Masuzoe says he wants to make Tokyo No. 1 city in world

Picture expired. Yoichi Masuzoe AFP

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  • 17

    warispeace

    Same old, same old. It seems the only thing that changes in Japan is the labels of beer cans.

  • -3

    Daniel Naumoff

    He looks like your average evil genius, I wouldn't vote for him to be Nuclear-tyrant of Tokyo.

  • 6

    Jimizo

    Does the sex ban come into effect now? Perhaps Soaplands and the massage parlours will feel the Masuzoe effect.

  • 12

    Anthony Head

    This is what's wrong with Japan. Old men running the show with old ideas, power in their eyes and no accountability. But when they get caught out what do these men do, yes say sorry and have a big cry.

  • 2

    hereforever

    I guess my last posts about LDP being unstoppable were correct. Oh and as foreigners can't vote, I guess where are the only ones getting lucky tonight. Enjoy the sofa Japanese guys.

  • 8

    Guiseppi

    Okay, if you want nuclear power, just build a plant in the area of Tokyo Bay. Masuzoe can have his governor's mansion built right next to it.

  • 8

    zichi

    It's still unlikely that Tokyo will be supplied by nuclear energy any time soon. TEPCO lost one Fukushima plant with 6 reactors to the disaster, and the second Fukushima plant with 4 reactors to the event. The NRA still have to decide if the TEPCO Niigata plant with 7 reactors is on an active fault line, or not.

    The LDP gov't are not united on the future use of nuclear energy. Low voter turnout.

  • 6

    BurakuminDes

    So, just over 11 PERCENT of eligible voters backed the winning candidate? Good luck, Tokyoites - I hope this old guy better than the last old crook.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Maybe he will start to reduce Tokyo Govt bureaucrat employees. He may ask female employees to resign if they had MPS. He couldn't care less of their experiences. Sorry for people who complain old people should not be in politics. At least he is not like young men who don't have experience to handle Abe, etc. Young men? In 20's? 30's? He is elected. He is not 95 years old.

  • -3

    daito_hak

    @toshiko

    Elected? After a voter turnout of 34%, you call him elected? I guess I would advice you to recheck the definition of the word elected.

    People, if anyone in Japan is saying you again that Japan is a democracy, just have a big laugh in front of his/her face....

  • 1

    Pukey2

    So, just over 11 PERCENT of eligible voters backed the winning candidate? Good luck, Tokyoites - I hope this old guy better than the last old crook.

    Indeed, 30% of 34%. Not helped by the fact that every Tom, Dick and Harry was a candidate. Sometimes I think people here don't actually want any control over their own lives. Oh well, my opinion doesn't count. Just saying. Not my country, not my problem.

  • 6

    toshiko

    @daito_hakFEB. 09, 2014 - 09:53PM JST @toshiko

    Elected? After a voter turnout of 34%, you call him elected? I guess I would advice you to recheck the definition of the word elected.

    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

    Then who are elected to be the next Tokyo Governor? Write the name, of new Governor.

  • 7

    cwhite

    Sad day for Japan and very scary. The elderly who probably made up the majority of the votes are only worried about the next 10-20 years of their remaining life. They don't seem to care about Japan as a whole, the next generation, women in general, nuclear waste or anything other than their pension, welfare, bank account and price of everyday goods.

  • -2

    mskii

    Democratic elections are always somewhat flawed by candidates with similar stances taking votes away from each other. You only have to look at how Morsi was elected in Egypt for prime example. That being said, the reactions to nuclear power are so irrational that I'm glad this guy won. Many Anti-nuclear proponents cannot seem to comprehend it's comparative safety and benefits from all other forms of power. Their position is usually one of paranoia.

  • -7

    daito_hak

    @toshiko

    The name of the new governor is "ridiculously low turnout, Japanese should be ashamed". That's the name of the new governor, I can tell you.

