HollisBrown's past comments

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    She probably didn't notice because she was glued to her phone.

    Posted in: Woman arrested for pocketing change given to her by mistake

  • 4

    HollisBrown

    Just another example of Japan not really knowing how to handle mental illness.

    Posted in: Nagoya 'rubbish house' resident may boast mother of all messes

  • 6

    HollisBrown

    These campaigns are largely pointless. Rather than have a dozen old people in hi-vis jackets standing around intersections holding signs requesting that drivers slow down and passengers wear seatbelts etc, for a few days in May, may I suggest that they place hard hitting 'commercials' on TV, sandwiched between the most popular programs each night.

    I saw a woman flying through an orange/red light in a huge people carrier this afternoon with 2 - yes 2 - young children standing up on the passenger seat and leaning forward on the dashboard.

    This woman needs to see what will happen if her luck runs out.

    Old people holding signs won't change this woman's behaviour. There's no excuse for not having some hard hitting, graphic, traffic safety announcements on TV.

    Posted in: Spring traffic safety campaign begins nationwide

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    Confusing the accelerator for the brake is not the main cause of these accidents. The main cause is the car is in drive and not reverse.

    My theory on this is that Japanese people are overly conditioned to reverse parking - yet park nose first almost exclusively at convenience stores.

    When it comes to leaving, people are not used to putting the car into reverse and just automatically select drive.

    Looking backwards the driver doesn't notice motion in the way s/he expects and so gives it more gas and/or panics.

    One solution is for people to mix up how they park in other places ie nose first and reverse parking - which will ensure they have to think more when leaving.

    Another solution is to remove back monitors from the dashboard, as many people no longer physically turn round and look through the back window when reversing - which would be another part of a learned process of putting the car into reverse and not drive.

    Posted in: Man accidentally drives car into convenience store

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    "A huge number of over 65s who are in positions of management, governance, and amakudari are nothing more than poison to the intelligence, personality and creativity of youngsters." - Hollis Brown 4/10/15

    Posted in: Smartphones are nothing more than poison to intelligence, personality and creativity.

  • 7

    HollisBrown

    I live in a small 'city' of just under 30,000, and the city office has 3 official characters. I'd say it beggars belief but considering the other ridiculous wastes of tax money, and ill thought out projects and schemes I've seen in the last 15 years, it really doesn't.

    Posted in: Japan's mascots face cull or combination

  • 11

    HollisBrown

    The behavior of the photographers is absolutely disgusting. Just how many frames do they need.

    No idea why this needs doing in a news conference. Has the ex-husband done a news conference? It sounds like the break up was mainly due to his extra-curricular activities.

    Posted in: 'Talent' Suzanne announces divorce

  • 1

    HollisBrown

    Does anyone know if this watch works by GPS signals and radio wave time-calibration?

    Posted in: G-SHOCK MR-G watch

  • -2

    HollisBrown

    If you have Japanese nationality, that's it, you're Japanese and who your parents are doesn't matter.

    Right.

    So why the need to use the term 'haafu'?

    It's ironic that you can only be 'haafu' if you are in fact Japanese. Take the nationality of the other parent, and you'd be called a foreigner, America jin, etc.

    As I was trying to point out before, I could understand it if the term was being used in relation to a non-Japanese national who had a Japanese parent. But for Japanese nationals, I do find it rather ignorant.

    'Haafu-American', 'haafu-Nigerian' etc. and we'd be closer to a term that is a little more respectable (IMO!) - however that term would imply the person held dual nationality - which again ironically is something Japan doesn't allow. Therefore it should be Japanese, or non-Japanese - and none of this 'haafu' way house.

    Posted in: 'Haafu' to represent Japan at Miss Universe 2015

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    I hate the term 'haafu'.

    I find it quite revealing that it's an important point of reference when reporting on such people. Why is it necessary to point out that a person doesn't have 2 Japanese parents when said person is a Japanese citizen?

    I can kind of understand a desire to make reference to it if it was the other way round - as and when such people make the news in Japan - but I rarely hear it (e.g. Sean Lennon, George Takei, Bryan Clay - non Japanese nationals, with one or more Japanese parent). This in itself brings up an interesting web of logic.

    1.George Takei, born in America to two Japanese parents - he is 100% Japanese in everything except his passport. Would he be called 'haafu'? If not, is there a special word for him? Are his kids 'haafu'?

