Most Muslims want sharia law, but divided on interpretation

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  • 6

    Steven C. Schulz

    Sharia is Sharia. What is there to interpret?

  • 11

    Green Panda

    After reading this, maybe Inose should retract his apology (and people should apologize to him in return).

  • 18

    MapleG

    In the United States, 81% of Muslims said such violence can “never” be justified—against a global median of 73%.

    So, that means over one quarter of Muslims worldwide think violence is justifiable?

  • 24

    NZ2011

    Religion should not be involved in law, full stop, end of story.

    You are free to believe whatever you like, but you are most certainly not free to act however you like as it effects others rights, including towards those in your community.

    I do not want mankind to head towards another dark ages ruled by the tyranny of a few powerful and often unelected organisations, stifling the progress we have made and destroying the freedoms we all hold dear.

    I hope when the time comes we will all be ready and courageous enough to stand up against superstitions, mysticism and demand that our governance be based on substantive truths.

    All people should be treated equally and allowed to live their lives freely as far is as possible when taking others rights into consideration.

  • 13

    MarkG

    I wonder if a gender poll were to be taken and what the woman's view would be?

  • 17

    jforce

    What a bunch of wackos. Frightening when you let religion dictate law.

  • 11

    Wolfpack

    In the United States, 81% of Muslims said such violence can “never” be justified—against a global median of 73%.

    So 19% of Muslims in the US think that violence in the name of Islam (ie. terrorism) is justified? That's pretty scary. I guess we can expect many more Boston Marathon bombers in the future.

  • 4

    Virtuoso

    Articles like this about poll results are only meaningful unless the actual question asked to the respondents is given, verbatim. Instead of reporting that XX% of Muslims in (country) are in favor of XXX, it should be related by saying "XX% of Muslims responded 'yes' to the question (for example), 'Are you in favor of amputating limbs as punishment for convicted thieves?'" And so on.

  • 17

    ratpack

    I wish they could all head to one country. That way they can all live happily together and have all the Sharia laws they want. The problem is when they migrate to another country and expect that country to bend over backwards for them by implementing their personal ways of living and thinking and then expecting that new country to amend their rules and laws for them. Religion..............believe with your heart and soul...quietly if possible. But please don't impose your radical religious beliefs into law.

  • 9

    Nessie

    However, in most countries surveyed, there was less support for severe punishments, such as cutting off the hands of thieves or executing people who convert from Islam to another faith.

    Even the non-severe punishments are wacky. For example, under some sharia law still practiced, you can kill someone, pay off the family with blood money and get off scott free.

    A majority of Muslims are also in favor of freedom of religion, even while backing sharia. In Pakistan, for example, 84% of Muslims want sharia enshrined as official law but 75% believe non-Muslims are free to practice their religion.

    And how many favor laws outlawing blasphemy? They have no idea of what freedom of religion really is.

  • 7

    modz

    From 12% in Turkey, support for sharia as official national law stood at 56% in Tunisia, 71% in Nigeria, 72% in Indonesia, 74% in Egypt and 99% in Afghanistan.


    I'd be interested to these stats alongside the average level of education or literacy of those very countries.

  • 9

    tkoind2

    Religious law of any kind is a direct threat to liberty and to justice. Religion is belief, nothing more. Once you have a group of "believers" driving the law, it is game over for anything else.

    History teaches us that religious rule of law usually ends up with someone being repressed. Namely anyone the faith decides is not ok. That is bad news for most of us.

    Sharia has a long track record of harsh bloody rule over people. How any rational person could want to live under it is shocking. But religion does indeed blind us to common sense that would otherwise give us better judgement against making laws that are dangerous even to the believers.

  • 9

    Bgood41

    Sharia law was initiated by the Wahabi Muslim sect in Saudi Arabia as they claim the full authority of its meaning. The law and the way of life in Saudi are very much reflected of Sharia law. Same token, to better understand Islam, is to look at the life of Mohammed, including the wars, the conquer, sex and marriages, women status, politics and religions......in scholarly way that enable us to deal with the expansion of Islam into the world. Most politicians and the mass in general have no clue of Islam and thus proclaiming and dreaming of peace as was intended by the liberal media who view Islam as the victim of open minded powerful democracy countries. Sharia & human right, equality, freedom....??????

