Frungy's past comments

  • -2

    Frungy

    Japanese media quoted police Friday as saying they believe Uemura went out later that night after receiving a message on his cell phone from one of the gang, although investigators have been unable to find his mobile device.

    Why would they need the mobile phone? If they know the carrier then their servers should contain a copy of the message - although it might have been deleted by now.

    I know that in most countries one of the first thing police do during a murder investigation is to phone the cellphone company, give them the victim's cellphone number and say, "Please give us any and all records relating to any activity on this phone.", because it often provides information like GPS data, emails, what websites they visited, who they called, etc.

    Posted in: Police arrest 18-year-old youth over murder of Kawasaki boy

  • -2

    Frungy

    It"S MEFeb. 26, 2015 - 05:11PM JST Given the foreigner to Japanese ratio I can't see the need for an English need(doubt that the majority of foreigners Korean and Chinese are all English speakers). Most foreigners I know here aka Asians speak no English, many(African) only speak French, Portuguese.

    Only speak French and Portuguese? ... Have you been to Africa? I have and almost everyone spoke at least enough English to get by. Likewise in China I could always find someone who spoke English (the older generation not so much, but the younger generation all spoke enough for communication). And in Korea people were almost lining up to help me, eager to show off their English skills.

    Nurses have to read and write report logs about patients and what happened during their shift, as well as instructions for special cases. In short everyday Japanese and not medical acronyms.

    Everyday Japanese that could be written in hiragana, doesn't require N1 level of proficiency and doesn't require them to re-learn the medical Japanese anatomical terms, names of nerves, and all the other very specialised Japanese vocabulary that they need to pass the nursing examination and will probably never use again.

    You seem to have lost sight of the issue under discussion here. Should nurses be required to pass the medical portion of the examination in Japanese when it doesn't relate to what they'll be doing on a daily basis? No.

    Should they be required to pass the JLPT N1 when actually a narrower and more specific job-related Japanese course covering stuff like, "How to speak to and understand Showa Era Japanese", "How to speak and understand dialect", and "How to take a case history in Japanese" would be far more appropriate. Do you know which of these topics the N1 covers... precisely none of the above.

    And this is the essence of my argument. The JLPT isn't specific enough, and the medical terminology they learn is too specific and not useful to what the duties they'll be performing on a normal day. They need a special course and special examination linked to the practical aspects of the job.

    To put this simply, would you trust a Japanese doctor who had a TOEIC score of 900 to treat you? No, because while he might be perfectly well equipped to discuss business or the news he would have no clue about half of what you were saying because the words, "stomach" and "ache" aren't even in the top 1000 words used in the TOEIC test. That's what using the JLPT to certify nurses is like, it is irrelevant.

    Would be nice if you replied to my whole post instead of picking and choosing.

    There, I replied to your whole post. Happy now? I doubt it.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • -1

    Frungy

    It"S MEFeb. 26, 2015 - 01:27PM JST Japanese is needed here as the majority of patients are Japanese, reports, etc are also in Japanese(even for non-japanese soeakers) and so on. So expecting JLPT 1(high school level) is NOT unreasonable.

    Clearly reading a medical report with confusing "Japanese" acronyms like GTP, LDL, HDL... oh, wait, these are all English acronyms.

    The number of English speakers that visit doctors is also small,

    Please provide a source for this, because merely repeating this doesn't make it true.

    most foreigners I know speak good enough Japanese to not need a translator.

    And "good enough Japanese" here means, "very little". Think N4 or N3. Not N1.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • 2

    Frungy

    Quite simply bullies need to be given a nice long time-out at home for the first offense, and expelled for the second offense and sent to a "special needs" school for bullies... one with special classes on managing aggression and anti-social impulses.

    Bullying is a manifestation of anti-social personality disorder, and needs to be treated. We need to be aware that bullying is a form of terrorism. The bully isn't just hurting the child they're actually bullying, but is sending a clear message to all the witnesses, "Look what happens if you cross me.", and it instills terror in all the other children and damages their ability to learn at school. Numerous studies have shown that victims and witnesses both manifest symptoms of anxiety and depression.

