The states didn't purchase weapons for their militias, they expected the men to show up with their own weapons.

    So back in 1791 the text of the Second Amendment makes perfect sense and was a great amendment to the Constitution, but it did not allow for technological advances, nor did it allow for organizational changes at the State and National levels. Today, it is possible to have a single hand-held weapon with the same firepower a platoon had back in 1791. Also today, civilian militias are no longer expected to be maintained because we have a national army and individual state National Guards. The nation and the states purchase the weapons to be used. The soldiers and Guard members are not required to bring their own weapons from home.

    So the Second Amendment is sorely in need of amendment itself - if only to bring it into alignment with the 21st century. But any such amendment to the amendment will never prohibit a homeowner from being able to defend themselves if they feel their life or home is in danger. The thing is, you don't need a 30-round banana clip to defend your home from an intruder (or two, or three).

  • 0

    MoBass4u

    Yeah, America doesn't have any problems at home and has certainly never interfered in the affairs of other nations...

    It was NEVER implied by myself or the other poster that America doesn't have problems and lord knows America sticks it's nose where it shouldn't. It was a tragic event but trying to change the gun laws and "blending" is absurd. Your response was a bit simple.

  • 0

    malfupete

    @Fadamor: Funny how the gun nuts choose to only quote the "right to bear arms" portion - leaving out the fact that the original intent was for a civilian militia

    that being said, if congress were to ever try and "amend" this amendment.. we'll probably see a march on Washington

    why don't they just ban ammunition then?

  • -1

    Resurfaced

    Damn of you look Hispanic and are walking into a strangers backyard YOU WILL GET SHOT!!! I know my father will shoot ask questions later. That's just the Texas way.

  • 1

    SpeakJaplish

    I remember when that happened and and few months later Masakazu Kuriyama(my neighbor in Katsushika-ku) was shot in California. Reason unknown,....? Reporters were swarmed at their residence and they refused to talk to the press, so there was very little coverage. I remember the petition with signatures, and thinking if they banned guns at that time, how long would it take for the guns in circulation to cease to work, etc. 200-300 yrs. Banning is a futile discussion or action... America is on the decline and the gun pushers and ban gun people can't see the dark road ahead. They need to focus their attention on education and parental education. I.e. father teasing a handi capped student: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jN6zznQHss0&sns=em Lack of morals, lack of parental guidance, declining middle class, almost 30,000 gun deaths in 2000. No idea what it is now???. Hard to see anything good coming out of all the guns floating around. Nightly news in Houston always has gun violence and deaths almost every night. The new thing is home invasions... Welcome to the new America. I would recommend Japanese looking to go overseas to look into New Zealand, Canada, England or where there are less guns and violence. The big thing now is getting your concealed weapons license. Yee haw welcome the the Wild West again.

  • -1

    Noliving

    but it did not allow for technological advances, nor did it allow for organizational changes at the State and National levels.

    By that argument that is like saying the first amendment did not allow for technological advances. The second amendment does allow for technological advances. Actually it does allow for organizational changes, the second amendment never said the civilian militia would be the primary or only military defense the US would have.

    Civilian militias were called up into service during WW2, especially in Hawaii to defend against any possible land invasion while the main US military force fought overseas.

    Today, it is possible to have a single hand-held weapon with the same firepower a platoon had back in 1791.

    It is also possible today for a single video by anyone to cause an international crises and lead to people being killed worldwide.

    The thing is, you don't need a 30-round banana clip to defend your home from an intruder (or two, or three

    What are you basing that off of? Lets say someone fires more than 30 rounds to defend their house from an intruder or two or three or more intruders? What happens? Do they get prosecuted for firing more than what ever you consider acceptable?

  • 1

    some07791

    A sad event. More importantly, when considering the event 20 yrs later, its very possible it may happen again in America.

    America is up there with which other countries when it comes to the likelihood of this type of crime happening? afghanistan? PNG? Certainly none of the OECD countries. Nothing more needs to be said

  • -4

    Cat5

    "The Hattoris circulated a petition calling for more stringent controls on firearms and collected 1.7 million signatures from Americans."

    While i agree with their desire/motivation it will never happen. America is a land full of cowards encased in a THICK layer of bravado to compensate. Taking away guns from them is like taking away rice from asians.

  • 0

    Sensato

    I am grateful to the Hattoris for their efforts to bring about positive change through the senseless tragedy of their son Yoshihiro's gun-related death -- every parent's worst nightmare.

    America is very fortunate to have people like the Hattoris from foreign lands who are willing to devote their time and energy in making the nation a better place.

    Thank you Mieko and Masaichi Hattori.

  • -1

    cleo

    Following the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon in September 2001, however, Americans became more aware of the need for self-protection, and controls on guns lapsed.

    If every single person in the towers had been armed to the teeth with assault weapons, they'd still be just as dead after the planes flew into them. Claiming 9/11 as a reason for more guns is just pathetic.

    what if I go to shinjuku and go to a yakuza gangster standing in from of his snack club take his glasses and say "cool glasses" i am sure I will get shot in the chest.

