Nurse in royal hoax call case was found hanged: inquest

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  • 6

    JeffLee

    Suicide doesn't happen just because of a phone call. It happens because of a collection of deeper complicated factors, including genetic ones, that build up over time. The phone call was merely a trigger. If you look into her eyes in that old photo, you can detect a sense of unhappiness.

    The DJs aren't really at fault, and shouldn't be blamed or punished. But if you take the simplistic approach and really believe the phone call caused it all, then blame the station's management, which created the prank programming policy, and the listeners, who demanded the pranks.

  • -4

    Fadamor

    The phone call was merely a trigger. If you look into her eyes in that old photo, you can detect a sense of unhappiness.

    OR... you could be looking at someone whose upbringing didn't put a premium on smiling in photos. My ex-wife was Russian. Good luck getting her to smile for a photo. Most other Russians I know also have few photos where they are smiling. They're happy people, but for some reason smiling when their picture is taken isn't one of things they do.

    But if you take the simplistic approach and really believe the phone call caused it all, then blame the station's management, which created the prank programming policy, and the listeners, who demanded the pranks.

    Jail the growers and the users, but don't jail the pushers, huh? That's a bit of an odd way for fixing blame.

  • -1

    Cos

    If that had been a nurse suicide in a hospital dorm (without or even with any prank, or even a radio prank and not about Kate) , they'd call Prime Ministers and all to deal with it ?

    In England, inquests are held to examine sudden or unexplained deaths and can record any one of a number of possible verdicts including suicide or misadventure. They do not apportion blame.

    No they don't apportion blame... but they summon a MP to say "Aus$500,000 (U.S.$523,600) " is not enough ? So not only they blame the pranksters, but they even do it before the inquest is over. If I unkindly refused a drink from a guy in a bar and he went to kill himself a few minutes later, they would come to tell me to pay money to the family ? It's really weird what they are doing here.

    The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) said it was probing the broadcaster behind the hoax, Sydney’s 2Day FM, but not presenters Mel Greig and Michael Christian who have borne the brunt of worldwide anger. The station’s right to broadcast could either be cancelled, restrictions put on its licence or it could be fined.

    If the station is fined for breaking some laws, OK, that's fair. That would be for airing the women's voices without consent. But then, the other nurse should get most of the money as it's mostly her voice and she said everything.

  • 1

    YuriOtani

    Cos they drove that women to suicide. A person could be walking along the cliff but they pushed her off. Defending such trash is inexcusable. The pair should do some time in jail. The pressure she was under after the "prank" would be hard enough to make most people crack.

  • 3

    Fadamor

    No they don't apportion blame... but they summon a MP to say "Aus$500,000 (U.S.$523,600) " is not enough ?

    Read the article again. "They" is the woman's FAMILY - who's being represented by "British lawmaker Keith Vaz" - who claimed that the money wasn't enough. (Shocker that a lawyer representing a grieving family claims an offered compensation isn't enough)

  • 3

    Kobuta Chan

    Hoax call should be banned internationally. Most of peoples take seriously on their professional and the victims think it's embarrassing and black mark on their career. Practical joke turned to tragedy.

  • -2

    Cos

    A person could be walking along the cliff but they pushed her off.

    Precisely, they went giggling to tell a person walking "We are the Queen and Charles" and the person ran to the cliff and jumped.

    "They" is the woman's FAMILY

    No. I would understand it from them.

    • who's being represented by "British lawmaker Keith Vaz"

    He is not a lawyer. He represents them in the sense he is the local MP and a compatriot, like that could be someone of the Embassy if they had not resided in UK. He went to access and transmit them the information from the authorities, Minister and parliament since they discussed the case there and arrange the paperwork. That's what I find abnormal that he is involved in an official inquest (that will last 4 months)... and he does the "judging" in media.

  • -2

    volland

    @Fadamor

    In a case like this a lawyer gets 30% off the amount. Could that have something to do with it?

  • 2

    JeffLee

    you could be looking at someone whose upbringing didn't put a premium on smiling in photos.

    What does "smiling" have to do with it? I said the "eyes," aka "the window to the soul."

    don't jail the pushers, huh?

    Drug pushers are engaged in illegal behavior. These DJs were not breaking any law. A bogus comparison. The DJs were doing a job that was demanded of them by their bosses, not to mention the public. And the boss' lawyer had cleared the prank and told them it was OK to go ahead with it.

