Pensioner sues NHK for using too many foreign loanwords

Pensioner sues NHK for using too many foreign loanwords

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  • 20

    Cricky

    Ha ha, oops fu fu

  • 0

    FullM3taL

    ROFL!!!

  • 49

    Jimizo

    Oh, relax. Have a biiru.

  • 47

    wanderlust

    Suing for damages is very American behaviour!

  • 12

    Airion

    NHK was right to ignore it, as will the courts.

    Emotional stress? The irony is how much this sounds like an American-style frivolous lawsuit.

  • 1

    some14some

    prisoner of narrow minded thinking, shouganai !

  • 6

    Namaman

    "Americanized'!!! what about globalised, as English is the default global language...Oh wait, thats a good thing!

  • 14

    Wakarimasen

    neba! Kono gai is kurezi.

  • -2

    talexa05

    If NHK can send people to collect monies for their programming, then the gentleman in question should be allowed to demand broadcasting that he can understand. It is not about globalisation as Japanese do not need English for their daily life.

  • -1

    Lilic

    Well they speak EIGO!

  • 14

    Disillusioned

    This is a matter of Japanese culture

    This is a matter of Japanese xenophobia! How many billions of yen do Japanese spend on English education every year to come up with less than 2% of the population actually having some sort of English conversation skill? As a result, I am never saying sushi, tsunami or origami ever again! I think I have to sue Japan for attacking my English speaking culture!

  • 0

    gokai_wo_maneku

    “There is a sense of crisis that this country is becoming just a province of America.”

    "is becoming"? Well, OK, I'll refrain from commenting on that. I agree with the commentator above, is this the arrival of the frivolous law suit in Japan (フリブロス・ロー・スウト?)

  • 4

    Harry_Gatto

    The lawyers win again, no matter what the outcome. My guess is that he will lose and his lawyer will suggest an appeal.

  • 23

    cleo

    He probably would be quite happy sitting on the ソファ watching the ニュース on the テレビ as he sipped on his ビール or maybe a ウイスキー, puffing on his タバコ, his feet encased in cosy スリッパー: towards evening he could draw the カーテン, turn on the ラジオ and enjoy a bite of パン and バター or マーガリン with a bit of ハム、チーズ、トマト and ブロッコリon the side; then his missus could pour him a nice cup of コーヒー with ミルクor クリーム and he could have a クッキー and it would all be lovely, if only there weren't so many forn words spoiling it all for him.

    Seriously, Granpa needs to get up to speed.

  • 0

    akumakoe

    Wow. This adoption and evolution of language happens in every culture. Get over yourself, mister.

    JT, please please please followup on this when there are developments! This is super-entertaining.

  • -2

    karjai

    fool!

  • 1

    GW

    Somebody please shoot me or perhaps take a sword to me(being in Japan & all) if I every become as grumpy as this old oyaji LOL!

  • 0

    Thunderbird2

    “The basis of his concern is that Japan is being too Americanized,” lawyer Mutsuo Miyata told AFP. “There is a sense of crisis that this country is becoming just a province of America.”

    It's been a province since 1945... that aside, I actually agree with him about the Americanisation. Even other English-speaking countries are slowly becoming American. Recently, within the last 10 years anyway, people in the UK have started to use the American term "gotten" for example.

    I can see where the old bloke's coming from with his fears... though I don't agree with suing NHK. The English language is a mix of Old English, Saxon, Latin and with loan words from all over the world - including India... I wouldn't sue the BBC for that

  • 3

    Farmboy

    Traditionalists in France and French-speaking Canada also worry about the erosion of their native tongue

    Yeah, the French protect their language from other invasive species, or speeches, or something, with the language police. Just about everyone else just borrows like crazy. English has always borrowed from other languages, and I think Japanese always has as well.

  • 21

    spudman

    is the old fella going to give the Chinese their kanji back?

  • 8

    risugirl

    今コメントーできません, NHK said about this matter...lol!!

  • 6

    rickyvee

    this is actually quite french of him.

  • -1

    Saxon Salute

    This poor old soul is probably incapable of having a conversation with anyone under 40 then. Maybe he should sue the whole youth population for allowing the langauge to evolve.

  • 3

    cleo

    If NHK can send people to collect monies for their programming, then the gentleman in question should be allowed to demand broadcasting that he can understand.

    Except that NHK also needs to cater for the needs of the rest of the population, most of whom find katakana words like kea and conpuraiansu (dastardly forn words mentioned in the suit) much easier to understand than their 'pure Japanese' equivalents Mr Takahashi suggests should be used instead - 手当/介護and 法令遵守 - which are after all combinations of Chinese characters。

  • 4

    slumdog

    Hoji Takahashi, 71, is demanding 1.41 million yen in damages for the broadcaster’s reliance on words borrowed from English, instead of their traditional Japanese counterparts. “The basis of his concern is that Japan is being too Americanized,” lawyer Mutsuo Miyata told AFP.

    The basis for my concern is that neither using English nor using foreign words necessarily have anything to do with being Americanized.

  • 9

    Shinjuku No Yaju

    Americans use Honcho, Tsunami, Sushi, etc. And my little sister in LA screams "kawaii!" at things now (lol) so it works both ways in the new smaller world.

  • -2

    Robert Dykes

    This is really funny. but I actually agree with him. but you cant fight the nature of language.

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    Shinjuku No Yaju: "Americans use Honcho, Tsunami, Sushi, etc. And my little sister in LA screams "kawaii!" at things now (lol) so it works both ways in the new smaller world."

    All countries use 'loan words' from other languages and in some cases a new language is formed called a pidgin language, but you cannot compare the number of words used in English that originate in Japanese as with vice-versa. 98% or so of loan words from Japanese are limited to arts that come from Japan, such as the names of tools and styles in Ikebana, set pieces in Kabuki or other types of drama, words in the martial arts, etc. With a few exceptions, all Japanese loan words are used for exactly what they mean in Japanese and Japan: ex. the sushi you mention, tsunami, sumo, and the cultural words I mentioned. Some exceptions are honcho (which you pointed out -- the pronunciation and meaning are slightly different), tycoon, geisha (often the Western image is more like 'prostitute'), hara-kiri (which we pronounce 'harry carry'), skosh, karaoke (in pronunciation), etc. Japanese, on the other hand, has more than 20,000 loan words from English, not at all limited to the arts/sciences/athletics -- more than what your average native English speaker knows -- and which they use in some six or so different ways, from words that are both phonetically similar and similar in meaning ('kuriiningu' isn't a far stretch from 'dry cleaning'), to reduced and combined words which make zero sense ('guts-pose', nouto pasokon, etc.).

