U.S. lawmakers warn Japan, Canada on Pacific trade deal talks

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  • 1

    Disillusioned

    Yep! Too bloody right they should too! This deal is a bonus for all countries concerned and Japan needs to flood their markets with cheaper imported goods to increase spending and make the sales tax hike work for reducing the public debt. But these stone-headed old bureaucrats want to keep their price fixing practices and kick-back policies. If they don't want to play they should be shut out and let them suffer the consequences of their ignorance.

  • -1

    StormR

    If they dont drop farm tariffs they should be dropped, NZ for example has major interests in farm products and if no concessions then it is pointless NZ and others doing business with this protectionist market.

    Farming in japan is a joke and needs to be dragged kicking and screaming into the modern age.

  • -14

    umbrella

    Japan should be told to go forth and multiply for Christ's sake. Hopeless country.

  • -2

    Charlie Kinsman

    @umbrella You seem to have a lot of problems with Japan based on your comments on past articles. Do you live there?? If you do why are you even still there if it's becoming such a problem for your well-being. Or do you just enjoy complaining online like 95% of the people commenting on these articles LOL.

  • 3

    danalawton1@yahoo.com

    I was amazed a couple of years ago while living in Japan and the Yen / Dollar rate was at Y80.... a 400 gram cut of steak, not Kobe but Australian, was Y600 per 100 grams. Or in Dollar Terms at the time... $30 for roughly a 13 ounce steak.

  • 2

    Kapuna

    If you are going to trade, trade. Open the markets and let the consumer decide, local or imported.

  • 3

    Tom Webb

    There is no such thing a free trade on farm goods when it comes to Japan. It is the same thing as the Russian saying that they might give the conquered northern islands back. It ain't going to happen. TPP talks need to move on without the Japanese taking part, otherwise the US will be blackmailed into okaying with all kind of "exceptions".

  • 8

    zootmoney

    One of the biggest proponents of TPP is Monsanto, the St. Louis-based agricultural biotech giant and the world’s biggest seed developer. Currently, Monsanto has its patented genes inserted into approximately 95 percent of all soybeans and 85 percent of all corn grown in the United States, controlling about 90 percent of seed genetics in the country. I wonder how much Monsanto has donated to these US lawmakers' campaigns. Charles Rangel faced a series of allegations of ethics violations and failures to comply with tax laws. In November 2010, the Ethics Committee found Rangel guilty of 11 counts of violating House ethics rules, and on December 2, 2010, the full House approved a sanction of censure against Rangel.

  • 1

    ReformedBasher

    U.S. lawmakers warn Japan, Canada on Pacific trade deal talks

    Farm lobby groups have already threatened to oppose the TPP, which is key to the Obama administration’s foreign policy in Asia, if they do not get better access to Japan and Canada’s markets.

    So, where is all of the anti-Canada rhetoric? The silence is deafening.

    @zootmoney

    Scary.

  • -6

    Disillusioned

    So, where is all of the anti-Canada rhetoric?

    Yeah, we want it import snow from Canada!

  • 4

    CrazyJoe

    Japanese farmers exert substantial influence over the ruling party because rural districts enjoy disproportionately heavy representation in the Diet, or parliament.Tokyo's failure to offer leadership is particularly disheartening because Japan has been one of the world's prime beneficiaries of the free-trade oriented regime fostered during the post war era by the Geneva based GATT.

  • 10

    Daniel Neagari

    As long as the US drops its position too, I suppose Japan should comply accordingly....

    Oh wait... the US won't give their advantage neither...

  • 0

    GW

    As a Canuck but living here for a couple decades so a bit out of the know regarding dairy etc back home but I do remember all the inter province trade regs that were pretty daft so I can imagine how some yanks want change & it would probably a good thing. A lot of farming back home could use a little more competition.

    But the yanks also have lots of subsidies with lots of virtually free grazing for example, so they would need to be willing to reform as well.

    The TPP would likely have been fine if Japan had NOT been allowed into negotiations as Japan basically lied/deceived, their whole intent has been to throw wrenches into the machinery & to de-rail the talks, the Yanks should have been smarter & only allowed Japan to join AFTER a TPP had already been completed, but they got FOOLED AGAIN!

  • 12

    Thunderbird2

    Is America totally open to all imports? Anything they're protecting? It would be interesting to know.

  • 10

    StormR

    US is protecting its own interest as always, and also wants to protect its auto industry, we hear all the time here about japan and its farming tariffs but the US has restrictions and tariffs on autos so ask yourself is this a reasonable thing or is the reporting always one sided here.

