Gov't asks 4 power companies to plan for rolling blackouts

TOKYO —

The government on Friday asked four power utilities to make plans for rolling blackouts from July in case power demand reaches 99% of capacity.

The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry instructed the four companies—Chubu Electric, Kansai Electric Power Co, Shikoku Electric Power Co and Hokkaido Electric Power Co—to prepare to implement rolling blackouts for up to two hours a day, Fuji TV reported.

According to the ministry’s guidelines, the government will issue an alert in the morning if power demand looks like reaching 99% of capacity in areas serviced by the four utilities. An email alert will be sent to consumers 3-4 hours before the planned blackout, urging businesses and consumers to cut back on power usage. If power demand keeps rising, there will be a final alert two hours before the lights go off.

The ministry said the blackouts will last about two hours and only be implemented once a day for each area, Fuji reported.

Hospitals, prefectural government buildings, police and fire stations will be exempt, along with railways, airports and banking systems, the ministry said.

Japan Today

  • 3

    gaijinfo

    Just deregulate the power companies completely, which means NO more subsidies. Let them charge whatever the true cost is for power. People will affect their own "rolling blackouts."

  • -3

    I and 4 million home owners have our own rolling black out. We just installed millions of solar panels.

    KEPCO will pay us $0.53 kWh for harvesting solar energy and feeding it onto the public grid.
    We no longer need KEPCO --- the utilities and the nation needs us!

    Home owners are now the new utility.

    By 2013 there will be 100,000 new millionaires in Japan, ie., those first 100,000 home owners who install 20 solar panels on their homes.

    We can make alot of money harvesting solar.

  • 12

    NeverSubmit

    Even the communist Eastern Bloc countries could keep the lights on during the 1950s.

    It's the 21st century in supposedly the most advanced country in the world and they can't even keep the power on.

    Korea is having the same issue too.

    Yet 1960s Bulgaria and Romania had ample, stable power.

  • 6

    KariHaruka

    One of the most advanced countries in the world and they are planning to implement rolling blackouts. Well this will be fun when it happens..... -___-

  • 2

    KariHaruka

    Now why doesn't that surprise me. Its about time we get rid of Noda, its obvious he is out of touch with reality.

  • 5

    smithinjapan

    More scaremongering. Interesting that the government takes such a long time to release details critical to the public's health in certain situations, but has no qualms about leaking this kind of report it makes to the power companies just as it's trying to get the Oi plants back online.

  • 0

    maitai62

    Perhaps the anti-nuke protesters should be the first to have their homes blacked out. For now, nuke power is the best alternative until Japan can get on the ball with other renewable energy sources (PV, wind, etc.)

  • 7

    zichi

    An email alert will be sent to consumers 3-4 hours before the planned blackout, urging businesses and consumers to cut back on power usage.

    and were do they intend to find the email addresses?

  • 2

    JaneM

    Last year, when Tokyo was told that there would be possible blackouts, the lights in the stations were reduced, ac in the trains, too. Many buildings did so, too. My Japanese co-workers never stopped complaining that it was too hot and too dark everywhere and that stations might get dangerous with so few lights. The first thing they did every morning was to switch on the several powerful fans in the office and then continued complaining that it was too hot.

  • 4

    zichi

    In Kansai, many major companies anf gov't office buildings have stated they will reduce power by 20% for July/Aug. Some companies have installed their own method of power generation. JR West said it was thinking of using disel trains on its Shinkansen lines.

  • 0

    tmarie

    Wait, what? Kansai? I thought the whole damn point of restarting Oi was to AVOID blackouts. Lies, lies, lies....

  • 7

    Onniyama

    All BS! Turn the street lights and platform lights at stations out during daylight hours. I counted about 20 000 unnecessary Watts of energy being used at one little station this week, all outdoors in broad daylight. This was in Kansai area by the way.

  • -3

    basroil

    OnniyamaJun. 23, 2012 - 11:05AM JST

    All BS! Turn the street lights and platform lights at stations out during daylight hours. I counted about 20 000 unnecessary Watts of energy being used at one little station this week, all outdoors in broad daylight. This was in Kansai area by the way.

    20kW? You know that even if you had a million times more savings, you would still be under the capacity of KEPCO alone. I doubt your calculations are even correct though, as it's actually very hard to estimate wattage for industrial lamps without knowing the type, ballast type, actual use percentage, etc. This is the reason why professional power engineers are needed to make those plans.