    Anyway, I agree with the old codger that Japanese uses FAR too many loan words from predominantly English but also other languages, but suing for damages is ridiculous. What young people need to be taught is that while, effectively, the words have become 'Japanese' and part of the lexicon, they can't always be used as English, and in fact can't be understood at all when they are NOT from English but the speaker doesn't know that. I mean, when was the last time you went skiing on the 'gerende' or were asked to pass the 'hochikisu' (actually the inventor's name)? I got a few confused responses when I asked friends back home if it was worth seeing "Outlaw" starring Tom Cruise (actually titled "Jack Reacher"), etc. Japan SHOULD use more original Japanese and less loan words, but I doubt the trend will change any time soon, especially since the obsession with all things US has not abated.

  • 2

    iichiban

    Is Japanese culture that fragile that few words of english can invade it... i dont think... one can use english words and still respect the Japanese culture...

  • 5

    JOETODAY

    "Japanese has a rich native vocabulary" which is taken, mostly, from Chinese.

  • -1

    Baibaikin

    @cleo's comment presents many reasons why the courts probably won't bother with the grumpy fella's complaint. However, I think NHK of all broadcasters should make more of an effort to use real Japanese when possible, especially if the words are common, e.g. athlete, or compliance, as highlighted in the article.

  • 0

    derangedbaba

    In my opinion I think more english better. maybe get foreigner anoucers also. How about you?

  • -1

    gokai_wo_maneku

    Oh wait, that should be 馬鹿訴訟.

  • 1

    RealJapan

    4COL CSL. (Cool!)

  • 1

    FizzBit

    NHK could have responded with a letter. Go for it Ojiisan! At least we won't have to worry about being reamed by the netizens.

  • 14

    Stephen Knight

    I have to admit, even I got annoyed when NTV started using 'torafikku infomeishon' instead of 'koutsuu jouhou' on their morning news shows--that's not language evolution, that's plain-old pandering to a younger crowd (and leaving the older folks behind). NTV is particularly blatant about running roughshod over the language.

    Advertising is another area where I'm sure senior citizens are left mystified--especially fashion and cosmetics. But then I suppose, the advertising isn't aimed at them in the first place.

    That said, I'm still not sure myself about the differences in nuance between 'jiko', 'akushidento', 'hapuningu', and 'toraburu'... I must be getting on in years... :-/

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    Suing for damages is very American behaviour!

    Okay, I'm an American and THAT was pretty funny. Thanks for the giggle. :-)

  • 1

    Scotchy

    I could imagine this happening back in Britain - gave me a chuckle

    Nobody of any language realistically - Native or learner - is going to know every single word or phrase, I mean my degree is in Engineering and if something perhaps from Medicine or Law was being explained to me then I would have trouble comprehending. I can understand how he would feel considering language and style is/has changed in the last couple of years to hundreds of years.

    At first people where saying YOLO back home and I was like what is magical saying among these young people. It must be realised that Katakana is there for foreign loan words and everyone should be allowed to use because how else are you to say the word "drive" without using Katakana, like the news back home they can't report the story if they don't use the words.

    I think that if the news has a "duty" to report the news then they have to do so accurately, which means loan words, no other way about it but I wouldn't sue!

  • 5

    Citizen2012

    I am all for NHK to use ONLY Japanese words and then charge only Japanese citizen for its programs !

  • -1

    safinator

    lol only a brave or desperate lawyer would touch this mad mans claim.

  • 1

    Simon Foston

    ROFL!!!

    Don't you mean "ro-fu-ru?"

  • 4

    Harry_Gatto

    Recently, within the last 10 years anyway, people in the UK have started to use the American term "gotten" for example.

    "gotten" has its origins in Middle English and was even used by Shakespeare (The Merry Wives of Windsor) but I know what you mean.

  • 1

    Magnet

    As for the old guy, it's funny, until you realize it's his generation with the same mindset running the country.

  • -5

    Guru29

    So why don't Japan start to get rid of ganji and katakana?

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    He's right, of course.

    The way they slaughter and bastardize the English language here with their katakana is beyond despicable. I have many times asked Japanese people what the Japanese word for "fork" is as I dislike calling it "hooku" but nobody knows. So just stop using it. Keep your "culture" clean, jiji! Furthermore, stop using anything foreign or you risk undermining your local specialness. In fact, you should all cease wearing "yofuku". Just put on an extra yukata in the winter.

  • 3

    gonemad

    In every generation you can find the old complain about the language of the youth. Without English influence, there would still be other new words which may sound more familiar, but which he still cannot grasp. Get over it, your father had the same problems with your language.

  • 0

    edojin

    Does this pensioner know what "window watcher" means? Wonder what he did in his working life ... watch windows? Instead of watching & criticizing NHK ... why doesn't somebody empty his desktop, give him the morning newspaper and a cup of green tea ... and let him stare out of the window ...

    He sounds like some of the window watchers that happened to be at a Japanese company where I once worked ...

  • 1

    Disillusioned

    He is this week's 'complainist'!

  • 5

    Serrano

    "this country is becoming just a province of America"

    Better than becoming just a province of China.

    "Oh, relax. Have a biiru."

    Har!

  • 7

    fidaruzki

    at first when I heard labu labu I was like, huh? what's that. only to find out it is actually Love Love. ok so lost there

  • 4

    smithinjapan

    Piotr: "Latin, which was dominant during medieval, is now used only for reading historical documents and religious purposes."

    Just out of curiousity, when did Polish have its 'Golden Age'? And to say French has lost its global status, and Latin is only useful for reading historical documents or religious purposes is beyond naive. The former still ranks third in terms of the number of countries which use it as an official national language (English first, Spanish second), and English has incorporated a LOT of French. That said, much of the Romantic languages are based on Latin, and even non-Romantic languages like Germanic and especially English which is a mix of both, use prefixes and suffixes that are almost entirely Latin based. As with Kanji, if you know the meaning of the prefixes: 'oto' (related to the ear), 'rhino' (related to the nose), 'laryn' related to the throat, and the suffixes '-ologist' (related to a practitioner), then you need not ever have heard of 'otorhinolaryngologist' to know it means 'ear, nose, and throat doctor'. I gave that extreme exampe intenionally, but you get my idea.