    Quite simply bullies cannot be allowed in regular schools. First offense - suspension, second offense - special school.

    Nothing else will work.

    edojinFeb. 25, 2015 - 05:22PM JST I couldn't do anything ... because I'm a foreigner.

    I disagree. Just look at them and yell, "Yamite!" loudly and walk towards them. They'll stop it immediately. I know, I've done it before when I saw two boys trying to pull down another boy's pants in public. They apologised and I proceeded to chew them out in Japanese for about 10 minutes about how it was completely wrong to bully other kids. Nobody did anything to stop me, including several teachers who were nearby.

    Part of me was disgusted that the I had to do the teacher's job, part of me was disgusted that they did nothing to stop some random stranger from yelling at their students, and overall the entire experience left me feeling dirty.

    Posted in: What can be done to stamp out bullying at schools?

  • 0

    Frungy

    The solution to this problem is to require identification for all bank accounts.

    If I transfer money to an account I can see the name of the person I am transferring to. The police should also be sure of the name and address of that person so that they can drop by and pay them a visit and ask why the money was transferred to them.

    I don't know why this isn't being done. As a foreigner I had to produce identification to open my account. Is the rule different for Japanese people? It shouldn't be.

    GWFeb. 26, 2015 - 01:01PM JST This looks more like an amakudari scam being done for ex-coppers!

    Actually, since these are female police officers, I suspect many of them will have resigned because of pregnancy, and this is a good way to get them back into the system.

    Posted in: 70% of such fraud victims are women aged 60 and older. By using the former officials who are experienced in investigations, we hope to detect possible scam cases in advance.

  • 0

    Frungy

    Personally I think this article just reveals the utter lack of HR planning in companies.

    For example, "you may be tempted to ... leave an unfinished project for your eventual replacement."

    This brings up many points: 1. Why are you the only one with knowledge of that project? Why is it your responsibility to finish it? If the project is long-term (which is what the term "project" implies, rather than "task" which is a short-term issue) then there should be no reasonable expectation that you should work overtime or try to finish it. It simply isn't realistic or reasonable. 2. Why do they refer to "eventual replacement"? If the company is running on such a lean HR model that there's nobody to hand over to, and no-one else to maintain the project when you leave then this is the company's fault, and not your responsibility.

    Some of the suggestions are just laughable, for example: " Could you stay longer to assist in training your replacement? Will you leave the company in a bind?"

    This comment exposes the fundamental hypocrisy of the author: 1. The company would think nothing of firing you if it served their financial interests, and wouldn't let you stay on longer until you found a new job, even if it left you in a financial "bind". Why should the company expect loyalty when it doesn't extend the same loyalty to employees? 2. As for training your replacement... don't make me laugh. I've been in this situation several times, and every time the company hired two or three inexperienced, under-qualified individuals to replace me and then asked me to, "Please train them.". I did my part but the company was in such a state of constant change that most of my advice was along the lines of, "The current situation is this . It evolved from this . What it will be next week when the CEO gets his latest brainstorm is anyone's guess.". Inexperienced and under-qualified individuals simply can't cope with that degree of uncertainty and change, but the finance department sets the budget for hiring and the HR department tows the financial line.

    Frankly this article is nothing more than a string of hypocrisy intended to place the blame for the company's poor planning on the shoulders of departing employees.

    I agree that you should be professional when leaving, refrain from burning bridges and continue to work as usual up to and including the last day, but the company has no right to expect you to work harder in your final days or weeks to make up for their lack of planning.

    The old maxim applies, "A lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part".

    Posted in: Modern etiquette: Proper protocol when leaving a job

  • -2

    Frungy

    toshikoFeb. 26, 2015 - 08:30AM JST IF they get deoirted, they probably come to USA to become nurses etc. There are bunch of filipino, Chinese, etc doctors. If they can speak some Japanese, they get assignment gf Japanese people. Pay is not low like Japan, HOW many dollars is 210 000 yen?