  • 7

    zootmoney

    “Control oil and you control nations,” said US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the 1970s. “Control food and you control the people.” Global food control has nearly been achieved, by reducing seed diversity with GMO (genetically modified) seeds that are distributed by only a few transnational corporations. But this agenda has been implemented at grave cost to our health; and if the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) passes, control over not just our food but our health, our environment and our financial system will be in the hands of transnational corporations. At least try to be informed before making blanket statements about TPP being such a great "bonus" for Japan. Local farmers in Asia cannot hope to compete with American multinationals. In future, these countries will be beholden to the US for the majority of their food supply and they'll also be beholden to whatever prices are put upon these essential staples.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/monsanto-the-tpp-and-global-food-dominance/5359491

  • 3

    FizzBit

    I think Zootmoney hit on the head with the campaign contributions issue. These bozo's haven't even read it yet cuz it's still top secret. How can they start making demands of other nations? I think they should first demand that it be made public.

    Traveled through Hokkaido two summers ago for 10 days in a camp car. Saw lots of anti-TPP signs. Met some family farmers running little road side stands. I'd really hate to see them have to close down. On the other hand, I'll never pay more than ¥800. for a sirloin steak, and I dislike the JA scam going on. Green beans from Oman? How does that happen?

  • 6

    taj

    as a Canadian in Japan, I tell these bought-and-paid-for US lawmakers to kiss my shiny metal @ss.

  • 9

    BertieWooster

    The local farmer's markets produce excellent fruit and vegetables at cheap prices. If Japan joins the TPP, the local farmers will not be able to compete with mass produced fruit and vegetables that are tasteless and about as natural as expanded polystyrene. These people will be out of a job and farm land will probably be sold off or allowed to revert to forest, swamp, etc. The number of jobless would not be small. This would give the tax payer another burden and push people in poorer areas to poverty, increase crime and so on.

    TPP is NOT a good idea. It is formed by huge corporations who care nothing for the consumer.

    Certainly the current situation in Japan is not good either, but changing it requires careful planning into the future. Something Japanese governments cannot seem to do.

  • -2

    smithinjapan

    ReformedBasher: "So, where is all of the anti-Canada rhetoric? The silence is deafening."

    And your comment on this Japan-based news site on the TPP is only that?

    Both nations should be dropped if they are unwilling to budge. Drop the tariffs and trade, or be dropped. So long as safety standards are met, let the consumer decide what they want. People in Japan, at least, will still continue to insist that 'made in Japan' is better and will still buy Japanese cars and rice before the cheaper, imported stuff. I'm sure a number of Canucks would to the same as well, though I think more would go for the cheaper product than would here.

  • -4

    bass4funk

    TPP is NOT a good idea. It is formed by huge corporations who care nothing for the consumer.

    Certainly the current situation in Japan is not good either, but changing it requires careful planning into the future. Something Japanese governments cannot seem to do.

    As if the farmers in Japan already care about the consumers.

    as a Canadian in Japan, I tell these bought-and-paid-for US lawmakers to kiss my shiny metal @ss.

    And what can Canada offer to Japan???

  • 2

    It"S ME

    I don't see the local small farmers competing with anyone outside Japan most likely like in other countries they will supply the local market while large scale farming for the overseas market will be done by corporations. There don't need to be a conflict.

    Interesting to read online how many Europeans are fighting the TPP and similar agreements from being adopted by their governments

  • 3

    ReformedBasher

    And your comment on this Japan-based news site on the TPP is only that?

    I believe the expression is "Fish on!"

    One the resident Japan-hating Canadians has taken the bait. You will excuse me if I don't even bother?

    (Seems we are in agreement on the Ukraine issue though)


    Not anti-US but isn't this a case of "your" lobby vs "my" lobby? Would appear from the comments above, that a few are in agreement.

    Who is going to pay for all of the out-of-work farmers if these foreign lobbies have their way? Even if Abe, or anybody else, gave the full green light, he/she would still get blamed for the consequences.

  • 6

    Thunderbird2

    No Americans going to argue about their own producers' protectionist attitudes?

  • 2

    tinawatanabe

    the Yanks should have been smarter & only allowed Japan to join AFTER a TPP had already been completed, but they got FOOLED AGAIN!

    GW, you're wrong. Japan of course confirmed US before entering the TPP talks that some products could be exempted. It is Japan that got fooled.

