5-year-old boy playing in street dies after being run over by car

KANAGAWA —

A five-year-old boy was run over and killed Monday while he was playing in the street on a tricycle in Miura, Kanagawa Prefecture, police said Tuesday.

According to a TV Asahi report, police received an emergency phone call from the driver, who has been named as Yukio Miyagawa, 46, at around 1:30 p.m. Miyagawa told the operator that he had accidentally run over a boy who was playing on a tricycle in the street. Emergency workers rushed to the scene where they found the boy in an unconscious state, TV Asahi said.

The boy was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead a short time later. Police say the boy was playing alone on a T-junction which did not have a traffic signal.

Japan Today

  • 2

    gaijintraveller

    Who is to blame, the driver or the parents? I suspect it is the parents, who let the child ride his tricycle in the road. Probably, the driver could not have avoided the accident.

    The driver will have to pay a lot of compensation to the parents. The parents will receive a lot of money. It may seem callous to suggest that parents want to be rewarded for the death of their child, but how else can you explain why so many behave so irresponsibly and let their children behave so stupidly on the road? I am sure many drivers have had this thought.

    Or is it that the parents themselves ride bicycles and are typical Japanese cyclists completely lacking in any road sense?

  • 4

    yasukuni

    I wish, wish, wish that Japanese could get it through their heads that roads are dangerous. I see people do stupid things all the time. And it's not just the young people. Almost everyday I see people walking on the road whether there are blind corners even when their is a safe sidewalk on the other side of the road. It's crazy.

    I feel sorry for the driver. Just remember, that if you drive here, people expect to be able to do anything at anytime on roads. Scary.

  • 3

    papasmurfinjapan

    I wish, wish, wish that Japanese could get it through their heads that roads are dangerous

    Unfortunately "Roads are not safe places to play" is about as understood as "Seatbelts save lives". It's not as though Japan lacks parks for kids to ride their tricycles around in safely - I'm not sure whether a parent or guardian was watching the child ride on the road, or if he was out there by himself. Either way, what was lacking most here was parental responsibility.

  • 3

    HonestDictator

    It the fault should lie with the parents IMO. Honestly, children should not be playing IN the STREETS. I could understand if the child just wandered out there at the last moment, but at the same time a watchful parent wouldn't have let their child that close to the road in the first place. I agree, I feel very sorry for the driver in this case.

  • 0

    JeffLee

    ******Who is to blame, the driver or the parents?**

    Maybe no one is to blame. Maybe it was just an accident. Maybe the kid is to blame for reckless driving? Maybe it's really not relevant in a case like this.

  • 5

    tmarie

    I would like to have this article in Japanese and head it out to parents. Too many kids where we live play in the street - busy streets at that. There are parks. Take the kids there. But I guess that would mean mom or dad would have to get off their butts and look after their kids.

    Poor driver. Poor kid. Idiot parents.

  • -3

    NetNinja

    Once again, terrible Japanese mothers not supervising their children. Probably in the house on her keitai or watching a drama.

    The driver is toast. He's going to jail for involuntary manslaughter. He'll do time.

    The insurance company must pay a boatload.
    Every wonder if this is an insurance scam. What kind of mother lets her child play out in traffic? She wanted something to happen. It's a very sick thought but I've seen what Japanese women are willing to do to have a Louis Vuitton bag.

  • 0

    zichi

    In my little "donkey lane" after school children of 5+ gather for a met and some fun.

  • 1

    NeverSubmit

    I feel sorry for all involved. Absolute tragedy. However, accidents can never be entirely prevented ever. It's important to find a balance in life.

    When I was a kid, some of my best memories were playing on the street with my brother and the neighborhood kids. We never had any parents supervising us and consequently we learned to handle situations on our own and we learned some independence.

    Kids need an opportunity to play alone and develop social and life skills by dealing with situations without their parents watching them constantly.

    A judgment call should be made considering the type of street, level of traffic, visibility, number of friendly neighbors etc.

    Safety is important, but it's not the be all end all. Otherwise we should all lock ourselves in the closest and surround ourselves with foam.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    "Kids need an opportunity to play alone and develop social and life skills by dealing with situations without their parents watching them constantly."

