Nearly 290,000 people still living in shelters 2 1/2 years after Tohoku disaster

TOKYO —

The devastation from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami will not soon be forgotten. It has left an indelible footprint on the collective consciousness of Japan and, indeed, the rest of the world. While photos of Japan’s speedy response in many of the stricken areas are certainly inspiring, it’s important to remember that the prefectures worst hit by the natural disaster are still in the process of recovery, with a great many citizens continuing to live in refugee shelters.

It has been two and a half years since the Tohoku disaster which left over 18,500 people either dead or recorded as missing, and reconstruction and recovery efforts are in full swing. Even so, there are still roughly 290,000 people from Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures living in evacuation shelters, temporary housing, or other sorts of refuge. This is despite the number of refugees decreasing by 25,000 people over the last six months.

While a large portion of the refugees are still unable to return due to damage caused by the tsunami and earthquake, over 52,000 of the refuges remain displaced as a result of the ongoing issues with the reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, including irradiated water leakage. As the problems in Fukushima seem to be growing instead of abating, it’s hard to say exactly when those with homes within the irradiated area will be able to return.

On Sept 11, a 1,000-person-strong team searched the coastlines of the three prefectures for the 2,654 people still missing. With such a massive number of individuals still unaccounted for, it is undoubtedly difficult to even discuss recovery. While the massive loss of life was and continues to be beyond horrifying, we can only imagine how much more difficult it must be for those still seeking some sort of closure.

Source: Yahoo! Japan News

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  • 6

    some14some

    Olympics will take care of them, wait till 2020 :(

  • 2

    CrazyJoe

    All because of a false premise that the displaced could go home to a place they couldn't.

  • 0

    JTDanMan

    Same thing with the Great Hanshin Quake.

  • 8

    gaijinfo

    But hey, Abe lied and said there's no problems, so the olympics are coming, the government can spend all kinds of money to build transportation systems that will only be used a couple of times, so what's a few hundred thousand homeless people that are still swept under the rug?

    ABENOMICS!!

  • 11

    bruinfan

    These people have been abandoned. Let their plight be known if you can't help directly.

  • 8

    BertieWooster

    Abe doesn't care about these people because they are in Fukushima.

    Abe thinks Fukushima is "inaka," (Boondocks).

    And therefore can be disregarded.

  • 7

    nedinjapan

    This is where they should have spent their money, not on silly projects all over Japan, from chasing whales to building bridges to nowhere ...

  • 12

    Cricky

    A national disgrace.

  • 8

    jforce

    2&1/2 years is disgraceful. The disconnect by the government and rest of Japan from the reality is ... shocking. Oh well, Tokyo 2020 will make it all better ... right?

  • -17

    sfjp330

    What do you expect these people to do? Most are too old to work. Maybe the goverment needs to gradually start reducing benefits and let them start paying rent.

  • 2

    globalwatcher

    I can feel my blood pressure is going up and every piece of my hair is standing up to hear this. What's going on, Japan? Inaction and "shoganai" in Japanese Dekinai Culture are not allowed. MOVE YOUR LAZY A@@ and FIX IT.

  • 3

    FightingViking

    @Cricky

    A national disgrace

    Soon to be an International disgrace... (if it's not already...)

  • 3

    taj

    "and still unable to return"

    Rebuilding residences in inundation zones is a bad idea. Of course they're unable to "return". They shouldn't "return" in a lot of cases. The need to reloacte.

    It takes time to relocate entire villages and neighborhoods. New high ground needs to be cleared. Roads built. Water, sewer, power to be put in. Then housing built.

    The headline here uses the word "shelter" rather than "temporary housing" or "prefab housing". These places aren't ideal, but they're not school gyms. A lot of resident's would rather stay in there until something good can be built, rather than something rushed.

    People who bitch and moan here, please go participate. See the situation on the ground. Buy some souvenirs and eat at the local prefab shops and restaurants. Talk to the people. Listen to the people. See the big picture.

  • 8

    OldHawk

    What do you expect these people to do? Most are too old to work. Maybe the goverment needs to gradually start reducing benefits and let them start paying rent.

    With what? They probably lost everything.

  • 0

    Yardley

    As the problems in Fukushima seem to be growing instead of abating, it's hard to say exactly when those with homes within the irradiated area will be able to return.

    Answer: Never.