  • 2

    gokai_wo_maneku

    The "TTP" is not about trade or agriculture or any such thing. It is about one thing: all regulation of capital flow is prohibited. That is a disaster for the world that Wallstreet will have such free reign over the global economy. THAT is what the "TTP" is about. Well, look forward to another 2007-8 disaster of global proportions, the likes of which you have never seen. And you will be the victim (unless you are a .005%er).

  • 4

    ReformedBasher

    @Thunderbird2

    No Americans going to argue about their own producers' protectionist attitudes?

    Even if there are, I still think it's a lobby issue rather than a national one.

    People need to stop generalising about other countries and their people. In this case, all three countries have their own best interests first and foremost. It's unavoidable I guess. Like someone mentioned, no sense in trying to force others unless you've got something to compensate.

  • 1

    StormR

    So when the US opens its borders to cars from japan and lets them pour across its borders like Mexicans then I guess japan could drop its tariffs on farm produce, until then I don't think the US has a reasonable stance on this.

    Its all for calling others out but needs to stand in front of the mirror and take a long hard look.

  • -4

    Mike Critchley

    Free trade. The name says it all. Trade freely, or don't step up to the table.

  • 7

    Farmboy

    The TPP is not advantageous to Japan, and should stay out of it. As for the US, look at how they support farmers with subsidies, and then come back and explain why Japan shouldn't support its agricultural sector.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-09/farmers-boost-revenue-sowing-subsidies-for-crop-insurance.html

  • 7

    Markus L

    One of the reasons the US is having trouble stemming the huge flow of immigrants from Mexico is that thousands of them are corn farmers who can no longer make a living due to subsidized USA corn Mexico is forced to buy due to NAFTA. Over 1.5 million Mexican corn farmers were put out of work and many of them were forced to go north of the border to work illegally (ironically many with huge US meat packing companies who advertised for workers in Mexico).

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/02/01/107871/free-trade-us-corn-flows-south.html

    Just as the small farmer in America has been largely put out of business by huge Agribusinesses, Asian farmers will suffer the same fate. Those with any doubt about that should watch the documentary "Food Inc.".

    http://documentaryaddict.com/Food+Inc-2174-doc.html

    Canada and Japan are wise to protect their farmers from the onslaught of US Agribusinesses. And a lot of the criticism about Japan's farmers is simply wrong. Their produce are superb and their prices are not high, especially considering the quality.

  • 4

    Frungy

    Apparently U.S. lawmakers don't understand the word "negotiation". The signing the TPP is a negotiation, not an imperial law imposed by the Empire of the United States on every other country in the world for the exclusive benefit of the U.S.

    Only an idiot would sign it under the conditions the U.S. seems keen to impose.

    I say give them the middle finger. Honestly there are WAAAAAY too many strings attached to the U.S. version of the TPP. This won't stop Japan from negotiating something very similar to the TPP with all the other countries involved. Just cut the U.S. out of the loop. The U.S. economy is already circling the drain anyway.

  • 2

    gokai_wo_maneku

    The action of Japan and Canada is a sign that TTP is already dead.

  • 5

    Randy Thompson

    Beware of these trade deals, they are in support of local, small farmers in any of these countries. When the article said "Pork farmers said the congressional show of support was welcome" those pork farmers were large, environmentally unfriendly, corporate hog farms.

    If you want to know what happens to a nation's farming industry after one of these corporate trade deals look at Mexico. NAFTA destroyed the traditional farming industry in that country and ended up driving millions unemployed Mexicans north into the US. When a small Mexican village's small farmers went out of business, the local dry good sellers closed, the small banks closed, etc, etc....

    Notice these US Congressmen seem to only get "non-partisan" when it comes to contributing to corporations bottom line profits.

    No I do not currently live in Japan, but it is the nation of my second home and I hate to see it become just another cultural desert like the USofA and simply a foot stool of corporations.

  • 3

    StormR

    I used to be all for this TPP and then started to hear all sorts of things that don't really sound too good, and mostly not what your average guy in the street would want once they learn how far reaching it could be. I

    t isn't juts about cars n pigs n beef etc, there are all sorts of things that will suit the big corporations who's main goal is to keep the general populace enslaved, trapped and restricted, do some reading on this TPP, its another tool for the US to screw everyone. It started out alright but has been taken over by corporate pirates and criminals.