    Just don't pretend that you don't understand what I said. You will have a hard tome convincing me that such a low turnout gives to this dude any legitimate victory in this complete farce that you call election. No legitimate election and it's winner can be considered valid and representative of the population with a turnout lower than 60%, even you can understand that I suppose.

    A healthy democracy only exists if the population participates to it, otherwise it's a farce.

  • -2

    sengoku38

    I like Tamogami better, but this guy seems okay. I think practically very little will change. Not sure why nuclear power was even discussed at all. The governor of Tokyo is the nuclear czar of Japan. If he says to start reactors today, no one will listen to him, because it is controlled by a different branch of government.

  • 2

    Open Minded

    Not really what we can call a refreshing election!

  • 13

    Graham DeShazo

    Ok. A bit of perspective, guys. I'm no Matsuzoe fan, but.....

    He's way better than the guy who got kicked out of the ASDF for saying Japan was the good guy in WWII.

    I agree that his remarks about women were sexist, stupid, and wrong, but it was 25 years ago. How he governs from now is what matters (admittedly it may be the same, but let's see).

    Yes, he only got 11% of eligible voters, but turnout was abysmally low. Who's fault is that? If one votes and does not like the outcome, bitch away. Be my guest. If one does not vote, then shut up and go along. You had your chance and you took a pass. (Obviously foreign residents are excluded because we can't vote, and because bitching is so much fun.). I'm saying. That decisions are made by those who show up. Well his guys showed up most.

    Yes, he's old and out of touch. They're ALL old!

    What I'm saying is that Matsuzoe MAY represent the least worse outcome. At the minimum, I think he won't be worse than Ishi, but that's setting the bar pretty low.

  • 3

    Thunderbird2

    I suppose the snow and the cold would have put people off going out to vote, hence the low turn out. Some (with sympathies to countries that are anti-Japanese) may scoff and query how this can be a democratic vote... well the fact that people got their chance to vote shows that Japan is a democracy.

  • -2

    Garthgoyle

    I guess no more sex for a lot of people in Tokyo.

  • -1

    Victory Nippon

    Man this really suck's and makes me super worried.

  • 6

    tinawatanabe

    daito This is still a democracy, not a farce. Everybody can run as a candidate and vote. 64% didn't show up voluntarily, that means "I don't care, I let others to decide" so, everybody expressed their choice.

  • 1

    slumdog

    I guess no more sex for a lot of people in Tokyo.

    More of the same all around in Tokyo.

  • 0

    toshiko

    He probably (my guess) requests all female employees to resign if they had MSP to reduce Tokyo Gvt budgets.

  • 4

    Jimizo

    'I like Tamogami better' Tamogami is a swivel-eyed lunatic who would have made Tokyo a laughing stock. I'm not exactly enamored with Matsuzoe but the thought of Tamogami in charge of Tokyo is surreal.

  • 1

    jeff198527

    For better or for worse this man is now governor of Tokyo. This is what the people wanted.

  • 3

    Strangerland

    For all the people complaining about the fact that this guy got in with only ~10% of the electorate voting for him, that's not his fault that the people didn't get out to vote. And that doesn't make it any less of a democracy (though I'm still of the opinion that Japan isn't particularly democratic, but that's a different discussion). The fact is, the people had the right to vote, and could have gone out and voted, but only one in three did, and the most people voted for this guy. That makes him the rightful leader of Tokyo, whether you like it or not.

  • 2

    JoeBigs

    "The economy, stupid" James Carville

    It rings true today as it did in the 1992 campaign.

    People are more concerned with what they see than what they don't.

  • 3

    Strangerland

    No way, a democracy makes sense with the expression of the opinion of the majority not the minority. Otherwise it's broken. You can't possibly argue that it's not true.

    I can. As someone else mentioned above, the people who didn't vote decided that they were willing to leave it up to those that did. That was their choice. There are more ways to make a choice than checking a box on a ballot.

  • -10

    daito_hak

    the people who didn't vote decided that they were willing to leave it up to those that did.

    You will have to back such such claim with clear numbers indicating that the majority of the population not voting is in this way of thinking. Otherwise you are saying nothing.