    In the middle of the street on a T-junction? I agree a kid needs to be able to play alone or with friends, independent of parental figures standing over them at all times, but not at five years old on the street. Obviously the parents should have been watching.

    That said, there's not a lot of detail given about the driver and how he was driving. What speed was he going?

  • -2

    Elbuda Mexicano

    This is a very, very sad news, but so many stupid parents here in Japan do not bother to watch their kids, protecting them, who in their right mind lets a 5 year old play in on T junction?? Only an idiot, so I hope the parents are happy,now they do not have to worry about watching the 5 year old little boy play right? Because now he is 100% RIP little guy and idiot parents, I pray you get your heads out of where the sun dont shine ASAP!

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    Anyway, it's a sad story all around, from the parental neglect leading to the death of the kid, to the driver having to live with this for the rest of his life.

  • 7

    Samantha Zoe Aso

    Only this morning, a toddler stumbled out in front of my bike. We are talking about a main road here. Buses, taxis, cars, spaceships....you name it are zooming up and down that main street during rush hour. I park my bike up and comfort the startled kid. As I am doing this, another toddler stumbles out. 5 minutes I was crouched holding onto two little kids's hands. Just as I am about to call the police, a woman saunters....note the usage of the word 'saunters' out from behind a nearby building pushing a bike. The kids concerned are 2 & 3 years old. We are not talking about a parent looking away for a second, this 'person' took her time doing whatever while her 2 & 3 year old stumbled around unsupervised near a main road that has me on my guard. She got a tongue lashing off me regarding children being treasure and basic....totally basic, commonsense things you don't let your kids do. It didn't go down well with her but I don't care. If I ever see those little kids, who were totally adorable by the way, in that situation again, I will call the police immediately. Speechless!

  • 0

    chottomatte

    I don't let my child play in the street, unless one of us is with them, and broadly our neighbours are the same and usually there's a couple of those parents out, and the cars are slow and the kids promptly get out of the road when cars come.

    Go just two streets over, usually no parents, kids in the street and when cars approach the kids amble out of the way, often with the 3yr old's last to move, or until an older kid moves them.

    There IS more traffic around everywhere nowadays, but a lot of blind bends in Japan (not helped by dumb street parking). Sadly this guy missed something, an now everyone suffers -shows how quickly and seemingly simply bad things happen.

  • 0

    bogva

    Miura is partly rural area where I suppose it is a bit "safer" for kids to play on the streets. I have always wondered how life changed for the last 20-30 years since we were kids. Now to make your kid active you have to pay money and engage it in sports club or other activity. Before we just run the streets, jumped over fences and climbed trees!

    No words for the tragedy but for me it is pure accident. Probably the kid was told to play only close to grandma's house but for some reason it went to the crossing. Just tragic!

  • 3

    Darren Brannan

    Few kids wearing helmets, narrow streets and madcap drivers (especially mornings and late afternoons) who NEVER stop at crossings for pedestrians, and parents who are too busy doing something else to watch their littlies..it is a recipe for a world or hurt.This is the country that common sense forgot.

  • 0

    Reckless

    3 points:

    God bless little boy and I hope you find peace in the afterlife.

    Even if the boy was in the road, it does not excuse a driver. Drivers must be alert for people (young and old) in the street especially in this country with no sidewalks. Also, we have to know if this driver was on the cellphone or texting or reading a manga, as many drivers do.

    If the driver was truly alert, then I am sorry for him because I would find it hard to live with myself after killing a child, be it an accident or not.

  • 2

    Christina O'Neill

    Too young to be out on the street by himself, information is too limited as to how he came to be alone Such an awfull tragedy.

  • 1

    southsakai

    Down here i see little children playing everyday in the street kicking ball, riding the bike, etc

    I also see everyday some drivers here of scooters and cars driving through this narrow streets at such high speed, it was like they are on a freeway. I don't know why they drive so fast in these small residential streets!

    I really have no clue how no one here has been hurt, hit by a vehicle or run over when you combine the 2 ( high speed drivers and kids playing about on the streets, it's beyond me!

