A Chinese perspective: Some surprising cultural differences upon coming to Japan

A Chinese perspective: Some surprising cultural differences upon coming to Japan

TOKYO —

On Feb 1, a Chinese newspaper writing primarily for Chinese nationals residing in Japan published an article titled “Some of the Things that Surprised Me when Coming to Japan.” Written by Chinese men and women who have experienced the Japanese lifestyle, the publication gives accounts of some quite startling differences between Chinese and Japanese customs and what is taken for granted as common sense.

On first coming to Japan, some of the things that shocked the Chinese that took part in this poll include:

- The notion that ramen and dumplings are often seen as a side dish to rice.

- Upon entering a public lavatory, toilet paper is always provided,

- Pedestrians in Japan obey crossing signals and wait to cross even if there is no traffic.

- Household waste is collected on fixed days of the week.

- In Japan, it’s considered impolite to eat while walking.

- It is against the law for those under the age of 20 to smoke or imbibe alcohol.

- While pregnant, Japanese women have a tendency to keep themselves slim. Even so, carrying a baby around with them in public is commonplace.

- Fundamentally, a child’s medical expenses are free of charge.

With regard to the working conditions in Japan, many Chinese comment that, to their surprise, even part-time workers are treated with great respect. Other areas that are strikingly different in Japan include: the fact that university scholarships must be paid back in full once entering full-time employment; women often only leave home after putting on a layer of makeup; hospital care includes full nursing; small infants don’t wear open-backed pants that allow easy access to little ones’ bottoms when they tug on your arm and quietly tell you that they’re seconds away from having an accident.

In China it is common practice to dispose of toilet paper in a rubbish bin, but in Japan flushing it down the toilet is the norm. The idea that the toilet doesn’t become blocked leaves many Chinese somewhat bewildered. In Japan, one sprinkles salt on tomatoes or watermelons but in China one sprinkles not salt but sugar. Finally, in the land of the rising sun, one of the most “Chinese” foods is a dessert called “annindoufu” (a dessert of almond jelly).

Other differences that left many Chinese lost for words were that even older members of society use cosmetics to make themselves presentable.

But the list doesn’t end there. Despite being one of China’s closest neighbors, there were many differences in Japan that Chinese residents were completely taken aback by:

- Sports newspapers in Japan often images of naked or scantily clad girls, despite the fact that they have no relation whatsoever to the sports news itself.

- It is considered impolite to carry on conversations in a loud voice while riding a train. Similarly, there is a strict “no talking on the phone” rules on board trains in Japan, with most people putting their mobile phone in the ‘manner mode’ setting which prevents it from ringing.

- Many Japanese people keep their wallet in their back pocket and plainly visible, however there is very little fear of it being stolen due to the relative safety of Japanese society.

- Public transport almost always arrives at the scheduled time.

- Anyone participating in a wedding ceremony adheres to the strict rule of formal wear.

- Although there are no rubbish bins supplied on the streets, citizens take their litter home with them. For this reason, the streets are always clean.

- At fast food restaurants McDonald’s or KFC you are expected to clear your table and dispose of any wrappers, cups, napkins and the like, however the staff treats the customer as though they were royalty and will often step forward to take a customer’s tray to the bins if possible.

- In Japan, a medical examination or staying over in hospital doesn’t require any form of ‘special connection’ or resorting to the act of bribery.

- One particularly striking difference in customs is that in Japan the husband hands his paycheck over to the wife. On the subject of money, when going on a date, a couple often splits the restaurant bill in half.

- In Japan, if a person commits suicide by jumping in front of a train, their remaining family is charged reparations.

- Japan has hotels designed specifically for the purpose of having sex, where the front lobby is designed in such a way that the customer is saved the embarrassment of coming face to face with hotel staff.

- Finally, many Chinese were, perhaps understandably, surprised to hear just how frequently Japan’s prime minister changes.