    A fair point. The lowest paid 10% of nurses in the USA are paid $45,630 a year, which comes to about 452,000yen a month... in other words Japan wants these nurses to work for low pay for several years in order to qualify as nurses in Japan, and to acquire Japanese language skills that are actually worth MORE than the nursing job... and at the end of this it is still paying a lot less than the lowest paid nursing jobs in the USA.

    As for those making a big fuss about language, almost everyone reading this has had to struggle through a medical consultation with a doctor or nurse in Japan who barely spoke any English. We all managed to communicate the necessary information. One does not require complete fluency to take a medical history and deal with basic complaints.

    Is it desirable? Yes. But I also desire many things I will probably never have. Reality is very different from the realm of desire, and Japan needs to wake up and realise that they're not going to get the ideal situation. Nurses not speaking perfect Japanese might, possibly, perhaps, result in one or two avoidable deaths, but we're already seeing avoidable deaths on a daily basis from insufficient nursing staff, and it is far more than one or two.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • 0

    Frungy

    jerseyboyFeb. 25, 2015 - 11:05PM JST Which, my guess is, they are doing not because they expect a big increase in the pass rate, but simply because they are having a more difficult time getting folks into the program, since the high failure rate is becoming more and more well-known. (Da, the Internet.)

    You're entirely correct. The number has been dropping year-on-year, but its difficult to get a clear picture of the statistics because of the Touhoku earthquake - quite a number of the foreign trainee nurses left around that time after radiation worries and the numbers haven't recovered yet.

    To those who think that it is reasonable to require someone to have Japanese proficiency above N1 just to earn a salary of about 270 000 a month, ask yourself how much an interpreter/translator with N1 is paid in Japan. The answer is, "A lot more than 270k a month".

    These nurses aren't stupid. If they have a qualification that pays better than nursing then why be a nurse? The work is difficult, dangerous, dirty and badly paid. By contrast the life of an interpreter or medical sales representative is a walk in the park.

    That's the idiocy of the program as it is right now. But the bureaucrats just don't see the issue, because they think, "Japanese-born nurses are fluent in Japanese, so to be 'fair' we should have the same requirement for non-Japanese nurses."

    ... 'fair' would be requiring all Japanese nurses to be as fluent in English as a Filipino nurse.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • 1

    Frungy

    ReformedBasherFeb. 25, 2015 - 01:29PM JST I had you specifically in mind when I wrote my first comment. You can, correctly, choose to regard that as a compliment if you wish to do so.

    Well... thank you... umm.. sortof. Wow, I was a bit of a grouch wasn't I?

    It is useful only for speaking to Japanese doctors, who do understand regular Japanese and most speak English.

    The middle part of your sentence is odd and I think an exaggeration. Also I'm not sure whether the 2nd part is true or not. From my very limited experience, I recall that the few medical professionals I've conversed with speak some English, but often use "difficult" medical terms, rather than "common" English. But let's let that slide.

    These nurses are trained medical professionals, and most of them were trained in English, so the "difficult" medical terms are familiar to them.

    One concern is, despite assumed enthusiasm on the part of all parties - nurse/caregiver, doctor, patient - misunderstandings will occur. True that this happens even with all concerned fluent in the same language, but probably more frequent in the case of not fully understanding each other.

    I think this concern over misunderstandings is overblown. When you understand the type of work they're going to be doing this becomes clearer.

    Nurses work is mostly mechanical, they visit the elderly (either in their homes or more normally they're in retirement homes and the nurse is permanently stationed there). They check vitals (minimal communication skills required), assist in bathing the elderly (again minimal communication skills required apart from, "please remove your hand from my buttock"), and ensure that the elderly take their medication (and if you can read, 1日2回朝・夜 then you know enough to put the pills in the right trays). Apart from that they're just on the lookout for mostly physical symptoms like complaints of unusually high levels of pain, paleness, jaundice, difficulty moving, and so forth.

    The level of communication skills required to perform routine monitoring is dramatically over-stated, and you don't need every nurse to speak Japanese at a level exceeding N1. It is just Japan shooting itself in the foot.