  • 0

    TrevorPeace1

    So many Japan and Canada bashers!! The two countries where I spend all my time are not what's holding up the trade deal. As a few of you wiser individuals point out, there's a lot of behind-the-scenes corporate manipulation going on, and it's all in the U.S. Funny how the U.S. picks on its #2 and #4 export markets. If Canada and Japan shut down their U.S. imports for even a month, the U.S. would go bankrupt. Not that it isn't already, both monetarily and socially. How's that for some U.S. bashing??

  • 1

    Thunderbird2

    Trevor... there are a few of us who are America bashers too lol

  • 5

    Nightshade 2014

    Has anyone here actually SEEN the text and specific terms of the TPP agreement to be able to determine which part is in the best interest of whom? No? No one? Hmmm. Me neither. Not even the press have seen it. No one but the people at the negotiating table have seen it, because it is secret. How can an alleged trade deal that suggests open markets, unfettered barter and inclusive trade be so closed, secretive and exclusive? There must be some reason that the original proponents decided it should be a secret deal...even though it affects every man, woman and child in all signing countries. If I'm the only one who finds that fact disturbing, then I must be out of touch.

  • 0

    Cricky

    It was all on track honest and above board before either USA or Japan screwed the whole thing up.

  • 6

    StormR

    Nightshade I'm right there with you and Cricky it started out with a handful of nations all agreeing and working for the common good then the US jumped on board and started calling the tune, some bad corporations pulling the strings like Monsanto and some others, the more I learn the less I like it.

  • 4

    gokai_wo_maneku

    Nightshade, strictly speaking you are right. But at least in the Japanese press, enough details have been leaking out for the past year that allow someone to conclude it is a bad deal for everyone but the US. Especially the required complete deregulation of capital flow. Great for Wall Street. Bad for everyone else.

  • -3

    EthanWilber

    Put side of the increasing pressure from Capitol Hill, Japan is facing huge competiveness issues of its products from almost all of the directions. (not just farm produrcts) TPP negotiations only inconveniently expose Japan’s long-term viability on ever-growing globalization.

    Taking Japanese farm products for example, on one hand, protectionism may help Japan’s farmers who are on "life support" for a bit longer, yet on the other hand, artificially jacked-up prices on fruits and vege would reduce Japanese consumers’ purchase power and in turn cut their other consumptions which they could have done in terms of spurring economy broadly, otherwise. It’s really a lose-lose end game for Japan.

    Given J-govt’s hardline attitude, a quick TPP finish-up has become less likely at this juncture.

  • -9

    jerseyboy

    A bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers on Wednesday said Japan’s refusal to drop all barriers to farm imports under a Pacific trade deal was unacceptable and urged the U.S. administration to cut Japan and Canada out of the talks if they did not give ground.

    Great news. Japan had the "Miracle" in large part due to U.S. assistance, and the ability to export all the cars, electronics, steel, etc. to the U.S. without punishing tariffs. And don't think for a minute that these Congressmen and their constituents, don't remember that, and the large number of U.S. jobs that were lost as a result. Time for Japan to level the playing field.

  • -1

    tinawatanabe

    the large number of U.S. jobs that were lost as a result. Time for Japan to level the playing field.

    US and Japan lost a large number of jobs by China, but US did not lose because of Japan. Japan moved manufacturing to US on US demand.

  • -2

    Serrano

    I'm against it - for me it's less money.

  • 5

    Bear27840

    Japan and Canada need to protect their people from the large corporate companies of America that can only think of destroying what a country has in order to have total control over what that country has.

  • 4

    SamuraiBlue

    Is America totally open to all imports? Anything they're protecting? It would be interesting to know.

    Well, here is your answer;

    http://www.businessinsider.com/americas-biggest-tariffs-2010-9?op=1

    If you look into this page published WTO

    http://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/agric_e/negs_bkgrnd10_access_e.htm

    You'll find that the US has 54 items listed for Tariff quota while Japan only have 20 items. On the nexdt page you'll find that the US lists 189 items for Special safeguards where as Japan has only 121 items.

    Now tell me which has a more closed market?

  • 2

    StormR

    Jerseyboy there are restrictions and tariffs on cars going into the US what are you talking about?

    Farming in japan needs an overhaul there is no doubting that, the land needs to be used more efficiently but to this this farms need to be merged to make real sized farms not just a bunch of neighbours all sharing one tractor, it needs to be done on a grand scale, but to do that japan needs to throw out the old ways and get its farming into 2014 and out of 1914.