    You may well get a black eye, maybe a gap-toothed smile and a couple of broken ribs. I very, very much doubt that a yak would lay himself open to prosecution for firearms possession for the sake of some clueless tourist. You would not get shot in the chest.

  • 1

    bruinfan

    Whatever view you have on this, the state of Louisiana has lost out big on students from Japan not going there to study as much.

  • 1

    spudman

    sad case but no where in the world is safe. NRA are dicks with big guns, America can keep their guns.

  • 1

    Yardley

    As sad as this case is, it's really not the place of Japanese to demand changes to constitutional rights in the US. There are plenty of problems in Japan that they would be better off focusing on, and American laws are frankly none of their business.

    I remember this case very well. I totally agree with the above quote because other than remembering this young man the rest of the article was nonsense. Clean your own backyard before worrying about someone else's.

    This is funny. You can't swing a cat on JT without hitting comments from non-Japanese about the laws that need to be changed in Japan. The Hattori's have every right to protest the killing of their son and to advocate for change. It's our duty as citizens of the world to speak out against injustice wherever we see it.

  • 0

    Hayden Wellstone

    Exhibit A as to why there needs to be more gun control in America:

    http://tosh.comedycentral.com/segments/web-redemption/uncensored---web-redemption---i-just-shot-myself

    And here would be Exhibit B:

    http://tosh.comedycentral.com/segments/video-breakdown/video-breakdown---bulletproof-vest-test

  • 0

    Suzu1

    If every single person in the towers had been armed to the teeth with assault weapons, they'd still be just as dead after the planes flew into them. Claiming 9/11 as a reason for more guns is just pathetic.

    I agree with your criticism of this article. I don't know where the writer pulled this one from.

  • -1

    Noliving

    If every single person in the towers had been armed to the teeth with assault weapons, they'd still be just as dead after the planes flew into them. Claiming 9/11 as a reason for more guns is just pathetic.

    You mean a military style semi-automatic pistol, shotgun, and or rifle Cleo. There is no such thing as an assault weapon, assault weapon is a made up term by the Brady campaign.

  • -1

    Suzu1

    Noliving -

    If "assault weapon" is a term made up by the Brady Campaign, then why is it present in so many firearm industry magazines and publications that predate the Brady Campaign? Or are you saying that the term became a dirty word after the Brady Campaign started focusing on these weapons?

  • -1

    TheQuestion

    Make note of the year this amendment was passed, then think about what it meant to "keep and bear arms" back then. You had the choice of a muzzle-loading musket, or some form of muzzle-loading cannon.

    There's a reason that the constitution was written the way it was. The first 10 amendments were written in a fashion that makes them applicable to all time periods. No person could properly defend their home in the 21st century using a muzzle loaded weapon, you get one shot and if you miss it's lights out.

    Using the logic you presented the writers of the constitution could have never known about Nazism so banning their speech should be okay, or that of other hate groups. Likewise they could have never known about the internet so there should be no problem with the government restricting speech over social media sites. Back then 'freedom of speech' was freedom to make a stir in your hometown or debate in a public forum, now a person can reach hundreds of millions of people with what they say.

    They also probably had no idea about the future of intangible assets so if the government wants to seize intellectual property they should be totally justified in that regard.

    I firmly believe that the writers of the constitution knew that by allowing the citizenry to arm themselves they would never be able to fully extinguish the very worst depravities of men. But by sacrificing a level of security they would preserve the other freedoms against future potential tyranny. Given the passing of the Patriot Act and other awful legislation in the name of security I sometimes question it's effectiveness in that regard but I've never had to host troops in my home so I guess there's that.

  • -1

    Jaiegh Li

    Well put japlish !!!! Right on!!! America is on a major decline .. iam following those very same footsteps of leaving the states. States is done forget about it.

  • 0

    Deplore

    Well put japlish !!!! Right on!!! America is on a major decline .. iam following those very same footsteps of leaving the states. States is done forget about it.

    Please do. Judging by your grammar (or lack thereof), the United States will be better off without you.

  • 0

    hidingout

    A real tragedy for everyone involved. RIP Hattori-san.

  • 0

    namabiru4me

    My boy asks me if Halloween is dangerous because people get shot every year being mistaken for an intruder or something else. There are several tragedies every year...just this morning the news reported a 9-year-old was shot. She was in costume and mistaken for a skunk.

    Anyway, I tell my boy that he should be with an adult and/or a group of people.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    By that argument that is like saying the first amendment did not allow for technological advances.

    LOL, what? No, it's not like saying that. (Though I'm sure you're happily parroting the fine example of free speech some gun proponent has exercised by repeating it.)

    The second amendment does allow for technological advances. Actually it does allow for organizational changes, the second amendment never said the civilian militia would be the primary or only military defense the US would have.