    And even if it would be true, do you believe that this is then a healthy democracy?

  • 5

    Strangerland

    You will have to back such such claim with clear numbers indicating that the majority of the population not voting is in this way of thinking.

    They all had the right to vote and for one reason or another, chose not to. This isn't Thailand -there were not people blocking the polling booths. Therefore the choice was made to leave it up to others.

    Do I believe it's a healthy democracy? I think Japan has a lot of problems. But not being able to vote isn't one of them.

  • -10

    daito_hak

    They all had the right to vote and for one reason or another, chose not to. This isn't Thailand -there were not people blocking the polling booths. Therefore the choice was made to leave it up to others.

    You are not giving me the numbers backing up your statement you made in your previous. The sentence above is totally irrelevant, no one has said that anyone is blocking anything.

    Since you surely will never have them, I go to sleep....

  • 1

    Educator60

    ---They all had the right to vote and for one reason or another, chose not to. ---

    Or wanted and intended to vote but were prevented from doing so by the snow, having unfortunately not having had the foresight or time to cast an early ballot.

  • 5

    Strangerland

    You are not giving me the numbers backing up your statement you made in your previous

    It's a simple fact of elimination. 100% of people have the choice to vote. 34% made the choice to do so. 64% made the choice not to. By default, they left the decision up to others.

    Now that I've shown you the numbers, it's up to you to show how they are wrong if you don't agree with them.

    Since you surely will never have them, I go to sleep....

    Since you surely cannot refute them, I will also go to sleep.

  • 4

    Jimizo

    Not too many countries can boast high turnouts even in general elections. France is an example of a politically aware and engaged electorate. I remember Bill Maher commenting on an 85% turnout in a French election by saying that you couldn't get 85% of Americans to vote even if they offered a choice between breasts and bigger breasts and they were offering free samples. I'm a UK voter and they are no better. It's easy to blame uninspiring candidates but would anyone describe Sarkozy or Hollande as inspiring? Apathy isn't limited to Japan by any means.

  • -1

    CGB Spender

    Look at all those complainers who think they know what's best for Japan and Tokyo! Everyone is so prejudiced or otherwise must know Mazusoe very well.

    Congrats to Mazusoe! Probably the best choice among the candidates.

  • 4

    Farmboy

    White gloves are the key to election success. His opponents failed to realize this.

  • -1

    toshiko

    In August 2007, Masuzoe was appointed as Minister of Health, Labour and Welfare. He served in this position until 2009 under three consecutive prime ministers (Shinzo Abe, Yasuo Fukuda and Taro Aso). Abe reportedly appointed Masuzoe, a frequent critic of Abe's policies, in order to silence critics who would call him a factionalist.

    Read about him in Wikipedia, Japanese language version has more stories. So, Abe wanted him more than Masuzoe needed. I don;t know Abe, etc can dictate Masuzoe.

  • 1

    JoeBigs

    daito_hakFeb. 10, 2014 - 12:20AM JST No way, a democracy makes sense with the expression of the opinion of the majority not the minority. Otherwise it's broken. You can't possibly argue that it's not true.

    So, you wish that the system forced each and every person who can vote to vote the way you think the nation should have voted?

    That's not a democratic system, that is a Dictatorship.

    Yesterday my wife didn't go to vote because she is ill, but if she had she would have still voted for Mazusoe.

    Mazusoe, was the front runner and he won, so the system worked.

    Better to have the right to vote than not.

  • 2

    ToshiYori

    This is what's wrong with Japan. Old men running the show with old ideas.

    Are young politicians prohibited from running for office? If voters are indeed tired of "old men running the show," young people should get more involved in politics and work hard to get younger candidates elected. Even if they don't have a party's financial backing, etc., youngsters should be able to support their candidates by active participation as volunteers, donors, etc. Simply complaining about old folks continuing to get elected isn't going to result in younger officeholders.
    .

  • 0

    cornbread1

    Another empty claim with no action plan...for the sake of Japan and neighboring countries, I hope he does an about face with regard to his stance on nuclear energy.