Many Chinese also state that living in Japan is very convenient, and society as a whole is very safe. It is very much a society in which you reap what you sow: by putting in the effort, you are recognized by those around you, which in turn encourages further individual growth. It is perhaps this social bond of solidarity that helped many a Japanese person overcome the devastation of the most recent great earthquake, where through the help and kindness of those around them many were able to rebuild, to some degree, their previous lives.

Well these are some of the most apparent differences expressed by the Chinese who have come to Japan. Having read this how does all of this compare to your own country’s customs? Feel free to let us know in the comments section below.

Source: Record China

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  • 27

    Kronos

    Hopefully those Chinese traveling and living abroad will take some of the good things they see in other countries back home.

  • -2

    kringis

    I wouldn't say everything above is more civilized (most are, but some things listed are actually quite antiquated or just perks of a different kind of society).

  • -1

    Okinawamike

    • Upon entering a public lavatory, toilet paper is always provided

    Not always as I found out durning an urgent matter at a local beach. Yes had a back up plan.

    • Pedestrians in Japan obey crossing signals and wait to cross even if there is no traffic

    Unless they don't make it to the crossing and use the middle of the street. I'm just as gulity.

    • In Japan, it is considered impolite to eat while walking

    But talking with a mouth full is just fine.

    • It is against the law for those under the age of 20 to smoke or imbibe alcohol

    But the machine on the corner does not care how old you are for buying smokes.

    • Finally, many Chinese were, perhaps understandably, surprised to hear just how frequently Japan’s prime minister changes

    Now your just behind the times.

  • 14

    Fugacis

    Having visited both countries, and having met lots of people from both countries, there are different things I prefer respectively.

    • I really, really chafe at the stupid shibboleths, rituals and taboos in Japan - no eating while walking, no talking on the train, all the ridiculous sempai/kouhai displays of heirarchy - and I think China is far better at creating an atmosphere of equal, informal camaraderie between people.
    • I like that people in China can be outspoken and direct in their language and communication, in opposition to the labyrinthine politics of everyday conversation in Japanese.
    • Even with an oppressive government, Chinese people are much more opinionated and outspoken than Japanese people. I've had some great conversations with Chinese people, even on politics relating to China, if one approaches it with a little humility and respect. Japanese people tend to be wishy-washy and bland when it comes to debate and discussion.
    • I hate the whole 'yamato nadeshiko' syndrome that's inculcated into girls and young women in Japan, and the expectation that they will be live-at-home housewives. Chinese girls and women are growing up with more opportunities than ever before in education and work, and it always seems to me that they're seizing them and have goals and ambitions of their own. In Japan it seems like women are just taught that their only purpose is to be good wives who will live off their husband's paycheck. Of course, this is different in Kansai...
    • I much prefer Chinese food to Japanese food. And Korean food to Japanese food for that matter. And the smell of hundreds of different cuisines on a street in Shanghai is just something else.

    • Out and about, Japanese people are far more likely to respect my privacy and not try to strike up a random conversation with me. I often find that it's difficult to just be left alone in China, which is annoying.

    • Japan is much cleaner and has better standards of hygiene, and I really like this. Yes, China is a developing country, so this is to be expected, but there are still some attitudes that really need to change.
    • However bad Japanese drivers may be, I felt like I was going to be run down even when walking on the pavement in China. They really need to sort out their traffic system.
    • While it's hubristic to say that Japan is entirely safe (there's a great amount of threat especially for women), as a man I have only ever felt wary or potentially unsafe in Japan in Roppongi and other red light districts in Tokyo and Osaka. China unfortunately feels more unsafe more often, even if it's mostly petty crime.
  • -15

    Chin4Sailor

    Wow... People actually wait in lines...?

    In China, we usually just bum rush the counter in one big cluster, who-ever can jockey their way to the front of the line, by pushing, pulling or maneuvering, gets served first...!

    Waiting in Lines is for the birds... hehe...

  • 4

    LiveInTokyo

    Rocket News trying to make Japan superior again... Do they ever seriously research their articles? Or do they just rely on age old dogma?

    It is against the law for those under the age of 20 to smoke or imbibe alcohol.