  • 2

    basroil

    tmarieJun. 23, 2012 - 10:58AM JST

    Wait, what? Kansai? I thought the whole damn point of restarting Oi was to AVOID blackouts. Lies, lies, lies....

    No, it was to reduce the chance of it. Unfortunately, only two of the four Oi reactors are restated, so only 2GWe or so was returned. Generally they had 10GWe of power, when in conjunction with the oil and gas plants, provided about 33GWe with 21-23GW from non-nuclear (due to hydro plant water levels). The max for 2010 was over 28GWe, so even with Oi a very hot summer will cause the grid to crash.

  • 0

    basroil

    smithinjapanJun. 23, 2012 - 09:20AM JST

    More scaremongering. Interesting that the government takes such a long time to release details critical to the public's health in certain situations, but has no qualms about leaking this kind of report it makes to the power companies just as it's trying to get the Oi plants back online.

    If these plans aren't made and the grid crashes, it can cause hundreds of heatstroke related deaths during a hot summer. It is better to be prepared than to find out after the fact that something wasn't good enough.

  • -1

    basroil

    Jun. 23, 2012 - 06:45AM JST

    I and 4 million home owners have our own rolling black out. We just installed millions of solar panels.

    KEPCO will pay us $0.53 kWh for harvesting solar energy and feeding it onto the public grid. We no longer need KEPCO --- the utilities and the nation needs us!

    Home owners are now the new utility.

    By 2013 there will be 100,000 new millionaires in Japan, ie., those first 100,000 home owners who install 20 solar >panels on their homes.

    We can make alot of money harvesting solar.

    Please stop with entirely off-topic comments that are simply spam. Moderators, please get rid of those messages and get rid of his nameless access. This spam is getting annoying.

  • 1

    zichi

    so far this year, the power consumption iin Kansai has been a bit less than last year so I hope we won't get a summer which is too hot.

  • -5

    basroil

    zichiJun. 23, 2012 - 12:02PM JST

    so far this year, the power consumption iin Kansai has been a bit less than last year so I hope we won't get a summer which is too hot.

    As long as the temperatures are under 33C or so, it should be fine... But at the same time Japan needs a wakeup call to reality, so perhaps having the grids crash would be beneficial and more nuclear plants will be restarted. Even just 30 reactors restarted would prevent grid failure even with 2010 level heat.

  • 3

    Onniyama

    basroil. if anything my estimate was low ball. i did not take into account the lights still blazing on the vending machines. FYI, I could clearly see the wattage on each bulb. The were the long flourescent tubes at 100 W each. And this was only one tiny station. I am sure there are over a thousand stations in the Kansai area. And how many streetlights do estimate there are? Why don`t you try making a statement that gets a thumbs up for a change? And quit attacking people.

  • -2

    JaneM

    Onniyama

    basroil. Why don`t you try making a statement that gets a thumbs up for a change? And quit attacking people.

    Because, I guess, making the truth known (even the uncomfortable one) is more important than getting thumbs up?

  • 0

    Dale Berry

    As long as the temperatures are under 33C or so, it should be fine...

    33! last year didnt it almost hit 43?! Ha!

  • 0

    Onniyama

    JaneM. So your truth is to leave as many lights as possible on during broad daylight and then build nuclear reactors to support the energy requirement? Brilliant!!

  • -1

    JaneM

    Onniyama

    Don't put words in my mouth. Your question was about thumbs up and as long as I have followed the posts of Basroil, he has pointed out many unwanted/unpopular truths concerning n-plants and radiation.

    Maybe you are the one who should try to be more reasonable and try to use your energy in a more positive way?

  • -1

    basroil

    OnniyamaJun. 23, 2012 - 12:11PM JST

    And how many streetlights do estimate there are?

    Street lights come on only after peak is over. Signal lights are always needed and without them you can expect vehicle injuries and deaths to soar.

    OnniyamaJun. 23, 2012 - 01:12PM JST

    JaneM. So your truth is to leave as many lights as possible on during broad daylight and then build nuclear reactors to support the energy requirement? Brilliant!!