  • 16

    ares7

    I have tried and tried to think of the Muslim religion with fairness, but in the end my thoughts always returns to it being so unbelievably backwards, intolerant, violent.

  • 20

    zichi

    There's no freedom or equal rights for women under Sharia.

  • 3

    Hilman

    Well Big surprise indeed...

  • 5

    NZ2011

    Ares7, While I tend to agree there are aspects of Islam that seem particularly to go against what we generally tend to agree should be universal rights, there is a bigger issue I think, if we believe in equality ALL religions must be treated equally..

    I think the solution is as simple as I said before, religion should have no impact on anyone's life who does not wish to be effected by it, laws, education and public spending should be based on substantive truth and reality, no single religion should be supported or promoted at a state level anywhere.

  • 8

    Bhateswar Bhutbhute

    Wherever they are in minority, they will play victim and cry foul on smallest of the small things.

    When in majority...well look at any Islamic country. Even the secular Turkey is going that way soon.

    All religions have radicals. However, most of them stick to sloganeering and rabble rousing. When there are so many suicide bombers and terrorists from a single community, there is seriously some problem with the teachings.

    And no, the terrorism did not start with 9/11, it has been prevalent long before that. Much before the drone attacks, and cruise missile strikes that allegedly created the terrorists!!!

  • 20

    Probie

    Let them have it, in their own countries.

    If you live somewhere else, you should respect the laws of where you are.

    The double standards are disgusting. If you're a Christian and you break an Islamic law like drawing a picture of Mohammed, in an Muslim country, you're in jail or worse; if a Muslim burns a Bible in a Christian country, nothing happens, and if someone complains about them doing it, they're racist.

    I'm sick of people pandering to Islam. If they want their stupid sharia laws, they should live in Muslim countries. If they want to live in civilized countries, they should follow their laws. Stop making women dress up with sheets on their heads. If people can't co into stores with motorcycle helmets on, Muslims shouldn't be allowed in if they have those veils on. If they don't like that, tough. Go to a Muslim country.

    I've been to Iraq and Afghanistan, and the people who weren't shooting at me were nice people. Why is it that many of those who choose to live in other countries are so horrible?

  • 4

    Triumvere

    Sharia is Sharia. What is there to interpret?

    The business of any judicial system is the interpretation of laws. There are no laws, religious or secular, that do not require interpretation. If it were otherwise, there would be no need for lawyers, judges, or legal scholars.

  • 1

    lucabrasi

    If you live somewhere else, you should respect the laws of where you are.

    Agreed.

    If you're a Christian and you break an Islamic law like drawing a picture of Mohammed, in an Muslim country, you're in jail or worse;

    Yes, because it's against the law.

    if a Muslim burns a Bible in a Christian country, nothing happens,

    Yes, because it's not against the law.

    You seem to be contradicting yourself.

  • 10

    CrisGerSan

    who cares? i am tired of all the attention paid to the muslim minority. Time for them to try to fit into the rest of the world more instead of trying to force their extreme views on others.

  • 10

    Jimizo

    I recently saw a chilling BBC documentary about Sharia marriage counseling in the UK and the appalling treatment of Muslim women in marriage was an outrage to the UK. Regular beatings were treated with nothing like the seriousness any nation should demand. One particularly obscene incident saw the counsellor advise a woman who was being continually beaten to only go to the police as a 'last resort'. A 'last resort'? I was born in a multi-cultural city and immigrants made and continue to make great contributions to my great city, but barbaric, outdated religious nonsense certainly isn't one of them.

  • 15

    AquArin Chan Daisan

    I'm moslem but I dont want to live in a country with sharia moslem, as a woman with sharia law it will be difficult for me in my daily life activities. DOnt have right to work just stay at home. I prefer live in modern law

  • 4

    zichi

    A recent BBC program on Sharia "Are Sharia councils failing vulnerable women?" http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22044724

  • 3

    Probie

    if a Muslim burns a Bible in a Christian country, nothing happens,

    Yes, because it's not against the law. You seem to be contradicting yourself.

    No, I'm not. In civilized countries, we give people the right to do stuff like that.

    The moment religion=law, things are wrong.

    AquArin Chan Daisan good for you! I strongly urge you to stop believing in fairy tales altogether.

