Dreamliner probe may take weeks, says battery maker

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  • -1

    Sherman

    Hahahahahahaha. It is Japans fault!

  • 1

    888naff

    Battery is just part of system, if its not used right.... Cant blame the battery. Too early to say without the proper investigation.

  • 3

    GG2141

    I do hope it is an easy switch out to standard batteries. Ironic about the passenger warning on L-ion batteries.

    Personally; I love the jet. Friends who have flown on it love it even more. But, it uses a whole lot of untried technology and more worryingly it was the first Boeing to be built from components sourced globally.

    A third or fourth generation Boeing worker who had just been laid off once said: "there is more to building a jet then just pure design, there is an element of generational learned know how that just makes them work better".

  • 0

    VicMOsaka

    It is well known among those who use lithium batteries for their model planes and cars etc., that they are prone to catching fire especially when recharging. They are warned not to charge the batteries unattended and to charge them in a safe place where they can't set anything on fire.

    It is not the fault of any maker of these types of batteries. They are just a risky battery to use compared to other types of batteries.

  • -6

    humanrights

    They will probably say ''Its not the JP batteries, but the cables that hook on them'' HAHA ''The batteries radiation levels are acceptable.....

  • 0

    tMMt2

    The small number of L-Ion batteries that caught fire in Laptops and iPods a few years ago caught alight because one or more of the very thin layers shorted across the electrolyte causing local overheat and combustion.

    If it is the battery at fault on the 787 it would likely be a similar cause. But, L-Ion are very much more sensitive to charge voltage and current than normal rechargeables. If there is an over-voltage that damages the battery then that will lower the safe charge voltage for the affected cell, making it more likely that a further over-voltage will happen, damaging the cell further, etc etc, round and round. Aircraft electrical systems are a lot better voltage regulated than they used to be, but still are nonetheless noisy and more variable than ideal.

    Whilst Boeing could be looking at a manufacturing fault in the battery, it's equally likely that they have a result of a combination of sensitive batteries hooked up to less than perfect electronics.

  • -1

    basroil

    VicMOsakaJan. 18, 2013 - 09:21AM JST

    It is well known among those who use lithium batteries for their model planes and cars etc., that they are prone to catching fire especially when recharging. They are warned not to charge the batteries unattended and to charge them in a safe place where they can't set anything on fire. It is not the fault of any maker of these types of batteries. They are just a risky battery to use compared to other types of batteries.

    It is well known among the millions and even billions of users of cellphones and laptops that lithium-ion batteries (not lithium batteries, which are not rechargeable and doing so WILL cause problems) that they are not dangerous at all, at least no more so than any other battery. Almost all battery fires are caused either by improper manufacturing of the battery or the charger, or physical damage to the battery. And other battery types are just as prone to failure as lithium ion batteries, including the lead acid batteries still used in airplanes and cars (only other batteries that can be used to pull 300 amps or more without a lot of parallel batteries).

    888naffJan. 18, 2013 - 08:13AM JST

    Battery is just part of system, if its not used right.... Cant blame the battery.

    Actually, you can blame the battery. Those batteries are built to specifications saying they cannot leak electrolyte even when overcharged (standard specification for any use actually, not just airplanes), and that they can't have thermal runaway in the case of a short (again, applies to any battery at any application)). Regardless of what caused the battery problems, the manufacturer is entirely to blame for the internally sourced fires. Whether anyone else also deserves blame is to be investigated, but Yuasa is squarely to blame for all battery fires.

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