    The nuclear reactors are already in existence, hence nothing built. However, building more will help prevent blackouts, especially Gen III+ reactors that are inherently many times safer than even Oi.

    Even so, those lights are there to prevent injuries, since good building design has a maximum darkness ramp set. Others are not able to be turned off because they are not connected through standard means. What can be turned off though, are hair driers, washing machines, electric stoves, and hot water heaters, all of which use more than 1kW each (hot water heater can be over 10kW). But those things are personal so off limits right?

  • 1

    billyshears

    Gen III+ reactors that are inherently many times safer than even Oi.

    = Even the reactors at Oi are inherently many times more unsafe than Gen III+ reactors

  • 2

    zichi

    Basroil

    well if the gov't prediction is correct, that in future nuclear energy will only be used for 15% of total power then there won't be more than 20 reactors in operation? I expect by the end of this year 10-15 will be operating. The gov't have been forced by the opposition to delay the law to increase the life span of NPP's.

  • 1

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Hoping you are not right on that last prediction, Zichi-san. Although everything else has gone to batsh*t, so perhaps 10-15 operating will happen, even if 100,000s are demonstrating against them. I guess we should all simply cross our fingers until alternative, sustainable power comes into play?

  • 4

    Samantha Ueno

    Last year in Tokyo when they reduced lights and AC in the trains and other places it was great! Less light makes indoors cooler anyway, and as long as you have air circulation it's not so hot. And they had the power consumption charts on the TVs in the trains and stations and I don't recall it ever going above 80% or so, so rolling blackouts seems very unlikely.

  • 4

    bonword

    One of the companies I work for posted the power consumed every day in front of the first floor elevator last summer. They managed to reduce power by over 40% compared to the year before. They did this by; 1) replacing all desktops with notebooks (about time), turning off one elevator out of four, unplugging the coffee machines in the cafeteria, disconnecting the hot air dryers and the seat warmers in the bathrooms and ensuring that there was no overtime (i.e., it got dark, go home). One building, 40% less power. Makes you wonder about waste.

  • -3

    Yubaru

    We can make alot of money harvesting solar.

    What do you do during rainy season? Ah I got it, rolling black-outs!

  • 0

    basroil

    zichiJun. 23, 2012 - 02:31PM JST

    well if the gov't prediction is correct, that in future nuclear energy will only be used for 15% of total power then there won't be more than 20 reactors in operation? I expect by the end of this year 10-15 will be operating. The gov't have been forced by the opposition to delay the law to increase the life span of NPP's.

    At the rate that Japan's demand was growing through 2010, it would actually mean restarting practically all the reactors.

  • 1

    basroil

    Samantha UenoJun. 23, 2012 - 04:04PM JST

    Last year in Tokyo when they reduced lights and AC in the trains and other places it was great! Less light makes indoors cooler anyway, and as long as you have air circulation it's not so hot. And they had the power consumption charts on the TVs in the trains and stations and I don't recall it ever going above 80% or so, so rolling blackouts seems very unlikely.

    Last year they also didn't have manufacturing at all until September in some parts. The numbers you were shown were likely current numbers rather than summer peak. Summer peak is generally twice the spring average, and is quite high. Last year they had rolling blackouts even with Osaka reactors still online and adding 3GW to the Tokyo side. This year, those regions that still had surpluses will now be under themselves, so you may actually see not only Tokyo dark, but Osaka and other large cities too.

  • 0

    basroil

    bonwordJun. 23, 2012 - 04:27PM JST

    replacing all desktops with notebooks (about time) Replacing a new desktop (generally 15W idle, +15W for a large screen) with a new laptop (generally about 30W idle with screen on to 100Cd) does not save power. In fact, laptop power adapters are generally more inefficient than the 80+ gold level power supplies, and you can end up wasting a few extra watt per machine simply because the wall adapter is less efficient than a power supply. Also considering the power needed to make a laptop vs making a desktop, you are likely to have wasted more energy with a laptop.

  • 0

    edojin

    What bugs me is that while my wife and I try to conserve electrcity there are those out there who continue to use as much as they please. Those who ignore electrical conservation practices should have their homes stripped of all wiring ...

    That might help save a little electricity ...

  • 0

    Stranger_in_a_Strange_Land

    They are going to have to turn off all the pachinko and vending machine lights before I start even thinking about turning my a/c up.