    Poor little child.RIP

  • 1

    southsakai

    Samantha Zoe AsoOCT. 12, 2011 - 09:17AM JST Only this morning, a toddler stumbled out in front of my bike. We are talking about a main road here. Buses, taxis, cars, spaceships....you name it are zooming up and down that main street during rush hour. I park my bike up and comfort the startled kid. As I am doing this, another toddler stumbles out. 5 minutes I was crouched holding onto two little kids's hands. Just as I am about to call the police, a woman saunters....note the usage of the word 'saunters' out from behind a nearby building pushing a bike. The kids concerned are 2 & 3 years old. We are not talking about a parent looking away for a second, this 'person' took her time doing whatever while her 2 & 3 year old stumbled around unsupervised near a main road that has me on my guard. She got a tongue lashing off me regarding children being treasure and basic....totally basic, commonsense things you don't let your kids do. It didn't go down well with her but I don't care. If I ever see those little kids, who were totally adorable by the way, in that situation again, I will call the police immediately. Speechless!

    You say it girl! we need more people like you around that will speak their mind and say the right thing! I'm very glad you did what you did this morning!

  • 2

    YongYang

    I have to agree with posters here who see what I see. A total TOTAL (misplaced) belief by -most?- Japanese in others taking care of their children in the sense that infants, children, are allowed to play, walk around, run, where ever their will is taking them with no supervision and that 'fate', will kindly shine, that those driving, for example, will not run over , hit and injure , kill their child. That is not how reality works. Accidents DO and will happen it is up to parents to ensure as far as humanely possible that exposure to such actualities are reduced to a minimum. That involves WATCHING your child, SUPERVISING your child and INSTRUCTING your child. Be a PARENT. Don't be a gossiping, mobile using, island. BE a PARENT.

  • -1

    steve@CPFC

    It is quite usual for youngsters in Japan to play outside, even in the street. In the cul de sac where i live they children play happily in the street daily but are always supervised by older family members. If they cycle wihout helmets they must perform street cleaning duties (this was my idea approved by other local families). This tragedy could have been prevented by locals ensuring that children are safe at all times.

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    Samantha Zoe AsoOct. 12, 2011 - 09:17AM JST - I gave you a thumbs up for this!

    I have to agree that the lack of commonsense is beyond normal when it comes to traffic and basic road safety. I don’t understand why some people are voting down on the posts that say that road safety is neglected in this country.

    If you live here and walk and drive then you will fully understand what we are seeing.

    I drive, and I park my car in my local mansion car park. Every day I see situations that call for parents to be told off for their lack of understanding, or even be given smacks up the side of the head.

    I have had kids run out from behind me and in front of me, I have even seen parents loading their cars with whatever whilst their children wonder around beside or in front of the cars, and the kids are as young as 2 or 3. Anyone with commonsense would load the child in the car first.

    Just the other day I was coming to the entrance/ exit of my car park and had two kids running and wondering about at the mouth of the parking bays, both aged around 1 to 3 (I say 1 as the youngest was just about able to stand and walk and was dribbling from the mouth as a baby does) I looked around for the parents and they were no were to be seen, I slowed down and shouted “be careful, cars are dangerous” and at that time the father walked out of somewhere and called his kids as if everything is hanky dory!

    Now I have gotten to the point of using my car horn to warn people that I am driving here and to watch out. And when I get strange looks from parents and adults I just shack my head and drive away slowly.

    And dont get me started on bike safety I will tell you stories for days! ;)

  • 0

    hoserfella

    the only thing that will solve this problem in Japan is for more parents to be charged with negligence. Unfortunately, Japanese society (and courts) see it as a private family matter. Much like spousal abuse.

  • 1

    Samantha Zoe Aso

    Southsakai and Simon Phillips~ A huge thanks! Some parents need to appreciate and value their children a he'll of a lot more than they appear to do. There are couples out there who long to have children but can't.

