Frungy's past comments

  • -2

    Frungy

    It is worth noting that previous studies on hallucinations in cocaine users showed that part of the problem was that people with serious pre-existing mental problems were often drug users, so the drugs are not necessarily responsible for the problem.

    ... as usual I wish that they'd provided an accurate citation for the paper. Why is it that newspaper reporters can't master something as simple as a reference?

    Posted in: Legal regulations and crackdowns have limits. It is an urgent task to ensure education to prevent abuse as well as a framework to treat addicts.

  • -3

    Frungy

    A customer who turns up at the hotel insisting they have a reservation, although they haven’t actually made one. Sometimes, a Ghost might be just trying their luck; or they might have actually made a reservation, but gone to the wrong hotel by mistake.

    Or the hotel staff might have messed up and lost the reservation. This has happened to me several times around the world, and most of the time hotel staff are stupidly stubborn about admitting their mistake, even when you pull out an email showing your reservation or show them your cellphone and point to the call you made to make the reservation.

    The customer isn't ALWAYS right, but equally the business isn't always right either. In the U.S. I can understand the reluctance to admit fault because of legal issues, but there's simply no excuse in any other country.

    Posted in: The secret language of Japanese hotel staff

  • -1

    Frungy

    sangetsu03Apr. 16, 2014 - 10:56PM JST Under his watch there have been substantial improvements in the LGBT situation, he's pushed through Obamacare, he's given increased protection to whistleblowers, and overall he's kept just under half the promises he's made.

    Among the myriad real problems facing the world, LGBT issues are not in the top 200.

    Human rights don't even make your top 200 "real problems"? ... well, enough said really.

    Posted in: 2016 presidential race off to an early start

  • 1

    Frungy

    A 3-year old is way too little to be out and about. At that age I was restricted to our yard of supervised play in parks. Kids that small are simply too uncoordinated.

    Posted in: 6-year-old boy dead, 3-year-old girl in coma after being swept away in river

  • -2

    Frungy

    bfg4987Apr. 17, 2014 - 08:04AM JST Wow. Pretty unprofessional journalism, here, so much for unbiased reporting. Also, once again, no "circumventing" needs to occur, the ruling only applied to the current expedition.

    I can't believe you got so many thumbs-down. I completely agree. Their intention is to abide by the letter of the law. The ICJ did not forbid whaling outright, in fact they found it "not unreasonable", but quibbled about the sample size. Japan is complying with the ruling, and there is no "circumventing" going on here.

    Now don't get me wrong, I'd love to see the whaling programme scrapped outright for moral reasons... just the same as I'd like to a see honesty in reporting for moral reasons. Unfortunately neither is about to happen anytime soon.

    Posted in: Lawmakers demand gov't 'redesign' whaling program

  • -2

    Frungy

    bruinfanApr. 16, 2014 - 08:33PM JST I agree that most Japanese over 65 want to "have their cake and eat it too". This is a major reason why this country is in such a mess. The age to collect a pension should have been changed over a decade go...perhaps to 67 (but in increments)(disabled people able to collect sooner of course) Many (not all but many) of the people over 60 are of able body or at least able mind and should work longer instead of complaining again and again.

    ... I think you may have the wrong end of the stick here bruinfan. Older people WANT to work, but are not ALLOWED to work because of the legal retirement age. Their companies simply won't keep them on. Not the other way around like you seem to think.

    Posted in: Japan's population shrinks as elderly make up 25%

  • -4

    Frungy

    The reason they can't participate is because it is very difficult for a doctor to help someone in another country when they encounter a patient and their first question is, "Nihongo shabemasu ka?"... and when the patient responds in English they simply can't understand. Make English mandatory and maybe they have a dim and distant hope of being able to operate outside of the "Japanese only" bubble they operate in.

    As for Japanese lawyers... yeah, I wouldn't want one of them "helping" me.

    Posted in: We need a system to make it easier for Japanese women with special expertise such Self-Defense Forces officers, doctors and lawyers to participate in overseas activities for international peace.

  • -1

    Frungy

    titaniumdioxideApr. 16, 2014 - 06:22PM JST Yeah! I'm one of them and I regret being a part of it. It SUCKS. Ugly plot, so much feminism, so much singing... UGHHHHH!!!!!! Let it go, let it go lalalalala. So annoying! PLEASE STOP

    ... did you ever consider that perhaps you are not the intended target audience? I had to remind myself of this pretty much every time I saw Jar-Jar Binks, it became my mantra, "I am not the intended target audience... I am not the intended target audience...".

    Posted in: 'Frozen' tops box office in Japan for 5th consecutive week

  • -5

    Frungy

    No.

    Companies are legally people. The government wouldn't bail you or I out if we made bad decisions and got ourselves into financial trouble. Why should it be any different for companies?

    Maybe companies will eventually learn to be responsible if governments stop bailing them out.

    At the end of the day if a company fails, yes its employees will TEMPORARILY be out of work, but if there really was a market for its goods and services then another company will step into that market gap and create new jobs. If there wasn't really a need for those goods and services then those jobs were doomed anyway.