    They should be allowed to believe in whatever they want. They aren't pushing it on you.

  • -1

    interuni321

    It`s things like this that damage the reputation of "moderate" Muslims, although a only 12% of Turks want it, Inose still owes them an apology maybe.

  • 5

    WilliB

    ...and there we have the real problem with islam, It is not the "tiny minority of violent misunderstanders" which terrorizes us; the real problem is the "peaceful majority" which does not set bombs, but which wants Sharia, and which elects Sharia-advocating parties into government. Just see how wonderful "democracy" is working out everwhere where we had the much touted "Arab Spring".

    And the bit about "interpretation of Shariah" is misleading. Once accept the premise that the Koran and the behaviour of Mohammed are the benchmark, there really is no room for moderation any more. The islamic texts are pretty clear in their medieval brutality.

    Scary stuff, and one would hope that our politicians finally open their eyes to this reality.

  • 4

    JaneM

    It seems that in many muslim countries the support of Sharia is rooted in strong religeous education.

    As a woman, I feel lucky to have been born in a secular country, which has learned from its past and where religion and law are separated. Though Christianity has had its dark moments, Christian countries have established freedoms which we all appreciate and try to maintain the best way we can. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said about Muslim countries. At least not yet.

    But then again, if the women there feel happy this way, shouldn't we let them be the way they are? As long as those countries and their governments do not expect the rest of the world to become Muslim, that is.

  • 5

    JeffLee

    The Muslims, meanwhile, have established a parallel legal system in Britain with their Sharia Councils, which you'll find in the major cities and communities throughout England. Unbelievable that this was ever allowed to happen. Do women really expect equality in a Sharia court? LOL.

    And to think, I learned as a child that in a democracy, it must be one law for everyone. I guess not anymore. Well, that's one pillar of our liberal democracy knocked away. How many more will fall? I wager that free speech goes next.

  • 5

    Yubaru

    In most countries, a majority of Muslims said a wife must obey her husband, although a majority also said a woman should decide whether or not to wear a veil.

    Did they ask only men this question? So I guess the majority don't believe in equal rights for women. One reason I would never become a Muslim.

    Religious freedom is their choice, and more power to any Muslim, but I like my "woman" having a voice and I don't mind "obeying" her either, she is neither greater, nor lower, she is my equal.

  • 4

    Neo_Rio

    I don't know what it will take for Muslims to understand that Islam as a political doctrine together with Sharia doesn't actually work. If anything it produces dictators that trample everyone's rights and who have to be overthrown on a regular basis.

    Honestly, if it worked, the west would have adopted Sharia wholesale by now. We haven't because we've learnt from our own history that the mixing of religion and politics is a recipie for social disaster.

    To try something over and over and over again and expecting a different outcome is,... well.... madness.

  • 9

    Nessie

    From the Economist:

    Almost 80% of Egyptian Muslims say they favour religious freedom and a similar number favour sharia law. Of that group, almost 90% also think people who renounce Islam should be put to death. Confused? So are they.

  • 9

    Zartan Woods

    Allowing Sharia courts to exist within a secular society is like welcoming Satan to the table as long as he behaves himself.

  • 1

    SuperLib

    Time to evolve....

  • 5

    Jimizo

    @JaneM I think we should get out of the habit of using the expression 'Christian country'. A country with the theocratic nonsense of Sharia deserves to be called a 'Muslim country'. Thankfully, most people in non-Muslim countries do adhere to civil or common law, not laws imposed by theocrats.

  • 3

    zichi

    In the majority of religions, and under their laws, women don't have equal freedoms and rights.

  • 2

    NZ2011

    The Christian nation thing is a myth.. Almost all laws for equally and freedom have been achieved by secular government organisations.

    Also.. While thought laws are not possible or practical, what other people believe is important because generally it colours their thought processes and decisions base on originally false information can be not only wrong but dangerous.

  • 1

    JeffLee

    In the majority of religions, and under their laws, women don't have equal freedoms and rights.

    That's not relevant. Christians, Jews, Buddhists, etc. in Britain and elsewhere haven't set up their own legal system based on religious councils headed by ultra-conservative old men to dictate rulings on such important matters as divorce and domestic violence.

