Ah_so's past comments

  • 0

    Ah_so

    I was a bit sceptical, so I asked Kitty what she was. She replied very firmly, "Wagahai wa neko de aru."

    I think that clears this confusion up. Stop spreading lies, Sanrio!

    Posted in: Hello Kitty not a cat, has never been: Sanrio

  • 0

    Ah_so

    I hate pachinko, much as I hate all gambling. Gambling bores me intensely, thank goodness, so I stand no chance of being a gambling addict.

    However, places such as packinko only survive on those gamblers who go in and lose real money repeatedly week after week, not someone who pops in once a year for a 2,000 yen flutter. These gambling addicts end up destroying their lives and families as much as drink does or any addiction does.

    Banning this stuf outrightf is against my principles of free choice (however misguided) and would only drive it underground, but I would love to see reasonable limits around it.

    Posted in: What do you think of pachinko?

  • 1

    Ah_so

    Japan needs a cheap, nationwide Wi-Fi service. This is something that visitors expect, but will not get. Either something you can log on to for a fee or one of those silly portbable Wi-Fi boxes, which could be hired for a week or two.

    I know that some visitor Wi-Fi app was launched recently, but it seems to be of limited effectiveness.

    Posted in: Special English zones proposed as part of Cool Japan tourism initiative

  • 1

    Ah_so

    The article clearly confuses correlation with causation.

    It is the time spent not studying that is important.

    Posted in: Survey shows longer periods of smartphone use can lead to lower school exam scores

  • 1

    Ah_so

    This article seems to negative towards the police. The police are just enforcing a ridiculous law. We should be aiming our vitriol towards the lawmakers who haven't gotten rid of this arcane rule. Some might say that the police have the option to not enforce the law, but do we really want to live in a society where the police arbitrarily decide which laws to enforce or not, that sounds more like the 3rd world to me.

    tatsuwashi: you raise an interesting question about the role of the police - you come to the conclusion that police should blindly follow a strict interpretation of the law and that it is up to politicians to set them. The alternative is "3rd world".

    I think we point to the other model, the "common law" style of law setting and interpretation, that you have in countries such as Britain and the USA. There is far more scope to interpret laws and judge enforcement in terms of the public interest.

    In terms of these photos, how can they be obscene if the human body is not obscene? Am I obscene when I go to an onsen?

    Posted in: Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art forced to cover up 'obscene' photos following complaint

  • 3

    Ah_so

    If you live in a Western country and cover yourself in a face-concealing burqa, you de facto cut yourself off from the rest of society. This leads to isolationism and ghettos. It is not good for society overall.

    It is not purely a relative thing. If a Jewish guy wears a skull cap, that is fine, and barely sticks out. If he wears some ultra-orthodox Hasidic outfit, with a black hat,beard and ringlets coming off the side of the head, it looks odd. The latter rarely integrate much with wider society and it is disconcerting for wider society.

    Even if you choose to keep your faith alive, you can never be a true part of society if your wear an outlandish religious costume. The message is clear - I reject the cultural norms of your society and place the customs and identity of a foreign culture far above it

    Posted in: In some countries, there is a ban on adults and children wearing religious clothing and symbols such as burqas, veils, head scarves, skullcaps, turbans and crucifixes in public places like schools, recreational facilities and so on. What’s your stance?

  • 3

    Ah_so

    I actually watched 'In Which We Serve' two days ago. I did not even notice Attenborough in it, but Noel Coward was excellent.

    Posted in: Actor-director Richard Attenborough dies at 90

  • 5

    Ah_so

    Absolute nonsense - you do not need to be a scientist to identify this as pseudo-science.

    The psychologist behind this is also pushing the belief that there is a Japanese race, whereas we know that Japanese are a mix of slightly different Asian peoples, but are genetically little different from their neighbours, such as the Koreans. Characteristics common among Japanese people should be common amongst other N.E. Asian people, as well as people of Japanese heritage born abroad, such as Hawaii or Brazil.

    In case anyone is taking him seriously, remember that he is the author of a pop psychology number of books including "Mystery of the identity of the sixth sense - close to the secret of the mysterious ability that everyone has" according to Amazon. Not to be taken seriously.

    Posted in: Anxiety makes Japanese stingy, says psychologist

  • 1

    Ah_so

    We already know that he wasn't stopped for stealing the cigars, he was stopped for walking in the street, which is an infraction. Failure to obey an order to get out of the street is a misdemeanor, and the officer has the right to arrest suspects for committing misdemeanors. Striking an officer, or resisting arrest with violence is a felony, and an officer is required to arrest suspects who commit felonies, not let them walk away and hope they can catch them later.

    And this justifies shooting them?

    Posted in: There is never an excuse for shooting unarmed suspects

  • -3

    Ah_so

    Having read about the increased donations, I will take back my earlier cynical comments, because it has raised money charity. A pretty small amount in comparison to all the fuss there has been, but it it still a substantial amount of money.

