7-year-old Japanese girl mauled by 4 dogs in New Zealand

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  • 11

    torosushi

    my prayers to her speedy recovery...

  • 11

    JohnDigsJapan

    Get better soon, sweetheart!

  • 9

    David Foley

    What a nightmare. I pray that she recovers fully and this is the last bump in her family in their new home.

  • 9

    Douglas Macarthy

    jail time for the owner,,,i have seen this before in NZ ,lots of times,

  • 8

    jumpultimatestars

    i dont think it's as "complex" as they're trying to lead us to believe. First off, there is no reason for a breed that even has a remote inclination to such violence to not be within the confines of a fenced in area.

  • 5

    cleo

    Poor little girl. I hope she makes a full and quick recovery. But, “extensive injuries to the majority of her face”.... doesn't sound good.

    I've just erased the post I originally wrote, about irresponsible owners choosing to keep 'tough' dogs for show. From other sources it appears the four dogs were family pets, properly registered and chipped. They were Staffie crosses, not mastiffs as initially reported. It was the owner who immediately arranged for the dogs to be euthanised.

    Horrible, horrible story for all concerned.

  • 8

    NZ2011

    Its certainly one thing I DONT miss from NZ, aggressive breeds of dogs not being controlled properly by their owners. It happens too often, I have seen both my sisters bitten, just walking home from school and once doing a paper round, I don't like to admit it but Im actually a little afraid of larger dogs now.

  • 0

    Tessa

    People will insist on keeping dangerous dogs. I've heard of horrifying cases in the UK in the past several years, too. Here's hoping the little girl makes a full recovery.

  • 4

    wontond

    I can only imagine how afraid this little girl must have been seeing these dogs approach her. Hopefully, all turns out well for this little girl and her family.

  • 1

    Reckless

    God bless her and I hope she survives and without too much scarring. Based on the news the 4 dogs worked up in a pack mentality once the attack started. In my childhood in rural part of America a young boy got attacked by 4-5 dobermans and he had scars all over his body. I honestly don't know how he survived. In such a place it may be necessary to carry a weapon, but a kid like that is helpless.

  • 4

    ReformedBasher

    Irresponsible fool has ruined the life of this young girl and the rest of her family.

    Not just jail time, his assets should be sold to pay for her medical bills.

  • 2

    CGB Spender

    Ignorant dog owners with their affinity for a very ugly and violent race of dogs! If I was the father of the girl I'd want to throw the owner into a pit of poisonous snakes.

  • 0

    jojo_in_japan

    OMG ... this is a parents worst nightmare.

  • 2

    edwardw

    Poor girl. Hopefully modern medicine can fix her up. Unfortunately, she will be scarred psychologically for some time.

  • 4

    risugirl

    Got bitten by a dog when I was 5yrs. old.My left ear almost came off.I survive,but I can't help but to hate dogs even the most docile ones. The girl even if she survives will likely have a trauma. Praying eanestly for her recovery.

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    Poor little girl. I hope she survives and recovers both physically and mentally.

  • -9

    jojo_in_japan

    Just adding another note, why would any parent leave a small child alone with 4 large dogs (large compared to usual japanese standard of dog size) is it because of some "kawaii" factor? that most japanese over look the fact that dogs regardless of pedigree are hunters deep down? my sadness and sorrow turns to mild anger.

  • 2

    zico11

    Murupara, hmm, not the safest place in NZ...

  • 0

    Frungy

    I hope the girl recovers quickly.

    As for this type of problem, it should be mandatory to attend dog training classes with your animal if you buy one. Any half-way experienced dog trainer would immediately be able to tell you what happened here, namely "packing". One, two or even three dogs and you're okay. The moment you go above 3 and you have a steadily increasing risk of a pack forming where a human is not the alpha, especially where the owner is not actively involved in training and working with the dogs. If this was a dog-led pack, as I strongly suspect (a suspicion that is supported by the owner deciding the euthanise the dogs so quickly - this move projects the image of someone not very emotionally invested in their dogs) then the little girl may have accidentally injured one of the dogs (patting too hard, pulling a tail, an accidental finger to an eye), and the pack would then have turned on her as if she was an enemy.

    Packing is a very serious and real danger with dogs, and it is the owner's fault. Ignorant or not he should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

  • -1

    CrazyJoe

    They are animals, plain and simple, and you can never anticipate their behavior around anyone.

  • 2

    shanabelle

    The poor girl, I hope she has a full recovery. The owner should be charged.

  • 4

    Peacetrain

    I've been bitten by a dog when i was a kid too. Of course the owners said it was my fault. I teased it somehow. By running away!!

    I really hope this girl can have the best doctors working to erase scarring, and also somehow to get mental health care. I can only imagine how terrifying that must have been.

  • 3

    tmarie

    Poor kid. Hope she recovers.

    Lots of comments about the dogs and the breed... It is the fault of the owners for this, not the dogs. Larger dogs are less likely to bite than smaller ones. However, when they do, obviously more serious that when some overgrown rat bites. Rather than ban certain dogs, ban idiots from owning ANY dog.

    Not sure why Jojo got thumbs down for asking the obvious question as to why a child was left alone with a group of dogs. Were they protecting their land? Was the child a guest? Plenty of questions here that need to be addressed.

    Just to answer your question Jojo, I don't think the "kawaii" factor matters. Most kids in Japan are terrified of dogs and will cross the street when one comes near. Frankly, I think there is a lack of education on dogs here - be it fixing, training, chipping... However, ignorance of dogs isn't a good reason to blame anyone for getting mauled.

  • 3

    JeffLee

    Why can't people be happy having beagles or collies? Staffordshire terriers were bred for a single purpose: blood sports.

  • 2

    StormR

    ReformedBasher

    Irresponsible fool has ruined the life of this young girl and the rest of her family.

    Not just jail time, his assets should be sold to pay for her medical bills.

    NZ has a insurance system that covers this little girl, so the person does not nor should they have to sell everything to pay for her hospital.

    The dogs were pets the girl was playing with in a fenced yard with other animals, chickens, dogs cats, goats, pigs etc, something happened that made these normal pets turn in vicious attackers, the police are investigating but seems it is not a criminal matter.

    Feel so sorry for this little girl and her family and hope their experience of NZ turns out to be much better.

    I have seen domestic docile cats turn vicious and attack their owners, biting, scratching, kicking, something sets them off its not something they have in mind to do.

  • -7

    tmarie

    Why can't people be happy having beagles or collies? Staffordshire terriers were bred for a single purpose: blood sports.

    You do get that those dogs bite as well, right? Any breed does and any breed can turn on a person. It's in the training. Idiots buy staffies, pitbulls, rotties and when these idiots don't train their dogs to be social, they bite and the dog gets put down. How on earth is that fair? You also understand that people are more likely to report an "bad" breed than they are the family beagle, right? The worst breeds I have ever dealt with in terms of nastiness have been shitzus, chihuahua and pommiranians. Vile, snarly little beasts but since their bite has no really impact, people don't bother to report them. ANY dog can bite. Blame the owners, not the dogs.