  • 2

    Hategobo

    A tragedy for all concerned. Unfortunately the example set for children by many adults on bikes and scooters probably doesnt help their sense of road safety. Bikes travelling at mach 2 on pavements, crazy adults travelling on the right side of the road into oncoming traffic whilst plugged into their iPod, scooters ignoring traffic lights by going up onto the pavement at zebra crossings to cut off corners, the stupidity is endless. I cannot ever remember seeing the local constabulary enforcing the traffic laws. Pedestrians in Japan are at the bottom of the pecking order with regard to safety in the streets. Try Jiyugaoka on a Saturday

  • 1

    southsakai

    Samantha Zoe AsoOCT. 12, 2011 - 11:17AM JST Southsakai and Simon Phillips~ A huge thanks! Some parents need to appreciate and value their children a he'll of a lot more than they appear to do. There are couples out there who long to have children but can't.

    Thank you Samantha. Yes! I couldn't agree more with what you said. Parents really do need to appreciate what they have.

    Being able to have a child and bring someone into this world is probably the greatest thing ever could be, it's the greatest gift, a parents greatest treasure when they bring new life! They really do need to appreciate this gift because many can't.

  • 0

    hakuman

    I don't know why you people think playing in the street is a Japanese thing - we did it as kids in my country as well. Street hockey was how I spent countless hours of my childhood. Add this to the fact that there aren't a lot of places for kids to play that aren't the street in Japan.

    I don't know what it is abou so many foreigners here that they come and then blame the same things that happen in their own society on the Japanese. Talk about walking around with cultural blinders on.

  • -1

    techall

    I have driven in Miura many times. This is not like driving in the big city. Lots of very narrow roads with tight turns and houses and walls built right up to the roadside. Very limited visibility for drivers. Drivers must be very careful.

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    hakuman - no one is saying it is a Japanese thing, what people are saying is that the lack of commonsense is beyond normal when it comes to traffic and basic road safety.

    I too played football in the streets when I was young, but we played on a "none busy street" that had little to no cars, bikes, and if a car came we new when to stop and get off the road.

    The problem is that kids are not being taught what to do and what is right and wrong. Plus it doesnt help if mum or dad do the same as the kids, walk out with out watching the road and so on as what has been written by many above.

    Its all commonsense at the end of the day, and I dont let my three year old walk around our car park without holding someones hand. So many times I have seen kids from very young to old just run out without checking and make a dash for their parents cars!

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    I must add that this goes for drivers too, speeding and so on........

  • 0

    CrazyJoe

    Doesn't a five year old ride a bicycle , rather than a tricyle? When I was five, I was riding a bicycle without training wheels.

  • 0

    Samantha Zoe Aso

    @Hakuman. Yeah, I played out on the street from dawn to dusk at times. Wasn't near any junctions or main roads though. Always with the older kids from the immediate area. Always with an adult nearby watching. We had rules. You left that area and that was it, grounded for a week. Wasn't worth missing put on playing outside for a week, so you did as you were told. Yes, I was allowed to find my own way and independence but within the capabilities my age would allow. A five year old unsupervised, playing by a road is a disaster waiting to happen. There are people everywhere who really shouldn't be parents. Sure other countries have similar problems but that in no way condones the laxical behaivour of parents anywhere. Sure I've met some great Japanese parents but I am sorry to say, most aren't hands on. I really am shocked by some of the things I've seen and personally experience. I tend to hang out with Japanese families that have similar or the same values as we do.

  • 0

    Hategobo

    @Hakuman I also played in the streets when I was a kid, but 1950s Bristol was not 2011 Japan. Comments by Foreigners or Japanese are still just as valid. If you think that the streets of Japan are safe for children to play in you are the one who needs to take off the blinkers. How your comment about cultural differences got into the conversation I do not know. Are you implying that Japanese parents have a different view of their childrens safety from Foreigners because of their cultural differences? Every country has their share of moronic parents and road users, and these are the ones who need educating. Stupidity is not a cultural thing.

  • 2

    bicultural

    In Japan, it's always the driver's fault. I don't think it's fair, but drivers know it will be entirely their fault if they are involved in an accident. If they know that, they should drive like it. If a bicycle came shooting out of an alley at 30km per hour and hit my car, there's not much I can do to prevent that. But a tricycle? How fast can a tricycle go? If you can't stop in time to prevent yourself from hitting a tricycle, you're going too fast. I see trucks /cars going over 40km in side streets and alleys, barely slowing down for "tomare" signs. Sorry, no sympathy for the driver from me.

