Frungy's past comments

  • 3

    Frungy

    Himajin. Thank you for your post.

    It may surprise you to know that I don't entirely disagree with the moral relativist standpoint. I do think it is important to try and take into account variables such as the local culture, the individual's culture, etc, and understand WHY they thought it was justifiable.

    Where I disagree with moral relativists is that I don't think that these factors alter the fundamental morality of the act, they merely help us to understand the nature of the problem and the psychology of the individual.

    Posted in: If you found a large sum of money in a secluded spot, would you keep it or hand it in to the police?

  • 0

    Frungy

    I too call on Japan to stop scrambling aircraft... Instead just paint them with radar and announce that they have X minutes to leave Japanese airspace and then launch.

    At the end of the day China is just going to continue this endlessly because it costs Japan more to scramble their high tech Jets than it does for China to send out its Soviet era rust buckets. In effect Japan loses more money each time they scramble. If China doesn't desist then equalize the equation by shooting down their planes. One at a time if necessary. Ideally downing them in a way that doesn't kill the pilot would be best, but that is rarely practical.

    In short, call China's bluff. They probably would only need to do it once.

    Posted in: China calls on Japan to end jet scrambles

  • -1

    Frungy

    Mike O'BrienOct. 30, 2014 - 08:14PM JST

    Actually you did, with the line

    Actually I didn't, as your nice quote shows no mention of paper or pencil. I didn't presuppose anything, you jump to an assumptioin that allowed you to prop up your contention. Classic strawman.

    Bull. You're reaching here. You explicitly stated that voting was too time-consuming for regular citizens. I proposed a model that overcome the time constraints traditionally associated with voting. That isn't a strawman, that's point and rebuttal.

    Your naive belief that politicians don't routinely accept inducements in order to vote a certain way. And where did I do that? Oh wait I didn't, just another assumption so you could whing.

    You stated, "Of course, because the only way someone can do something you disagree with is if they are paid off."

    This statement clearly indicates that you believe that being paid off is not a routine part of modern democracies. It is. My point stands.

    It worked fantastically

    which is rule of the people (even the ignorant and stupid) by the people for the people.

    So rule by stupidity and ignorance is your defintion of worked fantastically. Well no wonder your perceptions of reality seem so skewed.

    It works well enough to elect those representatives you have such faith in, but suddenly you have no confidence in it when citizens can vote on all issues? Yeah, right.

    But it is their job to try and get the information needed to make those decisions.

    Show me this mystical job description you refer to. Most democracies have to put in place rules to ensure that elected representatives arrive to meetings, never mind having done the pre-reading. And if your belief that they had done the necessary research was true then please explain why elected representatives normally vote along party lines, instead of actually voting as their research indicates.

    Your theory is full of bull.

    Of course it doesn't work perfectly but better to have a small group trying to make informed decisions than millions making clueless guesses.

    "Doesn't work perfectly"? The understatement of the century.

    And research has shown that millions of "clueless guesses" is actually the right way to go. Did you ever watch, "The Weakest Link" or similar game shows? Most of the time the studio audience (some of whom were homeless people paid to sit there) got the right answer more reliably than most of the heavily prepared participants.

    Posted in: Kyushu town approves nuclear reactor restart

  • -4

    Frungy

    Mike O'BrienOct. 29, 2014 - 09:18PM JST

    Anyone who honestly buys the need for paper and pencil voting in this day and age is a bigger fool than they have any right to be.

    And nobody here advocated that, but nice strawman.

    Actually you did, with the line, "If every issue required a referendum people would spend much of every day voting on one thing or another.".

    You presupposed paper and pencil voting, or at minimum people standing around in a hall. I correctly pointed out that technology could bypass those issues.

    Clearly we can add the term "strawman" to the list of things you don't understand.

    And don't give me fearmongering about hackers

    Another strawman.

    Nope, it is preempting a common fear about electronic voting. Again, check the meaning of words before you use them in order to avoid embarrassment.

