Hashimoto refuses to stop tweeting during campaign

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  • 11

    cwhite

    oh brother, who cares. I do hope this ship which has numerous holes sinks soon.

  • 12

    Yubaru

    When are the police going to get serious and start investigating this dude? Whether the law is archaic or not, during an election is NOT the time to change it, nor openly flaunt it either. Someone needs to take this guy down a few pegs and do it right quick.

  • 13

    Green Panda

    Laws that predate the Internet era prohibit the use of e-campaigning, with candidates and their supporters spending two frenetic weeks driving and walking around their districts doing little more than shouting out their names.

    They really need to change this law. There will be so much less noise pollution.

  • 16

    wackness

    Translation: I am above the law.

  • 8

    Resurfaced

    This guy need to join the fish and the crabs in the bay. There he can shout all he wants.

  • 6

    buggerlugs

    So it's one rule for Hashimoto and another rule for everyone else? Seems to be his total policy, screw everyone else ill do it my way. It's amazing this zealot is still allowed in public office. C'mon big brother we are all waiting to see what you'll do next!!

  • 4

    some14some

    He will abide by the rules from Monday (after weekend fun) if not disqualify Restoration Party :)

  • 3

    YongYang

    Another populist arrogant spoilt brat... The nail that sticks up, ESPECIALLY here, well, doesn't the idiot EVEN know his own culture?

  • 2

    smithinjapan

    Wow.... so he's not allowed to tweet, but it's perfectly fine for him to annoy the pants off everyone by making stump speeches with loud speakers around every station, or to drive around with loud speakers blazing crap in favour of the candidates for his party?

  • 6

    kwbrow2

    Hashimoto forced public workers to reveal information about tattoo's and their location on the body. (Of course there is no law that requires public servants to comply). Now, Hashimoto says he will ignore the law. Clearly he thinks the law does not apply to him. Hashimoto seems to be lawmaker, judge, jury, and executioner.

  • -4

    YuriOtani

    At least we can watch TV without hearing it. It was hell here in the states just before the election.

  • 1

    GW

    Candidates and their supporters need to follow strict rules and campaigning formats, he said . . . Yeah doesnt he know your only allowed to make noise pollution & hand out envelopes stuffed with Y10,000 notes!

  • 4

    globalwatcher

    What does he think he is?

    A dictator?

  • 1

    Kazuaki Shimazaki

    How can a "tweet" or even a string of them be considered to be equivalent to a "flyer"?

    Besides, it is difficult to see any justification for banning Internet campaigning. If anything, maybe we should ONLY allow Internet campaigning, because that will in comparison to current methods virtually eliminate the need to use funds (thus, no need to allow campaign support funding which are one step away from flat-out bribes).

  • -2

    nahaman

    I'm starting to like this Hash-Ish political party.

  • 5

    telecasterplayer

    Does this blowhard ever do anything for the good of the country, or is it always for his ego?

  • 9

    Niloc1981

    My god people, I despise this guy as much as the next person, but he does have a point. The Japanese voting law currently restricts internet campaigning "by candidates" or "for candidates by sanctioned 3rd parties." Being a former lawyer, I can reasonably assume that Hashimoto-san is aware of this. Taking this assumption in tandem with his statement ("he said") in paragraph 3, one is lead to believe that his tact for tackling this, admittedly arcane, law is to "air his thoughts" as always, but steer clear of any direct support messages of candidates.

    Seriously, it takes all of 1 minute to formulate the scenario above. If, and only if, he uses twitter to support a candidate he will be on the wrong side of the law. that's his premise and will most likely be his argument if he is taken to court over simply using Twitter. How hard is that line of thought to understand?

    I don't like Hashimoto-san, but I will not dabble in quasi adhominem attacks on his character just to satisfy my disgust. It will just add to his argument that "if you are against the Ishin-no-kai you are either illogical, emotional, an idiot, or some combination therein". Don't let him have that card over us.

    But anyways, here's to him not being as successful as he wants to be on Dec. 16.

  • 2

    Balefire

    Charming.

    Draconian rules and bans for Osaka City employees, but the national election rules/laws don't apply to him.

    What a sorry state of affairs it is that this jerk and his xenophobic, reactionary, ready-fire-aim buddy Blinky are so popular.

  • -1

    avigator

    Japan used to be fragmented regions ruled by different Lords. It was united by the blood of many people. when that blood no longer has viscosity, it could turn into another Yugoslavia, if some of their politicians brain wash their citizens. Like Kansai is a region with total different culture from the Kanto region. Hokkaido has its own unique culture. Kyushu also has it many differences from the rest of the country. And Okinawa is close to China than to Japan when it comes to culture and language. So, who knows what the future holds for Japan. Politicians are selfish and will prefer to go to war than to compromise on anything. Good luck Japan!

  • -3

    timtak

    I just don't understand why people have it in for this guy. Attempting to uncover Yakuza who are on public employee pay sounds like a very good thing, as does sharing his political views rather than blaring bs around town (especially since he is not a candidate). He is a lawyer so I guess he knows where he stands legally, but even if I disagreed with his interpretation of the law I'd not want to take him to court.

    Kazuaki Shimazaki is right.

  • 3

    BurakuminDes

    When are the police going to get serious and start investigating this dude?

    I'm with you Yubaru - but we know it won't happen. The background of this grub - being the son of a high-level yakuza from reports - means he has no respect for authority and places himself above the law. Yaks have no respect for the law and police turn a blind eye - exactly what is happening here.