  • -1

    globalwatcher

    What do you expect these people to do? Most are too old to work. Maybe the goverment needs to gradually start reducing benefits and let them start paying rent.

    With what? They probably lost everything.

    Shame, these people are not refugees in Syria. They are Japanese living in Japan; the 3rd largest economy in the world and a host country of 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Do not tell the world that Japan cannot take care of its own people. Shape up, Japan. Your credibility is on line. We do not want to hear any more BS and excuses from you. JUST DO IT. WE ARE SICK OF YOUR INCOMPETENCE.

  • 2

    AKBfan

    They will never go home. and this government will take advantage of their stoicism to leave them where they are for as long as it can. shameful.

  • -5

    pointofview

    Blame the general population not the government. Weve known for years and years of their thuggery and incompetence but they still go on and on. Unless you are pounding down doors they wont lift a finger. In the end, I have to tip my hats to the government for creating the endless distractions that inundate our lives.

  • 6

    Tom Webb

    So what happened to the donations that we gave? I thought it will give most families enough to start somewhere. I am sure that lots of us in the USA and the other countries that donated are wondering why more families are not been helped. These people are still living in temp shelters, 2 years after the disaster!!

  • 7

    papasmurfinjapan

    People who bitch and moan here, please go participate. See the situation on the ground. Buy some souvenirs and eat at the local prefab shops and restaurants. Talk to the people. Listen to the people. See the big picture.

    I bitch and moan just as much as everyone else, but you make a good point. Instead of the next vacation to Disneyland or USJ or Okinawa - why not take a trip to Iwate or Miyagi?

  • 3

    Cos

    Olympics will take care of them, wait till 2020 :(

    Sad to say, but without the Olymcircus, they wouldn't be sure to leave the shelters before 2050... In 2019, they'll be shipped elsewhere, just like Osaka's homeless were taken away during soccer cup.

  • -15

    CH3CHO

    globalwatcherSep. 18, 2013 - 09:34AM JST

    I can feel my blood pressure is going up and every piece of my hair is standing up to hear this. What's going on, Japan?

    We are in a free society, where government is not here to GIVE hosing and money to its people. They are on their own now, after 2 years of the disaster. They cannot live on charity forever.

    globalwatcherSep. 18, 2013 - 11:52AM JST

    Shame, these people are not refugees in Syria. They are Japanese living in Japan; the 3rd largest economy in the world and a host country of 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

    Why do we see so many people living on the street in NYC and other big cities in the US? Japanese earthquake refugees are much better off that they live in free houses and no one is evicting them.

  • 2

    Cricky

    I see that some are lacking in compassion and empathy, perhaps they should run for office?

  • 1

    Wakarimasen

    Smurfie. not sure "buying some souvenirs" is going to rehouse these people. This is a government responsibility - charity is of course welcome, but not enough to make all this right.

  • 0

    daito_hak

    Well the mentality of the government and the rest the population is who cares about those refugees? The government made it clear, it's Olympics first, let's just pretend that those people do not exist.

  • -12

    CH3CHO

    Tom WebbSep. 18, 2013 - 01:09PM JST

    So what happened to the donations that we gave? I thought it will give most families enough to start somewhere.

    They were all distributed to the victims.

    "Refugee shelters" may sound horrible but have you ever seen what they look like? There are various kinds of so called shelters.

    http://oomorikoumori.web.fc2.com/

    http://datehigasi.web.fc2.com/Temporaryhouse.html

    http://www.g-mark.org/award/describe/38913

    Now, if you have an option to live in a free rent shelter like above or to leave the shelter and find housing at certain cost, which would you choose? In addition, if you live in a shelter, your former neighbors are all living close to you.

  • 2

    papasmurfinjapan

    This is a government responsibility - charity is of course welcome, but not enough to make all this right

    Of course, I agree 100%. But supporting them in whatever way we can is still better than doing nothing.

  • 1

    rowiko68

    Only one word: DISGRACEFUL.

  • 6

    Get Real

    @Wakarimasen,

    Let's not be defeatist. The expressways are open and trains are running. Staying a couple of nights in a local hotel enjoying local restaurants and buying souvenirs will help the local economy.