    OK, allow me one last cynical swipe: well done to all those celebrities who have got their faces into the newspapers without having to even give a penny to charity!

    Posted in: Ice Bucket Challenge

  • 0

    Ah_so

    f they just donated money, no one would notice or care, with this people all over the world are noticing

    Most celebrities who get involved in this sort of thng are doing it for self-promotion. I expect that a large number of people have now heard of the ice bucket challenge, but only a fraction will be able to link it to the underlying cause (ALS aka motor neurone disease). Of those who can, how many actually donate as a result of this. And why should they donate to ALS as opposed to cancer research or some other worthy disease.

    Have a look at Charlie Sheens version to understand how it should be done.

    Was he sobering up?

    Posted in: Ice Bucket Challenge

  • 1

    Ah_so

    Because there are no full-blood Ainu, and there have been none for some time. What is worse, there is no specific way to determine who is or isn't part Ainu. You have to go back some generations to find any "pure" Ainu people, and even then, they were few.

    Perhaps not "pure", but considering that there were still large numbers living traditional Ainu lifestyles 150 years ago, it would be surprising if the heritage had been completely eradicated. Also, if there is no full-blood Ainu, there are probably few full-blood Japanese in Hokkaido who is not part Ainu.

    Posted in: Even if there are Ainu, they are no more than Japanese who are descended from Ainu. All they do is insist relentlessly on exercising their rights. It's absurd, and I can't explain it to the taxpayers.

  • 0

    Ah_so

    And at the other end of the scale, a 30 minutes/5km run a week is significantly better than none at all.

    Posted in: When it comes to exercise, how much is too much?

  • -1

    Ah_so

    the average modern human body is struggling with a bit of a water shortage.

    Thanks for the info, Nightshade, but it sounds like a lot of pseudo science to me. The great mid-90s myth of us all being deydrated unless we drink an extra 6 glasses of water a day has long ago been dismissed as baloney. I am happy to accept that the liver requires a lot of water, but the body is very good at regulating itself and we have a very good way to keep our body fluids in check - our thirst and the bathroom.

    Of course it is important to stay properly hydrated, but if you drink fluids (including tea) regularly and are still going a few times a day, you are all right.

    What the article above does not explore is changing behaviour and changing demographics. Of course a lot more old people die that 50 years ago - Japan did not have all that many back then. In terms of young people dying, are the numbers really statistically significant?

    Posted in: Are Japanese growing less heat-resistant?

  • 0

    Ah_so

    I doubt that. The verbal response and the decision to use certain words orally are as a result of learning the Japanese words thru Kanji and/ or learned in written material where such words are used. Anybody who has really taken the time to understand the Japanese language and have mastered it well enough understand this quite well.

    nigelboy, are you suggesting that Japanese people can only speak their own language as a result of having learned to write it? This sounds like a case of putting the cart before the horse.

    Strangerland: there are lots of definitions for words like "run", but if we converted them to kanji, a significant number would share the same base meaning. 'The man ran'; 'the river runs through the town'; ' the conversation ran along similar lines' - all of these uses of run/ran are different definitions and would get their own OED definition, but are essentially the same core word. There are still a lot of totally different uses of these words, of course, but not hundreds.

    Posted in: The fuzzy logic behind Japanese attachment to kanji

  • 12

    Ah_so

    Even supposing that China and Japan managed to agree upon a common script, they would be no closer to mutual linguistic understanding than joint users of the Roman alphabet such as Hungarians and Australians.

    Clearly untrue - the author shows above that a Chinese reader of Japanese can already grasp the gist, or at least subject matter of what is written, even if the subtleties are lost. By contrast, who would know what this Hungarian sentence means:

    "A légpárnás hajóm teli van angolnákkal."

    Posted in: The fuzzy logic behind Japanese attachment to kanji

  • 1

    Ah_so

    Damn, this wind is annoying. I just want to sleep!

    Posted in: Typhoon makes landfall near Kochi

  • 0

    Ah_so

    What suggestions do you have for reducing the amount of garbage that gets thrown out each day?

    This is Japan we are talking about - answering this question is like shooting fish in a barrel!

    Posted in: What suggestions do you have for reducing the amount of garbage that gets thrown out each day?

  • 3

    Ah_so

    Gimme a break. Holding your own debt is actually a good thing, a really good thing, believe it or not.

    Up to a point, I agree. But you end up with a massive concentration risk in a single asset class (JGBs). Rising interest rates would hammer the value of these bonds, reducing banks' asset base and weakening their capital position.

    Posted in: Japanese regulators highlight interest rate risk

  • 0

    Ah_so

    She is captured now, there is no point in wasting time, money or effort to rehab her. She is a psycho killer, she should be put down NOW like a rabid dog or she WILL end another's life in the future.

    The same could be said for the 14 year-old Kobe killer back in 1997. Back then, I pretty much thought exactly the same. Actually he was released back in about 2005 after having turned out normal in the end and as far as we know, has not committed any further crime.

    Posted in: Teen murder suspect committed 'unforgivable' act, says father

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