    Back to Japanese and loan words, though, one thing I would like to see, as I touched on, is Japan using either the Katakana equivalent of a movie title, or the meaning, as close as possible, in Japanese. I hate it when they STILL use Katakana English but change the title altogether (as with the Tom Cruise movie I mentioned). Ever since "Pretty Woman" was a smash hit in Japan everything and it's dog has been renamed "Pretty -- " in an attempt at association: ex. "Pretty Princess" (Princess Diaries), "Pretty League" (A League of Their Own), "Pretty Bride" (Runaway Bride), etc.

  • -1

    JustAGoodOleBoy

    Wonder how he feels when the Japanese words "sugoi" or "mazui" are written in katakana subtitles

  • 1

    Tom DeMicke

    Dang! Why didn't I think of doing that? He has a point but to go and sue? Odd!

  • 4

    Jason H Raymond

    "Pan" comes from the Portuguese word for bread. Although it is the same in Spanish, that's not why it was historically incorporated into the Japanese language.

  • 4

    Get Real

    I cringe when my mother-in-law understands less of what's being said on NHK than me.

    It's exclusivist, and symptomatic of an agist aging society.

    Upping Japan's English game is a noble goal. However reducing Japanese to a 中途半端 pidgin ain't the way.

  • 0

    602miko

    haha language barrier

  • 1

    presto345

    Why does Takahashi single out NHK and not go after all the networks?

  • 3

    NZ2011

    In a way I kind of agree but probably for different reasons.

    I say if your going to use a word from English, say it correctly, if your going to use English in your advertising, check it with someone who actually has some idea about the language in the first place, otherwise use the Japanese counterpart which there is absolutely nothing wrong with, we are in Japan after all :-)

    Imagine the improvements in English and the additional words people would learn in Japanese, win win all around.

  • 2

    sojherde

    I do not understand about the fuss that is made about someone who cares for a better style of his country's language. Of course is he right. Filling in all kind of Katakana words does not make Japanese better. And mixing Japanese in other languages is not a sign of open mindedness but just of laziness.

  • 1

    Serrano

    "Nihongo o taisetsu ni suru kai"

    There are a bunch of schools and companies in Japan where they have Eigo o taisetsu ni suru kai.

  • 2

    yyj72

    I'm certain that when the Chinese were teaching the Japanese how t read and write 1400 years ago , some oyaji complained about the country becoming "Sinofied". I love it when kanji words spoken with on-yomi get regarded as "native Japanese" words. Ha!

  • 2

    Fadamor

    karate, sushi, tempura, tsunami, hibachi, karaoke, sudoku, judo, ehh... that's all I can think of that we use and understand here that doesn't relate specifically to Japanese culture unique to Japan (geisha, samurai, etc). It seems there are a few more "loan words" going in the other direction.

    As has been pointed out, other countries use many loan words as well. I was surprised at the amount of French words in use in Russia until I learned the history behind it. In Russian you have "zhournal" for "magazine", and "magazine" for "store". The toilet is 'twa-lyet". You can surf the internet at "internet salons". The history is that Peter the Great traveled to France to learn how to build warships capable of defeating the Swedes and when he came back he brought a lot of the French language with him.

    I remember during the Apollo missions, the French government was raising a stink when their broadcasters were using "splashdown" to describe what the capsules did upon return to Earth. The broadcasters hands were tied because there wasn't a suitable word for it in the French language, so they used the loan word. THIS is the main reason loan words get used and subsequently integrated into the borrowing language.

  • 1

    Laguna

    Pensioner sues NHK for using too many foreign loanwords

    I agree - Domestic loanwords are far superior. Foreign loanwords are いかれた。

  • 3

    Mirai Hayashi

    Languages are constantly evolving. Even the English language is full of words that didn't exist 10 or even 5 years ago. As for Japanese, there are only a couple of countries that even use Japanese (Japan and some parts of Brazil) so its more susceptible foriegn influences and rapid changes. You can't just sit around hoping that the world around you doesn't change, just because you're unable to keep up. It's your responsibility to keep up with the changes so that you don't get left behind.

  • -3

    malfupete

    Is this guy for real? perhaps he would like it better if Japan closed all its borders and kicked the foreign devils out

  • 2

    letsberealistic

    This is a slight overreaction but as Makoto Yamazaki (associate professor at Japanese language institute) said today it highlights a serious problem with borrowed English words in the Japanese language. It means older generations which are after all the main age group in Japan, are finding it difficult to follow news and discussions these days.

    All languages use borrowed words, especially when there are no alternatives in the local language, but in Japan this is out of control with perfectly adequate Japanese words being replaced with English words that nobody understands.

    My question is; WHY?

  • 4

    kaketama

    I found it somewhat understandable... manifest → マニフェスト agenda → アジェンダ compliance → コンプライアンス concierge → コンシェルジュ usability → ユーザビリティ I'm not sure NHK actually used these words. But I don't think it's a good idea to just replace these foreign words with Katakana if there are appropriate words for them in Japanese.

  • -1

    toshiko

    Maybe he does not know Japanese writings in Kanji were all came from China?

    So, Japanese should stop using any kanji letters?

    Why he is using Kanji letters in his names? Almost all Japanese people have to abandon writings in his/her names according to his claim.

    Americanized is new. Has to go back to Chinaized eras for many centuries, So, all Japanese valuable writings has to be burned now? He himself is Americanized using a lawsuit that is not Japanese culture.

  • -1

    letsberealistic

    Guardian has a little more on this;

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/27/japan-broadcaster-sued-english-words

  • 0

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Sorry Granpa, but I appreciate the NHK loanwords......I appreciate the lift towards understanding what the hey ho they are talking about. This article (and comments) are hilarious tonight. Cleo must get an award for effort and insight, as well.

  • 0

    KnowBetter

    Suing for damages is very American behaviour!

    Oh I'm sure the irony is lost on the old goat.

  • 0

    letsberealistic

    Something that has always been a mystery to me; how do Japanese come to understand borrowed words like "governance" and "compliance" and other more complex borrowed words?