  • 0

    sakurala

    Absolutely horrible. I feel so bad for the family and the driver. Accidents happen but it seems like this one was avoidable with a little respect for the rules of the road.

    When shopping for a house, my husband and I focused on finding a safe location with parks nearby for when we have kids in the future. Luckily the house we bought is located at the end of a 1.5 meter wide street that has a kink in it so that you can hardly go past 5kms/hour. Also the kink has it so people almost stop while looking at our front property which will allow them to scan for kids. Even at that though, I will be out there watching the kids while they play until they are street smart enough...it's just common sense.

    If the parents have other kids or plan to have more, I hope they will learn from their mistake.

  • -1

    NeverSubmit

    When I was 5 years old I walked to my kindergarden which was integrated in the local elementary school and I crossed a semi-busy street. I walked to school unsupervised and so did most of my classmates. Due to the nature of neighborhoods where I grew up it was necessary for 5 year-olds to cross several streets on the way to school, more or less unsupervised.

    Back then it wasn't considered negligent parenting. It was normal.

    Open poll to posters:

    1. At what age did you walk to school alone?
    2. How many streets did you cross?

    Bonus Question: Is it fair to judge (or condemn) a parent (or any person) just from reading a news article. Especially considering all the facts are unclear and none of us were there.

  • 0

    zichi

    One of my God children, who was 5-years old at the time, came out of the family apartment in Hiroshima, with his mother, but Chris, my Godchild was hit by a car sending him skywards. He survived but with a badly broken leg, which has been a very major problem because he's still growing. Now 9 years but he has had two ops on his leg.

    The accident was witnessed by his grandmother, who was standing on the opposite side of the road. There was a court case but nothing much happened to the driver. The evidence of the grandmother wasn't accepted, and in the end the driver paid a very small amount of compensation, because Chris was only 5-years at the time of the accident.

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    It is fine if you cross 10 roads or even 100 roads if you follow the basic rules, stop at the red light, look left and right. Stop at a crossing and check if it is safe, and not walk out if you see a car, big truck or busing coming.

    I live in Japan and what I have seen is nothing to the above! I havent seen any children stop at lights, even when they are green, to check to see if it is safe. I havent seen any children slow down when they take corners on their bikes!

    Yes, every country has stupid people who for some reason cant follow the basic rules! But, I have never said that Japan is the only country with this problem, all I am saying that it is a bit higher here than my home country and with the new parents these days.

    And to top this off I have seen adults do the same as what I have written above.

  • 0

    zichi

    Simon Phillips,

    someone we knew, a 50+ woman this year was crossing the road at an intersection. The light was on green, a car jumped the lights and killed her. She followed the rules too!

    • Moderator

      Stay on topic please.

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    Zichi I agree with what you have written I drive everyday and what I see of some car drivers is beyond belief!

    All I want to say is I wish new and older parents teach their children basic road safety, and I also wish that drivers would stop tailgating me when I am driving at the speed limit, and if I dont go 5 or 10 over I wish I they would stop beeping me, hahaha

    I know 100% that not everyone is like what I have written, but the numbers is a bit high for my liking to what I see everyday.

    I will stop now as I am on my lunch break and should eat!!

  • 1

    ambrosia

    I also played on the street when I was young, all the kids did. The thing is that we were never alone. There were always at least two kids but usually more like five or six and one of us was always watching out for cars. Someone's parent was also poking their head out regularly to make sure we weren't getting into trouble or not looking for cars. It helped too that the adults in our neighborhood were known for taking down license plates of cars that went too fast and giving them to the police, or as with my kind of crazy dad, spraying them with the hose if he was out during yard work while they sped past. Heaven help the driver who was foolish enough to stop and say something to my dad about the water! Unfortunately for this little boy someone didn't have his best interests in the forefront of their mind.