    The bottom line here is that this is Japan's old "Use 'em and lose 'em" philosophy in full force. They get these "trainee" nurses (they're fully qualified back home) and pay them peanuts because they're only "trainees", then send the vast majority of them back home after a few years, confident that another truckload will arrive the next day to be used as cheap labour.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • -1

    Frungy

    u_s__reamerFeb. 25, 2015 - 12:56PM JST The purpose of my posts has been to call people's attention to the moral depravity of a society where "justice" is for sale and capital punishment is imposed EXCLUSIVELY on the poor and powerless. ... If you or one of your family and friends ever die from a smoking-related disease, I guarantee you that the phrase "reductio ad absurdum" which you have, by the way, erroneously employed, will never pass you lips.

    No, I haven't. You're not arguing that these "poor and powerless" people are innocent of the crimes they are accused of, merely that the system is unfair and therefore they should not be executed. This is textbook "reductio ad absurdum" because if we accept your argument then for so long as any element of unfairness is present (which there will always be as no human system is perfect) no-one can be punished. Or perhaps you'd be satisfied if these drug king-pins were executed? ... but they'd get a free pass by your logic as it is unfair to merely target the top people and ignore the middle-men...

    Do you see how ultimately ridiculous your argument is?

    Posted in: Indonesia warns foreign countries not to interfere over death sentences

  • 0

    Frungy

    u_s__reamerFeb. 25, 2015 - 10:51AM JST The tears shed by the Indonesian elite for the poor victims of drugs are distinctly crocodilian since FAR more citizens (at least 200,000) die annually from smoking-related diseases.

    In essence your post boils down to "smoking also kills people, so any drugs are okay as long as smoking exists".

    Your argument is ultimately reductionist, because once smoking is removed it will be alcohol, and once alcohol is removed it will be driving, and once driving is removed you'll excuse heroin peddlers because some people stumb their toes while walking.

    The flaw in your thinking is so common that it has a name, "Reductio ad absurdum", to reduce things to their most absurd logical conclusion. Rather than worrying about stubbed toes let's focus on removing the big evils first and working our way down to stubbed toes eventually, rather than allowing big evils to continue or doing nothing simply because some people stub their toes.

    Posted in: Indonesia warns foreign countries not to interfere over death sentences

  • 0

    Frungy

    FightingVikingFeb. 25, 2015 - 11:33AM JST I know you're a professional medical but give the robot a little time to perfect it's performance ! It takes several years (at least seven in France) to become a doctor (as I'm sure you know) "Polar Bear nurses" also need training ! I'm sure the human nurses are going to be very happy not to have to lift heavy weights anymore !

    Fair enough, which is why I wrote it wasn't a solution "at this stage".

    The problems are structural, no amount of programming/training will change the fact that it doesn't have the dexterity or range of arm movement required to put on the sling itself, nor will programming/training change the fact that it needs constant supervision.

    At this stage it isn't really offering anything that couldn't be achieved by a bed that moves itself around. In fact it would be safer for patients to just alter the beds to take them to the bath and transform into a wheelchair (there are already beds that do this).

    This robot doesn't do anything that isn't currently available more cheaply, more safely and more effectively.

    Posted in: Robear: Strength of a robot, face of a bear

  • -2

    Frungy

    ReformedBasherFeb. 25, 2015 - 08:26AM JST Are you suggesting teaching the current group of elderly/infirm/handicapped English overnight?

    Two points here:

    1. Have you spoken to any elderly people lately? Their Japanese is completely different from what you learn in your textbooks, full of regional dialect, phrases that have gone out of fashion and passing the JLPT N1 wouldn't equip you to understand more than half of what they say.

    2. Do you even understand what is in the test? It is almost entirely highly technical medical Japanese, which has ZERO cross-over with the Japanese used by patients. It is useful only for speaking to Japanese doctors, who do understand regular Japanese and most speak English.

    There is no reason that the main portion of the test shouldn't be in English, with two smaller sections on Japanese ability entitled "Reporting to doctors" and "Speaking to patients" where they cover the Japanese specifically required for interactions with patients and doctors. Making the entire test in Japanese is... well, it requires Japanese skills well in excess of JLPT N1.