    The arable land is not being utilised properly, old people cannot plant grow and harvest large tracts of land efficiently enough to compete with industrialised farming the rest of the world uses.

    Japan does need to increase its production and export in many areas to see any benefit in any trade deals, at the moment its hoping around like a one legged man in a ass kicking competition.

  • 2

    Castra Lejos

    Good on Japan. I am an American living in Japan and the quality of food far exceeds that of the United States. The Japanese are a people of honor and good judgment, they will protect the livelihood of their farmers. The people of Japan don't want GMO products in their country, nor do they need to be undersold by import.

  • 0

    nigelboy

    “We urge you to hold Japan and Canada to the same high standards as other TPP partners. Otherwise, Congressional support for a final TPP agreement will be jeopardized,”

    Correct that to

    "We urge you to hold Japan and Canada to kowtow to our demands as other TPP partners. Otherwise, Congressional support for a final TPP agreement will be jeopardized"

    No fast tract so what you have in the U.S. are bunch of lawmakers merely echoing their constituencies with no concept of "compromise".

  • 1

    Frungy

    Nightshade 2014Jul. 31, 2014 - 09:11PM JST Has anyone here actually SEEN the text and specific terms of the TPP agreement to be able to determine which part is in the best interest of whom? No? No one? Hmmm. Me neither.

    Just because you're commenting from a position of ignorance don't assume everyone else is. I read a leaked portion on wikileaks a few months back. It wasn't the whole thing, but after I'd read it I concluded that you'd have to be made to sign that document.

    Not even the press have seen it. No one but the people at the negotiating table have seen it, because it is secret. How can an alleged trade deal that suggests open markets, unfettered barter and inclusive trade be so closed, secretive and exclusive?

    The answer? Because there are several clauses related to copyright that will basically stop all innovation internationally. It is a mess of legalese, but it amounts to not being able to trade in anything trademarked/copyrighted/patented in another country. ... and since the standards for intellectual property are so lose in the U.S. and so strict in Europe and other countries this means that most products from non-US countries won't be able to import jack into the U.S, but the U.S. will be able to export like mad. And it isn't just into the U.S. either, they'd be able to use this clause to block imports into other TPP countries.

    The TPP amounts to serving the US's self-interests and absolutely no-one else's.

    There must be some reason that the original proponents decided it should be a secret deal...even though it affects every man, woman and child in all signing countries. If I'm the only one who finds that fact disturbing, then I must be out of touch.

    No, you're not out of touch, but you can read it on wikileaks if you like. However you probably won't be able to sleep afterwards.

  • 0

    CraigHicks

    The US wants to sell California rice to Japan. But California rice is subsidized with cheap irrigation water - farmers in California pay as little as 2% of the cost for water compared to consumers in cities. The price of water in California is not set by the free market. While there are some reasonable arguments that subsidizing agriculture for domestic consumption is in the long term interests of US citizens, subsidizing rice, almonds, etc. for export is just plain stupid. Los Angeles is investing 1 billion dollars in a new desalination plant to secure its water supply in the continuing California drought, surely the first of many more to come.

    Japan has no such water shortage - surprise surprise Japan naturally suitable environment for growing rice. The only question is whether Japanese small farmers should be replaced by "foreign trainees" stacked up in plywood dormitories so that agriculture profits can be more effectively funneled through a smaller number of hands, hence allowing influence money to filter up to government level faster and more freely.

  • -3

    jerseyboy

    Jerseyboy there are restrictions and tariffs on cars going into the US what are you talking about?

    StormR -- I know exactly what I am talking about. And these Congressmen do to. Do you? The U.S. tariff on cars is 2.5% while electronics averages 5.6%. Compared to Japan's rate of 38.5% on frozen beef and 800% on rice, for example. Japan is never going to get what it wants in these TPP talks with that kind of disparity. IMO, these guys are right -- toss Japan to the curb.

  • -1

    nigelboy

    StormR -- I know exactly what I am talking about. And these Congressmen do to.

    No they don't. For instance, do American Auto manufacturers care what the American farmers want, and vice versa? NO. Is there an official within the U.S. that could negotiate a 'compromise' between the two? No. Is their an authority in U.S. where they could unilaterally decide by giving up the interest of one (Auto) to satisfy another (Farming)? No.

    Again, the so-called Congressmen are merely making "me, me, me" demands without even considering a compromise.