  • 2

    Ali Khan

    Now the American will say we are going to court, the Japanese destroyed our English words, even we can not understand. and now the young Japanese will refuse to use all those words which come from Chinese, because the quality of these words might not match the Japanese standard. now what is going to happen, the written version also comes from Chinese

  • 2

    Frungy

    If I were the judge I'd start by saying, "Okay, in the interests of making this case fair I'm banning all loanwords from this courtroom. The complainant may now make his case."

    ... and then sit back and laugh as he tried to make a case against a television network and its television programmes without using the loanword television.

  • 0

    Nessie

    Suing for damages is very American behaviour!

    Kureimu ni naru.

    This is what you get for watching too much TV.

  • 1

    choiwaruoyaji

    What gets me is that the loan words used in Japanese are almost always slightly the wrong word or somehow twisted perversely so as to become different to the real English that would be used.

    I was thinking that about the word "bound" the other day.

    If they just used "bounce" they would be studying English and using a loan word at the same time...

  • -5

    Cos

    He's right, he is retired and he can do the activist. Not everybody can be a Snowden. He won't win, but maybe they'll try to think about it 5 minutes. That's not being against loan words and evolution, but the excesses and the non-senses.

    Why does Takahashi single out NHK and not go after all the networks?

    He had to start somewhere. Then, others don't ring at his door to get his money.

    Nobody of any language realistically - Native or learner - is going to know every single word or phrase, I mean my degree is in Engineering ...

    Because you failed at language ? Seriously, I disagree with you. I know every single word that I say or write. And that's not the case of many people that drop foreign looking terms to decorate conversation, and (OK not NHK) many of the ads that rename products with terms nobody understands.

    when I hear ‘asurito’ (athlete) and ‘konpuriansu’ (compliance), I don’t know what it means,” Takahashi was quoted as saying.

    I'm like him. I saw this :

    スピードアスリート: スポーツコンディショニングウォーターです。

    They want to sell that crap to people of what country ? Don't make fun of me. That was another brand, but the first time they gave me one of those bottles at a race, I asked if they made some with higher UV protection. The eigo doesn't make sense, and you have to browse the label to find some clear Japanese explanation.

    I remember during the Apollo missions, the French government was raising a stink when their broadcasters

    There was only one broadcaster back then. They were paid, by the taxes, and employed indirectly by government (so they got scolded by their boss).

    were using "splashdown" to describe what the capsules did upon return to Earth. The broadcasters hands were tied because there wasn't a suitable word for it in the French language,

    No suitable word for something invented by the French ? " Amerrissage" has been used since Pilâtre de Rozier . But that's not the point. With *splashdown" I'd have understood it had exploded as it fell down, like a meteorite. In French, schplash, crash, splash, smash... whatever, it's just noise. They got complaints because that didn't make sense. The announcers repeated the English term as they were clueless and lazy. They translated the news agency text without understanding nor asking a specialist to help them. If really there had been no French term. they could have explained it by a phrase, but for that they had to understand. So they announced "ladies and gentlemen, the stuff from the space ... well, it sploosh-boom-ploof-dum-dum... well it arrived... at about to 4 p.m. at local time at somewhere where it made splash... ". Not converting the unities is the same laziness.

    while the French “concierge” is pronounced “konsheruju.”

    No. Anyway, they say "kanrinin" for the French "concierge". They took "concierge" from its meaning in globish. Like now, you want to stay in a hotel, they tell you "You can have room service, floor service, concierge service and front desk service... ". So service.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Oh, just this guy is an extremely uneducated person who never understood Japanese history when he was in school, I'd bet. I think he is the only one in Japan who does not know Kanji is Chinese writings. ....... Frunngy, you made my day, Television is a loanword!

  • 3

    Vermillion Brent

    JT points to Quebec as a example of preserving culture. I have had friends born and raised in that region and they have nothing but contempt for the practice and make fun of it often. They also point out that it can get in the way of everyday life; they have said they can't easily get some products simply because the manufacturer does not label them with the "proper" French.

  • -3

    nigelboy

    Maybe he does not know Japanese writings in Kanji were all came from China?

    I doubt that. Kanji is basically a character from China much like the alphabet to latin based language.

    Interestingly, a Chinese professor estimated that 70% of 熟語 (combination of kanji characters to form a word) used in the modern Chinese language were from Japanese origin.

    http://www.zhaojun.com/youci/riyu.htm

    The list of Wasei Kango can be found here.

    http://www.catv296.ne.jp/~t-homma/dd040912.htm

    This grumpy old man needs to learn that languages evolve over time and the concept of "loan" words, whether it becomes butchered by the receipient will continue.

  • 1

    Lowly

    Poor deluded guy! Because the "English" words unfortunately have something like a 60% chance or more of not even being English, as English's vocabulary is something like 50-60% Latin (causing us to lose an astounding number of perfectly good Old English (Germanic) words along the way. Harrumph!) (never mind words from other languages.)

    But!!

    Not only that, but the "Japanese" words he wants to re-replace them with have about a 60% chance in turn of being Chinese anyway.

    What I want to know is what will the international fallout be?? Will he next be sued by the Italians to get all the stolen words (that he collects from NHK) sent back to America so the Italians can reclaim the heritage that the Brits "stole" from their Latin grandfathers?? (Because "borrowing" without giving back is after all stealing, right?) Will some of the Chinese words be mistakenly sent back to America, worsening relations with America and China even more? Does Snowden perhaps have some of the answers locked away in his laptops?

    It's all so complicated!!!

  • 0

    Yogi Zuna

    I agree, if you do not like borrowing words from other cultures, then also get rid of all Chinese influence in Japan, like the use of kanji in writing for example. Use only pure hiragana for everything then! :)

  • 2

    toshiko

    @Nigelboy: Jukugos were created by using combination(s) of kanjis. You need to learn more about jukugo in linguistics before you write your conclusion from one Chinese professor's opinion without learning his thesis that was not modern. You belong to this fool, too? Without kanjis, there was no creation of jukugo which were not in ancient Japan.

  • 2

    danalawton1@yahoo.com

    The guy definitely has a point.... but because he is part of a pre-existing group "Nihongo wo taisetsu ni suru kai" that focuses on keeping the language clean of foreign words he probably does not have a legal leg to stand on. His legal point is one in which he cannot understand what is being said.... but yet he is part of a group that wants foreign words out of the language. In 1994 France passed the "Toubon Law" which required advertisements and many other public communications to be in French. This man should more so be petitioning the Government of Japan on a Toubon style law rather than trying to go after NHK. The thing is though.... Japan over many, many years has had a propensity to adopt things foreign but still maintain its culture. To adopt things foreign is culturally a Japanese trait.