    What is ironic is that clearly YOU are the one who doesn't understand.

    Really? And what brought YOU to that epiphany?

    Your naive belief that politicians don't routinely accept inducements in order to vote a certain way.

    The voters elect 'representatives' who meet to vote on laws/issues affecting the voters. I never said there weren't abuses. Of course those abuses can come from everywhere not just the groups you don't like. Again we seem to be back to your apparent belief that your opponents are always wrong and corrupt or they would think like you.

    Now THIS is a straw man argument.

    I made a statement that they should check the politicians' accounts. You then misrepresented this statement as me believing that ONLY people who I disagreed with accepted bribes, and proceeded to attack your misrepresentation.

    That's a textbook straw man argument.

    It worked fantastically

    Really? So all the voters spent the time to understand every issue and cast an informed vote about it while still carrying on their normal lives?

    Hell no, they just voted how they felt on the issue. However it was real democracy, which is rule of the people (even the ignorant and stupid) by the people for the people.

    What we have now is rule of the people (by the rich and powerful through bribes) by elected career politicians for the benefit of the rich, powerful and the careers of the elected politicians.

    All in all I prefer allowing the idiots to vote (which is hopefully cancelled out by the genius' votes) and take the average result than trusting in career politicians.

    Personnally making a living doesn't leave me enough time to be in expert in the intricacies of all the major issues. Just like I don't have the time to be an expert in car repair and HVAC repair and plumbing and electrical wiring and medicine and a whole host of other things, so I hire experts in those fields.

    Well done, you admit your limitations. Now kindly extend that same thinking to politicians, who generally have only a basic degree, yet are asked to vote on complex issues like economic reforms, health care, and ... yes, the complexities of nuclear physics, geology and disaster management.

    They clearly don't understand the issue any better than you do. And they were elected by a process that amounts to a glorified popularity contest, so the only qualification that they do have that we can be vaguely sure of is that they're popular people... or have enough money to buy the appearance of popularity.

    Personally I'd rather trust the people, and more than 50% of them in this area DID NOT want nuclear power turned back on. That's democracy. Over ruling the will of the people is nothing short of fascism.

    Posted in: Kyushu town approves nuclear reactor restart

  • 0

    Frungy

    Fox Sora WintersOct. 29, 2014 - 08:49AM JST @frungy Is it lonely up there on your pedastal?

    Nope, I apparently have to share it with over 50% of the JT readers.

    You proposed the scenario of a Dementia sufferer leaving the money. How many Dementia sufferers have access to what one would consider a "large sum of money" (say £50,000)?

    5 million yen? Most elderly people in Japan have that much cash in their account to pay for their funeral and other expenses.

    How many of those would be able to gather that much cash in hand over the course of their Dementia?

    Many elderly people in Japan keep their "funeral money" at home, because they know their accounts may be temporarily inaccessible when they die, and they don't want the shame of burdening their relatives with their funeral costs in the interim. If you had any elderly friends in Japan you'd know this.

    How many of those would be able to leave it in a secluded area (say, wedged in the fissure of a boulder by a river)?

    How many carry it around with them and might drop it? Well, 5 million yen is about 500 x 10 000yen notes. A large wad of cash for a wallet, but easily carried around in a handbag or a briefcase.... precisely the sort of thing that an elderly person out on a stroll by the rive might put down and forget about.

    Your hypothesis appears to be rapidly falling apart with each question I ask.

    No, it doesn't. The only thing that is becoming increasingly clear is your lack of knowledge about how little 5 million yen weighs.

    Why is this hypothetical Dementia patient not in the care of a trained medical professional?

    Because there's a chronic shortage of medical staff in Japan, and most elderly people are left to the care of their families. And with Abenomics on the rise and women being pressured to work that means that there are less full-time caregivers in the home. Wow... you really don't know a thing about Japan, do you?

