7% power-saving target set for Hokkaido this winter

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

  • -3

    JeffLee

    Smart people should be spending the autumn stuffing more insulation in their walls and in attics and replacing single-pane windows.

    Well, that's what people in Canada and the northern US have long been doing to deal with winter, and those places don't even have energy crises.

  • 0

    Noliving

    Even with it's ramshackle infrastructure, 1950s communist Eastern Europe was able to keep a steady flow of power going. It's the 21st century, and a "technologically advanced" country like Japan can't even keep the lights on.

    Technologically advance also means much greater power consumption, 1950's didn't have people charging phones or tablet or laptops or even their electric vehicles. Then you add multiple TV's and to a house as well desktop or other laptop devices and you can see how the electric usages compared to the 1950's when all it was just refrigerator, one small tv and light bulbs you can see the difference right away in terms of demand.

  • 1

    kimuzukashiiiii

    JeffLee - ever been to hokkaido? The houses there are very similar to those in northern Europe and other cold climates. They have insulation, central heating and double glazing.

    The thing is... when its -40 you do need to turn the heating on.

    And correct me if Im wrong, in Japan this past summer, there were no blackouts (rolling or otherwise) because people voluntarily reduced their energy consumption. So a target to save energy in Hokkaido this winter sounds perfectly reasonable for me.

    We should all be encouraged to save energy, whether in the midst of an energy crisis or not.

  • -4

    basroil

    kimuzukashiiiiiNov. 03, 2012 - 09:50AM JST

    ever been to hokkaido? The houses there are very similar to those in northern Europe and other cold climates. They have insulation, central heating and double glazing.

    The thing is... when its -40 you do need to turn the heating on.

    Yup, and most of the population lives in apartments and can't do things like add insulation. One of the dumbest things I've heard, but clearly from someone that doesn't live here.

    And correct me if Im wrong, in Japan this past summer, there were no blackouts (rolling or otherwise) because people voluntarily reduced their energy consumption. So a target to save energy in Hokkaido this winter sounds perfectly reasonable for me.

    Actually, it's not reasonable at all. Unlike mainland where summer peak can be offset by companies stuttering manufacturing or turning off all the AC, the main issue in Hokkaido is actually 6-8pm when practically only individuals are consuming (rather than companies). As shown from TEPCO and HEPCO's summer use reports, the most we can hope for is 1-2%, with the actual peak demand reduction having been much less in consumer sector.

  • 1

    sf2k

    Let's invent something called insulation, but don't call it that, and then claim it's a Japanese invention.

  • -4

    basroil

    sf2kNov. 03, 2012 - 11:08AM JST

    Let's invent something called insulation, but don't call it that, and then claim it's a Japanese invention.

    Good thing hokkaido already has that. And homewrap. And double windows with double pane. And anti-draft doors.

    Hokkaido isn't the same as lower Japan when it comes to thermal insulation, and while there are always places that can be improved, it is far more efficient up this way in general (and those that don't don't use electricity for heat anyway)

  • -4

    basroil

    NolivingNov. 03, 2012 - 08:13AM JST

    Technologically advance also means much greater power consumption, 1950's didn't have people charging phones or tablet or laptops or even their electric vehicles. Then you add multiple TV's and to a house as well desktop or other laptop devices and you can see how the electric usages compared to the 1950's when all it was just refrigerator, one small tv and light bulbs you can see the difference right away in terms of demand.

    No, here the article talks about Hokkaido, which is entirely unlike anywhere else. In summer I spend maybe 240kWh/mo including two computers, but when temperatures hit -15C outside, my bill spikes to 800kWh. Hokkaido is the only place in Japan where peak demand is in WINTER, and usually later at night. Turning on the lights or keeping them off is pointless, as all the electricity goes to heat anyway.

  • -1

    komuso killa

    If Japan was smart enough to make buildings with insulation, they would save a lot of energy in the winter.

  • -4

    basroil

    komuso killaNov. 03, 2012 - 02:59PM JST

    If Japan was smart enough to make buildings with insulation, they would save a lot of energy in the winter.

    As stated a million times before, Hokkaido already has it on all buildings that use electrical power for heating.

  • 0

    proxy

    Close more factories, lay off more workers, Japanese people move to another country. Without energy, cheap reliable energy, most Japanese will soon be no better off than the people in North Korea.

  • 0

    Disillusioned

    Let's hope a 7% decrease in energy consumption doesn't result in a 7% increase in deaths by freezing, shall we?

  • -2

    Thomas Anderson

    Oh noes without teh powerful nuclear crap we will all freeze to death.

  • 0

    zichi

    30% of domestic power is used for heating, we need to come up with ways of heating water and warming that are more energy efficient. Electric heating is expensive compared with gas or oil but I understand its difficult when living in an apartment. The "ecocute" is suppose to reduce power consumption by 20%.

    Better to try and have several methods. We have electric, gas and oil but only use oil. out in the countryside, wood burning stoves are very good which can warm the whole house. Some methods like over night storage heaters are just too expensive to install but cheaper to run.

  • -4

    basroil

    zichiNov. 03, 2012 - 05:34PM JST

    30% of domestic power is used for heating,

    In hokkaido, it's a far higher percentage during winter, and you can't rebuild large apartments to use all the latest and greatest technology.

    Better to try and have several methods. We have electric, gas and oil but only use oil.

    You can't rebuild an entire city that went electric because it was more environmentally friendly thanks to Tomari, at least not in any reasonable timeframe.

    out in the countryside, wood burning stoves are very good which can warm the whole house.

    What countryside? The three major population centers alone have more than 50% of the population, and close to 80% of the electrical use (muroran has low population but high use due to manufacturing). Unless you want Sapporo to have black snow, burning anything other than natural gas or propane is more hazardous than freezing to death.

    Some methods like over night storage heaters are just too expensive to install but cheaper to run.

    It is very clear that you don't live in Hokkaido, nor have ever lived here, from statements like this. Practically all electrical heaters here are overnight charging, which is why there's a second peak when nighttime prices start. Practically the only heaters which aren't are gas ones and portable heaters.

  • -1

    KariHaruka

    2 young daughters in my household. Don't think I'll be cutting down on my power usage. My and my partner will be fine with the cold temperatures up here in Hokkaido because we're used to it back in Finland but my girls aren't.

Login to leave a comment

OR
  • Spanish Speaking Sales Manager

    Spanish Speaking Sales Manager
    Autocom Japan (オートコムジャパン株式会社)、Kanagawa
    Salary: ¥270,000 ~ ¥1.0M / Month Commission Based
  •  Burmese Sales Staff

    Burmese Sales Staff
    Autocom Japan (オートコムジャパン株式会社)、Kanagawa
    Salary: ¥350,000 ~ ¥1.0M / Month Commission Based
  • 語学訓練調整員

    語学訓練調整員
    Berkeley House Language Center / バークレーハウス語学センター、Nagano
    Salary: ¥200,000 / Month Negotiable
  • 英語講師-福島県

    英語講師-福島県
    Berkeley House Language Center / バークレーハウス語学センター、Fukushima
    Salary: ¥300,000 / Month Negotiable
  • 海外(韓国)事業の支援スタッフ

    海外(韓国)事業の支援スタッフ
    NIWAKA Corporation - 株式会社 俄、Kyoto
    Salary: ¥3.0M / Year Negotiable

More in National

View all

View all