  • 1

    WilliB

    " I mean anything we can do to stop horrific attacks like this, but it’s an incredibly complex area. It’s not as simple as banning a breed.” "

    I am tempted to say that yes, it is that simple. Yes, there would probably still be dog attacks if all of these pitbull type dogs that were bred for aggression were banned, but sure as hell there would be a lot fewer. I mean, how often do you hear about a pack of, say, Golden Retrievers attack children out of nowhere?

    I would like to know how many people really need these aggressive breeds and why.

  • -2

    cleo

    The worst breeds I have ever dealt with in terms of nastiness have been shitzus, chihuahua and pommiranians. Vile, snarly little beasts

    Big breeds or small breeds, it's not the breed that's at fault. A dog is a dog. The problem with big breeds is that idiots think it makes them look tough/cool to have a big, snarly uncontrollable dog; the problem with small breeds is that idiots think they're toys and treat them like furry barbie dolls. And hey, if they do get stroppy, they're only little. A dog needs to be treated like a dog regardless of size.

    I shudder when well-meaning people tell me, and I've heard it more than once, 'Junior starts school this year and he's old enough to have a dog of his own, so we're going to get him a little pom/chihuahua/some other tiny, high-strung breed. He'll be able to handle a small dog all by himself'. No he won't. And likely the dog won't be able to handle him, either. I always advise them, if they must get a dog, to get a larger breed that will be better able to stand the rough and tumble of life with kids, and to consider it a family dog, not the kids' dog; adults need to take responsibility for training, feeding and cleaning-up.

  • -4

    tmarie

    I would like to know how many people really need these aggressive breeds and why.

    How many people need any breed of dog?

    Can you define "breed for aggression" please? Beagles, many terriers and the like are hunting dogs. How is that not bred for aggression?

    **. I mean, how often do you hear about a pack of, say, Golden Retrievers attack children out of nowhere?**

    How many people actually own a pack of goldies? Lord, the fur and slobber that would be everywhere...

  • -2

    Disillusioned

    All dogs bite! Even a Pomeranian is capable of giving a nasty bite to a kid. There has been a recent spate of dog attacks in Australia and many states have introduced much stricter controls on certain breads and have also changed the laws to make owners accountable for their dog's damages. It's a sad event, but if you have dangerous dogs you have to be aware they are dangerous. We had many pig dogs when I was younger Staffordshire terriers, bull terriers, ridge backs, pit bulls and all kinds of crossbreeds, but we would never ever let kids play with them. They were penned or muzzled when out of the pen. Unfortunately, I think this kind of restrictions have to placed on all 'dangerous' dogs, but this leaves the question, which dogs are dangerous? All dogs are dangerous in the right circumstances! When we were pigging we were more afraid of the dogs than the pigs. I hope this little girl recovers. I know how vicious a pack of frenzied dogs can be.

  • 1

    StormR

    One of the most aggressive and biting dogs is in fact one of the smallest, the damn Chihuahua rat thing , they are highly strung (as someone earlier mentioned) and very aggressive, they will snap and bite at anything, thing is though they usually do little damage, but a big dog will do damage and more than one attacking even a grown man can be over come by them, they recommend not having more than 3 jack Russell terriers in the same room for very long too, and these dogs are one of the smartest most intelligent, Animals are just that animals don't forget that.

  • -2

    cleo

    How many people need any breed of dog?

    (Raises hand....) Life without a dog is like a boiled egg without salt, like a house with no roof, like a bouquet with no flowerheads, like a bath with no hot water, like a bicycle with no wheels....

    But I suppose it doesn't have to be a breed. Or rather, it can be a dog with lots of breeds in the same body.

    how often do you hear about a pack of, say, Golden Retrievers attack

    Like tmarie says, not many people actually own a pack of Goldies (heaven, if only I had the time to brush all that beautiful fur....), but in the past few years I have heard of instances of goldies and labs bred in Japan that have had a vicious streak. Two breeds that are supposed to be as laid-back as they come, but due to their popularity the puppy mills have been pumping them out by the litter with no thought to breed standards or the effects of inbreeding. Same goes for other breeds that are popular in Japan; I would be wary of taking on a mini dachs, toy poodle, papillon or chihuahua bred in Japan. And more recently, the beagles, too, though I haven't heard anything bad yet apart from the incessant barking - I think that's probably due more to snoopy going crazy from lack of exercise than any problem with breeding. Aren't beagles supposed to be remarkably uniform, genetically speaking?

    Best kind of dog to get for a family with small kiddies - a lab that has failed the Seeing Eye dog programme. A lot of care and thought goes into their breeding, they're already house-trained and have completed their basic doggy training. Not having that special something that makes them suitable as a guide dog doesn't mean they don't make superb pets.

  • 3

    wipeout

    Just adding another note, why would any parent leave a small child alone with 4 large dogs (large compared to usual japanese standard of dog size) is it because of some "kawaii" factor?

    Why would any dog owner be unaware that their pets can be a very serious threat to other people? Dogs are territorial and they also have a pack mentality. The dog that an owner fondly imagines is perfectly trained and has never attacked anybody can still turn savage unexpectedly, and it's happened many times before. Maulings by dogs in NZ are not that uncommon, either.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wairarapa-times-age/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503414&objectid=11106608

    Dog owners have an absolute responsibility to make sure that people visiting their property are safe, especially children. The parents should too, but a dog owner who overlooks what their animals are capable of is behaving more irresponsibly than the unfortunate target of the attack.

    When I was a kid, this stuff was all treated as a bit a laugh - dogs chasing postmen, menacing delivery people, scaring the kid on his way to school. Over the course of my life, I've seen a lot of behaviour from dogs that makes me very wary of them, it took a long time to come to the realization that even a friend's or relative's pet can be bloody dangerous, and it took some unpleasant experiences, including being attacked, to really bring that home to me. I certainly don't provoke dogs, but on their own territory, all bets are off, however well you know the owner.

  • 3

    JeffLee

    "Vile, snarly little beasts but since their bite has no really impact, people don't bother to report them."

    Exactly. The lapdogs rarely ever (never?) kill anybody, and call me crazy, but I see that as a much preferable thing. But a bite from a blood sport dog is by far more likely to be lethal. When biting, their instincts tell them to lock on and not let go until death comes to their victim (or until their owner starts whacking them over their head with a lead pipe).

    Again, why in heck would anyone other than a nutter with erm, "compensation issues" want to keep these creatures, whose instincts have programmed them to kill?

  • 2

    FightingViking

    @Cleo

    Best kind of dog to get for a family with small kiddies - a lab that has failed the Seeing Eye dog programme.

    Or even a "throw away" Police lab... I've never had a more gentle, affectionate dog in my life (my younger brother and I bought our first dog when I was 9 and he 6 with our Christmas money but that was also a very gentle terrier). As for my ex-cop-dog, His bark was most definitely MUCH worse than his bite - but that's what's kept the "bad guys" away...