    Posted in: When big companies look like they are going under, should governments use tax money to bail them out?

  • -3

    Frungy

    Patricia YarrowApr. 16, 2014 - 06:33PM JST FIRST THING: get rid of any mandatory retirement limits. I want to do my job, which I like a lot and am good at, for as long as possible. All the time I am working, I am not a burden to society. Why is this so hard to implement?

    Exactly. What is the problem here? The problem is that elderly people are forced into retirement. Today's 60 is like 50 in the 1980's. Sure, scale back their working hours a bit (but seniority tends to deal with that problem), but otherwise 60 year olds who want to work should be allowed to work as long as they like.

    In many poorer countries retirees retire on Friday and they're back in the office on Monday as an "independent contractor" earning 10% more and doing training and mentoring in addition to a lot of their old duties. You don't need to be young to sit behind a desk, and the vast majority of Japan's jobs are white collar.

    The elephant in the room in Japan is the complete lack of training and development, meaning that by 60 most Japanese employees' skills are completely useless and have never been updated, which is why Japanese corporate lobbyists are blocking any attempt to raise the retirement age. Their complete lack of HR planning has created this mess, and again the taxpayer is left footing the bill for companies' money-saving shortcuts.

    Posted in: Japan's population shrinks as elderly make up 25%

  • -4

    Frungy

    “We don’t need a moratorium because safety is not the issue,” said Dr. Steven Chamuleau of University Medical Center in Utrecht, Netherlands.

    Umm... no. There's a risk associated with inserting the device and a risk with its continued presence in the body. If there's no conclusive clinical evidence that it works then it should be pulled and go back to the clinical trials phase.

    Posted in: Heart doctors seek curbs on kidney-zapping hypertension devices

  • -4

    Frungy

    In the news the most? glances at this week's headlines Yeah, the police, hands-down.

    And while teachers and civil servants may get caught from time to time the police are undoubtedly the perverts and criminals in Japan. There are constant and consistent stories about routine physical, psychological and even sexual abuse during the "interrogations", with the cops confident that a 99% conviction rate means that the person will be behind bars and unable to file charges - and won't be believed even if they could file charges.

    The sooner they get cameras into the interrogation rooms and cells the better.

    Posted in: Which profession in Japan seems to be in the news the most due to deviant or unlawful sexual behavior by its members?

  • -10

    Frungy

    RowanMApr. 15, 2014 - 12:21PM JST @Frungy squeaker? His popular vote and electoral vote margins were significantly wider than either of Bush's elections.

    Considering who he was up against? I mean honestly I was shocked when I saw how many people voted for that train-wreck Romney.

    sangetsu03Apr. 15, 2014 - 04:54PM JST Frungy, being an American, and having met a few presidents (including Mr Obama), and having known others who were friends of my father and grandfather,

    Do you have any other names you'd like to drop?

    I honestly have to say that Obama is probably the worst president we have ever had the misfortune to elect. He has kept none (not even one) of his campaign promises

    Under his watch there have been substantial improvements in the LGBT situation, he's pushed through Obamacare, he's given increased protection to whistleblowers, and overall he's kept just under half the promises he's made.

    These aren't matters of opinion, they're matters of record. You're obviously not a fan of Obama, but there's a world of difference between not being a fan of someone and being so hate-filled that you lose any connection with reality.

    Posted in: 2016 presidential race off to an early start

  • -11

    Frungy

    SwissToniApr. 14, 2014 - 02:36PM JST Frungy, I'm no lawyer but I disagree with your opinion there. The law requires a household to register with NHK if there's a TV receiver in the house. As soon as you buy the TV you've entered into the contract. It's a bit like the TV license fee in the UK, except there you can end up in criminal court and even prison if you don't pay.

    I'm not a lawyer either, but I did study contract law when I was younger, because it is a useful thing to know about considering how many contacts you're likely to enter into in your life-time.

    To have a valid contract you need the following: 1. a sum in legal tender (that's yen in Japan) 2. a meeting of minds (all parties must understand what is expected of them in terms of the contract) 3. an offer and explicit acceptance without duress

    You cannot have an "implicit" contract that isn't stated from something like buying a TV, and frankly those EULAs that only pop up AFTER you have bought the software (and thereby constitute duress since they already have your money but you can't use the software without agreeing) are legally unenforceable because they don't meet the requirements for a contract.

    We have a special name for contracts that you don't have to agree to. They're called "laws". Laws bind you without requiring any agreement or acceptance or even (in some legal systems) an understanding of what they're all about. That's why NHK's only recourse here would be to file criminal charges, because there is no contract. People talking about a contract really have no clue what it takes to make a contract.

    Regardless though, you need to understand that if you watch NHK without paying the fees then you're breaking the law. It really is that simple. That NHK would have a tough time proving that you watched NHK is beside the point.