  • -1

    nigelboy

    Jukugos were created by using combination(s) of kanjis

    That's what I said. See the second link as to examples.

    You need to learn more about jukugo in linguistics before you write your conclusion from one Chinese professor's opinion without learning his thesis that was not modern.

    I did. These wasei kango or jyukugo flourished during the Meiji era during which timewhere many Chinese students who studied in Japan imported back to China. Japan at that time modernized by western influence before China so there were many jyukugo that was established during that time.

    You belong to this fool, too?

    No. My opinion of him is stated in the last paragraph of my previous post.

    Without kanjis, there was no creation of jukugo which were not in ancient Japan.

    Never claimed such thing. I suggest you read my initial post again.

  • 1

    LSpiro

    “Kawaii” was recently added to the English dictionary, adding to a long list of Japanese words taking over the English language, such as ikebana (flower arrangement), honcho (chief), etc.

    Young people can probably understand a lot of this stuff, but for older people like myself, when I hear “zori” and “waka”, I don’t know what it means.

    This is a matter of American culture, the country itself, including its politics and its economy.

    The basis of my concern is that America is being too Japanized. It causes me emotional distress, and I must sue for 1.41 million yen, because that is the numeric value of the amount of distress I have been caused.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    I DO find it funny that he's suing a テレビ broadcaster for using English words on the テレビ.

    The more I think about this, the more I think this is just a bitter old man who's realized the world has passed him by and wants to do something to yank the world back to where he stopped progressing.

  • 0

    doedel

    For me it is not so about the borrowing from another language BUT much more the weird pronunciation. Example: Why the heck is there no real "C" sound? Eating some stuff and telling how "jyuushi" it is, sounds like a speech disorder. And there are plenty of more samples like that.

    Making a bank account at Citibank, ...

  • -2

    toshiko

    Shshi,, tempura, sashimi are in American dictionary. Top restaurants in Las Vegas have these in menus without explanation. Caesars Palace stated that it only have hot sushi and it did not work out when it opened that restaurant. American tourists sure know what is sushi and sashimi. Tempura everywhere. Shrimp is shrimp, not yebi. Maybe it is easy to pronounce, the words are used in borrowed language? ....... Nigelboy: read Chinese thesis in Chinese language written papers. I read Chinese books in Kan-bun. That professor made fool himself. in China

  • -1

    jinjapan

    excellent!! it's about time someone spoke up about this ! america is a melting pot, so obviously there would be many borrowed words from other languages . japan is not & the words that are used here, the pronunciation becomes totally different not to mention the fact that most people have no clue what they mean .

  • 1

    CraigHicks

    In my experience "trouble" is usually the 3 syllable "to-ra-bu"

    got a problem/worried = torabu-tte iru, torabu-tyatte iru

  • 2

    SanshinMaster

    Someone is bitter for not taking an eikaiwa class

  • -2

    simplex

    Here's an old speech I did 5 years ago about the absurdity of loan words with made-up meaning, and its potential impact on Japanese language/culture: http://youtu.be/NzJYFIyVvc4

  • 0

    Ah_so

    France has a law that states that French words must be used instead of English, including the creation of new words where necessary, to remove the use of ungainly words like "le weekend". I believe that some stick, but most will end up only in official documents.

    I have some sympathy for the old chap - the desire to replace Japanese words with English words seems to be almost pathalogic. To-ra-bu-ru - come on, there must be something better in the language to describe that concept. I am also sure that most of these concepts can be expressed within Japanese.

    I am happy talking about the "densha" rather than the "to-rain" or the "denwa" rather than the "te-re-foon". Japan was quite capable of coming up with suitable words 140-odd years ago, surely they can do so today. It is too late for the "te-re-bi", but there are all sorts of words bandied about without reason. Japan is not a melting pot of different cultures, few speak or understand English, and have ugly katakana words thrown at them does not help.

  • 1

    Fadamor

    Example: Why the heck is there no real "C" sound? Eating some stuff and telling how "jyuushi" it is, sounds like a speech disorder. And there are plenty of more samples like that.

    To be fair, English has NO "real C sound". The letter "C" has to borrow the sounds from other letters in the alphabet. In English a "C" either sounds like a "K" or an "S". Considering there is no Japanese phoneme for "si", they use the closest one they have which is "shi".

  • 1

    HokoOnchi

    It would be nice but admittedly impractical to have an academy of some sort that actually applied some thought and method to word borrowing. Such as only borrowing words that take fewer syllables to mean something, words that have a functional meanings that don't have a good fit in the mother tongue, things like that.

    On the other hand the rather free wheeling way in which English words are thrown into daily speech is breathtakingly fast, as is the changes in Japanese spoken by the younger set in general.

    As far as languages go, it seems to me that spoken contemporary Japanese is (to use an archaism) running at 78 rpm in a world where other languages are still at 33 1/3rd.

  • 2

    sfjp330

    Japan has known to copy everybody else since the beginning. Japan adopted many writings ideas and numbering systems from China. The Japanese number system dates back to back to around the 7th century based on the Chinese numeral system, which was created thousands of years ago. Also, the Japanese traditional calendar was on a luni-solar principle, which was copied from China.

  • -1

    genjuro

    I agree with many of the comments here that suing for damages is a tad excessive. There are more constructive ways of dealing with the issue American-style lol.

    However, I do understand his frustration and where he's coming from. Possibly in the last decade or so the usage of loanwords mostly from English has exploded, especially from the ad media sector and increasingly, in the news media. In most cases, there's no need to use loanwords if there's an acceptable Japanese equivalent for it. So it comes down to laziness and/or the desire to be seen as trendy or modern (supposedly by using English).

    Reminds me when I first wondered why so many J-pop songs feel the need to insert one line or phrase in English in an otherwise all-Japanese song. Thought it was then a recent phenomenon but apparently they've been doing it since the 70's and 80's (60's?) 歌謡曲. Looks like the post-war Japanese fascination with anything American/English won't go away anytime soon.

  • -2

    Yardley

    I agree with him. But, let's get rid of all foreign loan words! I already have my hands (and head) full just dealing with kanji and hiragana. Don't give me more symbols to learn! ;)

  • 2

    hikkifan17

    What was the point in this sueing? I mean come on, "ENGLISH" is GLOBAL LANGUAGE for many. As one said that is a very good thing.