    What bank would allow a Dementia patient to draw out tens of thousands?

    The can't refuse them. If they have their book and hanko there is literally nothing the bank can do legally. In Japan you do NOT have your parents registered as financially incompetent, the shame would be incredible.

    But as I pointed out, most of them do not need to go to a bank.

    What more do I need to say to explain that your theory is not only entirely improbable but completely absurd?

    What is absurd here is you attempting to justify your illegal actions.

    I'd also like for you to take a look around you, at the real world. Morals and ethics have been dwindling for decades. It is nothing new, or even shocking any more.

    Erm... no. There are morals and ethics. There is right and wrong. That YOU cannot see them is your issue. Don't assume everyone shares your lack of morals.

    However, there is a social stigma in admiting to something like this. I'd wager that many of those who claim they would turn the money in, are in fact being dishonest, in order to avoid being attacked and criticized.

    Perhaps, but there are also solid logical reasons for following the laws in this case.

    It is these people you have to be most careful of. An honest person you can trust to be honest, but the only thing you can count on about a dishonest person, is that they are dishonest. They will lie, deceive, steal, and do whatever they please while maintaining a facade of innocence.

    So by your logic, by being honest about your dishonestly you're better than most dishonest people? ... but that still makes you worse than an honest person.

    Mark my words, the next time someone steals your forgotten wallet, it'll be by someone who claims they'd turn the money in. Yeah, turn it in to their bank account. That's the reality of the world. It seems harsh at first, but you get used to it. I know I did.

    I've lost my wallet twice in Japan.

    Once I fell into a rice paddy in winter when I slipped on some ice. The next day a school kid turned up at my door with my wallet, with all my soggy money inside. I gave him all 2000yen in the wallet (I don't carry a lot of cash), and was incredibly grateful because I got my cards and stuff back.

    The other time it fell out of my bag somewhere on the trains. I waited for 2 days, and then the next time I took the train the guy at the ticket office gave it back to me. Apparently it had sitting under the seat in the train for 2 days and nobody touched it. Once again all the money was in the wallet (this time about 5000yen). I offered the ticket guy 2000 yen in thanks and he refused because his job doesn't allow gifts... so I bought him some snacks next time, which was apparently acceptable.

    The majority of people are good. You're in the minority.

    Posted in: If you found a large sum of money in a secluded spot, would you keep it or hand it in to the police?

  • -3

    Frungy

    Mike O'BrienOct. 29, 2014 - 07:34PM JST

    Now audit the town assembly members' bank accounts.... any mysterious "donations" suddenly show up in their campaign funds or personal accounts?

    Of course, because the only way someone can do something you disagree with is if they are paid off.

    Doesn't matter if I agree or disagree, this is how modern democracies work. Of course some countries are more sophisticated, like the US where "lobby groups" ensure that politicians' campaign funds remain topped up, have a hotline for free tickets paid for by an oil company, etc.

    And it amazes me how many people don't understand how a representative democracy works.

    Yes, it is amazing. What is ironic is that clearly YOU are the one who doesn't understand.

    If every issue required a referendum people would spend much of every day voting on one thing or another.

    Bull. France piloted a system back in the 1970's that allowed citizens to vote from their homes quickly and easily every morning or evening. It worked fantastically, but the politicians axed the project... because of mysterious technical issues that were never fully explained.

    With modern technology and encryption the need for pencil and paper ballots has long since passed, and we SHOULD be voting on every important issue. And don't give me fearmongering about hackers... banks transfer TRILLIONS every day, enough to crash every economy on the planet, and they do it all electronically with commercial-grade software. If you can safely transfer your cash around the place then you should be able to safely vote on everything important to your life.

    Anyone who honestly buys the need for paper and pencil voting in this day and age is a bigger fool than they have any right to be.

    Posted in: Kyushu town approves nuclear reactor restart

  • 7

    Frungy

    Now audit the town assembly members' bank accounts.... any mysterious "donations" suddenly show up in their campaign funds or personal accounts?