  • 1

    Cortes Elijah

    I've been mauled in the face 2 times by a dog. The first time was when I was around 3 years old. The dog was a pig-dog style of breed. I don't remember what type. He just randomly decided to maul my face one day.

    Second time was from another dog. It was all normal then suddenly just lunged at me.

    I have mental scaring and trust issues for dogs.

    Is it okay for dogs to maul? NO. Can it be avoided? YES.

    I trained Australian cattle dogs for years. Never had an incident or accident.

  • -5

    tmarie

    Life without a dog is like a boiled egg without salt, like a house with no roof, like a bouquet with no flowerheads, like a bath with no hot water, like a bicycle with no wheels....

    That wasn't the question though Cleo. I'm curled up with my dog right now (one of those monster breeds people are suggesting all need to be banned) and I am with you 100% about how great they are but my question was "How many people need any breed of dog?" - the question asked before was about aggressive breeds. Why does anyone NEED a beagle or NEED a pug... Why single out the aggressive breeds for such a question?

    I'm 100% with you on this matter. Just the other day one of my neighbors said she wanted to buy a dog (the husband said no to another baby hence the "need") and when I suggested a larger dog because she has a four year old out of control child, she said no, a smaller breed would be better. This coming from a woman who has never owned a dog and who has a son who is scared of dogs - seriously screamed and cried for 15 minutes when he met mine for the first time - and the dog didn't even go near him! Unreal. I have no doubts in my mind they will get something small and yappy and that child will get bitten because the dog won't be trained. The dog will be blamed, given up and gassed seven days later.

    100% with you on the puppy mills. Mine is from a shelter and I wouldn't have it any other way. Why spend thousands on a perhaps ill puppy that has so much inbreeding you'll be sorry when it comes to the vet bills?

    Beagles, uniform - which is why they are so often used in animal testing. Mine didn't bark. Just a howl every now and then but lord, the nose. Very cute but insane. IMO not a breed for new owners though they are a suggest breed for new owners - why is beyond me.

    Former police digs are great BUT many see them as bad breeds as shepards are known to attack. Personally one of my fav but they suffer from hip issues so I am wary. Wary of anything that is popular to be honest.

    I honestly don't know anyone in Japan with a lapdog that hasn't been bitten by them. My students reg report that they got bit by the family dog. Never reported because the bite isn't anything. A tosa bites and it's all over the news. And the dog is put down. Shame the owners aren't.

  • -2

    Nathaw

    (Raises hand....)Life without a dog is like a boiled egg without salt, like a house with no roof, like a bouquet with no flowerheads, like a bath with no hot water, like a bicycle with no wheels...

    ( Lower hand ----) Life without a dog is calm and quiet like Shinto Buddhist temple, like a home owner with no more mortgage to pay, like a shop-coholic or materialistic girl with Sugar Daddy, like a hot Spa with fragrant flowers and aroma therapy, like a jockey smiling on the race winning horse-----------------------------------------etc.

  • -1

    Americanhonor

    New Zealand is a fantastic place, however dog attacks have slways been a concern especially considering most dogs in NZ are the larger or more aggressive types used to protect property.

    They really need to tighten the laws down there it has always been an issue and I hope the owner responsible for the dogs receives at minimum a hefty fine and then some.

  • 2

    Moondog

    Peacetrain wrote:

    I've been bitten by a dog when i was a kid too. Of course the owners said it was my fault. I teased it somehow. By running away!!

    Exactly! Running away is the best way to guarantee that you'll get bitten (or worse, depending on what you are running from). Predator animals (dogs, cats, wolves, lions, etc.) cannot help chasing something that is running away from it. It's instinctual. Running communicates that you are weak and defenseless and ... lunch.

    If you are confronted by an animal intending to attack, the only thing to do is to stand fast and make it clear to the animal that you fully intend to fight. In most cases they will back down because the way they live is to attack weak animals. They avoid strong animals whenever possible. I have personally done this with a Doberman and a puma (mountain lion).

    Occasions where this will not work is when you are too close to their offspring or in a pack. If you are surrounded by a pack, standing your ground is probably not going to work. The best you can hope for is to take one or two of them out before the rest of the pack kills you.

    As for the discussion of bad breeds of dogs, I think it's more a case of bad breeds of humans training them. When there is an attack like this, it's the dogs owners who need to be put down.

  • -4

    cleo

    calm and quiet like Shinto Buddhist temple

    borrring

    like a home owner with no more mortgage to pay

    Living in an old house.....

    like a shop-coholic or materialistic girl with Sugar Daddy

    Oh puhleeez....

    like a hot Spa with fragrant flowers and aroma therapy

    till the water cools and you're left sitting among wilted petals in tepid water

    like a jockey smiling on the race winning horse

    wot about the ones who ran just as hard but not quite as fast?

    Mine is from a shelter and I wouldn't have it any other way. Why spend thousands on a perhaps ill puppy that has so much inbreeding you'll be sorry when it comes to the vet bills?

    Mmm, I get you, but it isn't about the money.....our current dog is a rescue, had a bit of an unstable past and came to us with issues. Physically he's fine, but a handful temperamentally. If he'd gone to any other family, I think he would have long ago been back at the pound.

    I honestly don't know anyone in Japan with a lapdog that hasn't been bitten by them.

    My neighbour has a shitzu-pom mix who could be a poster boy for world peace, he's as laid-back and friendly as they come, as sweet a temperament as you could hope to find in a dog. Looks a bit like a miniature Ewok. He and my dog are best mates.

    with a Doberman

    sigh Best dog I ever had.

  • 1

    avigator

    Too sad. Always be cognizant of your surroundings and do not be complacent.

  • -4

    tmarie

    Great post Moon and 100% agree? Run? You're asking to be chased and topped over making you an easy target. A shame that this isn't taught in schools - anywhere as far as I know.

    Cleo, not sure why you feel the need to contactly nitpick my posts. It's tiring. Enjoy your dog, I'll enjoy mine.

  • -5

    cleo

    tmarie - nitpick? Not my intention at all. I thought I was just adding to what you wrote, not detracting from it. Sorry.

  • 1

    KariHaruka

    This is why I refuse to own dogs or have dogs go anywhere near my daughters..

    I hope this young girl makes a full recovery and doesn't mentally affect her for the rest of her life.

  • 2

    JoiceRojo

    It is the fault of the owners for this, not the dogs. Larger dogs are less likely to bite than smaller ones. However, when they do, obviously more serious that when some overgrown rat bites. Rather than ban certain dogs, ban idiots from owning ANY dog.

    True true... in my country there are many irresponsible Dog-owners, because they do not train their pets many of them buy/get an "aggressive" breed to watch over property (German or Belgian Shepherds, Doberman, Pit-bull, Boxer, etc), but they do not care for training, do not take the dog for a walk or making exercise; and when some sad incident like this one, the owners are quick to euthanize the dogs (I hate that) In my house we always had mix breeds like from German shepherd and doberman, since they were mixed breeds and lived with children they were gently with people close to the family and fierce against strangers, unfortunately, they were kinda zealous and they did bark at night due to cats or other animals on the roofs, so neighbors put poison in their food in the backyard...