  • 3

    Alex Einz

    I dont really understand why are these 52000 are expected to return at all... its quite clear that aint happening during their lifetime or even longer... that 20km area is the bare minimum ( wait till the groundwater spreads along the coast, that will be another nail there ) Stop torturing people, make it absolutely clear to them that the worse has happened and relocate em to a proper housing elsewhere. This circus is absolutely ridiculous.

  • -11

    CH3CHO

    Alex EinzSep. 18, 2013 - 03:06PM JST

    Stop torturing people, make it absolutely clear to them that the worse has happened and relocate em to a proper housing elsewhere.

    Yes, and the people relocated to proper housing elsewhereare are counted as people in shelters.

  • 6

    smithinjapan

    Wonder why this fact wasn't mentioned during the 2020 bid while said people were being used to sway the vote? It'll be pretty hard for them to get help from here on in with all the money that'll be funneled into the Games, and the massive deficit when the games are done. Worse yet is that people around Fukushima are STILL being given hope they'll sometime be able to go home.

  • 0

    AkashiAussie

    I saw photos of these 'shelters' though, and really even though they are pretty crappy by international standards, compared to what people live in where I live in a rural part of Hyogo, they are not that bad. If they won't leave the area, options are limited.

  • 1

    Alex Einz

    Actually yea looking at the "shelters" links above.. its quite clear why they dont feel like relocating.. in that case register them there and case done...some of em shelters look way better than what folks live in regularly..

  • 0

    Cos

    Now, if you have an option to live in a free rent shelter like above or to leave the shelter and find housing at certain cost, which would you choose?

    I'd chose the "certain cost". I mean I'd chose receiving money in case of disaster and then I'd be able to choose if I relocate or rebuild. They were told : "you get a shelter or nada".

    the donations that we gave?... They were all distributed to the victims..

    No. Donations were handed to local officials and they have not dispatched to families without houses. They have chosen community projects like saving a tree, getting pandas for a zoo, helping fisheries of whales...

  • 4

    FightingViking

    @CH3CHO

    We are in a free society, where government is not here to GIVE hosing and money to its people. They are on their own now, after 2 years of the disaster. They cannot live on charity forever.

    I can't believe I just read that... Huge amounts of money have been DONATED for these people - where did it go ? Maybe CH3CHO should try to put him/herself into those people's shoes... How would CH3CHO like it if he/she had been a victim of the earthquake/tsunami ? Had lost family, friends, housing and all hope of ever being able to return to the place they used to call "HOME" ? "2 years" is NOTHING to anyone who has lost everything... How can you be so heartless ?

  • -9

    CH3CHO

    FightingVikingSep. 18, 2013 - 05:24PM JST

    I can't believe I just read that... Huge amounts of money have been DONATED for these people - where did it go ?

    The donated money was distributed to the victims. You can see the details here. http://www.mhlw.go.jp/shinsai_jouhou/dl/gienkin_130228_01.pdf None of the money was spent on the stupid projects Cos mentioned.

    Now, the refugees have the money and the nice free shelter. Why do we have to criticize that there are STILL so many people in the free shelter? We do not need to evict them. We can wait until they save enough to build their new houses and until they decide to go out. But giving them houses to their liking as present is going too far.

  • -1

    irishosaru

  • 1

    irishosaru

    絆 kizuna - kanji of the year in 2011.....so much for kizuna.

  • -4

    Ali Khan

    **Every think is under control ** This one sentence brought Olympic to Japan, the Olympic committee declared that Japan and Tokyo, the city of Mr.Ishahara is safe and suits the Olympics.

  • 2

    sf2k

    CH3CHO

    "Hundreds of millions of Japan tsunami money spent on other projects" noted from Japan's Board of Audit. Reported by UK's Telegraph October 2012.

  • 1

    papasmurfinjapan

    @ CH3CHO

    Thanks for the link. When you look at the numbers of people and the amount of money, you really get a sense of the scale of this tragedy. The simple fact is all the money we donated just simply isn't enough to change peoples lives.

    We need to help more and the government needs to help more. The problem is we (myself the main offender) gave our "generous" donations after the Tsunami, and tell ourselves we did our part. Now we say we're doing our part again by supporting the Olympics and the "economic boom" it will bring to the country and *no doubt *the people of Tohoku.

    The failure to help the people of Tohoku is as much an indictment on us as a society as it is on the hapless Japanese government.