  • 0

    tokyodoumo

    Trade is about comprise and trying to be fair as possible... If you only want to take and not give than serious trade between nations will not be possible. Japan sells tons of cars to US but American cars are not welcomed in Japan, times are changing and if Japan don't want to be left out it must cooperate and be fair.

  • 1

    sfjp330

    I am not sure if the criticism of Japan is warranted for not importing enough agricutlural products. Japan already imports 60 percent of its food supply and food safety is a sensitive issue. In less than five years, goverment farm subsidies will be eliminated. By comparison, the U.S. imports about a tenth of its food supply and tests less than 1 percent of shipments. Sure, Japan could import cheaper California rice, but what about rural farmers in Japan that will no longer will get goverment farm subsidies and they cannot survive? The J-goverment have to maintain a balance of future agricultral industry in their own country first.

  • 1

    Noliving

    If you want to know what happens to a nation's farming industry after one of these corporate trade deals look at Mexico. NAFTA destroyed the traditional farming industry in that country and ended up driving millions unemployed Mexicans north into the US. When a small Mexican village's small farmers went out of business, the local dry good sellers closed, the small banks closed, etc, etc....

    That is false, mexico's agricultural exports to the USA more than tripled since the NAFTA was implemented. In fact before NAFTA the USA ran a $1.7 billion dollar trade surplus with Mexico, they now run a $60+ billion dollar trade deficit with Mexico. Mexico's non oil exports increased by over 300%, and foreign direct investment has increased by more than 14 times since NAFTA.

    Also the imports of corn is yellow corn used to feed livestock while Mexico primarily produced white corn, another point to make is that only around 6% of Mexico's farms are considered efficient/profitable. The real issue with the poor farmers is caused by Mexican corruption, for example Procampo, a government programme meant to provide a minimum income for every farmer, was hijacked years ago by agribusiness, with a big slice of its annual budget of $1.4 billion going to large-scale farmers in the northern part of Mexico. Four-fifths of farmers have fewer than five hectares (12 acres), according to the ministry of agriculture.

    The truth of the matter is that if you're a farmer with 12 acres you were never going to be able compete on a global or even a national scale with or without tariffs on imports, that 12 acres of food is really just for yourself and only yourself. They can't produce enough food for their entire population, not even close. But here is the best part, corn production in Mexico has grown from 18 million tonnes to 24 million tonnes.

  • -3

    jerseyboy

    No they don't. For instance, do American Auto manufacturers care what the American farmers want, and vice versa? NO. Is there an official within the U.S. that could negotiate a 'compromise' between the two? No. Is their an authority in U.S. where they could unilaterally decide by giving up the interest of one (Auto) to satisfy another (Farming)? No.

    Again, the so-called Congressmen are merely making "me, me, me" demands without even considering a compromise

    Nigelboy -- for the life of me I cannot make sense of your rant. First off, if you have been following this process, you know that a similar group of Congressmen from auto-producing states already came out with a similar statement saying Japan must truly open its auto market if the TPP is to gain approval. So what exactly is your point? Second, the TPP guidelines state quite clearly that ALL tariffs are supposed to be eliminated -- Free Trade. So if Japan were coming to the talks with that attitude, there would be no need to compromise or to favor one interest over the other. You are blaming the U.S. Congress for a problem that Japan created. Finally, your comment about "me, me, me" as it relates to U.S. Congressmen is simply laughable. That has been Japan's MOD since Day 1 -- " we are special and must be accomodated". Japan knew the rules and decided to try to bully their way into a compromise and they are getting called out for it -- don't let the door hit you on the way out. But it's OK, because Japan just did a deal with Mongolia.

  • 0

    sfjp330

    @Noliving

    When the NAFTA was being negotiated, supporters promised it would increase the income of Mexicans. And the middle class did grow in Mexico over the past two decades. But it's clear that Mexico's ultrarich are among its big winners and benefited only the few.

  • 0

    nigelboy

    Nigelboy -- for the life of me I cannot make sense of your rant. First off, if you have been following this process, you know that a similar group of Congressmen from auto-producing states already came out with a similar statement saying Japan must truly open its auto market if the TPP is to gain approval.

    ??? There are no tariffs for foreign cars coming to Japan. Don't give me this BS NTB. I discussed this ad nauseum on a similar article.

    Second, the TPP guidelines state quite clearly that ALL tariffs are supposed to be eliminated -- Free Trade. So if Japan were coming to the talks with that attitude, there would be no need to compromise or to favor one interest over the other.