  • 0

    globalwatcher

    <<He is a lawyer so I guess he knows where he stands legally, but even if I disagreed with his interpretation of the law I'd not want to take him to court.

    Remember he used to be a corporate lawyer, not a trial lawyer. He would sell you for a dime.

  • 0

    alliswellinjapan

    Assume Hashimoto is up to his moves again. The media in Japan ie the newspaper tv and radio media would never touch upon the need to change the laws to allow use of the internet for the elections despite all the inefficiencies and inconvenience under the current system. They rather tend to ensure any cases of violation ie blog and twitter updates during the campaign are exhaustively reported (perhaps in similar context as violation through bribery) despite the fact that none of such cases seem to be actually prosecuted. Another calculated move on his front in my view, which will hopefully help shed light on this interesting topic.

  • 0

    alliswellinjapan

    Allowance of internet for the elections by the way is another one of those items DPJ had in their manifesto but could not materialize.

  • 1

    Craft Ledger

    "Under Japanese election law, candidates and their supporters are not permitted to tweet, use Facebook, update their websites or even send emails during the official campaign period"

    How pathetic and Anal retentive these laws are! Like politicians around the world, Hashimoto has joined the 21st century and is using modern media to his advantage. All the others still want to live in 70's and 80's and do not want live, operate and rule Japan in the modern times! Disgraceful and again... Pathetic!

  • 0

    lesenfant

    Wow.. Hashimoto you so badass! Now lemme get back to something more interesting, like picking the lint from my belly button. Must already think he is above the law like all politicians here are.

  • 0

    timtak

    I was of the impression that he was very anti-yakuza, indeed on a mission against them. Perhaps that has something to do with his "background." I believe his mother brought him up on her own.

  • 1

    Open Minded

    Craft Ledger: IMHO this has nothing to do with being modern or not. Modern media are permitted during the campaign time. But when the election come in many countries there is a truce rule, where it is not allowed to be in air. This gives the chance to people to comfort their opinion quietly without being bombarded by partisan slogan. I personally like this approach, but I accept that other places - like USA - may have different way of doing it.

  • 2

    Open Minded

    Craft Ledge: I must recognize I did not read properly the article and that modern media are banned during the whole campaign. I agree with you that this is totally outdated.

  • 1

    Scrote

    I always wondered why these election laws were not struck down as unconstitutional. Then again, the supine Supreme Court has done nothing to stop the election, even though it already ruled that the voting disparity was unconstitutional. They are utterly useless.

  • 1

    Ranger_Miffy2

    Much as I don't like this guy, he has a very good point. It's 2012, for pity's sake. Tweeting is not the same as email. Even my own president Obama uses tweets. Come on, Japan. Get with Now. And yes, if it would reduce the lame sound trucks, who could not say that is not a good thing?

  • 1

    marcelito

    The laws are there because they are advantageous to the LDP who introduced then and whose core support pensioner , farmer etc. groups are not overly Internet savvy obviously, instead relying on traditional campaign methods.. One can safely assume that young, urban voters connected through social media networks are much more likely to vote against the LDP ( if they were to mobilize through the net, get off their bum and actually bother to show up on the election day ) , therefore those laws still exist ( to assist the old boy politician club ) even in this day and age .

  • 1

    Cos

    The rule is not applicable. If we comment in favor of any candidate on this board we are illegal. Surprising that he is the first to rebel against the absurdity. Well, oldies like Abe or Noda don't tweet as they don't suspect tweeter exists.

  • -1

    herefornow

    While I agree that the campaign laws in Japan are asine and out-dated -- flyers, posters, and people driving around in speaker cars -- they are what they are. And Hashimoto is just proving once again what an arrogant, spoiled little boy he is by flaunting the fact that he will ignore them. Japan needs real leaders, not the likes of him.

  • 0

    Ivan Coughanoffalot

    Just a moment - I thought public servants, under hashimoto's tutelage, should understand that they have no rights whatsoever to a private life? Didn't he say that?

    Except when it suits someone with a self-perception of being above the law, a leader beyond accountability, und all orders are to be obeyed immediately und vizzout qvestion.

    God help us all if these jumped-up martinets ever get any real power.

  • 2

    wackness

    He just does stuff like this so that his supporters will continue to think "I love him - he's such a strong leader."

  • 2

    Yubaru

    Attempting to uncover Yakuza who are on public employee pay sounds like a very good thing, as does sharing his political views rather than blaring bs around town (especially since he is not a candidate).

    No that's not what his purpose was. Too many people still equate tattoos with Yakuza, not all people with tattoos are yakuza and not all yakuza have tattoos either. He wants to "portray" an better image that is born from "his" mind and "his" mind alone.

    Just like here, the law is there to protect the LDP from younger generations who would boot them out of office if they ever got their crap together.

    BUT, one does not change a law to benefit one side or another prior to an election. That's ludicrous, wait till after, then change it, but until then if you break it.........."Do not pass go, do not collect $200.00"

  • 1

    DP812

    Attempting to uncover Yakuza who are on public employee pay sounds like a very good thing, as does sharing his political views rather than blaring bs around town (especially since he is not a candidate).

    His method of "uncovering" Yakuza who are public employees is by labeling anyone with tattoos as a criminal. It's profiling, pure and simple.

  • 0

    TheDevilsAssistant

    “I am not a candidate, so acts other than vote solicitation should be allowed,” said Hashimoto,

    This guy has really lost it! He can do anything he wants, but fires people that have tattoos?

    Sounds like Anarchy in the Land of the Rising Sun.

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