  • 1

    wanderlust

    And don't forget the fully lit up Ministries, with their three to five staff plus supervisors in each department on call through the night, just in case someone asks their Minister or Vice-Minister a question, and they have to prepare an answer for them...

  • 1

    JaneM

    Wonderlust

    The ministries are using electricity from a different power company, not TEPCO.

    Also for your information, the ones who ask questions (usually at the end of the Diet's session for the day - meaning late at night) and want to have the answers till 6 o'clock next morning are the politicians in the Diet so you may as well take your complaint about the fully lit ministries to those whom we call politicians.

  • 0

    JaneM

    Wanderlust

    Sorry for misspelling your name. I will be more careful next time.

  • 0

    Blair Herron

    and were do they intend to find the email addresses?

    My municipal government encourages us to register our email address.

    Information in foreign languages are sent by cell phone throughout the City. Languages include: English, Chinese, Spanish and easy Japanese. Useful information such as rolling blackout schedule right after 3.11.2011, cut in water supply will occur the next day, random street assault still on the street, public school lunch cesium level…etc.

  • 1

    Blair Herron

    The ministries are using electricity from a different power company, not TEPCO.

    Add to JaneM,

    Farm Ministry: ENNET, METI: Marubeni Showa Shell F-Power, Justice Ministry: Marubeni F-Power, MIC: ENNET, Cabinet office: ENNET, Finance Ministry: ENNET, MLIT: ENNET, Foreign Ministry: ENNET F-Power

  • 0

    wanderlust

    JaneM - thanks for the info on different power suppliers. BTW, the MInisters are also politicians, nominal heads of Ministries.

  • 0

    JaneM

    Wanderlust

    True - the ministers are politicians, too, but they are requested to answer questions by other members of the Diet and this seems to always happen on the night before any relevant discussion. The opposition (doesn't matter which party is in opposition) is usually demanding answers for whatever they can think of.

  • 0

    kadenotoko

    The government and all the power companies knew that there is no such thing as power shortage in Japan. It's all about the power plant operations and of course the use of the NPPs. Without the rolling blackouts and all the energy saving measures it'll be very clear that the country doesn't need NPP's and the power companies balance sheet would be very much affected. And if so, all the donations these government officials are receiving every month from these power companies would be slash off and that's a lot of money for them.

    That's also the main reason why they don't want to change anything regarding power resources policies. These people hate changes because changes would mean changing their personal lives. A lot of researches have been done even before the crisis last year started regarding alternative energy sources but all of them were turned down by those officials because of money reasons and of course the amakudari.

  • 0

    cwhite

    one would have thought that companies who shaved 15-40% off their electricity bill would want to keep it that way throughout the year. Unfortunately it seemed that many companies didn't really care and went back to turning all the lights back on in broad daylight.

  • 3

    basroil

    cwhiteJun. 24, 2012 - 12:47AM JST

    one would have thought that companies who shaved 15-40% off their electricity bill would want to keep it that way throughout the year. Unfortunately it seemed that many companies didn't really care and went back to turning all the lights back on in broad daylight.

    Lost productivity, minimal cost savings, finally realizing the cave effect is harmful, etc. While there is probably waste, some lights are actually not wasteful.

  • 0

    Rick Kisa

    Japan has enough electricity to go around, even without switching on the reactors. The scare-mongering here is meant to scare people out of their skins to allow remaining reactors to be switched on. It is however a wake call for companies not to heavily relly always on dirty national grids. You can also make ur electricity....this is a common practice in USA!

  • 0

    YuriOtani

    People will die from rolling blackouts. It will be the elderly in their homes, traffic accidents at non operating traffic lights, etc. This is not a if but what will happen. Then add lost productivity from closed factories and business and it is a disaster. All of this to stop the evil radiation. So the lack of power will cause more deaths that the Fukushima accident. Then add in all of the pollution that will be caused and the deaths from that. The response from the anti nuclear crowd is to limit power use, Japan is like 26 in the would for electrical use at 6788. While it is nice that the Philippines comes in at 534, who would want to live like that? Hint they pay more for electric than in Japan. Their income is much less as well, thus it is easy to see why the demand is so much lower. Rick other than back up generators of which there are few, most people do not generate their own power. It would cost me 20000 American dollars to put up enough solar panels to power my home, during the day only and sunny days.