    I do hope that the little girl recovers quickly, although the emotional scars will be long term, I do not like the idea this little girl would grow up afraid of dogs, even though I'm a Cat person myself...

  • -4

    hidingout

    I too was bitten by a dog as a child. Golden lab ... one of the supposed "friendly breeds". At that time I was too little to stand up for myself. I pity the dog that tries to bite me as an adult. I will think nothing of the bite it may manage to inflict as I take my boots to its head.

    All my best wishes to this poor little girl.

  • 0

    WilliB

    Tmarie:

    " Can you define "breed for aggression" please? Beagles, many terriers and the like are hunting dogs. How is that not bred for aggression? "

    No, they are not bred for aggression against other dogs and humans. They are bred to help humans catch little furry animals. That is a completely different thing. This chant about all dogs being "the same" that we hear from some is really nonsensical. How about turning it around? If all dogs are the same, why don´t you see violent macho types buying beagles and poodes? No, they don´t. They go for precisely the dog that were bred to be weapons, e.g. pitbulls, dobermans and the like.

    Talking about weapons, would you also say that a small handgun and a military assault rifle are the same? No? But that is exactly the same argument.

  • 0

    hidingout

    This chant about all dogs being "the same" that we hear from some is really nonsensical.

    Talk about beside the point. They're all the same to a little kid getting bit. Try to show a little sympathy here.

  • 5

    WilliB

    " They're all the same to a little kid getting bit. Try to show a little sympathy here. "

    No, they are not. A pack of crazy chihuahuas would have scared the 7-year old, but mangled and almost killed her. Try to show a little perspective here. I am really tired of hearing a chorus of bloodsport dog lovers try to defend these vicious animals after each of the horrible attacks they commit.

  • 2

    eye

    I was attacked by a stupid dog owned by a stupid owner when I was a kid but got over it as I grew up. I worked with a lot of dogs on a farm for many years. they were working dogs and I haven't seen any other animal beat their courage, dedication and loyalty even when they have to confront animals much bigger than themselves.

    Their virtues aside, they are still dogs, they are animals. I don't subscribe to some people's views that they are somehow "human" and can do no wrong. What they do depends on a certain level to their training, breed and individual temperament. I believe it is totally the owner's responsibility when a dog misbehaves. I have shed tears when a dog died, and on the other hand I have also personally put down a dog when it had shown violent behavior traits and attacked people and livestock regardless of the training and care we have given it. To reiterate, dogs are dogs and I believe since we are the apes with the bigger brain, we are the ones who should be responsible. Hope the kid recovers without lifelong scars.

  • 1

    NathalieB

    Who lets a 7 year old girl play with a pack of dogs? ANY dogs? Be they staffies or poodles. Or am I reading it wrong and she was alone and the dogs broke in and attacked her? Not clear from the article.

    We have a border collie. Hes wonderful, sweet and playful. But hes a dog. He is treated with firmness fairness and respect and he pays it back in kind. He gets lots of attention and kindness. But he is a dog. Not a toy.

  • 0

    Rainbow_Demon

    All sympathy for the little girl. I see the possibility for lots of blame to go around, but none on her.

    I grew up with large dogs. I know what to do and what not to do around strange dogs. And it never ceases to amaze me how there are dogs everywhere, but people don't teach their children how to deal with them. Its like not bothering to teach your kids to look both ways before crossing the street.

    So, we have this girl playing on the property of the dogs owner. How did that come about? Where were the parents? Just how free were the dogs? Was there a fence? Do the dogs have a history? Any reason why the owner should have known a 7 year old girl would be there alone?

    I also feel sympathy for the dogs. They are pack animals. Guaranteed three were following the leader in this attack. And leader was still just a dog. Executing them has done nothing but create the illusion of justice.

  • -4

    NeoJamal

    Feel so sorry for this little girl and her family and hope their experience of NZ turns out to be much better.

    For a non-Chinese speaking Asian family NZ is probably not the best place to be, but life can be a lot better than in most places in Japan from what I've been told.

  • 2

    genjuro

    Horrible. Wishing her the best and hope she has a speedy recovery. Hang in there, little one.

  • 0

  • 0

    StormR

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9790536/Dog-attack-Girls-family-may-seek-donations

  • -10

    tmarie

    This is why I refuse to own dogs or have dogs go anywhere near my daughters..

    So instead you'll raise a daughter who fears dogs and has very little understanding of them?

    **No, they are not bred for aggression against other dogs and humans. They are bred to help humans catch little furry animals. ** And you don't think catching and killing other furry creatures is aggression?

    ** If all dogs are the same, why don´t you see violent macho types buying beagles and poodes? No, they don´t. They go for precisely the dog that were bred to be weapons, e.g. pitbulls, dobermans and the like.** Do you live in Japan? I see frufru dogs being walked by "macho" guys all the time. You're also forgetting that sweet old grannies back home have "aggressive" breeds. I have one of these breeds you seem to think should all be put down and trust me, I am very far from "macho" or needing a bred to be my "weapon".

    The issue here is yes, there are a bunch of idiots who own large, strong dogs. No one is saying this isn't an issue. They don't train them well and often tease the poor dogs. However, you also have a bunch of responsible folks who also own the same breeds who have very social and well behaved dogs. The same goes for smaller dogs. Idiots are idiots regardless of the breed they own. The issue is the owner, not the breed. So, shouldn't the owners be punished if the dog attacks rather than the dog? Shouldn't there be better laws about dog ownership, regardless of breed? It's not the dog's fault they ended up with some idiot who felt the need to get one of these dogs to make them look cool and then doesn't train the dog - who really does want a pack leader and someone to take control.

    No, they are not. A pack of crazy chihuahuas would have scared the 7-year old, but mangled and almost killed her. Try to show a little perspective here. I am really tired of hearing a chorus of bloodsport dog lovers try to defend these vicious animals after each of the horrible attacks they commit.

    I wouldn't go near a pack of chihuahuas, crazy or not, because they are so stressed out they are very likely to turn. They also could so a lot of damage to a seven year old - but again, who keeps a pack of this breed? The non-stop barking is enough for anyone to know better.

    Bloodspot dog lovers.... looks at dog who is curled up, snoring away in front of the heater... yes, terrifying dog he is. Guess I should wake him up and tease him and train him to kill, eh? Only got him to fight him... God lord.

    And yes, as NathalieB stated, who lets a seven year old play with a pack of dogs or near a pack? It's part of the responsibilty of being a parent - and the responsibilty of being a dog owner. Regardless of the breed, size, history... you don't allow kids to be around a dog, any dog, on their own without adult supervision. Common sense.

  • 3

    KariHaruka

    tmarieMar. 05, 2014 - 09:06AM JST This is why I refuse to own dogs or have dogs go anywhere near my daughters.. So instead you'll raise a daughter who fears dogs and has very little understanding of them?

    Don't pass judgement on my parenting techniques when you don't even know what I am like with my girls.