  • 9

    Daniel Moore

    Here in Australia, there was a muslim riot when the California-based amateur film maker apparently insulted their prophet. An angry mob took to the streets, and there was a 5 or 6 year old boy holding up a sign that said "behold those who insult the prophet". Most religions try to expand their influence by spreading their teaching, but Islam is unique in believing that those who do not share the same view need to be killed. Religion from the dark ages if you ask me.

  • 1

    WilliB

    NeoRio:

    " I don't know what it will take for Muslims to understand that Islam as a political doctrine together with Sharia doesn't actually work. "

    To the contrary, it works trememdously well. Just look at the world-wide growth of islam and the increasing number of societies which are submitting under Shariah law.

    Admittedly, our ignorant politicians, who for inexplicable reasons support the islamists (remember the much-touted "Arab Spring" aka Shariah takeover) are partly at fault, but still --- where do you see that it does not work? As a political scheme to take over, political islam is on a winning spree.

  • 4

    WilliB

    zichi:

    " In the majority of religions, and under their laws, women don't have equal freedoms and rights. "

    A complete red herring argument, since the "majority of religions" are demanding that secular law is literally replaced by religious law. In Sharia countries like Saudi Arabia, and Yemen the Koran IS the constitution. And that is the ultimate state of Shariah. There is no other religion that demands anything like this.

  • 0

    WilliB

    zichi:

    Sorry, that should of course had been "are NOT demanding". But of course that is obvious.

  • 5

    Nessie

    In the majority of religions, and under their laws, women don't have equal freedoms and rights.

    The majority of religions have realized that theocracy is a bad idea.

  • 2

    Nessie

    Here in Australia, there was a muslim riot when the California-based amateur film maker apparently insulted their prophet

    More like "an Egyptian Coptic Christian provocateur," but your point still stands.

  • 4

    WilliB

    Zartan Woods:

    " Allowing Sharia courts to exist within a secular society is like welcoming Satan to the table as long as he behaves himself. "

    Well, the excuse is in Western countries countries who have capitulated to this like e.g. the UK is actually that it is voluntary and does not extend to criminal law. But still --- the capitulation to Shariah, even if only in civil law, already violates one of the most basic principles of modern societies: The equality under the law. For e.g. muslim women in the UK, that equality is gone already. Anybody who fools themselves into thinking that those women actually have a choice in the matter, is living in dreamland.

  • 3

    WilliB

    Jimizu:

    " I recently saw a chilling BBC documentary about Sharia marriage counseling in the UK and the appalling treatment of Muslim women in marriage was an outrage to the UK. Regular beatings were treated with nothing like the seriousness any nation should demand. "

    That is entirely correct Shariah advice. Wife-beating is not only allowed in the Koran (see Sura 4:34). but actually prescribed. There really is no room for "interpretation" there --- where you have Shariah, wife-beating is the way to deal with marital disagreemts.

  • 7

    Thunderbird2

    Sharia law = turning the clock back to the dark ages, where 'heretics' were murdered, where intolerance of other religions is the name of the game... and where Holy War is something to look forward to. Women, once free to learn and work wherever they pleased will be made to stay at home and become baby factories... yes, let's embrace a religion which makes early Christianity seem tolerant. The Spanish Inquisition have nothing on the old men who hand down rulings based on this 'law'.

  • 3

    bass4funk

    Sharia law = turning the clock back to the dark ages, where 'heretics' were murdered, where intolerance of other religions is the name of the game... and where Holy War is something to look forward to. Women, once free to learn and work wherever they pleased will be made to stay at home and become baby factories... yes, let's embrace a religion which makes early Christianity seem tolerant. The Spanish Inquisition have nothing on the old men who hand down rulings based on this 'law'.

    Perfectly said.

  • 3

    Jimizo

    One if the most shocking defences of sharia I can remember was from Tariq Ramadan, a Swiss Muslim scholar respected by many for his progressive 'western' interpretation of Islam. He memorably defended corporal punishment for wives if they incur the displeasure of their husbands. When critics raise this point it is not uncommon for apologists to answer with something like 'Oh, you always raise that point, along with the penalty for apostasy'. I remember one great answer to that line of argument from a critic who likened it to a burglar in court defending himself with 'Oh, you would mention THAT burglary, wouldn't you?'. 'The sleep of reason brings forth monsters'.

