IAEA team arrives in Fukushima to observe decontamination effort

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  • 1

    YongYang

    The task is a daunting one because the nuclear accident spread radiation unevenly over a broad swath of Fukushima, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tochigi... the list goes on and includes the ocean.

  • 2

    some14some

    Any good hotel in Fukushima for these VIP guests?

  • 2

    warnerbro

    If they complete decontamination by 2014 it will only mean that the government has redefined the word "complete" the same way it has repeatedly redefined the word "safe" to suit its convenience.

  • 2

    zichi

    It's another mega task that won't be able to be completed. The minimum area contaminated in Fukushima Prefecture is 2,000 sq km and it could be as much as 8,000 sq km. If 10cms of topsoil was removed, that would create between 250 million to 1,000 million tons of soil. Enough to fill hundreds of Tokyo Domes. It will have to be stored in some kind of low level nuclear waste. Much of the area in Fukushima are mountains.

    It would be unrealistic to think it will happen. The top soil could be removed only to discover the following month, it's contaminated again? I think at best, they will have to deal with the many cities, towns, villages, the open farm land.

    Most of what is currently happening is being done by residents. The soil in a school is being removed but it's actually just being buried within the school grounds.

    No other prefecture will want to take the contaminated soil. The exclusion zone should be just left and declared permanent.

  • 2

    Nicky Washida

    Is it really that simple? Give everything a bit of a washdown and skim off a bit of soil and boom - business as usual everybody?

    If it was that simple, why hasnt it been done in Chernobyl? Or has it? I dont honestly know.

    But what scares me greatly is that this is step 1 in the governments plan to "reassure" everyone that they can return and everything will be fine.....at least for the next 10 years or so, who can say after that. But they HAVE been honest with us, havent they? After all, they are always saying "no immediate health risk"

  • 1

    YongYang

    @Nicky: No. It isn't.

    http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/national/news/20111007p2a00m0na018000c.html

  • 1

    zichi

    from the EX-SKF blog

    It's a program from July 10, 2011 on France 24 International News in English. Unlike NHK documentaries or Germany's ZDF programs, France 24 managed to get the workers talk in front of the camera without hiding their faces and having their voices changed to avoid identification.

    It is a well-made program.

    http://www.france24.com/en/20111007-reporters-japan-clearing-up-fukushima-nuclear-plant-workers-radioactive-debris-risks-earthquake-tsunami

  • 0

    Jared Norman

    The ocean is probably safe now even next to the reactor the amount of radiation that went into it is very small compared to the rest of the pacific it is probably too small to measure now.

  • 1

    Jared Norman

    Mrs. Washida chernobyl was much different because the reactor compartment actually blew up.

  • 1

    wanderlust

    Just observing?

    Thanks for the help!

  • 1

    Christina O'Neill

    I would love to be a fly on the wall when the IAEA return to their hotel and discuss their findings

  • 0

    Utrack

    The task is a daunting one because the nuclear accident spread radiation unevenly over a broad swath of Fukushima, leaving some areas near the plant relatively safe, while creating dangerous hotspots farther away

    Yes, daunting to say the least, I myself in trying to understand what exactly has been released from the reactors at Daiichi have had to breakdown isotopes into neutron and proton, their evolution ( radioactive decay ) which I previously did not understand. I have read that over 3000 Isotopes NOT found in nature are created in Nuclear Reactors and Particle Accelerators. So normal background radiation can not be compared to this. Good Luck with the decontamination efforts.

  • 0

    warnerbro

    Adults from abroad coming to have a look. I guess that's why the government just suddenly realised it had found some plutonium a few months ago. I'm sure they'll be staying in something reasonably plush in Shinjuku and commuting in. The IAEA team are nuclear power supporters, after all. They shan't be bothered risking exposure to the consequences of their support. I'd put their arses on the communal mats the nuclear workers are sleeping on if it were up to me.

  • 0

    pawatan

    Is it really that simple? Give everything a bit of a washdown and skim off a bit of soil and boom - business as usual everybody?

    It is and it isn't. Some surfaces can easily be decontaminated in such a way but soil definitely cannot.

    Once the radiation release is stopped or mostly stopped it will probably be best to store the soil that is removed somewhere near the reactor site. Over time try to decontaminate as much land as possible and gradually reduce the exclusion zones. VERY gradually.

  • 0

    Utrack

    Radioactive Neutrons pass through Concrete. So Some buildings, homes may need to be dismantled and stored away in a storage facility.

    http://www.nucleartourist.com/systems/rad.htm

  • 1

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Put the contaminated soil over the npp once it is shut down. Any better ideas?

  • 0

    Jared Norman

    If you mix the concrete with lead and water the radioactive gamma rays will be blocked. Nuetrons are not harmful to people, it is the gamma rays.

  • 0

    LuckyLangers

    This might be worth reading:
    http://www.economist.com/node/21531522?fsrc=scn/tw/te/ar/hotspotsandblindspots

    And how to protect yourself and your families: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jL1uzcDUFdc&feature=related

    Good luck.

    • Moderator

      Readers please stay on topic. Your posts should focus on the visit of the IAEA team.

  • 0

    Utrack

    Apologies Moderator

    @ Jared Norman

    Let's hope the 12 member IAEA team understands the Isotopes composition of **neutron and proton **elements also the evolution of said compositions. Be it Strontium, Plutonium, Gamma Radiation etc. in their observations of the decontamination effort.

  • 2

    Nicky Washida

    Thanks for the links and advice guys. I was aware that Chernobyl was a massive explosion that sent radiation up to be carried thousands of miles on the winds, as opposed to what happened in Fukushima. But I dont understand why, if it is that easy, that they havent cleaned up in Chernobyl the way they plan to here - unless they have and I just havent read about it?

    The mainichi article is really interesting - as I thought, washing away radiation from one place just creates an issue elsewhere, and even though we didnt seem to take a direct hit here (although from the map a blue swathe came perilously close) there seems to be big blue clouds over large parts of Gunma and Tochigi - places where my food sometimes comes from when I cant avoid it.

    Is anyone else exhausted and depressed, living like this? I have no idea if we have had any exposure, and what that may be, I feel selfish even considering it when there are people up in Fukushima who really have got issues, I have no idea if what we are eating is really safe, and I see years stretching out ahead of us living like this. I cant leave because my husband wont leave his job here, and I dont want to take the kids away from him.

    Sorry - just had to verbally throw my guts up for a moment there!

    Utrack - thanks for all the research you ahve done and for sharing it here. I would assume (hope!) the IAEA do know what they are doing, but meanwhile you are now up there with Johannes Weber, Zichi et al on my "posts that are compulsory reading" list!

  • 0

    Utrack

    @ Nicky Washida

    Stay Strong with both eyes open like you already are, I'll share what I learn and try to keep it on topic at the same

  • 0

    warnerbro

    The wolves arrive to monitor the foxes.

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