    When I was my eldest daughter's age I was attacked by the family dog which just suddenly went berserk one day. This is a risk I refuse to take because my 2 daughters are the most 2 most important people in my life. However this doesn't mean I hide them completely from dogs. I've already explained to my eldest (who is 5 in July) why I have a mistrust in dogs being around her and her little sister however I've also explained that while some dogs are dangerous, others dog's normally aren't dangerous but they can also sometimes accidentally cause harm. I didn't want to say that a dog could just randomly go berserk one day.

  • -1

    Anna Louise

    It should not be the dog that has to be put down, it should be the owner! Animals are part of a family and owners should be required to train with their dogs. There is no need for a dog to viciously attack anyone if they are properly cared for and trained. I was bitten by a bulldog who was let off his chain in a park and the owner did nothing to get him off me, she was just as terrified! If people are not willing to take the time to train with their dogs, they shouldn't be allowed to have pets at all! My heart goes out to the little girl and her family! Japan is one of the safest places in the world to live, sadly, many who go overseas don't realize it isn't as safe elsewhere!

  • -6

    tmarie

    I didn't say, I asked a question - to clarify your comment. You stated This is why I refuse to own dogs or have dogs go anywhere near my daughters and then However this doesn't mean I hide them completely from dogs. so I'm still not sure what you're actually trying to say.

    Telling kids that dogs are dangerous isn't going to help them - and probably ups their chances of being attacked because they don't know how to deal with them - like the running away post someone made above. Your kids, you choices but I find it really sad when I walk my dog and kids move away as far as possible, cross the street or comment that dogs are "kowai". Dogs are apart of life here and in many other countries. Teaching kids how to behave around them is important for their safety. I just don't see that safetybeing taught here though - hence my question with regards to your comment.

  • 2

    KariHaruka

    tmarieMar. 05, 2014 - 09:58AM JST I didn't say, I asked a question - to clarify your comment. You stated This is why I refuse to own dogs or have dogs go anywhere near my daughters and then However this doesn't mean I hide them completely from dogs. so I'm still not sure what you're actually trying to say.

    Yes I refuse to own a dog and I also tell people who have dogs to make sure that they are kept away from my daughters. But I haven't hidden the existence of dogs from the girls, that's what I meant by ''I don't hide them completely from dogs''. I've already informed my daughter about the dangers and how to behave around a dog. But it doesn't matter how much information I could pass onto them because I'd still feel uncomfortable with a dog being around them due to what personally happened to me and also from what I've seen on the news throughout the years. I don't hide my girls from the dangers in the world however I will do everything I can to prevent harm from falling onto them. The thought of something like what happened to the poor 7 year old happening to either of my girls is an unbearable thought to me.

  • -2

    cleo

    Dog owners need to take responsibility for their dogs - providing proper training, socialisation, management-, and people including, but not restricted to, children need to learn how to behave around unfamiliar dogs. In much the same way drivers need to take responsibility for their vehicle - driving with care, giving right of way to pedestrians, making sure the vehicle is safe when they leave it (ie no on a hill with the handbrake off)-, and people including, but not restricted to, children need to learn how to behave around vehicles, especially on busy roads.

    Would you refuse to own a car, tell people who own cars to keep them away from your children, inform your children about the dangers of cars but never give them practical experience of how to cross a road in safety?

    Like tmarie, I've had the experience of kids (and their parents) backing off when I'm out with a dog. It's very sad. The other problem of course is kids who haven't been taught that it is not a good idea to run up to an unfamiliar dog and start assaulting (='petting') it.

    In order to teach your child how to deal with dogs they need to be in contact with dogs, just as when you teach your kids their road drill, at some point you need to take them out to a road with real traffic on it.

    The latest news is that little Sakurako is 'still critical, but stable'. She's going to need an awful lot of reconstructive surgery. At least it seems that she will be eligible for 'full and free medical care under ACC'. Not sure what ACC stands for, but I gather it's the NZ equivalent of medical insurance?

  • -6

    tmarie

    Yes I refuse to own a dog and I also tell people who have dogs to make sure that they are kept away from my daughters.

    No one is asking you to own a dog though in order to educate your kids.

    I think it works both ways with dogs - parents also need to teach their kids to ask first before they march up to a dog (any pet) and pat it - not saying you don't but while many kids are terrified of dogs here, I have had a few stick their face in front of mine which has unnerved me. The screaming and running around dogs is also an issue. Kids are kids and all that jazz but they need to learn how to behave when there are dogs in the area. My dog is trained, I can't say they all are - and frankly, I know many here are not based on their behaviour. I wouldn't wish for any child to be attacked but sometimes kids are attacked because they lack the safety knowledge on how to behave around animals. Owners need to step up but so do parents - and school I feel.

    100% agree Cleo - I admit, I was a stick your face into their face squeal type kid as I love dogs. I am amazed that I didn't get a snapping from one or two to be honest.

  • 2

    KariHaruka

    @cleo

    You can't compare a dog which is a wild animal to a car which is mechanical.

    Of course you teach your children about the dangers of cars and dogs. A child knows not to cross a busy road unsupervised or directly in front of a oncoming car. But if a child (who should be right by your side) runs towards oncoming traffic than you can grab them and pull them back. However a child doesn't know how to react to an animal that runs towards them before clamping their jaws onto the poor child. And if you aren't nearby when the attack happens then the aftermath is devastating.

    I was in contact with dogs as a child and I knew how to behave around them. However it didn't stop the family dog from suddenly going after me when it went berserk. The exact same thing has happened to other families and that has left a lot of parents unwilling to have a animal which is unpredictable around their child. It may be sad to you and other dog owners when parents and their children avoid your dogs. However its nothing compared to the sadness that a parent would go through if their child was attacked by a dog.

    We are told from a young age not to trust strangers and the same thing should apply to dogs.

    I know that this is a topic where people would have different opinions. However regardless of what people might say about their dogs. Its the parents right and choice to whether they want dogs around their children. I don't know whether you and tmarie are parents or not. However as a parent I have strong protection instincts towards my offspring and I know a lot of other parents who share the same view as me.

  • -3

    cleo

    You can't compare a dog which is a wild animal to a car which is mechanical.

    A dog is a domestic animal, not a wild animal (huge difference) and is supposed to be under the control of its owner. A car is mechanical, and it is supposed to be under the control of its driver. In either case, it is the owner/driver who is responsible. I think the comparison is a valid one.

    A child knows not to cross a busy road unsupervised or directly in front of a oncoming car.

    Not until you teach it, it doesn't. and just telling a child he shouldn't cross the road alone doesn't do it; you have to take him out and give him practical instruction in the face of traffic, otherwise it's just so much theory and not real to a child.

    We are told from a young age not to trust strangers and the same thing should apply to dogs.

    Strange people, strange dogs, I agree completely.

    Its the parents right and choice to whether they want dogs around their children.

    Of course it is. Doesn't mean other people will make different choices, or question your/my choices.

    I don't know whether you and tmarie are parents or not. However as a parent I have strong protection instincts towards my offspring

    tmarie isn't, I am and as a parent I also have strong protective instincts towards my offspring, which is one reason we bought a house with a garden so that our kids could grow up with a dog (later dogs) in the family and learn the joy and responsibility of living with animals. Both kids have grown to be sensible, responsible animal lovers, and I wouldn't have it any other way.