  • -3

    mikihouse

    i went to mandarin hotel to have lunch and the waiter ask me if i like rice or roll in japanese pronounciation, i said gohan. Bastardised English sucks. If you can't pronounce it as is, don't use it, it does not convey the meaning and its irritating to the ears. And yes karate, sushi, sashimi exist in English because these words did not exist in the English language before morons.

  • 1

    Dennis Bauer

    Strange is he forced to watch NHK? Turn the idiot box off and read some of the Japanese classic writers!

  • -1

    R Lidster

    I'm glad that so many Japanese people are pointing out how ludicrous this case is. I was afraid that people would agree with him, since quite frankly, this story makes Japan into an international laughingstock.

    1) How is NHK responsible for his mental well-being? It is unimaginably arrogant to think that he is in a position to dictate how writers for an independent broadcasting company express their ideas, let alone that their failure to please him is a criminal offence!

    2) Is the plaintiff opposed to using kanji compounds because they come from China? Probably not. It's only difficult vocabulary words from some languages that ostensibly cause him mental distress, allegedly because he cannot understand them. But if that's the case...

    3) New words are formed every day in the language. I don't imagine he has a problem with new Japanese expressions like 地球温暖化, for example, although they have also burgeoned in number. No, this case can be reduced to anti-Americanism. But if that's the case...

    4) Would he perhaps sue hairdressers for the multicolored coifs we see on the streets? Or could he sue department stores for allowing in clothing makers that don't conform to his perverted ideals of Japanese identity?

    5) In that case, whose Japanese identity is it? Does some senile racist get to determine what is Japanese and what isn't? Is the Japanese used by young people somehow less valid than the Japanese used by the elderly? Words like トラブル are not American in the first place. They are neologisms, and most are uninterpretable for native English-speaking Americans who have never been to Japan. They are as Japanese as miso soup. They just happen to be new.

    6) It's too bad that some commenters here like Jinjapan and Ah_so seem to say that his ethnocentric, xenophobic argument about the putative "purity" of Japan has any merit or deserves attention. You can continue to pretend that the Ainu, Ryukyuans, Korean and Chinese immigrants, and any other groups that don't conform to your imagined nation-state do not exist in Japan, but in fact they do. Legislating based on some jingoistic delusion of ethnic homogeneity is just beyond reproach. If it causes "mental distress" to people to expose them to the real world, then so be it.

    (The original author makes two mistakes that should be corrected. First, パン comes from the Portuguese pão, not from Spanish. Second, "phonic structure" is a music term; it's called "phonotactic structure" in linguistics, and there are important differences between them that make the term "phonic" inappropriate here.)

  • 1

    Get Real

    Our elderly friend won't have an issue with the meaning of 地球温暖化. The term is appropriate to explain the general idea of global warming. Similarly, he might understand the gist of 遵守監査, though like most of us, be unaware of the finer details of a compliance audit.

    Assuming that the 'silver' demographic constitutes a significant portion of NHK's audience, the broadcaster's use of so many less established loanwords might be seen as jargon. A general consensus in modern business is that jargon, so often deployed to mask inadequacy, is best avoided.

    I recently overheard a recent graduate give his grandfather a perfunctory explanation of his consulting job. Although the old man had never heard of 'consulting', the grandson and his (professional) elder siblings lacked the social and linguistic nous to explain the concept to the old man. The conversational ball dropped dead, and the grandfather was disengaged.

    Is this really the best Japan can do?

  • -2

    Offwithyourarrogance

    Surprising he doesn't sue for not being able to read 'NHK'

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    Lspiro: While 'kawaii' is, for better or worse, being adopted in a number of nations, as well as a few others words I mentioned previously, Japanese is not at all taking over the English language (not suggesting you said as much, just saying). Like I said before, almost all loan words from Japanese are used only within artistic/sports/medical circles, and not at all in everyday English, whereas more than 20,000 words have been brought into the Japanese lexicon from English alone and a great deal of those ARE used in everyday Japanese.

  • 0

    André Moreira

    It's good for a language to evolve, but this is more like a mutation, and a bad one. It all comes from the "love" everyone around here has for America. Well, I guess I still have a lot to learn, as I can't understand it. Oh, and "pan" comes from the Portuguese.

  • 3

    House Atreides

    The pensioner has a valid complaint. Seriously, even a native English speaker would be hard pressed to understand words like "asurito" and "konpuriansu."

  • -3

    Tom Gill

    I totally support this old man in Nagoya who wants NHK to cut down its foreign words. This is not about nationalism, it's about basic communication. Many Japanese people now use lots of words that many, perhaps most fellow Japanese simply do not understand. OK it may not matter much about words like park and concierge, but when it comes to "informed consent" (infoomudu konsento) or "corporate compliance" (kooporeeto konpuraiansu) then the obscurantism of this obsession with trendy (often Latinate?) English words can have very dangerous consequences.

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    England was once dominated by Celtic-speaking people. Then came Germanic people (Anglo-Saxons) "at the request" of the Britons to fend off Picts. The Anglo-Saxons came in hordes, or more than needed, and took control of the most fertile portion of the land, the area today known as England. Earlier settlers were driven off to remote wasteland. Naturally language changed from Celtic to Anglo-Saxon (English).

    In 1066, the country was conquered by French-speaking Normans. As a result, French became a dominant language in high society with English spoken only by commons, which eventually led to the birth of a mixed language called Early Modern English. Modern English developed from this with hundreds of thousands of Latin or Greek derived words added to its lexicon.

    Original Anglo-Saxon words are small in number in Today's English. The majority are so-called loan words. This linguistic situation is very similar to that of Japanese. Original Japanese words (Yamato Kotoba) are small in number compared with Chinese-derived words or words composed of Chinese elements. As there is no pure English today, so there is no pure Japanese, either.

    Both languages, or linguistic cultures, are flexible and generous enough to take in foreign loan words very easily. That's a merit as well as a demerit for the cultures.

    Personally, I think Mr. Takahashi should be credited with his effort to call people's attention to the problem. Japanese is borrowing foreign words apace too much.