  • 0

    mikihouse

    the pranksters did not expect that their call will be taken seriously...but an immigrant just did. So it snowballed into a giant mess. RIP. The problem is, nobody in England even cared about the issue until the nurse decided to end her life.

  • 2

    Heda_Madness

    Lawmaker = Member of Parliament. He is a member of the opposition party and is doing his duty as a member of the government. He is NOT their lawyer and is NOT profiting from this.

  • 2

    Tamarama

    This story is an interesting marker about where we are as a social group. 50 years ago, I'm pretty certain this would have been considered completely unnaceptible. But we have become so used to pranking/humiliating people for cheap laughs on TV/Internet/Radio that many just say;

    'It doesn't matter that you didn't consent/weren't aware of what happened because it's just a joke, therefore it's OK and any embarrasment/humiliation you experienced doesn't count and is actually your fault'

    Defending people's 'right' to do what they want, whilst absolving them of their responsibilities to threir fellow man to be respectful and considerate is a very dangerous and unempathetic path to head down.

    Blaming victims of crime/pranks pretty much means our moral compass points 180 degrees in the wrong direction, in my opinion.

  • -1

    ka_chan

    Come on, of course they care about it. The prank probably broke several British laws. This was a breach of confidentiality. Since medical records are "own" by the government in Britain, this is a breach of the government. Those who released the information can be disciplined or fined or prosecuted. Since the prank basically was a hacking event by social engineering, it's criminal. How many British laws were broken is questionable but some laws were broken. It will be interesting to see what will happen.

  • 0

    USNinJapan2

    YuriOtani

    Cos they drove that women to suicide. A person could be walking along the cliff but they pushed her off. Defending such trash is inexcusable.

    Nonsense. Using your bad analogy, at best they suggested she jump (out of jest) and she did of her own volition. Calling the DJs trash is not reasonable. It's all fun and games until someone takes the joke too seriously and we shouldn't be condemning the joker.

  • 0

    cleo

    at best they suggested she jump (out of jest) and she did of her own volition.

    Nobody suggested, even in jest, that she jump. Nowhere and at no time was jumping mentioned. It was a stupid prank, certainly, not very funny, and appears to represent the lower levels of Aussie 'entertainment'; but it wasn't the kind of thing that could reasonably be expected to drive a person to suicide.

  • -3

    USNinJapan2

    cleo

    I concur. Sorry, it was very difficult to try and apply Yuri's bad analogy...

  • 0

    Reckless

    Under common law you take your victim as they are (eggshell plaintiff). Obviously the djs did not intend for anyone to die, but her suicide is arguably a consequence of their prank under the law and the family could sue the djs and thers for emotional distress, etc. I doubt there would be any liability under criminal law relating to her death, but there may be consequences for misrepresenting their identity to obtain information at the hospital. The law, for all its faults, can deal with this case adequately.

  • 0

    ReformedBasher

    @Tamara

    This story is an interesting marker about where we are as a social group. 50 years ago, I'm pretty certain this would have been considered completely unnaceptible. But we have become so used to pranking/humiliating people for cheap laughs on TV/Internet/Radio that many just say;

    'It doesn't matter that you didn't consent/weren't aware of what happened because it's just a joke, therefore it's OK and any embarrasment/humiliation you experienced doesn't count and is actually your fault'

    Defending people's 'right' to do what they want, whilst absolving them of their responsibilities to threir fellow man to be respectful and considerate is a very dangerous and unempathetic path to head down.

    Blaming victims of crime/pranks pretty much means our moral compass points 180 degrees in the wrong direction, in my opinion.

    I'll get labeled as a weirdo for agreeing with you but modern people are generally crud who believe in nothing and walk over others without a qualm - even for fun. And you and I are supposed to listen to them? No thanks.

  • 0

    ReformedBasher

    Maybe this lady took her job too seriously. But to suggest the problem was with her is ridiculous.

    Those "analysing" what went through her mind, are you psychic? Or a professional psychologist? Speculation at JT is reaching new lows.

  • 1

    tmarie

    I am sick of hearing about this and sick of the fingers pointing at the radio announcers. No one in their right mind would off themselves because of what happened. Clearly other things at work here and she wasn't stable. The real issue here is the training of the staff. If anyone should be taking responsibility for this, it is the hospital who hires staff that are not mentality fit nor trained properly.

  • 1

    skipbeat

    Hoax call nurse 'left suicide note criticising senior hospital staff over her treatment in days leading up to her death'

    @http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2247848/Jacintha-Saldanha-Hoax-nurse-left-suicide-note-criticising-senior-hospital-staff-treatment-days-leading-death.html

  • 1

    Tamarama

    I'll get labeled as a weirdo for agreeing with you

    You calling me a wierdo, RB? ;)

    Sometimes people lose perspective, and the forest becomes very hard to see for the trees.