  • -2

    Mitsuo Matsuyama

    Instead of making criticism, why don't you guys give suggestions to help to improve Tokyo?

    I see that there are a lot of things to improve in Tokyo as well as a lot of things to improve in all big cities around the world.

    However, in order to make each of these cities better, those individuals who reside there or work there also should cooperate by not throwing garbage on the streets, obeying the laws and rules, respecting others.

  • 0

    gokai_wo_maneku

    The most disturbing thing is that according to the Nikkei, 25% of Japanese in their 20s voted for the former Self Defence nut-job! What's with that? In contrast, only 1% of the people in their 70 and 80, who may have actually experienced the war, voted for him. Sorry, I do not want to remember the nut-job's name, so let's just leave it with "nut-job" (he claims Japan was liberating Asia from European Imperialists).

  • -1

    StormR

    Old crook out new crook, in nothing changes, Tokyo is still under control of the crooked, only the name on the door has changed.

  • 0

    Neo_Rio

    People in Tokyo are too busy working to think about politics, and it almost seems as if the media doesn't tell anyone where and when to vote on these issues.

    In the end, it seems to me that the only people who have time and inclination to vote are... old pensioners.

    Most everyone else working is too busy and apathetic.

  • 0

    cornbread1

    bilderberg_2015, don't think anyone can upend Sochi and Russia on that one!

  • -12

    YuriOtani

    I see the libel comments of foreigners and it upsets me. Lets face it you can not vote in Japan elections. In fact I made no preference since I can not vote in Tokyo being a resident of Okinawa. So give it up! Stop interfering in Japan's internal politics. How would you like foreigners endorsing candidates in your home country? Then showing their dislike of a democratically elected candidate. As for high turnout equals sound democracy? The Soviet Union and Saddam Husein's Iraqi had 99 plus percentage voter turnout. Being allowed not to vote is also part of the democratic process.

  • -1

    Andreas Bimba

    Don't forget to build enormous sea walls as Tokyo will be under water if rates of CO2 emissions continue to climb.

  • 8

    Strangerland

    So give it up! Stop interfering in Japan's internal politics.

    Giving opinions is not interfering in internal politics, particularly when they directly affect those of us who will live under the rule of the politicians in question. I don't think that non-Japanese citizens should be able to vote, but silencing opinions is not the way to go.

    How would you like foreigners endorsing candidates in your home country?

    If they were going to be living in the areas governed by those candidates, I would welcome their opinion. Unlike Japan, we generally value multiple viewpoints, so that we can make a balanced decision, rather than being blinded by our own singular views.

    Then showing their dislike of a democratically elected candidate.

    The people voicing dislike will live with the policies of this elected candidate. Therefore they have the right to complain about said candidate.

  • 4

    toshiko

    Foreigners. Don;t give up yet. Masuzoe had a plan to enable permanent residents to be able to vote in at least local area where they live. He has been bad mouthing Abe and he writes thesis and essays instead of just writing agenda. //read Masuzoe article in Wikipedia. He used to be contributing political analysts in media and a scholor. Check Wikipedia.

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    ...those individuals who reside there or work there also should cooperate by not throwing garbage on the streets, obeying the laws and rules, respecting others.

    And with that comment, I suppose you try to imply that this is a "foreigner problem", right?

    Yuri,

    If you live in Okinawa, you are less affected by the Tokyo election than foreign residents living there, thus your opinion is of even less worth. Think about it.

  • -2

    mskii

    So, 'Japan Today' seems to have deleted my link to the stats on the comparative danger of energy industries, so I will post it again. http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/03/deaths-per-twh-by-energy-source.html Real healthy dedication to free speech btw. Obviously, no one denies the risks and costs of nuclear power are unique for each nation, and that we should be very skeptical towards it, but if you look at the disaster in perspective. Deaths by earthquake and tsunami - 15,000+. Deaths by Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster - 0 directly, w/ 300 significant radiation exposures. Considering the plant was outdated, and hit by a tsunami, the biggest danger here was evident. But of course, the tragedy is quickly overlooked as media outlets turn to fear-mongering about nuclear power playing on peoples fear and misunderstanding of radiation.