  • -1

    No Miso

    @Preston Phro

    Why don't you finish his journalistic jaunt by actually discovering the reasons behind why this is the case? Why are people still displaced, and what plans are in place to get them back? Who is working on it? If no-one, then big problem, right? Not exactly Pulitzer prize material here. But at least you mentioned Fukushima, well done!

  • -3

    CH3CHO

    sf2kSep. 18, 2013 - 07:57PM JST

    CH3CHO

    "Hundreds of millions of Japan tsunami money spent on other projects" noted from Japan's Board of Audit. Reported by UK's Telegraph October 2012.

    That is tax money, not donation. You can check how the donation was spent in the previous link.

    Total amount of donation was 360 billion yen, which is a huge amount of money. But the tax money appropriated for disaster relief in fiscal 2012 alone is 4,970 billion yen. Government Accounting Office found a lot of misappropriation of the tax money. Am I angry as a taxpayer? You bet.

  • 7

    hatsoff

    I dunno, words from a keyboard are cheap. So the folks in the shelters are scrounging money from the government, are they? So those people should get a grip and relocate, should they? If only it were that simple.

    There must be any number of people who took care of themselves pre-tsunami and bought their own houses and paid their taxes, worked hard all their lives from their twenties to however old they are now. Now the area is ruined and their land has little current value. Why? Because the government has not yet replaced the public infrastructure that brings value to such places.

    That's not their fault. The government needs to replace that infrastructure. Without that everything is on hold. Which bank is going to lend you money to rebuild on a wasteland that has no electricity supply, water, drainage, sewer...?

  • -1

    Maitake

    On Sept 11, a 1,000-person-strong team searched the coastlines of the three prefectures for the 2,654 people still missing.

    Good idea, 2 1/2 years later you might find them.

    nearly 300,000 people without homes... but japan has bigger fish to fry, like hosting the olympic games in an ugly radioactive country.

  • 1

    No Miso

    @hatsoff

    Why? Because the government has not yet replaced the public infrastructure that brings value to such places

    The core infrastructure is rebuilt, faster than anyone could really believe. Please lay out what you think is left to be done for infra. Each community has a plan, and many are due to restart in earnest from next year. Please note the word COMMUNITY because that is important, individuals are having a hard time relocating because moving back to an empty neighbourhood is difficult. No Post Office, no Combini, just the space they occupied before, but with no neighbours, and in many cases, NO neighbours as they were killed in the tsunami. It wasn't buildings that were washed away, it was communities, and you can't rebuild those overnight, and you can't rebuild without a full community being in place. If you think that is easy, then you might need to relocate yourself for a while.

    Some reconstruction work can't proceed because the community can't agree on some details. It is horribly sad, and nothing we can even begin to understand because we haven't experienced such total loss.

  • -1

    hatsoff

    No Miso - read my post more closely and look back on the posts to see what I was referring to before you take a haughty tone. Despite that, I agree with everything you said.

  • -1

    kuuku

    if Abenomics does not include this Fukushima problem as part of the main activity to challenge perhaps first and foremost, then I don't think it would be a workable plan in the long run.

  • 1

    Aizo Yurei

    Woohoo! 4.5 billion yen for the Olympics! Suck it country peasants. We got the Olympics in 2020! Yeah! EVERYTHING IS UNDER CONTROL!

  • -2

    Francis Urquhart

    Woohoo! 4.5 billion yen for the Olympics! Suck it country peasants. We got the Olympics in 2020! Yeah! EVERYTHING IS UNDER CONTROL!

    Yep. That's pretty much it!

  • -8

    sfjp330

    Most of these older people are already getting pensions and retirement benefit from the state. The natural disaster happens everywhere. People lose personal possessions all the time. What makes Japan so different? These people want continuous free ride and that iclude free rent. They should start paying low rent and the benefit should be reduced substantially. Can't support these people forever and feel sorry for them. Think about the taxpayers and reduce the burden on these people.

  • -1

    No Miso

    @sfjp

    Most of these older people are already getting pensions and retirement benefit from the state. The natural disaster happens everywhere. People lose personal possessions all the time. What makes Japan so different? These people want continuous free ride and that iclude free rent. They should start paying low rent and the benefit should be reduced substantially. Can't support these people forever and feel sorry for them. Think about the taxpayers and reduce the burden on these people.