    Posted in: Indonesian, Filipino nurses to be allowed to stay extra year to pass exam

  • 1

    Frungy

    I attended a demo of one of these caregiver robots a few weeks ago and they're more work than they save. It took more than an hour to get it set up, and it still needed to be accompanied the whole way by human because it doesn't have the flexibility or dexterity to put on or remove the sling it uses to carry patients (you can just see it in the picture), nor to hold patients securely if they move.

    It might save a nurse some heavy lifting, but it is not a real solution at this stage, nor will it be until these robots have full human range of movement.

    Posted in: Robear: Strength of a robot, face of a bear

  • 2

    Frungy

    soukaFeb. 25, 2015 - 10:34AM JST The problem can slowly grow as the secret law already in place.

    I agree. I'd be nervous as a journalist too if anything I published could land me in prison with no warning because it concerned a secret I didn't know was a secret.

    And how do journalists confirm if something is a secret? Does the editor phone the government and ask, and if they get the answer, "We can't talk about that" then that's confirmation it is a secret?

    Posted in: Japanese media self-censorship grows under Abe

  • 0

    Frungy

    Is this a tragedy? Undeniably.

    Is it inhumane? No more so than the hundreds of thousands of girls (some younger than 10) who are prostituted in Nigeria on a daily basis, but you don't see them making headlines.

    Should we do something about it? Yes. Trade with Nigeria, establish legitimate businesses paying real wages, bring them into the economic mainstream and through this trade and business give the government enough money to establish a proper police force and anti-terrorism unit.

    The U.S.A. flying in, killing some terrorists and in the process killing a lot more innocent civilians and devastating what little infrastructure and business they have will just make things 1000 times worse. The problem here is money, and the solution is money and business.

    The simple problem is that right now the Nigerian government has neither the money nor the political will to deal with terrorism. More business = more money = more politicians money that they want to protect = end of terrorism in the region. It is simple self-interest.

    Posted in: 10-year-old suicide bomber kills 5 in Nigerian market

  • -1

    Frungy

    Before you get too upset about these executions, pause to think for a moment how many people that heroin would have killed or addicted.

    A firing squad is a quick, clean death. A lot quicker and cleaner than heroin addiction, the shattered lives of friends and families, and the eventual slow and painful death from overdose.

    Frankly I don't have a big problem with 11 people being killed by Indonesia... not when a quarter of a million people die every year from illegal drug overdoses, drugs supplied by people like these 11.

    Posted in: Indonesia warns foreign countries not to interfere over death sentences

  • -1

    Frungy

    Prime Minister Abe and the LDP don’t like the idea of same-sex marriage

    And this is why the judiciary should be independent of politics. Constitutions are important precisely because they protect minorities, but if the interpretation of the constitution can be overruled by politicians representing the majority then they're not doing their job.

    The best decisions to ever come out of the U.S. Supreme Court where when the Chief Judge and the President actively hated each other.

    Posted in: The constitution does not rule out same-sex marriage, so an interpretation can be made that it is constitutional. Prime Minister Abe and the LDP don’t like the idea of same-sex marriage, but at the same time the issue is gaining momentum.

  • 6

    Frungy

    I'm glad to see these sort of cases making headlines soon after the incident when people can actually help and might remember something. Good move JT!

    Posted in: 16 year-old girl reported missing in Aichi

  • -1

    Frungy

    ClippetyClopFeb. 24, 2015 - 01:18PM JST Then I suggest we do away with corners too. Incompetent driving shouldn't get in the way of progress. Roundabouts are a proven way of easing traffic congestion. The answer in Japan still seems to be more traffic lights and more constricted lanes.

    What you fail to grasp is that roundabouts need a lot of space - something that is in short supply in Japan. As a result when they do build roundabouts in Japan you tend to need to turn very sharply because they're much smaller.

    This isn't a question of incompetent drivers, this is the simple reality of combining very sharp turns with ice on the ground. The two simply do not mix.

    If you have a problem with the physics of the universe then I'd suggest you take it up with God rather than trying to blame drivers.

    Posted in: LED traffic lights too cool for snowy Aomori

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