    I admit, I was a stick your face into their face squeal type kid as I love dogs. I am amazed that I didn't get a snapping from one or two to be honest.

    Me too! Back in an age when dogs were allowed to roam free in the neighbourhood, intact and mostly untrained. I wasn't allowed to have a dog of my own until I was 16 and Dad, my brothers and I finally managed to override Mum (my Mum would have been soulmates with Kariharuka) and I did my best to make up for it by buying dog biscuits with my spending money and chasing up the neighbours' dogs.

  • 3

    KariHaruka

    @tmarie

    My eldest daughter personally isn't the type who'd just go up to something and be in its face. She was brought up to ask either me, her Mum or whichever adult she was with before she could go up to someone/something that she wasn't familiar with. My concerns are when dogs are off the leash running around. Because I don't know anything about that dog or its temperament around children. And whenever a dog has run towards my girls I've never suddenly picked up my girls because that would scare them. I'd make sure to redirect the dogs attention towards me and away from the girls while also making sure that the girls were close by because even if the dog did suddenly go for them I'd be able to get my arm in the way first (I'd rather it camps onto my arm than the girls). I'd do this till the dog gets bored and runs off or the owner comes to get the dog.

    @cleo

    A 'domestic' dog will still have its wild hunting instincts at heart and not all dogs are well domesticated. You can train a dog to behave however you can never have 100% control over an animal which can think and act for itself. The owner does have a certain amount of control over a dog and car (both of which can be deadly). However a car won't just suddenly attack a child.

    The difference between crossing a road and a dog is huge though. Once you teach your child how to cross a road safely and do it with them they know when its safe to cross and when it isn't safe to cross because they observe the oncoming traffic and any other dangers. But a dog is unpredictable, it doesn't matter how much observation you give a dog it will still act in a way that takes you by surprise at times.

    Its great that you are able to enjoy having a family pet and the children enjoy them. However my past experiences prevent me from taking that risk. But that doesn't mean my girls will grow up to be any less sensible or responsible animal lovers.

  • -8

    tmarie

    Kari, with all respect on this, you have no idea how your child behaves when you not there. Children do things they wouldn't do in front of their parents. I know I certainly did. I'm glad you are educating your kids about dog safety. The issue is, many are not. And many owners don't train their dogs. Hence the tragedy we read about.

    If any dog off leash came running up to me and near any kids I was around, the owner would be told off for their lack of common sense and safety. That shoudn't be happening to you nor your family.

    Cleo's traffic analogy is great. If it were as simple as you suggest, kids wouldn't get hit and killed by cars. We all know that isn't the truth though. Drivers, just like dogs, are unpredictable.

    Cleo, we didn't have roaming dogs - they had to be tied up or behind fences. I was talking about people out walking their dogs. Wouldn't ever have gone near a roaming dog nor one off leash without owners. I was dumb but not THAT dumb! ;)

  • 2

    KariHaruka

    I know quite well how my child behaves even when I'm not around because shes been brought up to show respect to other people and living things. Its not in her nature to misbehave or to act in a nasty way to anyone or thing.

  • -1

    WilliB

    " Bloodspot dog lovers.... looks at dog who is curled up, snoring away in front of the heater... yes, terrifying dog he is. Guess I should wake him up and tease him and train him to kill, eh? Only got him to fight him... God lord. "

    I wonder why there is so much fundamentalism in this issue. Isn´t this basically the same as the "nurture vs nature" debate in human psychology? Nobody in his right mind would question that both play a role in forming humans. So why do the blood-sport dog defenders that that position for dogs? All dogs are the same, and only nurture counts? That is patently absured. OF COURSE different dog breeds are born with different traits, and OF COURSE dogs bread for fighting or for war have different traits than companian dogs.

    If not, why don´t we allow people to keep wolfes as pets, for crying out loud? After all, they just dogs... before humans started to breed out their aggression, to various degrees.

  • -6

    tmarie

    All humans are the same, and only nurture counts? That is patently absured. OF COURSE different races are born with different traits, and OF COURSE different races are for fighting or for war have different traits than other humans.

    See how easy that is? Not any different.

  • 2

    WilliB

    tmarie:

    Are you denying that different dog breeds have different traits?

    To compare dog breeds with human races is patently absurd.

  • -1

    cleo

    My concerns are when dogs are off the leash running around

    I don't know where you live, but if you're in Japan you're very unlikely to be in a situation where there are dogs running around off lead, unless you make a point of going to a dog park....?

    You can train a dog to behave however you can never have 100% control over an animal which can think and act for itself.

    A child is also an animal which can think and act for itself and will act in a way that takes you by surprise at times; tmarie is right, you do not know what your child is doing when you're not watching. No one is suggesting that she might be doing anything 'nasty', but if she's a normal healthy child with a mind of her own, it's guaranteed that she doesn't follow all your rules to the letter 100% of the time.

    a car won't just suddenly attack a child.

    Driver DUI, having a heart attack, fit, fiddling with his mobile phone or satnav, whatever. Failed brakes. Some other mechanical failure. But mostly, driver failure. It happens with much greater regularity than dog attacks. Nearly 5,000 traffic fatalities in Japan every year. I've looked, but I can't find any statistics on fatalities caused by dog attack in Japan. It's easy to find stats from the US, though; in 2012, traffic fatalities, 33,561: dog-attack fatalities, 35.

    And many owners don't train their dogs. Hence the tragedy we read about.

    And when it all comes down to it, this is the nub of the problem. Always neuter/spay, always train using positive methods, and never leave even the most trusted dog alone with a child.

  • 0

    WilliB

    tmarie:

    " The worst breeds I have ever dealt with in terms of nastiness have been shitzus, chihuahua and pommiranians. Vile, snarly little beasts "

    So you are saying that shitzus, chihuahua and pommiranians have different inherent traits than, say, St. Bernhards or Golden Retrievers? (I would agree, actually.)

    But where does that leave your other argument that all dogs are the same, and only training counts?

    Please explain.

  • 1

    Jennifer Mo'ejanai

    This is totally the person who owned the dogs fault. Seriously.

  • 2

    DaDude

    The girl was** playing in a yard** at Murupara in the North Island on Monday afternoon when four dogs belonging to **the property’s owner **attacked her, police said.

    All I see is 4 watch dogs protecting their property. Someone trespasses and they are attacked by the dogs. Nowhere does it say the dogs ran after the girl off the property.

    They are many unanswered questions before we can assume whose fault it is-

    Were there No Trespassing signs? Is it OK by law to attack some who is trespassing? Were the dogs maintained, rabid or trained killers? Is it OK to enter people's property?
    Where was the owner at the time? Where were the parents of the child who trespassed at the time?

    If I am missing something in this article, excuse me.

  • -2

    falseflagsteve

    @Tmarie,

    Different races in humans is a good comparison with breeds of dogs. They are differences in intelligence, aggression, behaviour and many other things in human races and breeds of dogs, Though the most important part is the environment and in dogs the owner is responsible for ensuring their animals are not a danger.