    It's a myth that driving in the countryside is safer. It isn't for many reasons, not the least being because people tend to take more chances and drive faster than they do in the city simply because they think it's safer in the countryside. Plus, there are more accidents where there are more cars and people in the countryside generally all have cars because the trains aren't as centrally located for them. This is something pedestrians and cyclists should always be mindful of but we know how that works in Japan. Cycling toward cars so that you turn right into them and walk with your back to traffic so you have no idea what's behind you.

    I'm sorry for this boy and his family but also for the driver. It may well have been the fault of the parents for not keeping a proper eye on their son but at the end of the day it's the driver who's going to pay.

    *"Number of automobile accident fatalities from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare's vital statistics. In order to average the variation depending on year, the average numbers of automobile accident fatalities in each prefecture for the 10 year period from 1998 to 2007 have been compared.

    During this 10 year period, an average of 11,200 people per year have died due to automobile accidents, and the number of automobile accident fatalities per 100 thousand population is 8.765.

    The number of automobile accident fatalities per 100 thousand population is greatest Kagawa, with 16.302. This is 1.86 times the national average, and the deviation value, 74.7, is also high. The number of automobile accident fatalities per 100 thousand population in Kagawa is 1.2 times that of Saga, ranked second, indicating that number of automobile accident fatalities in Kagawa is incomparably high. Of the top 5 prefectures, 4 prefectures, Kagawa (1st), Kochi (3rd), Tokushima (4th) and Ehime (5th), are in Shikoku, and the high number of automobile accident fatalities in Shikoku stands out.

    In view of the rates per 100 thousand population, the numbers of automobile accident fatalities in Aichi and Osaka, in which there is said to be reckless driving, are not that high and fall below the national average. This is believed to be due to the low rate of automobile usage in urban areas, and thus few fatalities from automobile accidents.

    The correlative ranking shows that is is highly correlated (0.7 or more) with the number of Automobiles Registered, indicating that there are many automobile accident fatalities where there are many automobiles."

    http://stats-japan.com/t/kiji/11911*

  • 0

    Samantha Zoe Aso

    NeverSubmit~ I first walked to school alone when I was 10. And a mighty proud day it was too. My school was situated on a super busy road. Before that I walked with my parents, other parents or in a crowd with older kids from my neighborhood. I was lucky to live near the beach when I was a child. I spent every summer on the beach, when the tide went out searching for crabs and sea monsters. Parents weren't like helicopters but someone knew at all times where we were and what we were doing. Older kids who had proved themselves responsible were given more free reign. My oldest two have recently turned 8. Slowly I am letting them do things on their own but not before the do's and what not to do's have been drilled in. Whenever I won't allow them to do the same things, I always explain that's it's for their own safety and because Mummy and Daddy love them so much. There is absolutely no way I would have left them unsupervised anywhere outside at age 5.

    @ Zichi. I am really sorry to hear about your godson. Yes, accidents can happen at anytime to anyone. Even if you follow the rules. So why tempt Fate?

  • 1

    WilliB

    I am surprised that not more accidents happen here in the land of lacking sidewalks and unworried parents.

    I had a couple of iffy situations already where some kid jumped in front of the my car out of nowhere. Scary.

  • 0

    papasmurfinjapan

    I don't know what it is abou so many foreigners here that they come and then blame the same things that happen in their own society on the Japanese. Talk about walking around with cultural blinders on.

    I have no problem with older kids playing in the streets... that is normal as they are (usually) smart and quick enough to get out of the way when a car is coming. But don't you think a 5yr old, unsupervised, playing on the road is a bit reckless? Perhaps it is normal where you grew up, but where I grew up 5yr olds didn't play outside (in the front yard at least) without adult supervision. Maybe times have changed. But I know I certainly wouldn't let my 5yr old play on the road by himself. To me that is common sense, but I guess not everyone feels that way.

  • 0

    Chinchan Zu

    there is a problem in parenting here... i often see parents let their 3 year old to climb/go down the stairs on their own. I often see parent and child on a separate bicycle wherein the parent crossed the street without even looking over for his child on the back whether he is crossing at RED signal or what

  • -4

    NeverSubmit

    So is letting your kids go up the stairs unsupervised now negligence?