    Whilst it may not be immediately forseeable that what you are doing in a case like this will result in death, there are a few glaringly obvious factors in attempting a prank like this, which youthey were very quick to advertise to the world.

    1. Kate Middleton is a national obsession in England and one of the world's most famous people. People are going to be outraged, one way or another. Which they were.

    2. It will turn into a huge story. Which it did.

    3. If you pull off a prank like this, someone, or a couple of people are going to be under huge scrutiny and massive public pressure for what happened. Which they were. You just turned at least one person's life (check skipbeat's post) upside down for a cheap laugh.

    4. Don't assume anything about the people you are going to tun into a victim. You don't know anything about them.

    It's a case of very, very poor judgement by all concerned and possibly an illegal action. And only funny if you are a complete dope.

  • 1

    Heda_Madness

    Hoax call nurse 'left suicide note criticising senior hospital staff over her treatment in days leading up to her death'

    @http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2247848/Jacintha-Saldanha-Hoax-nurse-left-suicide-note-criticising-senior-hospital-staff-treatment-days-leading-death.html

    And the story moves on. In one of the other notes she also refers specifically to the hoax but that story has run it's course.

  • 0

    Cos

    50 years ago, I'm pretty certain this would have been considered completely unnaceptible.

    50 yrs ago, the most popular TVs shows were pranks shows, hidden camera, etc. And in the 30's, that was even better. Browse about Orson Wells' radio pranks.

    Hoax call nurse 'left suicide note criticising senior hospital staff over her treatment in days leading up to her death'

    And it appears the hospital never called her family after her death. Her husband called them several hours after she was found as she was not back home and he worried. Then only they told him she was dead. And it seems that's all what they did for her family. He was not aware she was concerned by the prank. In other word, the poor lady had coworkers and bosses from hell !

  • -3

    Nessie

    @heda

    He is a member of the opposition party and is doing his duty as a member of the government. He is NOT their lawyer and is NOT profiting from this.

    He's profiting from the publicity.

  • 0

    USNinJapan2

    Reckless

    I doubt there would be any liability under criminal law relating to her death, but there may be consequences for misrepresenting their identity to obtain information at the hospital. The law, for all its faults, can deal with this case adequately.

    Well it takes two to tango as they say. The hospital and the staff who were directly involved with handling the prank call were negligent and equally culpable. Medical records and patient information are strictly protected and I'm pretty sure there are substantial laws requiring medical staff and administration to safeguard patients' privacy and to release personal information only after properly confirming the identity and credentials of the recipient, which they clearly did not do here. They happily released patient information over the phone to someone who happened to sound like someone important. You call that competent? I don't, I call that incompetent and irresponsible. Oh hang on, my phone's ringing. Wow it sounds like President Obama and he wants some Top Secret information from me...

  • 0

    Tamarama

    50 yrs ago, the most popular TVs shows were pranks shows, hidden camera, etc. And in the 30's, that was even better. Browse about Orson Wells' radio pranks.

    Did they involve members of the Royal family?

  • 2

    Cos

    Did they involve members of the Royal family?

    You ask if any of the Royals did pranks ? Like a royal in a Nazi costume ? I wonder... but in the 60's the prank aspect would have been lost, that family had its bona fide Nazis still alive. As for being imitated, surely. They all always had look-alike comedians impersonating them. Maybe you don't remember but the Queen answered to prank phone calls and that didn't make much buzz. She never said anything ridiculous, vulgar or whatever, nor breached any privacy rule. Frankly, they never seemed to mind being in humor shows. That's not as if someone pretended to be the ex-daughter-in-law of the Queen to extort money...

  • 0

    Heda_Madness

    Wearing a nazi uniform, available at ANY fancy dress store to go to a FANCY DRESS party is not a prank. It MAY have been a misjudgement for a royal to wear that given the publicity that surrounds them but go to any fancy dress party and you'll find people dressed like that.

    The 50s were 60 years ago and times have move on. Morals have moved on. Certainly in most cases morals have moved on. And in the 50s there wasn't the opportunity for global humiliation.

    Comparing what happened in the 50s to this case is illogical.

  • 0

    Heda_Madness

    Nessie. He's an MP. a congressman, a politician.

    It's good that he's getting involved and supporting the family because they may very well have been ignored in all of this.

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