  • 0

    cleo

    DaDude - from what I gather the dogs were family pets not 'guard dogs', the little girl was playing in the yard of the family as her family was visiting the dog-owner's family with whom they were friends. There was no trespass. Apparently adults were present at the time. Whether the dogs thought they were 'protecting' anything is something we'll never know.

    http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/dog-attack-worst-ever-in-new-zealand-5856719

  • -1

    hidingout

    Cleo's traffic analogy is great.

    No it isn't. Its terrible. And only made worse by some head scratching stats on traffic deaths she is now posting.

    One: a dog has very limited brain function - except for the hardwired bit that says "chase and attack", that part works so well you can get a dog to chase a ball all day long proving how dumb they are. They have the problem solving/reasoning skills of a two year old. Do you know any two year old car drivers?

    Two: Automobiles are a necessity in the modern world. I have made every effort I can to live an automobile free lifestyle, but its very difficult to never use a car - even in a country like Japan. On the other hand I live very comfortably without a dog. I save money too.

    If you want to have a dog, that's your choice. Keep it quiet, pick up its crap, don't let it pee on the corner of my house, keep it on a leash and keep it away from other people and their children. Pretty simple really.

    Agree with everything KariHaruka posted in this thread.

  • 2

    madammika

    Cleo FYI: ACC is Accident Compensation Corporation in NZ. Kind of insurance if you must against accidents.

    In regard to the article unfortunately there are too many dog related incidents in NZ at present where children are being bitten or attacked (even adults as well) There had been some thought of banning staffies and other "dangerous" breeds but it was vetoed as far as I know. Besides ANY dog can be dangerous if its not properly trained.

  • -1

    WilliB

    falseflag:

    " Different races in humans is a good comparison with breeds of dogs. "

    No, it is not. Evolution among humans has been pretty much uniform as social creatures. Now, if you took a group of humans and selectively bred them for violence (or non-violence) for thousands of generations, then you might have a point.

    Otherwise, this argument is a false flag.

  • -2

    falseflagsteve

    @WilliB

    Incorrect except for the part where dogs have been bred and have many varieties over a small period of time compared to humans. Evolution amongst humans has been longer but there are great differences in races as there are breeds in dogs although there are fewer of them. The similarity in how different breeds of animals behave (dogs in this point) and different races of humans is valid.

  • 0

    WilliB

    Falseflagsteve:

    Humans have not been bred. We do the breeding ourselves, thank you.

    I hope you are just trolling.

  • 1

    fishy

    Not sure why Jojo got thumbs down for asking the obvious question as to why a child was left alone with a group of dogs. Were they protecting their land? Was the child a guest? Plenty of questions here that need to be addressed.

    This girl was visiting her friend's house and this happened there - there is nothing strange about a 7 year-old child to visit her friend's house without her parents, but the friend's parents should have known that they should not have the dogs and the children in the same area. What happened to this girl was so terrible, and what happened to the dogs was also terrible.. the dogs' owner (friend's parents)can never pay the price for the little girl's injury even if she recovers..

  • 0

    House Atreides

    There's one bit of good news. The family no longer has to worry about medical costs for the time being.

    The Accident Compensation Corporation moved to clarify the situation on Wednesday, after the hospital said it would start a donation line to help support the girl, as she didn't qualify for state-funded care.

    ACC says the girl is covered under a scheme that looks after overseas visitors injured in New Zealand and it will cover the costs of all of her medical care including surgery. It said Sakurako may also be entitled to further funding down the track, depending on her injury-related needs.

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/237957/acc-to-cover-mauled-girl%27s-costs

  • 0

    Rainbow_Demon

    Any of you who have small children, I hope you take note. Whether you have dogs or not, you need to teach your kids how to deal with strange dogs. Rule number one: Never turn tail and run. If you need to get away, you need to back away slowly and carefully and don't fall down. You won't outrun dogs. Don't try. Rule two: Remain calm. Don't get excited, not in a scared way, and not even in a happy way. Dogs can get carried away either way. Keep yourself calm, and by doing so you may keep them calm too. Rule three: If the dogs are being friendly, wagging their tails or at least not overly aggressive, crouch down and extend your hand, palm up, below their snout, for the dog to sniff. This will usually make a friend. Sometimes though, a dog will try to bite your hand. You got be ready for that and get your hand back before the dog can bite. But hey, a bite on the hand is better than one on the face! And if the dog does go for your face, your hand is out, you are crouched and leveraged, so pushing that muzzle away can be done quick. Rule four: If a dog has bitten your hand and won't let go, don't pull away, push! You shove your hand down that dog's throat its gonna back off for a while. You will get some scrapes yes, but it will be worse if you try to pull away.

    I am sure other people will have other advice and perhaps more mainstream and PC advice. But I grew up with big dogs and had some very rough wrestling matches with them when I was about this girl's age up until teenage.. I have been confronted with some strange aggressive dogs many times, and it seems the only ones that did not at least calm down with an extended hand were dogs trained to be vicious, presumably by way of being abused. I am glad I never had to actually fight such a dog, but if I did, I would grab it by the throat until I found a chance to stick my finger in its ear. I never tried that before, but I bet that would alter his consciousness for a while!

  • -9

    tmarie

    **tmarie:

    Are you denying that different dog breeds have different traits?

    To compare dog breeds with human races is patently absurd.**

    I don't think I've denied anything. i've just shown how absurb your comment is. Nature vs nuture. Go at it but I think I've made my points very clear and can't be bother anymore to deal with fear mongering over certain breeds when clearly the people making comments don't like nor have much experience with dogs. Enjoy your fear and ignorance while I enjoy my lovely dog.

  • -1

    sighclops

    Bloody Staffies (Staffordshire terriers). Before you jump on the "oh, it's a problem with the trainer" bandwagon, it most certainly isn't. They are an aggressive dog by nature, much like bull terriers and rottweilers.

    I have a mini fox terrier and it was nearly killed by a Stafforshire terrier - on more than one occasion. On one terrifying occasion, my dog was just happily playing in our garden and this beast of a dog came over and tore out my dog's throat. The dog's jaw was so strong that it took THREE GROWN MEN to remove him. Luckily we were able to rush my dog to ER and he survived after major surgery - which the owners thankfully paid for.

    I'm sorry but this breed should be added to the 'banned' list.

  • -2

    Fukuppy

    Banning breeds doesn't really help. People still keep them, and by the time something is done about it, it's too late for some poor soul. Only a few months ago a schoolgirl was mauled to death by dangerous dogs in the UK - horrible thing to have happened. You can charge the owners, but someone has still had to suffer.

  • 0

    JanesBlonde

    Actually, New Zealand is pretty loose when it comes to the control of dogs.

    They have improved in the main cities, but in the rural areas they can roam at will. Out in the real countryside / farming areas the farmers shoot them when they attack sheep and cattle or if they start roaming in packs.