    Pretty insensitive IMO, these people are not waiting for a house to be built, but a community, and those communities DO have plans for rebuilding, much of it begins later this year and goes through to 2018. There are huge tasks like regaining land that has subsided badly or buying land off people so that core routes and infra can be put in place. Levees have also divided communities. This is nothing to do with people wanting free rides, this is to do with a disaster that went off the scale.

  • -2

    sfjp330

    No Miso Sep. 19, 2013 - 07:22AM JST Pretty insensitive IMO, these people are not waiting for a house to be built, but a community, and those communities DO have plans for rebuilding, much of it begins later this year and goes through to 2018.

    You want to these people to wait for many more years with free ride because of sensitivity of the issues? The original concept of assistance after the Tsunami was of good intent, however, it has become a system full of issues. Helping someone when they need it is fine for those who is unable to work due to a mental/physical impairment, then by all means we need to provide for them. The problem is that many people on assistance simply do nothing to better themselves. We don't know how many, but if there's 290,000 of these people after almost three years, there might be alot of abuse out there and part of the problem is that there's not adequate monitoring to ensure that those who are abusing the system are caught. It is after all tax dollars that are funding this and they want to ensure that tax money is not being wasted on someone who is just to lazy to work. J-Goverment should create a job and make these people work for those who are capable and start reducing the benefits and charge them rent. If you don't change some of the rules, nothing will change.

  • -4

    globalwatcher

    irishosaruSep. 18, 2013 - 06:36PM JST

    Kizuna? Many Japanese peasants bought it. Sad. It is a cheap lip service by the J. government.

    sfjp330Sep. 19, 2013 - 07:53AM JST

    You want to these people to wait for many more years with free ride because of sensitivity of the issues?

    Heartless, heartless. What are they supposed to do? Farmers lost their faming land and fishermen lost their fishing boats to Tsunami and nuke spills. Most of them (70 years old) are too old to learn new skills. The government needs to extend the financial help to them.

  • -2

    taj

    "http://www.mhlw.go.jp/shinsaijouhou/dl/gienkin130228_01.pdf None of the money was spent on the stupid projects Cos mentioned."

    Thanks for posting this link.

    Now can everyone agree to STOP perpetuating the negative propoganda about how donations were misspent? Think about the consequences of spreading such lies. Take responsibility for what you type.

  • -4

    globalwatcher

    tajSep. 19, 2013 - 09:57AM JST

    "http://www.mhlw.go.jp/shinsaijouhou/dl/gienkin130228_01.pdf None of the money was spent on the stupid projects Cos mentioned."

    Thanks for posting this link.

    Now can everyone agree to STOP perpetuating the negative propoganda about how donations were misspent? Think about the consequences of spreading such lies. Take responsibility for what you type

    No. I would like to correct your misunderstanding.

    The website here fails to disclose an official financial statement to the world. If the Japanese Red Cross is a non profit organization , they need to fulfill their legal obligation to disclose it with the balance sheets how the donation money has been ACTUALLY spent to victims, not for a "WHALE research". Sad to know many Japanese do not understand this.

  • -3

    taj

    OK globalwatcher, your evidence has convinced me. the red cross spent all the money on whales and unicorns. (rolls eyes)

  • 1

    No Miso

    @sfjp30

    Call it community spirit, or whatever you want. Looking after the weaker ones in society should be a priority, simply because the stronger ones are able to do it. I prefer that to being in life just to look out for my self, as that sounds like a really lonely place. I'll bet that there IS someone in the displaced and amongst the refugees that IS getting a free ride, but I'll also bet that it is a microscopic minority. Your view stated above reminded me of David Cameron and his crusade against welfare abusers which has resulted in a huge number of genuinely needy people being put below the poverty line. He grasped the opportunity of "austerity" because he is a Conservative, what's your excuse?

  • -4

    globalwatcher

    tajSep. 19, 2013 - 03:42PM JST

    OK globalwatcher, your evidence has convinced me. the red cross spent all the money on whales and unicorns. (rolls eyes)

    You guys need to tell the Japan Red Cross to disclose English version of Legal Financial Statement that needs to be verified by CPA. I have been reading many articles that the donation money has been wasted.

    After personally volunteered for rescue mission for Tohoku victims spending more than couple months in Japan, and all my kids, grandkids and myself worked very hard for fund raising events in US for Tohoku. Your lazy sloppy work has not been very well received by many in the world. It has been very, very deceitful. Shape up. You are not good at accepting genuine positive criticism from the world. Some Japanese are holding back Japan to move forward. I guess Japan and Japanese want to stay in a dark hole in universe while the rest of us move forward. The justice will prevail.