    I never said militias were necessary for the entire U.S. They're a state organization. Read the amendment again. "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state...". Perhaps "necessary" means something different in your house, but in my house that pretty much means they are a REQUIREMENT. Yet the fact remains that MOST states don't have this force that is supposedly "necessary".

    Personally-equipped militias are rendered moot when it comes to modern wars and with police departments fielding SWAT teams, even the need for militias to maintain the security of the state when the state's National Guard is overseas during a war is no longer "necessary". Can you imagine a state calling up a militia in the sense that it was used in the 1700’s, then trying to find ammo for all the different firearms those militia members brought to the mustering location? Militias are an anachronism. So yes, the amendment needs to be brought into the 21st Century.

    Civilian militias were called up into service during WW2, especially in Hawaii to defend against any possible land invasion while the main US military force fought overseas.

    COOL! But who bought their weapons and ammo for them? Or are you trying to imply they brought their BOFORS Anti-Aircraft guns from home?

    The only state militias in existence today are supplied arms by the states they are in. They aren't required to bring their firearms from home.

    Finally, if "the right to keep and bear arms" was truly timeless in that the phrase applies to the modern world just as much as it did back in 1791, why aren’t the NRA and their toady lawyers suing the government for prohibiting all citizens from owning fully-functional automatic weapons? Why can't I drive down to the GM plant and slap down my lottery winnings to by a fully tricked-out and functional M1A2 Abrams Battle Tank? (A tank that’s a STEAL at only $9 Million per tank, by the way.) Why can't I own functional TOW missile launchers and the functional missiles that go with them? Why can't I own a fully-armed F-18A/E Super Hornet? Aren't those also "arms"? The answer is because the NRA KNOWS that the second amendment as-written doesn't apply to the situation today, but they can't publically admit it without losing their last leg they have to stand on. Therefore, they keep quiet on the apparently blatant "violation" of the second amendment that the government has been doing all this time rather than shine a spotlight on the ludicrousness of their position.

  • 1

    OssanAmerica

    "Rodney Peairs, yelled “Freeze!” but Hattori, clearly misunderstanding the command, kept approaching. Peairs fired a .44 caliber magnum bullet into Hattori’s chest at nearly point blank range, and the boy died before he could be taken to a hospital."

    Rodney Peairs could have fired into the air or into the ground first and this Japanese kid would have stopped in his tracks, as anybody would have. He could have shot him if he kept comming after that. What moron shoots first at an unarmed person at point blank range?

  • 0

    Ch1n4Sailor

    Two weeks later, Shukan Gendai magazine ran an article with a headline, stated only half in jest, that read: “Amerika de korosarenai tame no ikikata oshiemasu” (Here’s how to avoid being killed in America).

    No, they need to seriously inform Japanese (of all ages) about the REAL world outside of this "Disneyland" safe Japan.

    Here are a few basic Rules ALL Japanese should follow to stay safe when outside of Japan.

    1) Don't wander the streets alone after dark. Especially young women!

    2) Don't go to countries where there is a Civil War, or Civil Unrest is occurring, or Terrorist routinely take foreign hostages.

    3) Don't buy drugs.

    4) Don't sell drugs.

    5) Don't venture into unknown, dangerous parts of town, NYC, LA, Chicago, Detroit... ect...

    6) Stay in Public places, Public areas during the daylight hours.

    7) When on a plane, don't jokingly hand the flight attendant a note saying, "you have a bomb.." This will definitely spoil your vacation,

    These are just a few helpful hints that Japanese seem not be aware of, but are ingrained in the minds of westerners from a very early age.

  • 1

    Virtuoso

    What moron shoots first at an unarmed person at point blank range?

    Thousands of them, if the annual stats for death by firearms is any indication.

  • -1

    Elbuda Mexicano

    As Mexican American, I find it kind of funny that they say "go native" and grow a mustache, goatee, put a couple of tattoos of your favorite Norteño, Sureño gang and then you will be "safe"?? Sure! What about growing an Afro? Try and braid your hair to look like a Blood or a Crip?? Dye your hair blonde and go for the Hell's Angels look?? Yup, America is just a bunch of dirty, low down criminals, according to this article. My advice to Japanese etc..STAY AWAY from BAD NEIGHBORHOODS! Why do people go to the bad part's of town?? DRUGS! This is why some silly Japanese go off to the USA, not only for Eikaiwa, and if they go to the wrong part of town at the wrong time and start an argument with the wrong thugs?? Well no amount of suntanning, facial hair, etc..will protect from not using good old COMMON SENSE, meaning if you gots no business in the barrio, in the ghetto or in the redneck trailers, stay the heck out and avoid those problems at all costs. IMHO from a homey far away from the barrios and HAPPY!!

  • 0

    Andrew B Corpuz XX

    @commanteer

    Probably one of the worst thought-out comments I've read in a while.

    I would like to know what odds you are basing this on. Homicide rate in Japan is one of the lowest in the world, whereas the homicide rate in the United States is one of the highest in the world, comparable to third world nations.

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