  • -2

    SamuraiBlue

    @toshiko

    Foreigners. Don;t give up yet. Masuzoe had a plan to enable permanent residents to be able to vote in at least local area where they live.

    Seeing the result of the recent Virginia results I do not think this is a good idea.

  • -1

    CH3CHO

    Only around a third of eligible voters cast their ballots, media reported, down about 10 percentage points on the last election.

    This shows the low standard of reporting by AFP. The voter turnout was 46.14% or 4,930,251 voters out of 10,685,343 eligible voters. http://sokuho.h26tochijisen.metro.tokyo.jp/h26chi_tou_2200.html

    Masuzoe got 2,112,979 votes. http://sokuho.h26tochijisen.metro.tokyo.jp/h26chi_kai.html

    Yoichi Masuzoe - a former television pundit and one-time cabinet minister.

    He is mostly know as a professor at the University of Tokyo, studying politics.

  • -2

    whoopsadaisy

    I though Tokyo was already #1

  • 2

    toshiko

    He was an academic assistant at the University of Tokyo from 1971, and later spent several years in Europe as a research fellow at the University of Paris (1973-75) and University of Geneva (1976-78). He was then an assistant professor at the University of Tokyo from 1979 to 1989. After leaving the university in 1989, he established the Masuzoe Institute of Political Economy. He became known as a frequent guest on political talk shows in Japan, particularly the popular "TV Tackle" program ted by Takeshi Kitano

    No wonder he knows how to lecture to Abe asnd other LDP people. He was used to lecture in academic world.

  • 2

    cleo

    He is mostly know as a professor at the University of Tokyo, studying politics.

    Depends how long you've been here, I suppose. In my mind he is indelibly cast as a regular panelist on Beat Takeshi's Monday night talk show, and he was at one time in the cabinet. So television pundit and one-time cabinet minister it is.

    He is also well-known locally in these parts for investing heavily during the bubble years in a riding club that went spectacularly bust, so I'm not too confident of his financial management skills. I think he'll find Tokyo a pretty big job, but then so would anybody, it's bigger than a lot of countries.

    It's bad that a Masuzoe win is seen as a boost for Abe. At least it wasn't the nut-job.

  • 1

    Scrote

    I was dismayed to see that the foaming-at-the-mouth right wing nutcase Tamogami received the support of about 25% of voters in their twenties. Do they really believe the lies they are taught in their history lessons?

  • -2

    kimuzukashiiiii

    I wonder how it can be, when yesterdays news told us that by the end of next year its going to be under a couple of centimeters of Ash (mount fuji erupting.)

    Lets face it, Osaka is much better.

  • -1

    isoducky

    An 11 percent turn out on snow day, That sound about right. Tokyo has made it's choice, and while most people agree that Tokyo needs newer younger blood running the the crown jewel, most Japanese are unwilling or uninterested in voicing their honest opinion.

    People, in most nations, in the modern age really don't want a leader at the helm of their government they want a manager. Leaders drive the people, require more from their the citizens and can be very unsympathetic to trivial matters. (Sounds like a right-wing thing train of thought...). Managers listen, create false compromises while excusing most fundamental faults, which is why we find them agreeable, likable and better capable of leadership than a leader.

  • 1

    honey

    Yuri Otani, I myself am a long term foreigner in Japan and probably like many others on this thread,feel offended by your comments.I am married to a Japanese national and pay taxes.I would like to think I have a right to an opinion.All I hear all day long is Japan's issues with other countries and leaders.Many people including Japanese are concerned about the countries politics and future in a good way,including myself.As for Masuzoe.I don't see him as a problem because with all his legal troubles coming,he hopefully won't be around long

  • 0

    DaDude

    Masuzoe says he wants to make Tokyo No. 1 city in world

    This must be the reason why everyone above me lives in Tokyo and plus it was the only city they had heard of in Japan before moving here.