  • 1

    JeanValJean

    Remember the Good Old Days of the Spanish(Roman Catholic) Inquisition? That's a picnic compared to Sharia.

  • 2

    Jimizo

    Erm...let's not get too carried away with calling the brutal torture and murder of innocent people under the Inquisition a 'picnic' compared to shariah. Christianity also has a murderous, bloody history which we have largely, although not completely in some countries, left behind. Sharia should be reminder to those of us fortunate enough not to live under a theocracy that we should be on guard against attempts by any religion, not just Islam, to blur the boundaries of church and state.

  • 0

    2020hindsights

    Admittedly, our ignorant politicians, who for inexplicable reasons support the islamists (remember the much-touted "Arab Spring" aka Shariah takeover...

    As a democratic move, I guess they should support it.

  • 2

    WilliB

    2020hindsights:

    " As a democratic move, I guess they should support it. "

    In your mind, our politicians should support Shariah?! Seriously??

  • 0

    Neo_Rio

    To the contrary, it works trememdously well. Just look at the world-wide growth of islam and the increasing number of societies which are submitting under Shariah law.

    A lot is said about "the world wide growth of islam" as if it's actually happening, but the numbers don't back it up. I don't have the time nor platform to show you the details, but you might like to refer to the book "How Civilizations Die" for some stats, to see that - in fact - Islam is submerging in a demographic time-bomb much like Europe is already suffering. As Muslim women become more educated (something that the Taliban cannot stand, mind you), the less likely they are to want to marry, and the less children they have. The reason is, you guessed it - they're only getting married as a means of survival in a harsh world, and not because they want to. This leaves lots of ineligible male bachelors around, and with China driving up prices for basic necessities, the middle east is experiencing the culmination of these problems right now.

    The modern, scientific world is raining down upon Islam and unless Muslims can find a balance between science and their beliefs, their only rationale is to try and turn everything into their shallow version of Islam as only they can imagine it. It's going to be messy, and Muslims are going to try and take the west down with it as it blows itself up. The west is going to fend you off long enough until you do.

    Admittedly, our ignorant politicians, who for inexplicable reasons support the islamists (remember the much-touted "Arab Spring" aka Shariah takeover) are partly at fault, but still --- where do you see that it does not work? As a political scheme to take over, political islam is on a winning spree.

    Are the UAE and Qatar shariah nations? I mean, they're doing pretty well for themselves, but Sweden still beats them in quality of life indexes.

  • -1

    MetroGnome

    When the entire world is governed by the axioms of empirical science, rather than that of religious mandates, we will have arrived at a new plateua in human evolution.

  • -3

    2020hindsights

    In your mind, our politicians should support Shariah?! Seriously??

    If that's what people want; why not?

  • 4

    Ilikecat

    From 12% in Turkey, support for sharia as official national law stood at 56% in Tunisia, 71% in Nigeria, 72% in Indonesia, 74% in Egypt and 99% in Afghanistan.

    I want to see the full report on this report, since I'm an Indonesian by birth, though I've been living abroad for almost 10 years. Yes, yes I'm also a moslem, but heck I say no to saria law! some crazy people from Arab country had brain washed some Indonesian, special those are poor and in rural areas (also in some part of the city, but not really widely spread). This happen due to low education for many people. Just recently that the gov have enough brain to make the public school free of charge until middle school. But it'll take a generation to educate the whole country.

    Why I said no to saria law, eventhough I'm also a moslem, but I hate saria law! No WAY! and for those who said that Indonesia should be under saria law, where are you during the independent war to fought the Dutch? where are those 'Arab' people so called moslem who try to change into saria country? Did they also fought in the independent war during the early 20th century. If they did, they will not, I'm telling you, THEY WILL NOT change the country into saria country. Because we have a national HEROES on as many religion we have in Indonesia. We have Heroes with hindu religion in Bali island, if any of you know's Bali airport ( Ngurah rai ) is named after the lokal balinese hero which was a hindu practitioner. Also there's more from other religion, such as Christian, Buddism, Islam, even the beliefs in spiritual practice, also once was living to fight the war of independent. Some in my family was also fight in those war, so we could gain our independent by join together side by side to fought the Dutch that was once occupied the whole country.