    Failing to realize that U.S. wants sugar cane exception and to keep the tariffs on Auto.

    You are blaming the U.S. Congress for a problem that Japan created.

    No. I'm blaming the lack of fast track system. Read again.

    Finally, your comment about "me, me, me" as it relates to U.S. Congressmen is simply laughable. That has been Japan's MOD since Day 1 -- " we are special and must be accomodated".

    Nope. U.S. had already accepted the concept of Japan having exception in turn to reduce the tariffs in years to come. This was accepted by Australia so the precedence has been set. The problem again, is U.S.'s failure to respond in a manner by in which since there are no fast track, you get these "me, me, me" Congressmen who doesn't give a squat if this TPP gets through.

    But it's OK, because Japan just did a deal with Mongolia.

    Failing to realize that Japan ALREADY has EPA/FTA with 8 of the 11 participating nations.

    Something about the "door hitting"??

  • 1

    sfjp330

    Unlike U.S., with many restriction by Japanese goverment for many decades, you do not see single foreign auto manufacturing in Japan and operating independent dealership and distribution. There is no GM, Ford, VW, BMW, or MB manufacturing plant in Japan. None. Why is that? In Europe, GM employs over 40,000 European workers, and 22,000 alone in Germany. In Europe, with the very similar gas price as Japan, Ford sold sells about 60,000 cars a month. Many people in this site saids "well, if GM and Ford adapt to what Japanese want, they will buy". Well, look at Korean manufacturers like Hyundai. They build very similar cars to Toyota with a right hand drive. And how did their sales add up? In 2012, the entire Korean manufacturer sold just 500 cars in Japan, and what did Japanese do in South Korea? They exported 20,000 cars? What GM and Ford knows very well is that it is a closed market. It's just one way trade and Japan call it free trade.

    When U.S. vehicle is exported to Japan, they have many bogus safety inspections that is not necessary at all. They tax the heck out of any engine size that is over 1.5 litre. Is Japan really saying U.S. cars are unsafe and Japan is saying you cannot have a standarized inspection? Why do Japan need costly inspection of all the cars when there is no problem in U.S.? Heck, maybe U.S. goverment should inspect all the beer can Japanese cars that are exported from Japan and let the big 300lb guy sit on the hood and see if it bends? If it bends, send it back to Japan as a safety problem. Reality is that all U.S. manufacturers have given up thinking about Japan. It's a dead end road.

  • 0

    wildwest

    Any one should have the right not to accept substandard food, protect food security, poor engineering, oversized gads guzzling teckno antiquated vehicles.

  • 1

    nigelboy

    Why is that?

    Because it's costly. And the size of the Japanese auto market is small in relative EU or China. So what these American automakers want is a return without the needed investment. In other words, they want welfare.

    When U.S. vehicle is exported to Japan, they have many bogus safety inspections that is not necessary at all.

    Typical U.S. reaction.

    They tax the heck out of any engine size that is over 1.5 litre.

    Make one under then. Simple.

    Is Japan really saying U.S. cars are unsafe and Japan is saying you cannot have a standarized inspection?

    No. They're saying you play by our rules here and we'll play by your rules there. Simple.

    Heck, maybe U.S. goverment should inspect all the beer can Japanese cars that are exported from Japan and let the big 300lb guy sit on the hood and see if it bends? If it bends, send it back to Japan as a safety problem.

    By all means. At least Japan's auto manufacturers are in position since they INVESTED in many plants there.

    .

    Reality is that all U.S. manufacturers have given up thinking about Japan.

    Then stop whining.

  • 0

    CajunH2O

    Yeah my father in law is rice farmer in Hokkaido. What the US wants could hurt his livelihood. So the US should be willing to do the same that they expect from others. If tariffs are to be removed remove them on all sides.

  • 0

    sfjp330

    nigelboy Aug. 01, 2014 - 06:08AM JST Because it's costly. And the size of the Japanese auto market is small in relative EU or China. So what these American automakers want is a return without the needed investment. In other words, they want welfare.

    Perhaps Japan goverment's true policy has been the experience of the Renault-Nissan alliance that originally established about fifteen years ago and consolidated in subsequent years. The partnership ostensibly gave French-based Renault control of Nissan. After all, the Nissan distribution chain, which is Japan’s second largest was now ostensibly Ghosn’s to reshape. The two companies were expected to go through a process of rapid integration. To the extent that the companies have cooperated on distribution, however, this has been confined entirely to markets beyond Japan. In the Japanese home market, Nissan has kept its distribution system strictly OFF-LIMITS to Renault. The result is that, far from increasing, Renault’s Japanese market share has dropped substantially. What is clear is that Renault’s experiences in Japan should be of some significance to all other manufacturers.