    Posted in: Kyushu town approves nuclear reactor restart

  • -2

    Frungy

    Hang on a second here. Nomura says his health was bad... where's his side of the story? Did the reporter even investigate this reference?

    I mean, if Nomura rented the car for 3 hours, but then on the second hour he collapsed with a heart-attack and was admitted to hospital then I can understand that a man on death's door might not remember to say to the paramedics, "Oh, and please return my car to the rental agency". After a lengthy stay in hospital it may just have skipped his mind completely.

    If it was this sort of situation then I think it would be only reasonable for the car rental company to come to some sort of arrangement with Nomura in the name of simple human compassion.

    So once again, where is Nomura's side of the story? Were his claims of physical problems just an excuse, or where they a legitimate medical emergency?

    Posted in: Man with 3-hour car rental agreement keeps car for 6 weeks

  • 3

    Frungy

    More Americans than in the last 2012 survey favored building relations with traditional allies like Japan and South Korea, even if that means diminishing relations China.

    And all of this doesn't matter a brass tack because at the end of the day US business owners simply as, "Where can we get the products we want cheapest?". Low quality is now a selling point, just look at Apple's lousy cables. They break all the time, consumers complain and Apple twirls its moustache and laughs, because they know that rather than spend 50 000yen on another smartphone we'll go out and buy a new 2000 yen cable. Cables that cost about 100yen to make probably earn Apple more profit than anything else.

    For so long as we consume Chinese products all this media posturing is just that, posturing. The current "war" is economic, and we're all happily handing China the ammunition it needs while saying, "You really are naughty though... here, have some more bullets/money".

    Posted in: Japan’s PR battle for U.S. hearts and minds

  • -7

    Frungy

    hidingoutOct. 28, 2014 - 10:43AM JST Demonstrably false. Again and again the US has said that they will honor their security agreements with Japan (in spite of the fact that Japan has proved to be a most ungrateful partner. When Obama visited Japan he said clearly and unequivocally ... “Let me reiterate that our treaty commitment to Japan’s security is absolute, and Article 5 covers all territories under Japan’s administration, including the Senkaku islands.”

    Words are cheap. When the Fukushima happened the US forces stayed 80kms outside the danger zone. When Chinese fighters made fly-overs of the Senkaku islands the US did nothing. In fact it was that very doing nothing that prompted Obama's puff of hot air.

    And that's where the ambiguity lies. The US is fine talking tough, but when it comes to putting US citizens into any sort of danger to defend Japan the tough talk disappears, and the US forces stay well away.

    Please read the odd newspaper before making unfounded and foolish claims. The USA honors her security agreements.

    You're clearly reading some very, very odd newspapers if you believe the US would actually put US citizens in harms way to defend an ally who you yourself characterise as "ungrateful". The US propaganda machine is already laying down the groundwork for the excuses when the US reneges on its security agreement... while ignoring the actual agreement, which REQUIRED Japan to not have a military and to not engage in warfare, and just to pay protection money.

    scipantheistOct. 28, 2014 - 02:00PM JST Another record downvote for you, Frungy.

    You think I care? I don't. Down vote away. The truth is the truth no matter how many times you down vote it. All it demonstrates is the degree to which so many people have been brainwashed.

    My understanding was the US offered a ton of help during the Fukushima crises

    Help? I never denied that they offered help. But then so did many other countries that hadn't been paying the US $2 billion a year. The point was that they US refused to put any of their soldiers in harms way. And that's what they'd be required to do in the case of a real military emergency. They've never done it and never will, for the simple reason that the American public would never tolerate US soldiers dying in defense of some other country... unless US citizens died first.

    And that's the only real protection that the US offers Japan, and it doesn't need a military presence. Just the presence of US citizens in Japan guarantees that if China strikes a city in Japan and US citizens die then the US will be able to justify their reprisals to the US general public.