  • 1

    Serrano

    "Nihongo o taisetsu ni suru kai"

    I'm a member of Nihongo wa mada muzukashii kai.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Following are the Japanese which became Chinese /Nigelboy insisted. Made from Kanjis, 1. Kamikaze Mirtsubishi zero, Shinjuwan, Nippon, Nihon, Tokkotai, '

    1. Yasukuni, Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Toshiba, Mitsui, Tokyo, Osaka, Fukushima, Tsunami, Jishin, etc

    There are more but with all these kanjis, Chinese media dismissed the claim that any Japanese became Chinese especially, Nippon and Nihon. The claim is laughed at most..

  • 2

    Mirai Hayashi

    I remember watching a TV show a while back ( a few years back) where people were asked to talk about their daily routine, but were not allowed to use foreign words, and had to use their Japanese equivalents. For example, they weren't allowed to say computer, but rather tanmatsu, or email, but rather denshi tegami. It was nearly impossible for almost everyone who participated because the Japanese has evolved to incorporate foriegn words. The Japanese equivalent is either too awkward or too long to say, or an equivalent doesn't even exist.

    English has even adopted several Japanese words such as tsunami, koban, bokeh (a photography term to describe dept of field shots) or anime (although this is more of a Japanitized English word). The point is, this is no longer a society of isolated countries. As more countries become a part of the world stage, they MUST adopt foreign terminology being assimilated into their daily language.

  • -1

    yourock

    Japanese English rocks

  • 0

    Mirai Hayashi

    Many Japanese people now use lots of words that many, perhaps most fellow Japanese simply do not understand.

    Well, that pretty much goes for any language. Its a matter of maintaining your vocabulary through literature and other means of media. I think NHK is actually doing this guy a favor by educating him on the proper use of foriegn terminology, yet he foolishly chooses to shut it out.

    The Japanese language should be preserved through art and literature, not by hindering progress.

  • -1

    badsey3

    If natives cannot understand the language you have a problem. Use sub-titles to explain these words where there is difficulty.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Nextt he will sue USA for using Japanese words such as Kyoto, Fuji, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Abe, Okinawa.

  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    Correction:

    "Early Modern English" should be "Middle English".

  • 2

    danalawton1@yahoo.com

    The way I see it... words that do not have Japanese synonyms really should not ruffle anyone's feathers but if a perfectly good Japanese word already exists then use it. This comes down to whether or not NHK is quickly embracing a foreign word just because they saw or heard it once or twice elsewhere. NHK in a way, because of its long history as a channel the promotes culture and things domestic, should be the bellwether on acceptable Japanese language. Not to mention people pay straight out of their pocket for the privilege to watch ( well some people ). So... if it could be proven that NHK is just throwing in foreign words for the sake of sounding cool and with the times then I think this man has a valid reason to sue. If the foreign words they are using have hit the mainstream whereby the word is often seen in magazines and newspapers... then he will lose. The hard part will be measuring whether a foreign word has been used enough in print and media to qualify as acceptable for use on NHK or not.

  • -1

    talexa05

    @Toshiko<

    Kyoto, Fuji, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Abe, and Okinawa are all pronounced according to Japanese vowels sounds. Every imported loanword used in the English language is pronounced the "American way." The problem here in Japan is that foreign loanwords are pronounced horribly, and as a result effect the learning process of English learners.

  • -1

    CrisGerSan

    Good for him, The erosion of Japanese culture by the sorry importing of things from the US is sad to hear. The US is no fit source for anything cultural, as a creative professional of some 50 years now from the US, i have seen a steep decline in just about every aspect of American culture and life and language is especially badly eroded. So loan words can only hurt and not help. Hope that the media in Japan will clean up its act.

  • 0

    toshiko

    $talex: Yes, they are all pronounced according to Japanese vowel. In USA. they are borrowedwords from Japan, not American English. Are they?

  • 0

    cleo

    Kyoto, Fuji, Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Abe, and Okinawa are all pronounced according to Japanese vowels sounds.

    Well, they're place names so not really loan-words as such; how would you 'translate' Kyoto into English?

    That said, the idea that furriners pronounce Japanese words the same as Japanese is way off the mark; both vowels and stress get mangled regularly. I'm sure we've all heard kee-OW-toe, FOO-gee (with a labiodental f), hee-row-SHEE-mer, etc., etc.

    Complaining that loanwords aren't pronounced the same as in the original language is also a bit odd; how many of the loanwords used in English retain their original pronunciation? How many folk eat boeuf instead of beef? Or see the sky as blu instead of blue?

  • 0

    toshiko

    @Cleo: These names are combinations of kanjis from /hina, Kyoto is "Kyio' amd "to" Fuji is "Fu and Ji; Horoshim is "Hiro" and "shima:" Nagasaki is "Naga" and "Saki' Abe is "A, or an" and "Be, or bu:, Okinawa is "oki' and "nawa' Check their kanjisa. Kyoto is translated in English as capitol of Kyo. They use kanjis, not kana letters. USA just use loaned words instead of using lengthy translations. Check kanjis of these places. You will see Japanese use kanjis for places and last names, instead of kanas. Japanese writings mainly use kanjis. USA just use Japanese words alphabetically. Tsunami is tsunami in USA. Sushi, tempura, etc. . Using loanwords are clever.

  • -2

    JoeBigs

    All languages change with time, you can try to stop it, but you wont.

  • 0

    cleo

    toshiko - Yes I know they're written in kanji, that isn't the point. I was debunking the claim that Japanese words, including the ones mentioned, are always pronounced in the Japanese way by non-Japanese speakers.

    Kyoto is not 'translated in English as capital of Kyo'. It's a placename, Kyoto. It means 'capital', but people don't say The capital of Kyo is Japan's former capital, they say Kyoto is Japan's former capital.

    When Japanese people say rondon, nyuu yohku, bahminguhamu etc., they're not using loanwords in place of Japanese words, they're referring to places in the best way the phonological structure they are accustomed to will allow. That's quite different from the loanwords the old man is complaining about.

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Word borrowing usually occurs when there's no native word to label an item or a new idea. So words are also usually imported together with imported items that are not produced natively. Many of the words cleo (Jun. 27, 2013 - 04:01PM JST) lists are such examples:

    sofa, terebi (television), biiru (beer), uisukii (whisky), tabako (tobacco), surippa (slipper), kaaten (curtain), rajio (radio), pan (bread or bun), bataa (butter), maagariin (margarine), hamu (ham), chiizu (cheez), tomato (tomato), burokkorii (broccoli), koohii (coffee), miruku (milk), kuriimu (cream).