    Let's get a grip on reality. There are 120 million people in this country. One in a million events, admittedly tragic, are going to happen all the time. L

    Let's not get carried away with ridiculous helicopter parenting and insane safety rules.

    Parent's need to make reasonable judgment calls considering the safety of their children and also the benefit of playing outside and enjoying life.

    And as a general human decency you should condemn someone just because you read an ambiguous article on Japan Today.

    Personally I'll assume the mother in this case, like most, is a caring, loving mother, until I'm privy to all the facts and the situation in its entirety.

  • -2

    The Munya Times

    I have never seen any woman taking care of their children the good way the guard their mobile phone. Not even mentioning the mother cliques in public parks, good thing if they can remember at all they went there with their kids and don't forget them there when they go home. It's a miracle their children survive and not more of them dies every day.

    I will never understand why the hell they bother producing offsprings if they are not interested in their children safety and life.

  • 0

    tmarie

    I played in the street as a kid - though my mom or babysitter was always out with us, my street wasn't busy, and I was taught to look out for cars. The same can't be said for most of the kids I see out in the street here. No parents, busy streets and not taught to look.

    The laws need to change here and hold parents responsible for their kids when it comes to these 'accidents". Kids dart out in front of cars all the time here. They aren't taught to look both ways and cross. They are taught not to jaywalk at lights but when there are no lights? They just go. Have seen this numerous times. I can't count how many times I have seen moms under trees yaking away while their kids run around parking lots and pick up/drop off spots in front of station. I feel for the drivers in those areas - and have yelled at the moms a few times to watch their kids!

  • 0

    dolphingirl

    Few kids wearing helmets, narrow streets and madcap drivers (especially mornings and late afternoons) who NEVER stop at crossings for pedestrians, and parents who are too busy doing something else to watch their littlies..it is a recipe for a world or hurt.This is the country that common sense forgot.

    This sums it up.

  • 0

    goinggoinggone

    I would never let a 5 year old out to play alone. That said, I have had bad experiences with crossing the road here, many times, wait for a green man, red light, and still motor bikes, taxis and nutters speeding shoot round corners and miss me and my children by inches at times. I have seen an elderly man cross the road, on a green man, and get knocked flying by a taxi. This child should not have been out alone, but whoever knocked him over and killed him has to bear the brunt of the fault here.

  • 0

    tmarie

    Saw a kid today on a trike. In the street. Mom on the phone chatting away. Kid fell over and started screaming. I thought of this thread and wished I had it in Japanese to show her. Mind you, would probably be lost on here. Idiot.

  • -3

    NeverSubmit

    Umm., kids fall on trikes. It's normal. When it happened to me my mom yelled out, be a man, stop crying, get up and try again.

    And in my day bystanders didn't stick their noses in other people's business.

    Who are you to tell someone how to raise their children?

    Not all parents make their kids where helmets and elbow pads in the sandbox and nobody wants to deal with a self-righteous know it all telling other people what to do.

    And if the mother in this tragic accident in Miura can read this. Please understand that not all of us think you're evil, negligent or lazy. I imagine that you're a good mother and you loved your son like any mother does. Unspeakably sorry for your loss.

  • -3

    steve@CPFC

    tmarie; The mother was probably a working mum busy trying to get more clients for her daycare centre that is making her a mint.

  • 0

    tmarie

    Doubt it Steve as it was 1pm.

    Who am I to tell someone how to raise their kids? I don't for good parenting. Mom on cell phone while Jr is in the street and crying? Yep, I will voice my opinion on the crappy parenting I see.

  • 0

    Samantha Zoe Aso

    @ Tmarie and NeverSubmit. I think that's one of the main problems with society today. People aren't willing to 'stick their noses in'. In my childhood days, it was quite common. Think of children who die at the hands of their parents few abuse. In most cases, it is found that someone somewhere knew or suspected what was going on. I think parents are more isolated than ever. 'It takes a village to raise a child' is so true. And...if a parent is neglecting their duties and especially if by neglecting their duties a child is in danger or distress then it is perfectly acceptable to have a word with said parent. You see enough ladies approaching mums with babies on the streets here and admonishing them for not putting a hat or a pair of socks on the infant, why not the same for parents who are not being responsible?

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