  • -2

    tinawatanabe

    @Scrote Mr. Tomogami has said different things from what we learned at schools. That's why he garnered so many votes from the young. You should read J textbooks.

  • 0

    toshiko

    @honey: Presence of people from foreign countries encourage awfully closed mouth Japanese people to speak up. And it is fair them to be enabled to vote in issues of the place they live. In USA, only USA citizens (natural born or naturalized citizens) but in USA. people can speak up their mind. In Japan, people don't speak up. Thus they can not submit their opinions to elected officials easily. Masuzoe is disliked by LDP as he criticize on Abe's decisions whenever he feels. It is not easy to argue with Masuzoe who were used to argue in France and Japan and even on talk shows, LDP people complain. Once he was ousted fron LDP.

  • 1

    Strangerland

    So this officially confirms that democracy in Japan is nothing but a farce (as if that wasn't obvious already...).

    You mean people were prevented from voting? Or they weren't allowed? Why hasn't this made the news?

  • 4

    Strangerland

    Because only 37% of the people voting, and 11% of the population deciding a mayor that they don't like is not democracy, duh.

    A democracy only implies that the people are unrestricted from voting. If they choose not to, that does not make it any less a democracy, it simply makes it an apathetic populace. Duh.

  • 0

    JTDanMan

    Ain't gonna happen, though I like the ambition.

    Tokyo will never be the No. 1 city in the world, so long as Japan refuses to liberalize its immigration policy.

  • 1

    Kabukilover

    Tokyo will never be number one as long as it keeps electing people right wing idiots.

  • 2

    Chubbinessfan

    The anti campaign threatening to stop havibng sex was amusing but nothing more. how would wives know who their hubbies voted for? Plus they are all abcient anyway. and its not like married couples in Japan are noted for the frequency with which they have sex......

  • -3

    YuriOtani

    Honey, You can have a impact with your husband. As for your opinion you are free to say it. Doubt it will do much good and may have the opposite effect. The Americans do not want to hear my views or my endorsements for any American candidate. If I complain they say "if I do not like it leave!". As for my guy he makes up his own mind in elections.

  • 0

    gaijin playa

    Yuri i think youre missing the point again. Just accept the fact that japan and japanese people can be pathetically old fashioned. As for the withholding sex thing, thats never been a problem for me! G.play

  • -1

    wipeout

    Considering the plant was outdated, and hit by a tsunami, the biggest danger here was evident. But of course, the tragedy is quickly overlooked as media outlets turn to fear-mongering about nuclear power playing on peoples fear and misunderstanding of radiation.

    Erm, people also fear the expense. Nuclear seems to be one of the few industries that expects the public to issue a blank cheque for any expenses it is unable to cover, and as Fukushima shows, these can be colossal. You needn't browbeat us about unfounded safety fears - for one thing, some of us live a lot closer to that plant than you do. And for another, we're paying. Some people are paying twice, once through taxes, and once through TEPCO bills. And our kids will pay too.

    A revival of the nuclear programme in Japan, if it even happens, is going to be beset by problems, and there is no way you can spin it to make those go away. The public is now fully aware that no matter how many trillions are run up in another nuclear accident - or series of accidents, as a sufficiently bad earthquake could set off a disaster at more than one facility - they are expected to pay.

    No other industry is capable of loading people down with those kind of costs from a cockup at a single plant. Nobody died? Whoopee.

  • -2

    Strangerland

    As for your opinion you are free to say it. Doubt it will do much good and may have the opposite effect.

    Then why do you care if people say their opinions?

    The Americans do not want to hear my views or my endorsements for any American candidate. If I complain they say "if I do not like it leave!".

    And it's as ridiculous when they say it to you as when you say it to us.

  • 0

    jpntdytmrow

    I don't understand this phrase,

    "Masuzoe’s win would give Abe a fillip and strengthen his hand .."