    Posted in: NHK tags house of man who refuses to pay fees

  • -8

    Frungy

    hidingoutApr. 15, 2014 - 11:35AM JST I liked your post Frungy ... except this part. Please elaborate on what you see as Mr Abe's "warmongering agenda". Given that you agree Japan is surrounded by "hostile, saber rattling" nations, do you not think it would be prudent to establish an army?

    Well if by "army" you mean "a larger self-defence force" then I'm okay with that. But if you "army" you mean what most people mean, which is a force designed for attacking and killing people in foreign countries then I think that's a move in the wrong direction. The philosophy of "pre-emptive self-defence" has become so common that it has been carried to ridiculous extremes in the last couple of decades.

    Japan's focus on defence has allowed them to build a force specialised for defence that is a more than effective repellent for other forces around the world.

    AlphaapeApr. 15, 2014 - 12:47PM JST This is in part to the fact that the US has said that it will protect Japan. Japan had no need to go out and send it's military to at least seem to support their foreign interests.

    In part, perhaps, maybe, possibly, but there's no real evidence that the U.S. has done anything apart from using Japan to subsidise its massive military spending in return for no real benefit. Japan's current self-defence force alone is more than sufficient to repel anything that China could reasonably throw at it (and that is, at best, 10% of China's standing army).

    Posted in: Japanese constitution nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

  • -13

    Frungy

    First female U.S. president? I'd love to see it happen, but honestly I don't think it will.

    Face it, Obama's election was a squeaker and he's been one of the best U.S. presidents in recent history - I don't agree with everything he's done, but overall he's been pretty darned good... and he was running again that human slime-ball Romney.

    If Obama struggled to win with his clean record, amazing campaign and great ideas then I don't see a hope in hell for Hillary, who'd dragging a ton of political baggage behind her, all of which will be aired during the campaign: - Whitewater - Cattle Futuresgate - Filegate - Lewinsky - Vandalgate - etc.. etc.. etc..

    She's simply got too much baggage to win and the U.S. presidential elections are all mudslinging. She's a bad choice.

    Posted in: 2016 presidential race off to an early start

  • -5

    Frungy

    Personally I think that Japan deserves this win. The country as a whole has managed to avoid going to war for the last 70 years, a feat that no other G8 country can claim. That's impressive and a positive example of how peace CAN be a reality. And this wasn't easy. Japan is surrounded by hostile powers and countries that are constantly saber-rattling.

    It is also likely that Abe, as the President, would be called on to receive the award on behalf of the Japanese people, and that could shame him into stepping down his warmongering agenda.

    If the Nobel committee considers the most good that could be done with this award then I think this would be a good choice.

    Frankly it is a no-brainer considering that they gave one to Obama, and he had done absolutely nothing to deserve it apart from make unrealistic promises. Japan has made the promises and delivered the goods. They deserve a slap on the back and a nice statue to put on the mantelpiece.

    Posted in: Japanese constitution nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

  • -6

    Frungy

    StrangerlandApr. 14, 2014 - 08:53AM JST Not really. Police work over 24 hour shifts, usually closer to 30. As they start early in the morning, that would put the end of their shift sometime early afternoon. Having a few drinks after a long shift is understandable.

    Police in some countries maybe. In my area of Japan, no. There are more than enough cops in Japan and they work 12 hour shifts in my area. I live just down the road from the local police headquarters so I've had plenty of chances to watch the shift changes over the years. The day shift goes at at 7am (after the morning meeting) and comes back in at 5pm (and again has a meeting for about an hour). The night shift seems smaller and seems to mostly stick to the koban with about half the patrol cars staying at the police headquarters.

    Posted in: Drunk police officer arrested for intruding in store

  • -15

    Frungy

    And of course the police officer is completely unbiased here about the light being green? I'd like some corroborating witnesses or dashboard cam footage please. This officer is facing murder charges if that light was red and simply asking him if it was green and closing the case smacks of a cover-up.

    Posted in: Mother, son killed after their car hit by police car

  • -12

    Frungy

    SwissToniApr. 14, 2014 - 01:22AM JST It's an interesting situation, the Broadcast Law requires you to have a contract with NHK if you have TV equipment that can receive NHK broadcasts. So assuming you own a TV, object and don't sign up, you're in breach of contract law, a civil issue for which NHK would have to sue.

    Actually I think you're mistaken. If you own a TV and don't have a contract then you cannot be in breach of contract. You can't breach a contract you never entered into.

    Instead you have failed to make a contract with NHK, but are using their services. This makes it theft, which is a criminal charge.

    Here's a simple example. You go into a convenience store and pick up a pack of gum valued at 100 yen. You put down 50 yen at the register. The teller refuses to accept 50 yen since the marked price was 100yen and you have no meeting of minds and no contract. If you then consume that gum or walk out of the convenience store with it then you will be arrested for theft. Having no contact doesn't magically place you in a responsibility-free zone legally-speaking, nor does it mean you can get free gum or free TV shows.

    You might also fall afoul of Japan's new intellectual property laws for viewing TV shows without a contract. This is also a criminal charge.

    Posted in: NHK tags house of man who refuses to pay fees

View all