    It might be against the law, but there are plenty of under-20s doing it. I use the Keio line in Tokyo almost every day and now they have stickers on the train urging minors to refuse alcohol. If it wasnt a problem, those stickers wouldnt exist.

    Strick no talking on phone rule in Japan? What a load of rubbish, I see it every day.

    And the same for people strictly adhering to formal dress rules at weddings. I used to be a wedding celebrant and some of the stuff I saw people wear was crazy.

    I know China has quite a few problems, but Rocket News really has some serious journalist problems.

  • 7

    change

    And one of these people spit everywhere. I find it to be so unhygienic. I hope you know which country I'm referring to.

  • -4

    IparryU

    In Japan, it’s considered impolite to eat while walking. But in Japan, they eat while talking just like the Chinese do... nasty

    Sports newspapers in Japan often images of naked or scantily clad girls, despite the fact that they have no relation whatsoever to the sports news itself. Sometimes... I get confused and think that I turned to the AKB48 section of the newspaper, despite me reading the news on Sumo...

  • 12

    Vast Right-Wing Conspirator

    Basically, living in China takes a thick skin. You need to remember that, even in the big cities, most people are only a generation removed from being peasants stuck in rice paddies. They still maintain their, how can I say politely, 'old' ways even when they are living in modern urban areas.

    There is also far less sense in China of being members of a community. Hence, you can see mothers letting their toddlers literally squat in the street and pinch a loaf, then walk away without a thought to cleaning up. My observation is that they are incredibly selfish people, especially to those outside their tight circle of family/friends.

  • 1

    plasticmonkey

    a Chinese newspaper writing primarily for Chinese nationals residing in Japan published an article titled “Some of the Things that Surprised Me when Coming to Japan.”

    Well, actually China Record is not a "Chinese newspaper". It's a Japanese company that runs a website written in Japanese, supposedly for Chinese living in Japan.

    I do not have much respect for this kind of "journalism" that purports to convey the feelings of people on the street. In fact, the purpose of the story is to divide. To perpetuate the idea that national cultural codes are set in stone and that if you're an outsider you're going to be shocked by the differences.

    How is one to feel when being asked again and again, "Don't you have any problems living in Japan?"?

  • 8

    House Atreides

    Curiously, there was no mention of differences in air pollution levels between the two countries. In China, air pollution can reach levels of over 650 micrograms per cubic meter whereas in Japan it would be rare to see levels above 50 micrograms per cubic meter.

  • 1

    sighclops

    I'm with Fugacis on this one. The whole "yamato nadeshiko" mentality needs to be addressed early in education. It cost me a long term relationship because I was just not going to slave away on a single income. What kind of aspirations are to be a "stay at home mum"?! Ridiculous and utterly backwards!

  • -4

    CGB Spender

    It's no surprise! Japanese have discipline and manners that are much higher than any other country. Of course there are always exceptions but for the generality this is true. In such regards China isn't much different than the US or any other country in Europe. China is less developed but manners and discipline are bottom-low like in the US.

  • 1

    illsayit

    Fundamentally, a child’s medical expenses are free of charge

    Actually I agree with the fundamental perspective that China takes regarding this; though I dont agree with their one child policy.

  • 5

    Nessie

    The list is suspiciously slanted toward the positive. Not that there are not plenty of positives, but I would have expected a few more negatives.

  • 4

    tokyobakayaro

    Many Chinese also state that living in Japan is very convenient, and society as a whole is very safe.

    That is funny because many japanese I know do not feel safe because they feel there are of more and more chinese especially in Ikebukuro. Reading japanese newspaper at crime section you see almost everyday the 3 kanjis for "chinese people".

    I guess the safety chinese feel in Japan is a one-way only feeling.

  • -2

    ambrosia

    CGB SpenderFEB. 20, 2013 - 12:29PM JST It's no surprise! Japanese have discipline and manners that are much higher than any other country. Of course there are always exceptions but for the generality this is true. In such regards China isn't much different than the US or any other country in Europe. China is less developed but manners and discipline are bottom-low like in the US.