    So for this number, I would like to see the report, where they do this survey? and when? So don't tell me that this is a valid survey, specially done in my country that have a foundation of believing in 5 religions and may other believes, wanting to change into saria law. I'm not saying that, there are no crazy people out there in Indonesia that wanting this law for their own benefit, but this is all politic, and the majority of Indonesian citizen will not let this law to be the country law. We will not forget our independent war and our fore fathers just to make 'them' satisfy! And by the way, saria law is not islamic law, may of them are being twisted just to satisfy and benefit those who are in power. Like many other laws.

    Excuse me for my many grammatical error....... English is not my first language

  • 2

    WilliB

    Neo Rio:

    " A lot is said about "the world wide growth of islam" as if it's actually happening, but the numbers don't back it up. "

    Alas, they do. Just look at the population statistics. Saudi Arabia: 20 million in 2000, 28 million today. Iran: 60 million in 2000, 74 million today. And so on. These are mind-boggling numbers. No wonder, really, with the combination of child marriage, polygamy, and apostesy laws. But I wonder how you can claim the opposite?

    " Islam is submerging in a demographic time-bomb "

    No, Islam is the demographic time bomb. And with the massive immigration, Europe is being submerged by it.

    " As Muslim women become more educated (something that the Taliban cannot stand, mind you), the less likely they are to want to marry, and the less children they have. "

    But under Shariah law, women do not have a choice! And that is why Shariah countries are bulging with uneducated but indoctrinated masses. You can make your point about secular muslim countries like Turkey, but once they submit under Shariah, that secular protection is gone.

    " Are the UAE and Qatar shariah nations? "

    The UEA and Qatar have authoritarian rulers -- like Saddam Hussein in Iraq, Mubarak in Egypt, Gaddafi in Libya, and Assad in Syria. These are precisely the kind of rulers that the "Arab Spring" islamists want to remove and to replace with a Shariah theocracy --- and have the support of our politicians. Thank you for making my point.

  • 3

    WilliB

    2020hindsight:

    " If that's what people want; why not? "

    So what about the minorities? The Copts in Egypt? The Christians and Druzes in Syria? They have to live under Shariah law, because the uneducated majority wants it? What you describe is not not "democracy", it is mob rule.

    Likecat:

    It is nice that you don´t like Shariah, but what about Aceh? They fought the Indonesian government for Shariah, and now they got Shariah. And I hear of plenty of similar encroachments of Shariah in Indonesia. E.g. what about your infamous "anti-pornography" law, which the muslims in parliament want to pass? That is pretty much a catch-all law tu put women firmly in second place.

  • 1

    Ilikecat

    WilliB:

    I've told you that there are crazy people in Indonesia (but mostly have a strong connection with politic), and try not only read international news regarding one country, read also the local law with local language will you (if possible). As for Aceh, it was twisted during the reign of 2nd president, it had a long history of suppression, that's why the 'stupid' twisted law kinda flourish there, it's due to so many injustice happen there, and many uneducated people there. I have few friends from Aceh, that's why I know for sure, NOT EVERY Aceh people are like that. the saria law in Aceh is under surveillance of the Indonesian gov, but yeah, some are quite stupid law manage to pass in Aceh. Many people complain about it.

    As for the STUPID anti-pornography law, again! I'm telling you, this type of people is trying to sip into every corner of the gov. some succeeded, some failed, those who success to infiltrate the gov system, will always trying to make something as stupid as this law, which I hope the parliament will not pass this. The Parliament got many bad names when this law was brought up to public, many bad mouthing them, that's why now 'they' are trying other way, such as bring it some unrelated issues so the public will not notice this. Somehow 'they' haven't succeeded, and I hope they will never success.

    Also, due to next year election, many of so called religion based party got a BAD reputation right now, I hope these people (the crazy religious people) will be kick out of the parliament, but I guess it might be a wishful thinking due to many voters are still a lower education people.

  • 1

    HonestDictator

    I've said it, the muslim apostates have said it.... Any else here need more proof that Islam is a political/religion that wants to be the law of the land? "Oh nooo, its a religion of peaaaaace." Go on.