    Posted in: What’s difficult for Japan is that the alliance with the U.S. is the centerpiece of its security policy. How can Japan maintain this alongside relations with Russia? This is an extremely important problem for Prime Minister Abe now.

  • -15

    Frungy

    What precisely does the USA contribute to Japan's security?

    Again and again the US has been decidedly ambiguous about what it will do if China actually does anything (not that I think this will happen), but the smart money is that if China actually does something then the US reaction will be like Fukushima, they'll pull back and decide it is a "Japanese" problem.

    And the US presence in Japan costs Japan a FORTUNE every year. $2 billion in direct payments, plus a whole lot of backhanders like oil for US ships, maintenance costs for bases, etc.

    From an outside perspective it seems like Japan is paying through the nose for nothing, and when there is an actual emergency the response is half-hearted at best.

    Posted in: What’s difficult for Japan is that the alliance with the U.S. is the centerpiece of its security policy. How can Japan maintain this alongside relations with Russia? This is an extremely important problem for Prime Minister Abe now.

  • 1

    Frungy

    Fox Sora WintersOct. 27, 2014 - 09:46PM JST I'd most likely keep it. Times are tough, wages are poor, taxes are too high. Little boost to my nest egg, why not?

    Because it might be someone else's entire nest egg?

    A large sum of money doesn't just get randomly left lying around in broad daylight, somewhere public. The money itself would be suspicious no matter how you look at it, most likely being used in some criminal dealing.

    Or it could be some dementia-suffering old person's entire life-savings.

    Stealing from a thief isn't really stealing, and I can put it to better use than buying drugs or underage girls or whatever the hell's being sold by gangs.

    ... no, stealing is always stealing. That's why it is called stealing. Even if it was that proceeds of crime you'd still be stealing it. That money might more rightly belong to the victims of those crimes.

    There's no way it'd be left by an honest person making an honest mistake.

    Yes, there is. I proposed one very possible scenario, that a dementia-suffering old person put it there as a "safe place" in their somewhat confused state.

    I think you may need to attend one of those "morality classes" they're proposing for elementary schoolers Fox, because your moral compass is pointing the wrong way.

    Posted in: If you found a large sum of money in a secluded spot, would you keep it or hand it in to the police?

  • 0

    Frungy

    Good point Cleo. Bank robbers are unlikely to find you, but if those were sequential notes from a bank or ATM robbery and you were caught with the you'd have a very hard time convincing the J-cops to ONLY charge you with not reporting lost property. You could be facing much more serious charges.

    Frankly though I'm shocked how many JT readers would steal.

    Posted in: If you found a large sum of money in a secluded spot, would you keep it or hand it in to the police?

  • -3

    Frungy

    What the article is calling for is more funding to study the problem and find solutions. What I'm seeing in the comments here is a mass of shrugging and "I can't fix it so it can't be fixed"

    If this was someone motivating for funding for Ebola research (about as likely as a mass volcanic eruption) you'd all be for it. But because it is much bigger and you don't understand you're just shrugging and denying that anything needs to be done.

    Give the geologists their funding and let them work on it for 50 years and they'll find a solution.

    Posted in: Colossal volcanic eruption could destroy Japan: study

  • -2

    Frungy

    Unless they plan to send the entire Tokyo Diet back to elementary school for a refresher course I don't see this improving things much.

    Posted in: Officially certified textbooks should be introduced to improve moral education, which is important to prepare children for social life.

  • 3

    Frungy

    I'd hand it in. Not for moral reasons purely, but also for logical ones.

    Let's say its 8 million yen stuffed inside a discarded old futon. 8 million yen sounds like a lot, but when you balance it against the risk of legal fees, being fired and being permanently unemployable thereafter it becomes a lot less attractive.

    ... especially when there's a much lower risk way to get the money. Merely hand it in at a koban and wait 3~6 months and you get it all if it isn't claimed. In 2004 a trash collector got 24 million yen this way.