    Add to the list: esute (a beauty parlor that gives non-surgical aesthetic treatments.), konbini (convenience store), rimokon (remote controller), biiesu or BS (direct broadcasting by satellite), anime (animation), yubikitasu (ubiquitas), infura (infrastructure), ondemando (on demand), sofuto (software), pasokon (personal computer) and a myriad of computer-related words.

    Borrowing occurs in the other direction. So English has "sushi, karaoke, judo, karate, manga, kawaii. But their number is minuscule and the direction is overwhelmingly from English to Japanese. The ratio may be 99 percent from English to Japanese.

    How many septuagenarians in the U.S. would complain if they have to say common English words in borrowed foreign forms?

  • 0

    toshiko

    @voiceofOkinawab: You have written good points. In USA, I say Sankyu, I take a kapup obu tee, wan sarbing obu shshi, No problem. What I say here is not even Japanese or English, Americans are used to our broken English and glad to know old old people speak some English and Japanese,

  • 0

    Gilberto Nino Yanguas Mori

    If broadcasters tend to use foreign words, at least pronounce it properly so listeners could distinguish it from Japanese words. If one is going to use "athelete" instead of "senshu", please pronounce it properly and not as "asurito".

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Why do Japanese people want to use loan words where there are enough good native words to describe a situation? It's probably because loan word users feel good, fashionable, trendy and oftentimes superior to other people who may not yet understand the words.

    So there is a deep social aspect to this excessive foreign (English) word loaning. One cannot deny such Japanese mentality has nothing to do with a close contact with the U.S in such a way as they have done since the end of WW II. Maybe, this explains everything.

    The topic is subject of an ineresting academic research. I suggest someone do research on this.

  • 1

    badsey3

    I think a better example of this is how many people in Japan know Korean words from all the dramas.

    The real issue is that some brains have a harder time picking up these words = causes difficulty and is upsetting/frustrating. Does this mean you must be learning all these new words all the time? --> That is BS and I pay the NHK fee. One channel of NHK should be for people that do not wish to learn all the new words and with many older people in Japan their wishes should be granted.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Let me see: Athletes are undou senshu, kyogisha. plurals, Japanese has to add tachi. Senshu is a team member, athletiic team member. Plural,s, it has to add tachi, etc. It is easy to use foreign language words instead of translating in Japanese that usually do not express plural. Just practice th, v, r, etc and English words meld in Japanese. The same in USA. Japanese words are easier than translating each Japanese to English.

  • 0

    Lau Yi Ching

    Don't mind if I say anything but to be curious, like the tittle said above, is it true that nowadays Japanese began to speak Bahasa Rojak(Mixed languages)? Because, in Malaysia, we used to borrow every languages, be it foreign or locals,mixed them like a rojak and used it to communicate each other, especially broken English which some found them disturbing.

  • 0

    genjuro

    @Nigelboy Thanks for the link above from the Chinese professor. Very interesting and shows the Chinese learning from the Japanese. Reminds me of the old joke about the English teaching the Irish the language but the latter teaching the former how to use it. lol. To quote the professor in his article (rough translation):

    These various disciplines involving almost new vocabulary or new creation of modern Japan, or use old words and endowed with new ideas, and now the majority of Chinese intellectuals to borrow, which greatly enriched the Chinese vocabulary, and promoted many Chinese changes to China's modernization movement laid a very important cornerstone. Now we used some of the basic terminology, vocabulary, mostly been imported from Japan at this time. Such as services, organization, discipline, politics, revolution, government, party, principles, policies, application, solution, theory, philosophy, principles, etc., in fact, all come from the Japanese "foreign language", as well as economic, scientific, commercial cadres, health, socialism, capitalism, legal, feudal, republican, aesthetics, literature, art, abstract ...... numerous, all come from the Japanese.

  • 0

    cloa513

    Ridiculous lawsuit- its still Japanese. However I don't why someone hasn't sued the other TV channels especially channel 9- they don't have true subtitles- the show nyoin's subtitles didn't match the spoken Japanese- its discrimination against hearing impairment- in deed shows should have true subtitles.

  • -1

    Gaijin Desi

    he he ha ha ha yuk yuk yuk... and yesterday there was news that younger generation faced difficulties with KANJI...

  • -1

    toshiko

    @genjuro: Followings are more Japanese which became Chinese according to the professor. I am sure you will admire them. Honda, Toyota, Nissan, Matsuda, Suzuki, Mitsubishi, Tokyo, Nippon, Tohoku, Kyushu, Ginza, Osaka, Tennou, Jinja, Yasukuni, Nara ----- Note, most are proper noun, He did not have much collection as he was not familiar with Japanese linguistics beside his collective words are from WW II time such as Tokkotai, Kamikkaze, Kushu, Hinan, sokai, kyiosei, also he stated Ian-fu. Any combinations of Kanjis in Japanese became Chinese he claimed.

  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    The issue is not only linguistic but also social. In other words, the phenomenon of this excessive and extravagant use of foreign loan words, especially from American English, has something to do with the post-WW II Japanese mentality. One may call it "colonial nature."

  • 0

    badman

    Kulasico!

  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    It is this mentality of Japan's national leaders that explains why Okinawa has to suffer so much under the overfluous U.S. military presence. A vassal only cozies up to its suzerain, complying with whatever the suzerain demands. The Futenma issue is a typical example.

  • 0

    kitzrow

    He would be better off suing them for unlawful collection of monthly fees!

  • 0

    sf2k

    Japanese as a language is in need of protection as it continues to erode into gibberish English without meaning.

  • 0

    Roxana A.

    I will sue japanese citizens for my stress caused by trying to understand their EIGO!!

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    I dont know why this man is not going after the TV broadcasters for the unfunny talanto and endless eating programs on every channel at prime time. Maybe he should watch TV within the day where there is more choice of what to watch instead of waiting till prime time and just watching one channel.... I have seen a number of times a news debate get taken over by the talanto and make it so childish you start to loose track of what they really where talking about.

  • 0

    WilliamK

    I know i'm a bit late, here...But - At first I laughed...then found that I could understand their viewpoint. "Traditional" is, perhaps, a more appropriate a term than "Xenophobic". The intusion of 'foreign" terms and phrases is an unavoidable in the modern world. Believe me...there are one or two "innocent terms" from the US (and we share the same language), that could land you in court (or hospital), in the UK. Guess the NHK incident was "one too many", for the person concerned.

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