  • 0

    HonestDictator

    My uncle up in Detroit (he's probably moved to Dearborn by now) was pretty much advocating that Sharia law was ideal for the US in his mind. Now this is a man who was born and raised in the US, wants more than one wife, and liked to smoke his ganja... and that was back in 1996. Nothing like having a relative so close that helps to advocate for the negative influences of Islam.

  • 0

    It"S ME

    HonestDictator.

    Ever read the Quoran in it's original form minus the later additions which make it extreme. Pretty much the old testament which is also the base for the Christian and Israel religion, they even recognise Jesus as a prophet on the same level as Moses, etc.

  • 0

    Urqinchina

    The fundamental differences between Islam and Christianity are- Jesus is the son of god, Islam states he was a prophet but not the son of god. Mohammed is the last prophet in Islam, but in Christianity there is another prophet yet to come. Until these fundamental differences are resolved, these very similar religions will never see eye to eye

  • 2

    Nessie

    Urqin, two more fundamental differences. One is the status of scripture. You don't have believe in the Bible to be a Christian. All it takes is accepting Christ. To be a religious (not just cultural) Muslim, you need to recognize the Koran as the literal, infallible word of God.

    The second big difference is the Enlightenment. Islam is still waiting for its enlightenment, and the status of the Koran makes a change like that more difficult, in my opinion.

  • -1

    maglev101

    From 12% in Turkey, support for sharia as official national law stood at 56% in Tunisia, 71% in Nigeria, 72% in Indonesia, 74% in Egypt and 99% in Afghanistan.

    amongst this group, i think indonesia has the world's largest muslim population. also, it's the only one i would visit, as it's safer than the rest and relatively more peaceful.

  • 2

    Nessie

    ...and another difference is that Islam started out explicitly political, with political and religious authority vested in the main proponents of the religion, in a way that Christianity did not, although it didn't take long for Christianity to go that way.

  • 1

    Jimizo

    Christianity in Europe has been largely relegated to a very healthy position as part of history and tradition, not a source of morality as in sharia. The US still suffers from religion, but has bizarrely managed to turn Jesus into a homophobic capitalist. If you asked ardent Christians if they believe in the moral codes of Jesus as in giving all you have to the poor, turning the other cheek and taking no thought for the morrow, you would probably be called a dangerous socialist. When Muslims cling to their moral codes in sharia, they are actually remaining true to their faith. Give me hypocrisy over faith if reason isn't an option.

  • 5

    WilliB

    ITS ME:

    " Ever read the Quoran in it's original form minus the later additions which make it extreme. Pretty much the old testament which is also the base for the Christian and Israel religion, "

    It does not sound as if you read the Koran. Unlike the Old Testament, which basically deals with ancient Jewish tribes, the Koran is chock-full of direct condemnations against EXISTING religions. It explicitly names and attacks Jews and Christians. There is no such thing in the O.T. (obviously, because it predates Christianity by 3000 years or so.) So this is absolutely not the same thing.

    Besides, as others have pointed out, Christianity has gone through something called the age of enlightenment, whereas islam remains stuck with the doctrine that the Koran is the literal word of God and its ruler/prophet Mohammed the perfect man.

  • -1

    gelendestrasse

    I very much doubt Japan, China, Oz or the US would ever allow religion to trump rights. If people want to limit themselves because of religion that's their right. As soon as you tell me I have to adhere to the tenants of your religion you've crossed the line.

    Guess I'm never going to see the pyramids. Oh well.

  • 0

    Kobuta Chan

    “Most of Muslims want Sharia law”

    Why rich Muslim countries can not take their fellow Muslim refugees from around the world? Most of Muslims who got asylum in Western countries and they want to introduce Sharia law in host country is becoming problem in Europe and Australia. Muslims should choose Muslim country instead of Westernize country because different culture and religion which the Muslim could not integrate into. Rich Muslim countries must accommodate fellow Muslim refugees from war zone. They need to show moral responsible for fellow Muslim peoples.

  • 0

    NZ2011

    I think there is little point comparing religions, and certainly the "cure" for one religion is not to replace it with another.

  • 0

    JeffLee

    I think there is little point comparing religions,

    Yes there is. Christianity, for example, doesn't exhort its followers to murder writers and cartoonists.

  • 4

    Nessie

    I think there is little point comparing religions, and certainly the "cure" for one religion is not to replace it with another.