  • 0

    sf2k

    @CH3CHO

    easy to google "Japan admits disaster funds to be used for whaling" from Fisheries Agency official Tatsuya Nakaoku,

  • -3

    globalwatcher

    tajSep. 19, 2013 - 03:42PM JST

    OK globalwatcher, your evidence has convinced me. the red cross spent all the money on whales and unicorns. (rolls eyes)

    Sad, why do you defend a wrong side of history, taj.

    I am correcting you over and over here again. We, the world did not donate money for a Japanese whale research project. You are offending many world audience here. We want that money going to victims. We want a decent response from the Japanese Red Cross with a legal financial disclosure. They failed to do that. I am doing this as I know many global journalists are reading YOUR moron comment for sure. No more money to Japan, as you said, next time, you guys spend money to "UNICORN" research spaceship.

  • 4

    nigelboy

    easy to google "Japan admits disaster funds to be used for whaling" from Fisheries Agency official Tatsuya Nakaoku,

    What do you mean "admit"? The proposal by the Fishery agency was disclosed for budget review to the public. As if you didn't know, these coastal towns had numerous processing plants that included not only whale meat but other marine sourcs as well.

    I am correcting you over and over here again. We, the world did not donate money for a Japanese whale research project.

    And none of the donated money was used for that. So what's the big deal?

    http://www.jrc.or.jp/shinsai2011/plan/

  • -7

    globalwatcher

    nigelboySep. 21, 2013 - 01:30AM JST

    And none of the donated money was used for that. So what's the big deal?

    http://www.jrc.or.jp/shinsai2011/plan/

    Is there any English version for the website listed above for the world journalists to read. Thanks.

  • 4

    nigelboy

    Globalwatcher,

    Sorry. I don't. But it appears the burden of proof is on you to show that such misappropriation of funds occurred with JRC. If watchdogs like Greenpeace Japan haven't reported it, most likely such acts never happened.

    • Moderator

      All readers back on topic please. This line of discussion is not relevant.

  • -6

    globalwatcher

    Moderator: Hope you allow two websites. I believe this is very relevant to this topic as these victims deserve every single penny. We did not raise fund raising events in US for the stupid projects as listed below. It is very disgraceful.

    nigelboySep. 21, 2013 - 06:59AM JST

    Globalwatcher,

    Sorry. I don't. But it appears the burden of proof is on you to show that such misappropriation of funds occurred with JRC. If watchdogs like Greenpeace Japan haven't reported it, most likely such acts never happened.

    Well, I am listing your baseless comment to make sure all other global journalists read it. It is very sad Japanese are not truly informed. Classic!! We get the most accurate news first before you guys do. Sad.

    Japan admits $1bn in tsunami recovery funds spent on projects like turtle observation

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-03/1b-in-japan-tsunami-funding-spent-on-miscellaneous-projects/4730812

    Japan admits disaster funds to be used for whaling http://www.news.com.au/newstest2/archive-old-assets/japan-confirms-greenpeace-whaling-charge/story-e6frfkyi-1226216712737

  • -3

    Chucky138

    Japan admits $1bn in tsunami recovery funds spent on projects like turtle observation - See more at: http://www.japanherald.com/index.php/sid/214941060/scat/c4f2dd8ca8c78044#sthash.yI9LLXqo.dpuf

    Greenpeace says 2.3bn yen ($30m; £19m) from a budget of 12.1 trillion yen is being used to fund extra security, Japanese officials argued when they applied for extra funding that whaling helped coastal communities http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-16064002

    Japan admits $1bn in tsunami recovery funds spent on projects like turtle observation

    ABC Australia Monday 3rd June, 2013 - See more at: http://www.osakanews.net/index.php/sid/214941060/scat/c4f2dd8ca8c78044#sthash.MOwrl1Iu.dpuf

  • 1

    Joshua Degreiff

    Hope the government do something fast for gave them trier houses and jobs fast they can't live forever with the benefits of TEMPCO monthly checks and Unemployment Insurance and welfare right ?

  • -1

    CanuckNikkei

    Once the Red Cross gets the money, it becomes theirs. And the Red Cross disperses the money as they see fit, at their own discretion. So that means a big chunk of Japan money could have gone to other countries that the Red Cross adjudged to be in need.

