Japan launches 2 intelligence satellites

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  • -5

    BertieWooster

    What a waste?

    They could have saved money by launching a joint satellite with North Korea.

  • 2

    Wonbatto

    Like the North Korean satellites that beam back revolutionary songs to Earth?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/5108667/North-Korean-satellite-is-transmitting-revolutionary-songs.html

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-20769324

    Presumably if Japan wishes to be free of US hegemony, establishing its own intelligence network independent of the us seems in order.

  • 6

    technosphere

    Japan still relies on the United States for much of its intelligence.

    Not good.

  • -7

    Waxman

    Good use of tax money.....now we can see what vegetables North Korea are growing....oh NK is so scary!!!

  • -1

    kazetsukai

    The positioning of the satellite is the key. In any case, Japan knows the real threat is from China which directly and indirectly "controls" N. Korea. If N. Korea takes action, it is a "cover" a "facade" to hide some clandestine activity that China is doing at the same time, economically or otherwise.

    As for the need... Japan finally realized that USA cannot be relied upon any longer.... even for the intelligence. Especially true since Clinton was Sec. State, now Kerry and most important, Obama's actions (not his rhetoric) which ignores the interests, security and safety of US allies.

  • 1

    kazetsukai

    Just to add... the dominating political party that elected Obama for his second term is backed by a population that do not question rhetoric and reality... so Japan cannot "expect" anything... substantial... from the USA in time of need. With the cut in military in the USA... it is questionable at best... regardless of high tech....

  • -3

    mangosqueezesbanana

    unlike the other satellites up there that are really used for jelly doughnut making?

  • -2

    Matt

    If they're ours then they are 'intelligence satellites', but 'spy satellites' for NK. Reminds me of the quote in 'Charade' refering to 'spys' and 'agents'.

  • 0

    The passage

    Japan launched two intelligence satellites into orbit on Sunday amid growing concerns that North Korea is planning to test more rockets of its own and possibly conduct a nuclear test.

    Here's one I made earlier! Hang on, so NK starts being belligerent and Japan finds some satellites to put up so it can watch its neighbour? Probably more like it has been planned for a very long time (how long to plan and build a satellite?) and this is a god way to bury the justification. Not fooled here.

  • 0

    Frungy

    The interesting thing about sattelites is that they orbit the ENTIRE planet. There areonly five points in orbit where an object would remain stationary above the same point (so-called Lagrange points), and NASA currently occupies almost all of them, and all other sattelites would have to expend fuel to manoever constantly to maintain a geo-synchronous orbit - which naturally is impossible given that once the fuel is expended the sattelite is then useless.

    What I'm getting at is that, depending on the orbital path of the satellite it could be spying on a dozen or more countries, with a relatively small percentage of its orbit spent over North Korea. Saying that the satellite has ONLY been launched to spy on North Korea in response to their actions... well, how dumb do they think we are?

  • 0

    technosphere

    There areonly five points in orbit where an object would remain stationary above the same point (so-called Lagrange points), and NASA currently occupies almost all of them, and all other sattelites would have to expend fuel to manoever constantly to maintain a geo-synchronous orbit - which naturally is impossible given that once the fuel is expended the sattelite is then useless.

    Orbits of spy satellites have nothing to do with mentioned Lagrange points. NASA has nothing to do with orbital positions of military satellites, launched by other countries.

  • 0

    Al Stewart

    Better known as SPY sats. Why can't Gov.s just agree to disagree. They always have to try to out do each other or control each other.

  • 1

    JonathanJo

    Frungy If the satellites pass over NK (latitude 40 North) then they will pass over everything between 40 North and 40 South at least. Only if the orbits are more highly inclined will they go over areas nearer the poles.

    The Lagrange points are all a very long way from the earth's surface (millions of miles) and quite useless for spying. In any case, if you're sitting at such a point, the earth will be turning once a day in front of you.

    Geosynchronous orbit is still quite along way away for spying (22000 miles) compared with low earth orbit of a few hundred, from where you'd get a good view for a few minutes as you passed overhead every day or so.

    If you want a good and continuous view, you need a high flying drone. But that would be invading their air-space so not very acceptable politically.

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