    See above comment and thanks for the laugh!

  • 5

    ambrosia

    While pregnant, Japanese women have a tendency to keep themselves slim. Even so, carrying a baby around with them in public is commonplace.

    What does this even mean? Do slim women in other parts of the world not carry their babies around with them in public? Does slim equal weak? This comment confuses me.

  • 6

    Vast Right-Wing Conspirator

    Or how about, "In Japan, people don't bother to put helmets on their children while riding bicycles, and don't bother to strap them into car safety seats while driving"? That is one of my personal favorites.

  • 2

    Kevin McLachlan

    Summary of this article: some expat Chinese in Japan praise Japan and criticise China. And Japanese media LOVES IT!!

  • 3

    sillygirl

    How long have these people been in Japan? 5 minutes?

  • 8

    WilliB

    A lot of these "cultural" differences seem to be simply the difference between and 1st world and a 3rd world country.

  • 5

    Alex Roncelli

    Every country can take a few lessons from Japan.

  • -1

    Ewan Huzarmy

    Where are the public bins, apart from outside of conbinis ? I live in a very residential area, where the drainage ditch 'mizo' is a constant dumping place of pet bottles, cans, fag packets etc (cigarette cartons for my American cousins).

  • -4

    tmarie

    Interesting how most of these things puts Japan in the better light, no? I guess all the negative or realistic comments have been left out to make the locals feel better about themselves.

    The things that "shocked" me when going to mainland China were... how little spitting I saw (kept hearing Japanese folks complain about it all), all the things that I thought were Japanese but were actually Chinese (prayer tablets at shrines/paper fortunes tied to trees,, much of the food...) how pleasant the locals were. Always quick with a smile and laugh while here, very rare... China sure has its fair share of problems but so does Japan. Articles like this that only paint the good things are misleading and I highly doubt these were the only comments made.

  • 4

    BurakuminDes

    And one of these people spit everywhere. I find it to be so unhygienic. I hope you know which country I'm referring to.

    I imagine you are referring to China - but let me assure you, I see old geezers hacking and spitting over the side of the pool at my gym every day. And surprise, surprise - they are Japanese. I always give them a frown and a shake of the head but they couldn't give a rats! Young Japanese tend not to spit from what I see, however.

    Where are the public bins, apart from outside of conbinis ?

    Japan removed many of their bins from public areas after the Tokyo terrorist attacks of 1995.

  • 7

    Yubaru

    It's getting rather tiring reading stories like this that just push the limits on stereotypes of one country vs another.

    There is good and bad, usual and unusual, in any country one visits and it's common to make comparisons to what one knows of their own.

    Live and learn, accept it, or leave, or maybe try to find some common ground in between.

  • -2

    tmarie

    Indeed Yubaru but the Japanese media would like to make the locals think they are unique and better than everyone else. Point out the bad points of Japan and you'll end up being told how horrible other countries are and how great it is here. Good and bad but the media and the locals don't want to address or admit the bad.

  • 5

    Cos

    The list is suspiciously slanted toward the positive.

    For 95% of Chinese expats, moving to Japan is a big lifestyle upgrade. They know there are problems, but they are grateful. That could be the same if they had moved to Hong-Kong, even the modern neighborhoods of Shanghai, Pekin, etc. But they come from the 98% of China that is still under-developed, organized without comfort for individuals, with unfair discrimination (millions not having access to health care, etc).

    Do slim women in other parts of the world not carry their babies around with them in public?

    They can't, if they have post-pregnancy over-weight. The time they lose the kilos, the baby has morphed into a toddler. But well, it's silly to say it's in a country or another. That depends on each mother, even on each pregnancy.

    Where are the public bins, apart from outside of conbinis ?

    Are their places without kombinis in Japan ? Even on the little island with only one building... that will be a Lawson. If not, you know you've landed in North Korea.

    Or how about, "In Japan, people don't bother to put helmets on their children while riding bicycles, and don't bother to strap them into car safety seats while driving"?