  • 3

    nigelboy

    Well, I am listing your baseless comment to make sure all other global journalists read it. It is very sad Japanese are not truly informed. Classic!! We get the most accurate news first before you guys do. Sad.

    ????

    JRC is not a central government. The former takes "donation" while the latter uses tax money. Your argument is all over the place. As to money spent on whaling, I've already addressed them Sep. 21, 2013 - 01:30AM JST.

  • -1

    3kunfuu

    While this is unfortunate, I think the blame lies with the charities that have not used the funds people have donated to them. The government needs to focus on the Olympics, the Senkakus, Takeshima, and the abtuctee issue. We must use tax funds to support whaling and fishing, as that brings jobs to the affected areas.

  • -5

    globalwatcher

    3kunfuuSep. 24, 2013 - 12:48AM JST

    We must use tax funds to support whaling and fishing, as that brings jobs to the affected areas.

    The world including US, Canada, Australia strongly oppose Japanese whaling research. You are really insulting all of us. The bottom line, the donation money only goes to victims, not whaling, turtle research, please.

  • -4

    CH3CHO

    globalwatcher, why do you keep confusing tax money and donation?

    What you call " tsunami recovery funds" comes from tax, not from donation. The Japanese government raised tax rates of personal income tax and corporate tax to set up the tsunami recovery fund. The tax money was indeed misappropriated.

    Donation from world wide totalled 360 billion yen, and was distributed among the victims. On the other hand, the tax money appropriated for disaster relief in fiscal 2012 alone is 4,970 billion yen. Are you saying that $1bl or 100 billion yen out of 360 billion yen is misappropriated? http://www.mhlw.go.jp/shinsai_jouhou/dl/gienkin_130228_01.pdf

    Where in your sources does it say that DONATED MONEY was used for stupid projects like turtle watching?

    A report in Japan's Asahi newspaper revealed that about $1 billion of public money earmarked for the tsunami-hit communities had been spent in unaffected parts of the country.

    Yes, I read the original Asahi article. They were talking about tax money.

  • -1

    kurisupisu

    @globalwatcher

    You have a valid point and for the fact that funds are misappropriated here I will never donate again.......

  • -6

    globalwatcher

    CH3CHOSep. 24, 2013 - 02:01PM JST

    globalwatcher, why do you keep confusing tax money and donation?

    Why do you defend a wrong side of history?

    1)Because I know a strong link bet when J Government and a non profit organization through Amakudari. There is a smoking mirror behind these stories.

    2) JRC is still legally obligated to disclose financial statement to the world audience.

    3) I was the first one to disclose a lie of TEMPCO not telling the truth to all of you on JT. I did that sometime on 3/20/2011. Just in case you do not know.

  • -4

    globalwatcher

    I have already requested an official financial disclosures to the Japanese Red Cross in English. They have not done that yet, hopefully they are willing to do so in English. The transparency is very important.

    http://www.jrc.or.jp/english/relief/l4/Vcms4_00002070.html

  • 0

    CH3CHO

    globalwatcher, why do they have to do as you tell them to do? I think your logic is very strange.

    I think you have already read this. http://www.jrc.or.jp/vcms_lf/Ops_Update_24monthReport_Final.pdf

    They have two accounts. One is donation "to" the Japan Red Cross activities, which totaled 59.7 billion yen and is explained in detail from page 4 through page 14. The other is donation to the victims "through" JCR, which totaled 326.3 billion yen, which was distributed to the victims, and is explained on page 15 under the title "Cash Grants".

    I think they have already explained in detail.

  • -3

    globalwatcher

    Nearly 290,000 people still living in shelters 2 1/2 years after Tohoku disaster

    The letter has been already sent to the Japan Red Cross why our money has not been fully used to help these victims.

  • -1

    taj

    GlobalWatcher, do you now understand the difference between "Donations" and "tax-funded government funding"?

    The RedCross has NOTHING to do with tax-funds or government funding. And government ministries don't get to "amakudari" retirees into NPOs that have zero to do with the government.

    You are spreading so much mis-information and confusion, that people like kurisupisu are claiming they'll "never donate again".

    For shame!

    Yes, follow up. See how your donations were spent. But don't confuse the government and the charity. They are separate.

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