    So do you think the Amish religion is no better than Wahabbi Islam or Scientology?

  • 3

    malfupete

    Having law based on a bunch of stories written over a thousand years ago? where do I sign up!!!

  • -2

    realist

    Sharia Law belongs to Muslim majority countries. They can keep it. Interesting to read some of the comments on here about "religion" having no place in the laws of the land. The fact is, however, that in most countries of the world, many laws are based on at least five of the Ten Commandments given to Moses. Without them, the world would be in even more chaos than it already is. Most Sharia laws are based on the Koran, of course, and it would be intolerable for those laws to be introduced into Western countries, given the fact that pazt of the Koran teaches that "infidels" should be destroyed for not believing as they do. No thanks, we dont need Sharia Law.

  • 3

    Jimizo

    @realist The laws contained in the 10 commandments are not exclusive to Judaism/Christianity ( although some are quite specific to the Bronze Age middle-eastern culture which created them ). Believe it or not, other societies came to the conclusion that murder, theft and perjury were not desirable without knowing that Moses received tablets of stone at Sinai. If they hadn't, civilizations such as China wouldn't have been able to construct a society which outstripped anything Judeo-Christian countries had produced in terms of technology, economic strength, jurisprudence and culture pre-enlightenment.

  • 2

    Jaymann

    it is difficult to respect or have any time for those who propose that anywhere or anyone should follow the clearly invented rules of sky-fairy worship. In the 21st century we should be looking to establish globally acceptable laws based on humanist and atheist principals. We should be seeking a total end to the lie that is religion existing anywhere outside of the private sphere. It is afterall logically indefensible.

  • 1

    Frungy

    One fact that hasn't come up is that in countries with Sharia law non-Muslims are treated as "half-men", in other words if it comes down to dispute about a contract or rape it requires the evidence of two non-Muslims to merely equal the evidence of one Muslim. One can see why Muslims would want Sharia law, it basically makes them top dogs and everyone else second class citizens.

    WilliBMay. 01, 2013 - 11:31PM JST It does not sound as if you read the Koran. Unlike the Old Testament, which basically deals with ancient Jewish tribes, the Koran is chock-full of direct condemnations against EXISTING religions.

    Actually WillB the Koran refers to Christians and Jews as "brothers of the book", of course it depends what part of the book you read and quote from. Mohammed, the prophet, conducted bloody campaigns against the Jews and Christians, and the extremists tend to ignore the "brothers of the book" bit and focus on what Mohammed did (and ignore the parts where Mohammed preached about tolerance).

  • -1

    Ah_so

    One fact that hasn't come up is that in countries with Sharia law non-Muslims are treated as "half-men", in other words if it comes down to dispute about a contract or rape it requires the evidence of two non-Muslims to merely equal the evidence of one Muslim.

    Frungy, I have no wish to dispute it, but would you be kind enough to provide a reliable link or piece of evidence to this claim?

    It might say this in the Koran, but it is not the most interesting of reads and is rather repetitive.

  • 0

    WilliB

    Ah-so:

    The concept is that of "dhimmi" (non-muslims under islamic law), it is firmly based on both the Koran and the Haddiths (e.g. the Koran clearly states that dhimmis are only allowed to live if they pay the "jihza" (head-tax), and they are treated as inferior in all sections of the law. You can see how this is practised in all Shariah countries, and even in moderate islamic countries such as Malaysia (where in case of dispute the islamic law trumps secular law). Listing all the details would go beyond the scope of a readers` forum. I suggest you start reading up on the "dhimmi" concept.

  • 0

    WilliB

    Frungy:

    " and ignore the parts where Mohammed preached about tolerance "

    Alas, the parts "where Mohammed preached about tolerance" are the earlier, Meccan, verses of the Koran, where Mohammed was weak and poetic. In islamic doctrine, they are abrogated by the later, Medinan, verses of the Koran, where Mohammed was strong and a ruthless ruler. You might want to read up on the concept of abrogation ("naskh").

    The equivalent in Christianity would be if the tolerant and pacifistic New Testament was abrogated by the brutality of the Old Testament... imagine the fun we would have with that.

  • 0

    Altruist777

    If Allah's teaching was so great, why did he have to make it so confusing that people have to decipher it? Stupid in my opinion.

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