Abe's return in Japan heartens U.S.

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  • 5

    mikihouse

    thanks China and South Korea in pushing the Japanese public into more aggressive stance. Most people who were interviewed had expressed that Japan should build up their military and remove the article 9 clause. It was such unthinkable even just a few years back.

  • 0

    Redcliff

    Us you better not get your hope too high. If Abe can mix up the name of the US President he spoke to he could very well mix up the Articles that Japan agreed and signed in the Treaty after WWII.

  • -1

    JoeBigs

    December 26th can not get here fast enough.

    ON the that the the PRC sponsored kowtowing DPJ will be gone and stablility will return.

    Japan is better served to side with the United States.

    The DPJ was trying to steer Japan to become a satellite servant nation of the PRC, but the wise Japanese people saw them for what they were and booted them out!

    Like I said, December 26th can not get here any faster!

  • 0

    gokai_wo_maneku

    The party relies on support from farmers.

    That tells you who calls the shots here. Even though there has been a massive migration to the cities after the war, there has never been any significant reapportionment of representatives in the Diet. 1 farmer vote is worth 4 city votes in some cases. The farmers are destroying Japan through their tool, the LDP.

  • 0

    bajhista65

    Obama and Abe spoke on Monday, reaffirming “the importance of the U.S.-Japan alliance as the cornerstone of peace and security in the region,” the White House said.

    Why does USA keep on asking Japan but not China to act cautiously in resolving Sankaku issue. Who is aggressived and bullying their neighbors.

  • 0

    kyk88

    I went to Japan for the first time at May this year. This has been my goal for a long time. The Japanese are polite. The street is safe and clean. One thing I regret is it was too rush- Osaka, Kyoto, Nagoya, Mt Fuji and Tokyo. We all know how Japan rise from the defeat at WW2 to economic superpower. The Americans even fear that Japan will overtake America but we know that was not to be. Tokyo was sucker punched by Washington- the yen was pushed up. Of couse the Japanese played their part too, the stock market and property price went through the roof, The troika- LDP, bureucrat and businnessmen tried to solve this by spending on infrastructure building roads and bridges to nowhere. Sounds familiar...Abe is using this approach...again. The destruction of Japanese companies continue...only left are car manufacturers. The ageing of Japanese society continue..because of the high cost of living the birth rate continue to plunge. But the thing Japanese fear most is that China will overtake Japan as the most powerful nation in Asia. We all know what Japan did to China during WW2. Abe, you are free to govern Japan. After a while, a new PM will come. You will be consigned to the history of revolving PM of Japan. Japan is going down and you can't stop it.

  • 0

    Fadamor

    Yukio Hatoyama, the first prime minister following the DPJ’s landmark 2009 win, resigned after clashing with the United States over the status of a controversial military base in Okinawa.

    As I recall it, Hatoyama didn't resign after "clashing with the United States". He resigned after promising both the United States and the Prefecture of Okinawa that he would come up with a solution to the Futenma Air Base issue that both parties would be happy with. When it became obvious that that most basic of promises could not be kept, he stepped down.

  • 0

    Serrano

    "Farmers, many of whom adamantly oppose foreign competition"

    No doubt.

  • 0

    Chubaka

    An Abe government is not likely to be as sympathetic to Okinawan concerns about the status of US forces there. Perhaps he will try to offer economic incentives instead, but regardless, Abe seems more interested in currying favor with the US to support his foreign policy goals. Any Okinawan issues are likely moving to the back burner. Wonder how they will respond?

  • -1

    ReformedBasher

    building roads and bridges to nowhere

    And yet another "expert" quotes from a book he/she has read, or parroting something heard from another foreigner.

    Please give me a list of all these unused roads and bridges. And let's compare them to the total number of bridges and roads while we are at it, to gain some kind of understanding of what the real situation is, before we do an in-depth survey of other country's spending on infrastructure.

    Not saying the LDP is perfect but isn't Noda-bashing popular anymore? Expertise comes from one's own experience. Repeating what others say, word for word, is a sign of being weak-minded.

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    Honest "Abe"?

  • 0

    kyk88

    we are in an intelligent discussion here. i don't claim to be an expert but the phrase road and bridge to nowhere is a figure of speech. the gist is by spending wastefully on infrastructure LDP has made government debt rise to a whopping 200% of GDP. LDP can't really begin the reform needed because it is part of the problem- the troika of LDP, bureaucrat and big business.

  • -1

    PT24881

    " mikihouseDEC. 20, 2012 - 07:46AM JST thanks China and South Korea in pushing the Japanese public into more aggressive stance. Most people who were interviewed had expressed that Japan should build up their military and remove the article 9 clause. It was such unthinkable even just a few years back."

    The end of a short promise & peaceful constitution to make Japan a guardian of the world peace with no aggression, 75 years after the last big one, towards others never ever again ended up with "land of peace" torn apart by the boomerang tactics well planned & triggered by a few tricks by the Rwingers.. You could not expect the Koreans & Chinese doing nothing...once they did..revival of militarism..easy isn't it ?

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