    They do that in China ? They do that where actually ?

  • 0

    cramp

    It is against the law for those under the age of 20 to smoke or imbibe alcohol.

    ok so they are just blatantly ignoring this law or what??

  • 5

    Yubaru

    The last thing I wanted to say here was;

    Thank goodness Japan isn't China and China isn't Japan. That goes for the rest of the world too.

    This little planet we all call home would be one rather boring place if everywhere we went was the same as where we came from.

    Isn't experiencing what they all have to offer part of what like if all about?

  • 0

    megosaa

    Pedestrians in Japan obey crossing signals and wait to cross even if there is no traffic

    this, is called 当たり前. we don't push ahead in lines as well.

  • 1

    KazHirai

    I agree with Yubaru on letting societies/cultures be unique, as long as human rights are observed. (I know, every country/culture violates them to some degree).

    I also want to say that I am in awe with how the Japanese people handled the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. I am seriously considering moving to Japan due to this.

  • 1

    Yubaru

    his, is called 当たり前.

    Just because you call it one thing, does it make it right? Or wrong for that matter to do it differently? Waiting for a traffic signal to change to walk across a street when there is no traffic coming is well senseless for an adult who knows right or wrong. Think about it, what's the point, when people all over this country will cross a street in the middle of a block and think nothing of it, even though there may be a cross walk at a traffic light 20 meters away. I know, I've seen too many people do it.

    we don't push ahead in lines as well.

    Please speak for yourself and not "all" Japanese because I can tell you as well from experience that this SOMETIMES depends upon WHO is in the line.

  • -1

    tmarie

    we don't push ahead in lines as well. I guess this poster has never waited for a train, been in a shop on a sale day or been surrounded by a bunch of older women.

  • 0

    JoeBigs

    "tmarieFeb. 20, 2013 - 09:08PM JST we don't push ahead in lines as well. I guess this poster has never waited for a train, been in a shop on a sale day or been surrounded by a bunch of older women."

    You must have been in line with PRC visitors.

  • 1

    BurakuminDes

    I also want to say that I am in awe with how the Japanese people handled the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. I am seriously considering moving to Japan due to this.

    Yep - it was generally civil - with a bit of greed and argy-bargy by some locals hoarding mineral water, milk and bread in the days after. Neighbours were generally very helpful to us, offering their well-water, and so on. Not unique to Japan, however: having also lived a good part of my life in Australia I can tell you that people are very helpful and caring to their neighbours after the natural disasters we have too like floods and fire. Dunno where you are from but I'm a bit surprised it isn't the same there?

  • 1

    KazHirai

    Yep - it was generally civil - with a bit of greed and argy-bargy by some locals hoarding mineral water, milk and bread in the days after. Neighbours were generally very helpful to us, offering their well-water, and so on. Not unique to Japan, however: having also lived a good part of my life in Australia I can tell you that people are very helpful and caring to their neighbours after the natural disasters we have too like floods and fire. Dunno where you are from but I'm a bit surprised it isn't the same there?

    I'm surprised as there was no reported looting in Japan. In Australia, there has been reported looting.

    http://www.nowpublic.com/environment/australia-floods-looting-ipswich-live-twitter-updates-2746556.html

    Looting is common all over the world. Seemingly, in all but Japan and a few other nations.

    I'm from the USA. I think that would explain my awe of the Japanese people's response to the triple tragedy they had 3/11/11.

  • 0

    ambrosia

    Cos: They can't, if they have post-pregnancy over-weight. The time they lose the kilos, the baby has morphed into a toddler

    Ah, yes they can and they do. Just because a woman hasn't lost her pregnancy weight or even just because she is overweight doesn't mean she has no strength. A woman who is strong enough to have a baby is generally strong enough to carry the paper so that comment is just odd and incorrect. If anything, it would be woman who loose the weight too quickly or who are too thin who'd be less likely to have much strength and even they can probably manage to tote around something that is under 10 kilos.

  • 1

    ambrosia

    megossa: this, is called 当たり前. we don't push ahead in lines as well.