  • 0

    Cos

    An email alert will be sent to consumers 3-4 hours before the planned blackout, urging businesses and consumers to cut back on power usage. If power demand keeps rising, there will be a final alert two hours before the lights go off.

    That's true blackmailing. After 3/11, that was emergency, so probably the surprise black-outs were the only way. Now, it's a choice to get on people's nerves. If we need to use less energy, fix objectives for industrial companies and let them adapt their schedule to it. Then for other users, if some blackouts have to occur, they should be scheduled weeks in advance and set at a fix hour of the day for a certain town, so everybody will know that weekdays 2 to 4 p.m., they do without electricity in Osaka, while Kobe will do 3 to 5 pm and Kyoto 1 to 3 pm., during 2 months, so all shops/offices will adapt. For me, I need electricity for my job, maybe 4 hours a day maximum so I can deal with 2 hours off easily... if they are scheduled. But if they send me an email 4 hours before, I cannot reschedule, I have to cancel, lose 2 days of work of money per day I cancel and probably lose customers as they will find it too inconvenient to take time off to attend uncertain activities. I think most are in the same case. Or I'll cancel the Kepco contract and get a camping generator for my modest electricity needs. I should do that with the neighbor as we share a closet with the counters . We'd have the generator and its fuel there instead. That would be ridiculous.

  • -7

    Stuart hayward

    Basroll: your solution to everything is always (turn on all nuclear plants)! Are you an electrical power engineer??? I'm was an electrician before coming to Japan, and understand that ( no one thing ) will fix every everyone's problems. My very simple fuel cell generator is 120 volts, 20 amps , it runs many small items in my house and it fuel is water or Zinc. There are many other options to choose from besides (solar or nuclear power!!!) If everyone could do (one small act) to slow down energy use, it will help the grid!.

  • 0

    YuriOtani

    Cos perhaps all the english conversation schools should be closed to save electric.

  • 1

    basroil

    Stuart haywardJun. 24, 2012 - 07:34AM JST

    Basroll: your solution to everything is always (turn on all nuclear plants)! Are you an electrical power engineer??? I'm was an electrician before coming to Japan, and understand that ( no one thing ) will fix every everyone's problems. My very simple fuel cell generator is 120 volts, 20 amps , it runs many small items in my house and it fuel is water or Zinc. There are many other options to choose from besides (solar or nuclear power!!!) If everyone could do (one small act) to slow down energy use, it will help the grid!.

    Where would you put it in a zinc air battery? It has a power density of 100W/kg, so you would need at least 20kg of fuel just to meet power requirements. At 470Wh/kg, you would also need a ton and a half of fuel per month. Nobody in Japan has that sort of space, especially not those in apartments. Lets not forget that you need to actually process and recover that zinc, which generally means putting in two or three times the energy you got out of it.

    Unlike the USA, where most people have their own large houses, Japan is very tight on space. You can't make large inefficient generators everywhere, nor can you make proper fuel transport routes. Japan already has enough generating capacity to avoid any problems, they are just refusing to turn them back on. And unlike the USA, Japan uses 100V power and your fuel cell will cause some devices to simply stop working.

  • -8

    Stuart hayward

    Basroll:
    Thank you for responding! I didnt tell you that this fuel cell generator was (portable) but I did tell you it will run (on water) OR (zinc), true, , I haven't found any place to purchase zinc after comming to Japan, but water is everywhere!. So far the generator (has powered up) lighting, rice cooker, coffee maker, computer, ( but not able ) to power the toaster oven, freezer, washer, dryer, as I mentioned ther is no (one silver bullet) to fix every electrical problem. I know that if everyone tried to safe some energy, (plus) use more alternative energy, it (Will help the grid)!!!

  • 0

    Cos

    Cos perhaps all the english conversation schools should be closed to save electric.

    Yuri, that's so 1990's... You've not visited Japan for years it seems. They have closed a while ago. Nearly all the gaijins that were eating the electricity of the precious Japanese have left. Anyway that was not electric English : we have not noted a national decrease of energy consumption since the Nova and Geos have been switched off.

    you would also need a ton and a half of fuel per month.