  • 0

    Cos

    “I want to make Tokyo the number one city of the world,

    So you've change your mind recently ? You and your buddies have made Tokyo number one in two sections at the Guinesse Book of Records. Number one as city that is the most suicidal and doing the least about disasters.

    in areas including disaster prevention,

    For the world, you had a nuke plant blowing at your door, and you simply do as if nothing happened, keeping Tepco and all.

    the economy,” Masuzoe told

    You're also number one in the category for cities (outside war zones) that were one successful and are running into the wall... while leaders push on the speed pedal screaming : "Tora Tora Tora... I'll get there first ! ". What's is in store for Tokyo's economy ? Already happening : aging population, less young people, few migrants (particularly as your party already succeeded in blocking and discouraging qualified pros, researchers, entrepreneurs), less workers, less businesses, consumer tax hike, less income to spend, further decline of the luxury and gadget shopping industry. Scheduled : burst of the tourist/hotels bubble after the Olympics, and huge debt and maintaining costs over decades for the useless Olympic facilities. The only economic sectors thriving in Tokyo are yakuza, porn industry, etc.

    welfare

    Sure. That's becoming a city of old senile dependent people. Waiting lists to get doctors, nurses, helpers, etc, are just getting longer. If Tokyo was hit by a disaster of any type, that would be last straw. Not only there would be victims, but you'd get scores falling into permanent poverty because the welfare support system is so weak.

  • -2

    Strangerland

    I guess it depends on how you classify the greatest city in the world. I absolutely love Tokyo myself.

  • 2

    toshiko

    @bruinfan: I to hear the opinions of people from various countries.

    Yuri sounds she never lived in USA. We can speak up and to be heard by politicians. They even have their local USA offices to hear from us. comment by a USA resident.

  • 1

    Vincehwr

    Masuzoe says he wants to make Tokyo No. 1 city in world

    Does he mean he wants to make it the top city for elderly people mostly exclusive to men?

  • 0

    toshiko

    He should declare he will help Tokyo City. He is not a mayor. He won Governorship.

  • 1

    Barry Cohen

    Sometimes when things are too good to be true, THEY ARE! Have the vote recounted by people that are trustworthy! Instead of a chicken in every pot these politicians should be yelling that they will provide 3 pounds of medical grade micronized powdered zeolite to remove the radiation from every person that has been radiated from Fukushima! By the way The Japan Daily Press has taken my freedom of speech in the press away and they have banned me from posting honest facts about TEPCO and the Japanese Governments actions in Fukushima that effect both Japan and the rest of our planet! We now know who the Japan Daily Press is working for and it sure isn't the people!

  • 1

    kaimycahl

    Masuzoe says he wants to make Tokyo No. 1 city in world

    Keep Dreaming!!

    I think if POKEMAN had ran for elections he could have won Japanese people are not interested in politics at all. So really there is no excuses not even for the weather why Masuzoe won.

  • 1

    billyhelpher_33

    The ONLY WAY things would ever change IS…if you saw me posing in the back of the pic with his daughter. That would be the ONLY WAY you would see TRUE change in this country. But they don't want that. The want to keep it the same. A profit is always rejected and without honour... Because someone like me isn't accepted, things will never change. Maybe some years down the road things might happen. But right now it seems to be all the same recycled bunch. The gates are closed. Its like I am Perry (just a bit darker) and they refuse to open. But if they open, the universal flood would come in and from that one anchor, all would be connected to the blessing.

  • 0

    toshiko

    Barry: Did you forget to mention your credibility of academic and scientic experience and also the names of your past published articles and books when you approached to The hon).Japan Daily Press along with your pen name and real name with your family registration summery (koseki shohon)?

  • 0

    FooPeiLing

    I'm sorry, but how does one make their city the No.1 city in the world?

  • 0

    lucabrasi

    @Ling

    how does one make their city the No.1 city in the world?

    Don't ask sensible questions; you'll destroy the "wa"....

  • 0

    FooPeiLing

    Well then... I've seen enough.

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