    Look, I don't want to be all negative but your assertion is just ridiculous. Yes, Japanese stand in line when a line forms but as soon as those train doors open the pushing begins. People push to get on, push past those trying to get on and push their way off when it's unnecessary. It's nice that you think you're, and I say "you're" because you said "we", all so perfect and everything but the fact is, you're wrong.

  • 2

    ambrosia

    KazHirai: As crimes, especially those that cast Japanese in general in a bad light, tend to be under-reported here, they tend to be over-reported in the States. I have been to disaster areas in the States, two members of my family lived through them, and I can assure you that their neighbors went above and beyond the call of duty to help each other out. Additionally, Americans gave $325.5 million dollars to charities after 3/11 so that would sort of go in the face of comments like those from BurakuminDes, who might want to ask the Japanese government where all that money went. Oh, that's right. Japanese are perfect and do nothing selfish or greedy in times of trouble, right?

    Maybe you can set an example to all other Americans to try and help each other instead of pursuing greed in times of trouble?

    It's good that in general, the Japanese did handle the disaster well but staying within the realms of reality when talking about such things is also good.

  • 1

    ambrosia

    Correction, not "carry the paper" but "carry the baby" though I imagine she well can carry the paper too.

  • -2

    nigelboy

    As crimes, especially those that cast Japanese in general in a bad light, tend to be under-reported here, they tend to be over-reported in the States

    Yeah right. This is a country where they just reported nationally a convenience store robbery (70,000 yen) in Ibaraki just a few days ago. Be lucky to get even reported locally in the States. Who are you trying to fool ambrosia?

  • -1

    ambrosia

    Japan is far smaller than the U.S. so it would be more of a regional crime in the States and would most certainly be reported regionally. I get a national and a regional U.S. paper and read quite a few online so I can tell you that you're wrong about that. I lived here for 10 years before I ever read about a woman being raped, unless of course it was by a U.S. serviceman, so don't tell me crimes here don't get under-reported.

  • 0

    nigelboy

    Look, I don't want to be all negative but your assertion is just ridiculous. Yes, Japanese stand in line when a line forms but as soon as those train doors open the pushing begins. People push to get on, push past those trying to get on and push their way off when it's unnecessary.

    I wouldn'd classify megossa's post to be perfectly accurate but neither is yours by a mile.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9zTciTvZoc0

  • 0

    ambrosia

    So one YouTube video is supposed to negate what I experienced everyday for ten years and the reason why I started riding my bicycle the 12 kilometers to work instead. Give it a rest.

    • Moderator

      No bickering please.

  • 2

    Yubaru

    Yeah right. This is a country where they just reported nationally a convenience store robbery (70,000 yen) in Ibaraki just a few days ago. Be lucky to get even reported locally in the States. Who are you trying to fool ambrosia?

    You need to wake up, it doesnt get reported in the states because it's minor. I know for a fact that there is plenty of crime that never gets reported, it keeps people here in the dark and let's them continue in their little bubble of thinking that Japan is a safe and relatively crime free country.

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    Yubaru:

    Waiting for a traffic signal to change to walk across a street when there is no traffic coming is well senseless for an adult who knows right or wrong.

    Come on, most people only wait because there is a koban close by. Being watched by authority is what keeps Japanese in check - nothing else.

  • -1

    ambrosia

    As crimes, especially those that cast Japanese in general in a bad light, tend to be under-reported here, they tend to be over-reported in the States

    Yeah right. This is a country where they just reported nationally a convenience store robbery (70,000 yen) in Ibaraki just a few days ago. Be lucky to get even reported locally in the States. Who are you trying to fool ambrosia?

    A quick check of a variety of studies proves my point - focus on where I said local news and not national - and I believe it was up long enough for you to have seen it but keep stamping your feet and insisting I'm wrong if it makes you feel better.

  • 0

    Yubaru

    I lived here for 10 years before I ever read about a woman being raped, unless of course it was by a U.S. serviceman, so don't tell me crimes here don't get under-reported.