    Risk-wise I'd say that keeping the money would be highly risky when lower risk alternatives exist with the same return.

    Its just common sense, and a tiny bit of impulse control.

    Posted in: If you found a large sum of money in a secluded spot, would you keep it or hand it in to the police?

  • -5

    Frungy

    nigelboyOct. 26, 2014 - 02:56PM JST Sorry. I don't think is a credible threat.

    Okay. Fair enough. You're entitled to your opinion. My opinion is that it is a credible threat. I don't think either of our comments on Japan Today will really influence the Japanese NRA, so I think we'll just have to agree to disagree.

    Posted in: Agency warns of increased activity at volcano near nuclear plant

  • 2

    Frungy

    What everyone seems to miss is that the nurse wasn't complaining about the quarantine itself, she was complaining about the manner in which it was imposed and the conditions she had to live in.

    There's a huge difference between kidnapping someone at the airport and imprisoning them in a tent for weeks on end without information, and showing a little humanity by having a doctor meet her, discuss the reasons and duration for the quarantine, put them in a comfortable pre-fabricated home with furniture that can be easily sterilized, with a cheap throw-away laptop, internet connection and the menus from a dozen take-out places taped to the wall, with an invitation to order whatever they want (and this makes a LOT more sense than it seems - fast food containers are generally designed to be incinerated and they can be delivered safely through an "air lock" system).

    Under the first conditions (kidnapping and imprisonment) 21 days full of uncertainty is an eternity. Under the second set of conditions 21 days of catching up on emails, browsing the net and eating fast food...well, that's some people's idea of paradise and the time flies past.

    Posted in: U.S. nurse quarantined over Ebola criticizes her treatment

  • -5

    Frungy

    nigelboyOct. 26, 2014 - 12:51AM JST

    And the last major volcanic eruption in Iceland spread ash for literally thousands of miles.

    So again, how does this affect the 62 KM apart NPP?

    Your question is so ambiguous that I cannot tell if you are asking:

    • What are the physical effects on the NNP likely to be? (see my post Oct. 25, 2014 - 11:00AM JST , second paragraph)

    • How much worse will those effect be 62kms away rather than 1300+kms away? Much, much worse.

    ... I could go on, but since you haven't even bothered to write your question clearly I don't see why I should bother to try and read your mind. If you're interested in an answer then phrase your question clearly.

    If you're just expressing your doubt that there is a credible risk then don't phrase your post as a question.

    Posted in: Agency warns of increased activity at volcano near nuclear plant

  • -4

    Frungy

    hokkaidoguyOct. 25, 2014 - 08:12PM JST And what was the effect of that massive ash cloud on the 70 or so nuclear plants operating in Europe?

    ... you do realise that Iceland is more than a 1000 kilometers from the UK, don't you? The ash that fell was minor at that distance, but it was serious enough that a group of 25 academics at the University of Bristol is studying the effects and preparing modifications and contingency plans (http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cabot/news/2014/536.html).

    So perhaps you think I'm some sort of tinfoil hat alarmist, but when 25 academics think a volcanic eruption is a credible threat 1300+ kilometers away then I think I'm on the right side of the debate I raise concerns about some trying to operate a nuclear reactor that is already past its "best before" date just 62 kilometers away from a cluster of active volcanoes.

    Of course it is difficult to get information on the impact as a civilian, just imagine the panic in the UK is the people were informed, "Oh, yeah, in top of airplanes nearly falling out of the sky we also nearly had a nuclear incident.". But the fact that the government are funding those 25 academics in Bristol to study the problem suggests that it is a serious and credible risk at a distance of 1300+ kilometers... 62 kilometers away -- well, you'd have to be insane and/or an idiot to engage in the sort of hand-waving "Oh, we've got this" attitude that the Japanese NRA is exhibiting.

    Posted in: Agency warns of increased activity at volcano near nuclear plant

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