  • -3

    bass4funk

    Japan and Canada need to protect their people from the large corporate companies of America that can only think of destroying what a country has in order to have total control over what that country has.

    And all the more reason Japan and Canada are slowly becoming wastelands, they are destroying themselves. People are becoming more and more disenfranchised with the rising cost of produce and if the 2 want to fall by the way of irrelevancy, so be it.

  • 0

    EthanWilber

    J-govt’s adamant tariff ratios on American auto, beef, pork, dairy goods, grains ... etc are exorbitant high. Such strong handed protectionism/shortsightedness actually is doing Japan’s economy a disservice, hindering Japanese competiveness in the globe marketplace.

    There is the thing, the US should be able to sustain its grow without Japanese market, but on the side of coin, without accessing American markets or reducing its exports to the US , Japan’s economy would be in trouble especially at the time Japan’s exports to its big neighbor are losing steam.

    Allow me to remind you guys that TPP is not all about trade; it’s the economic leg of Obama’s Asia Pivot , and losing this leg, the whole idea could be imbalance. Japan can't have both ways.

    At current political climate reflected on the Hill, granting fast-track is very difficult. J-govt should do some soul searchingand act properly before time could run out.

  • 1

    BPoint

    Everyone just watch Food Inc. and King Corn..... Big US Agribusiness is bad news.

  • 0

    gokai_wo_maneku

    The reason no cars sell here is that the US automakers put absolutely no energy into selling here. Have you ever seen a US auto commercial? 2 years ago Volkswagen started showing commercials here, and guess what, I started seeing Volkswagons on the street here. Much to my surprise because I didn't think they would sell here (suit Japanese tastes). Put some energy into it, USA! The only USA commercial you see on Japanese TV is Aflac.

  • 1

    SamuraiBlue

    The only USA commercial you see on Japanese TV is Aflac

    There are much more like P&G, MacD, Coke,Google, Apple,Nike, Microsoft,etc.

    The common points to all these companies is that they all came with no expectation from the government and they all strived to slice a piece of the market on their own.

  • -1

    elephant200

    Lets bring the things straight up, no games!

  • 0

    turbotsat

    Thunderbird2:

    No Americans going to argue about their own producers' protectionist attitudes?

    Almond and pistachio prices are quite high in California, even though huge orchards are planted in the state, you can see them along Highway 5 which runs north/south in the central valleys. Think I've read that these and avocados are protected by their respective state boards and trade groups. They indulge in as much protectionism as they can get away with. I think participation is mandatory for growers in the state. The avocado group puts ads on TV and in print. According to wikipedia the California Avocado Commission was successful in keeping out Mexican avocados until 1997. (Mexico, the ancestral home of avocados!) And almonds grown in California (but not imported almonds) are required to be pasteurized either with steam or with propylene oxide (PPO), a “Group B2, probable human carcinogen", because of some salmonellosis cases way back when.

    Yeah, I don't like paying high prices for these. Or eating adulterated almonds.

  • -1

    wtfjapan

    Yeah my father in law is rice farmer in Hokkaido. What the US wants could hurt his livelihood. So the US should be willing to do the same that they expect from others. If tariffs are to be removed remove them on all sides. yeah but imported rice has a 800% tarriff on it, no US tariiff on Japanese goods even come close to that. having tariifs on item you want to protect is understandable, but the rediculous high tarriffs on Agricultural imports into Japan is insulting to Japans trading partners. maybe the TPP members should puts 800% tarriffs and Japanese cars and electronics, id say Japanese high tarriffs would disappear overnight

  • 0

    vukodlok

    All food should be grown locally and naturally.

    NAFTA not only destroyed Mexican farmers it destroyed corn crop diversity.

    http://ase.tufts.edu/gdae/publications/working_papers/procientec/seedling.pdf

    Monsanto is constantly attacking U.S. farmers.

    http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=15825

    The TPP gives too much power to corporations, and is an assault on free market principles.

    "For this and many other reasons, the TPP represents an astonishing assault on democracy and national sovereignty, threatening not only existing public-interest laws, but also the ability of governments to pass such laws in the future."

    http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/opinion/57146825-82/tpp-treaty-laws-pacific.html.csp

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