    That must be really some antique equipment. I've used some more compact ones already in the 80's. But I agree with you, that would not be convenient, not safe... That's why we have electric companies. Like we have water companies, so each family doesn't need to dig and find a water spring. If the companies fail to provide a regular service, they won't convince people that nuclear is safe again -which the goal of the current operation. They would have to erase the Fukushima episode from our memories. But many will go back to anachronic solutions if random black outs occur.

    I know that if everyone tried to safe some energy, (plus) use more alternative energy, it (Will help the grid)!!!

    Many of us do. All my appliances are "eco". I commute by walking, cycling. My electricity bill is about 2500 yen per month, it's nearly nothing as most of that is the basic fee. But like everybody, I need the little I use. We don't want to install candles in the toilets.

  • 0

    borscht

    If KEPCO warned of a 15% shortfall if the plants were not turned on and, now that two are being turned on, they warn of a 7~10% shortfall, that means two power plants only provide about 5% of the needs of Kansai? Conservation and solar power could reduce required power by 5%. Basically, KEPCO is saying the nuclear power plants are useless, is that what they're saying?

  • -8

    Stuart hayward

    Michael Bonincontri: Part of your comment reads: all these (stupid and ignorant comments) on JT about an exit from nuclear energy are absolutely non sence.

    Every electrical item you mentioned ( I power up ) with clean energy that is 100% off the grid. Go ahead and keep talking, I welcome your intellagint responce!

  • 1

    basroil

    CosJun. 24, 2012 - 10:24PM JST

    Many of us do. All my appliances are "eco". I commute by walking, cycling. My electricity bill is about 2500 yen per month, it's nearly nothing as most of that is the basic fee. But like everybody, I need the little I use. We don't want to install candles in the toilets.

    In my area, a bill of 2500 yen means only 350 yen in electricity, or an average of 25kWh (assuming you spread the costs between day and night evenly). 25kWh is not much at all, especially considering an efficient fridge alone is about 20kWh/month. An efficient laptop changed once a day with an 85Wh battery is about 3kWh. Lighting a single room 2 hours a day (quite impossible in Japan, as sunset is very early) is another 3kWh. But of course, all these things mean that you will be either using gas appliances (which draw from the same source as power stations, or you end up using someone else's electricity to do what you do.

    If the companies fail to provide a regular service, they won't convince people that nuclear is safe again -which the goal of the current operation. But many will go back to anachronic solutions if random black outs occur.

    The elderly? Maybe. Everyone else? Very likely not. Companies? They will pull a Toyota and just leave the country never to look back.

    The power companies don't need to convince people it's safe, they only need to convince people it's necessary. Should massive power outages strike and people die either because they couldn't call an ambulance, or the air conditioner in the house of an elderly couple failed, people may think twice about their priorities.

  • 1

    basroil

    borschtJun. 25, 2012 - 08:35AM JST

    If KEPCO warned of a 15% shortfall if the plants were not turned on and, now that two are being turned on, they warn of a 7~10% shortfall, that means two power plants only provide about 5% of the needs of Kansai? Conservation and solar power could reduce required power by 5%. Basically, KEPCO is saying the nuclear power plants are useless, is that what they're saying?

    KEPCO is also quoted saying that when they ask for 15% they really only expect 4% will happen.

    The two reactors out of a dozen that they own will be able to add between 10 and 12% power capacity depending on the availability of hydro. At the same time, they will be getting less from other power companies that have stated they can't meet their own demands, let alone give power to KEPCO. The final one is that they were originally saying the average use of about 28GWe peak, and not the 32GW that can happen on a hot summer. The new numbers reflect last year's amount, which included a good deal of energy from nuclear.

  • 0

    basroil

    CosJun. 24, 2012 - 10:24PM JST

    you would also need a ton and a half of fuel per month.

    That must be really some antique equipment.

    No, that is using brand new equipment that is commercially available. The theoretical energy capacity (which is not able to be realized due to thermochemical limits and engineering considerations) would be about half a ton of fuel per month, which at current market prices is about 80000 yen (or about 8 times the market rate for electricity). Other fuel sources are not much better per kg, like the oil plants that Japan is currently relying on. 1kg of oil will produce about 4kWh, so you would need about 175kg of oil to produce the same amount of energy. 175kg of oil is easier to store, but it's still two bath tubs of oil (which ironically is about the same volume as the 1.5 tons of zinc fuel, though lighter materials are easier to store)

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