    FYI, there have been a number of recent incidents involving the US military down here in Okinawa that have made the local news but not here on JT. So not all military "crimes" are reported here either.

  • 0

    nigelboy

    A quick check of a variety of studies proves my point - focus on where I said local news and not national - and I believe it was up long enough for you to have seen it but keep stamping your feet and insisting I'm wrong if it makes you feel better.

    And I believe you completely missed my point that even such so-called minor incidents (theft in convenience stores) are reported nationally in Japan so how on gods earth do you come up with "especially those that cast Japanese in general in a bad light, tend to be under-reported here (Japan), they tend to be over-reported in the States"? Your fellow citizen in Yubaru even reaffrimed that it's not reported since he/she states that it's "minor". News media all over the world reports news that are "newsworthy" and doesn't even care whether it sheds a "bad light" to other countries for the simply reason that the readership is geared towards their own target audience/readers.

    .

    I lived here for 10 years before I ever read about a woman being raped, unless of course it was by a U.S. serviceman, so don't tell me crimes here don't get under-reported.

    This is why I question your language ability. To put it simply, you didn't read about them because you don't have the ability to read them.

    http://dailynews.yahoo.co.jp/fc/domestic/sex_offense/news_list/?pn=2

  • -1

    Kuribo1

    Love Japan, second home and I too find these things true. China not so much.

  • 0

    Terrikus

    I've lived in China for over five years. I've found that I have to agree with the notion that China creates an atmosphere were everyone is a little more equal, at least socially. I found it much easier to have casual conversations with locals, share opinions, share a meal or share a drink. Visiting homes and small towns is a generally pleasant experience. I guess I feel I'm much less likely to be offended or to offend in China than I ever was in Korea/Japan.

  • 1

    ReformedBasher

    I worked with several Chinese at a previous employer in Japan. They never complained about working conditions or Japan in general during the 10 years I worked there. They got on very well with the Japanese staff also. When I worked with Westerners, they always whined, were constantly trying to bed the female staff, even the married ones (nothing wrong with some hanky-panky, but there are some lines that should not be crossed) and telling one and all now great everything is back home. Workwise, some, not all, did a pretty lousy job too. They just couldn't understand why the locals wouldn't take them seriously.

  • -1

    ReformedBasher

    Thanks for the YouTube link nigelboy.

    You can see most people waiting in line. The big difference is that there IS a line.

    In Australia, let alone China, the line simply doesn't exist.

  • 0

    DaveAllTogether

    • Japan has hotels designed specifically for the purpose of having sex, where the front lobby is designed in such a way that the customer is saved the embarrassment of coming face to face with hotel staff.

    I don't know about that. I have been to quite a few love hotels where I came face to face with the nice old ladies at the front desk.

  • 0

    Morry

    I've lived in both China and Japan-- and Japan is better in nearly every way.

  • 0

    The758

    It is very much a society in which you reap what you sow: by putting in the effort, you are recognized by those around you, which in turn encourages further individual growth. It is perhaps this social bond of solidarity that helped many a Japanese person overcome the devastation of the most recent great earthquake, where through the help and kindness of those around them many were able to rebuild, to some degree, their previous lives.

    The Chinese had this to say about Japan? You cannot be serious.

  • 0

    coolprince

    Japanese are descendants of the Chinese. They have the same DNA. So, what do you expect? They migrated to Japan since the days of the Qin, and take everything from the ancient Chinese dynasties of Qin, Tang and Han and from Confucius, lot, stock and barrel. There are a lot of contradictions with the Japanese character though just like their perverse practice of SM, Sado Masochism. China, partly because of what Japan did to it in the past, is still a developing country but a rising one whereas Japan is a declining nation. For the record, the source of the article is from recordchina.co.jp, a Japanese website and this is a Japanese site, but like the dubious Japanese character, they never reveal the whole truth, so? Don't get me wrong, I love Japan and the people, and I visit Japan and China regularly. Japan just have to come to terms with their ugly side and sincerely apologize, and let their beauty blossom all the way through.

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