    But again it is the in between areas. In between the cities and the farms that are the problem. Small "rural" towns where everyone has a dog or 3 .... most are unlicensed.

    Up Northland way can be pretty rough in some parts and in the smaller towns you would be lucky to find a policeman let alone a dog ranger.

    Unfortunately this is certainly not the first time this terrible kind of thing has happened. Sadly I doubt it will be the last.

    The Police are looking at pressing charges against the owners, not registered dogs. A slap on the wrist probably. It has been an issue in New Zealand for years ... like the last 30 years.

    New Zealand is great in some aspects, but the whole "no worries" attitude becomes rather pathetic in the wake terrible events like this. Totally avoidable.

    These were probably pseudo guard / property dogs that were just running around the house / property loose. The girl was not known to the dogs and with this breed, anything could have set one of them off and then the pack would have joined in instantly.

    Again, stupid owners (probably the main owner was not home at the time) just not thinking about anything. The poor young girl and family were up north attending a maori language school (very similar language to Japanese) and from what I have been told , they had popped over to visit a friend / class mate.

  • 1

    Heda_Madness

    A donation drive for the 7-year-old Japanese girl mauled by four dogs earlier this week has raised $65,000 so far.

    The Middlemore Foundation opened a donation line to support the family of Sakurako Uehara, who remains in a critical condition in hospital after being attacked at a Murupara property.

  • 4

    jpntdytmrow

    Over the decades, I have rescued an Airedale Terrier, a large Japanese mix, a Pointer type abandoned hunting dog, and a starving abandoned dog that later became identifiable as a Pit Bull Terrier. I would never have gone out and bought any of these, especially the latter. But, like eslewhere, Japan has people who discard dogs. But, they have all come into our family at different stages and ages of children and all have lived with cats. All have training and communicate with local children. I use them to teach children and neighbors how to deal with dogs. Children walk with us, but I am careful to walk them after most kids have gone to school or on routes where other dogs don't walk. I do not put them in situations where they become defensive or possessive or frightened. No one is left alone with them. I put them away when visitors come. They are kept indoors. They, (two have died of old age), are my responsibility. They also trained to climb rocks or snow drifts and look for people or check to see if neighbors are okay. Neighbors call them by name. I don't recommend everyone keep a dog. I do wish people would take raising dogs seriously, though. They are not toys. As others have mentioned, small dogs should not have bad manners either. I would blame myself if they harmed another person. Too bad the situation in the article happened.

  • 0

    WilliB

    Tmarie:

    " I don't think I've denied anything. i've just shown how absurb your comment is. Nature vs nuture. "

    No you have not. You have claimed that a) all dog breeds have the same traits and b) Chihuhahuas are more aggressive than others.

    You still have not explained the contradiction.

  • -8

    tmarie

    No you have not. You have claimed that a) all dog breeds have the same traits and b) Chihuhahuas are more aggressive than others.

    How about you quote me where I have said what you've suggested.

  • -1

    Hawkeye

    Staffordshire bull terrier crosses are basically a fancy name for pit bulls who are nothing but trouble. There is not a week that goes by in the news about pit bulls mauling or killing someone. Dangerous dog breeds should be banned and those that are alive should be spayed and neutered as well as their owners.

  • 1

    Marilita Fabie-Fujisawa

    I just can't stop shaking my head upon hearing this horrible news. I hope the girl recovers with a lot of positivities..poor poor girl. I don't have the right to say that the parents are to blame for making her go near them bulls, but really totally sad results for everyone. I will truly include her in my prayers!

  • -3

    tmarie

    Staffordshire bull terrier crosses are basically a fancy name for pit bulls who are nothing but trouble.

    Yes, just as a wire fox is the same as a jack russell... Dangerous owners should be banned.

    Still waiting for those quotes...

  • 0

    Makere Solberg

    This is a heartbreaking news and I wish a successful surgery and recovery. I pray that sakurako will not have to suffer for too long. My thoughts and prayers are with her and all her families. I send them much love and many positive thoughts of healing energies. Brightest Blessings.

  • -1

    WilliB

    tmarie:

    " How about you quote me where I have said what you've suggested. "

    Scroll back and read your own comments.

  • 0

    Joselito Asi

    OMG. I hope the kid recovers fully well on time.

  • -1

    tmarie

    Will, you said I made certain comments so it is up to you to find those comments. I know I didn't say what you said I did. You refuse because you know I didn't say what you suggested. Hence why you can't locate any quotes. Go on, prove me wrong.

  • 0

    kdotson1965

    I have two rather simple questions for the Authorties

    "Police said the dogs were put down and they were considering laying charges.

    Local Government Minister Paula Bennett said authorities would look at tightening dog control laws in the wake of the attack."

    Considering Charges?? It is clear to anyone with a minimum of common sense that the animals' owner did not have them properly restrained and should face the full weight of the law and be responsible for the child's rehabilitation and additional damages to the family.

    The Minister saying that authorities would **look at tightening controls **- is a cop out and shows zero initiative or any concern about what has happened.

    In my city we have ordinances about dangerous animals - ie: any large and dangerous dog. Most of these type of animals were bred for aggression and fighting ability, not as cuddly pets for people - they exist to kill or maim and little else

  • 0

    LynnWales

    As the NZ authorities have said, it's a complex area. Staffies are thought to be the most empathetic of breeds and have many positive qualities, such as a particular orientation towards people and tough hides which make them less sensitive to children's tugs. This the reason they are in the top list of dogs recommended as being ok around children by The Kennel Club and by British vets. Define "blood sports" ? The bull dogs in the UK were originally bred for bull baiting - pulling bulls to the floor by their rings. Not so different to other hunting breeds of dogs, such as Dachshunds, which were used for ratting. They bull breeds were 'used' for fighting in Staffordshire. They had to be adaptable so they would slot into family life after fighting, or they were euthanised. Therefore, the ones that survived were of sound temperament, especially around people. I have a mongrel I rescued from death row four years ago. He has some bull dog in him. He had been discarded by two families as a puppy. He is fantastic with my twenty month old son and they really love each other. He enriches our family life. Research shows us that dogs helps us be more present in the moment, bring our blood pressure down and help improve our children's immune systems, not to mention the cardio vascular benefits we get from walking them. Trust and companionship are also huge pluses. However, I never leave my son and dog (or any other dog) unattended as both children and dogs are unpredictable. I would certainly never leave my dog with strangers. If my child was to push a crayon into my dogs ear drum, how could I be angry with the dog for lashing out? How could I blame my child who is below the age of understanding ? Then again, accidents happen and we can't account fof everything. If my dog had an unidentified brain tumour and started to show aggression, if I'm around my.child and dog hopefully i can pick up on this before anything happens. All the dog 'breeds' potentially have horrible things inbred into them. Whether it be illnesses or personality traits. It is up to the owner to be responsible enough to know their dog/s and to take the necessary caution.

  • 0

    LunarTuner

    >

    Police said their investigation into the attack was now complete and the two owners of the dogs involved had been jointly charged with an offence under Section 58 of the Dog Control Act - owning a dog which causes serious injury.

    >

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