    2.Seiji Ozawa, the famous Japanese conductor - born to two Japanese parents in China, and lived there until 9 years old. Certainly not 'haafu', but this shows that being born overseas doesn't mean someone is less Japanese. It's never referred to, and rightly so, that he was born and raised in China i.e. implying he is less Japanese than someone who was actually born here.

    3.Is Sean Lennon 'haafu'? He should be because one of his parents is Japanese. I expect not though because he's an American citizen (born in New York). If he'd have taken his mother's nationality, would he have then become a 'haafu'?

    4.If Ariana Miyamoto, or Becky, or another 'haafu' marries a Japanese man and has a child, is this child a 'haafu', or a 'kuota-', or does the mother simply revert to being Japanese when bearing kids so the child is just 'Japanese'?

    There are of course cases when the term 'haafu' is never used - see Wada Akiko, born Kim Bok-Ja (Korean father, Japanese mother). The only reason I can come up with as to why she's never refered to as 'haafu', or in fact why her mixed parentage is never brought up, is that she isn't 'cute', and she's 'old' (i.e. of a generation which that sort of thing isn't discussed).

    How many people actually know this about Wada Akiko? Ask your Japanese family and friends - not many. Therefore it's not important, and it's not a piece of information that needs inserting every time a Japanese national with mixed parentage makes the news.

    Posted in: 'Haafu' to represent Japan at Miss Universe 2015

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    Makes no sense whatsoever. What is the long-term plan JFA?

    Posted in: Japan hires Halilhodzic as new national soccer coach

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    I wonder if this person also offers etiquette advice to corporations about how best to make employees redundant. Lets face it, there are a lot of HR departments out there who don't give two for how they treat soon to be axed employees.

    Posted in: Modern etiquette: Proper protocol when leaving a job

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    I think 100 people each giving 10,000 is the least of the corruption worries!

    I'm fairly confident that there will be big corporations out there finding ways to funnel funds in exchange for favors. It's strange that it's often these small cases that bring people down here.

    Posted in: Education minister denies receiving illegal funds

  • 1

    HollisBrown

    These people will either be 'yes men' or 'ignored'!

    Many world leaders will have speech writers - and that is essentially what this is - so I haven't got a problem with that.

    My issue with this is that due to the fact Abe is a politician, his speech will be laced with 'politics'. I don't really understand what this will achieve besides further aggravation, especially on a more focused anniversary.

    Surely it would be a lot more meaningful and constructive for the Emperor or his son (who spoke intelligently about the issue earlier in the week) to make 'the' speech, or 'a' speech with Abe standing beside him, and maybe offering a few words of his own.

    Posted in: Panel meets to discuss Abe’s speech for anniversary of WWII end

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    As stated a few weeks ago - totally unnecessary and simply illogical.

    It would have made much more sense to have deployed the officers on bicycles. The same number of officers doing 20km each on bicycles instead of 10km on foot would have effectively doubled the 'security'.

    And what on earth is 'anti-terrorism gear'??

    I can state with 99% certainty that having these officers run made no difference whatsoever to the safety of any of the runners.

    Posted in: Running police keep the peace at Tokyo Marathon

  • 4

    HollisBrown

    And now he is telling decent people who follow Islam they must Do something about the terrorists, implying somehow decent Islamic people are purposely doing nothing, implying further they may accept what the terrorists are doing.

    This is quite important in my opinion.

    I think a significant number of older Muslims may generally 'understand' what ISIS is doing, even though they cannot openly 'accept' it or 'support' it.

    Why aren't they speaking up about it? Well, Its vital to understand the underlying theology of Islam. Muslims have been dreaming about a Caliphate that can unite the entire Muslim world and rule with strict Islamic code ever since the death of Muhammed. A caliphate is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. Besides uniting the Muslims, the goal is to arrange a massive army and call for Jihad against infidel states for the expansion of the Caliphate.

    This is all stated in the Quran, and preached by the Imams. It is not something that only the extremists believe in.

    The Quran also makes it very clear that those who resist Islamic rule are to be fought until they are either killed or fully humiliated and forced to acknowledge their inferior status by converting to Islam or by paying a poll-tax and otherwise accepting the subjugation of their own religion.

    So you can see the dilemma. How does a 'decent Muslim' know that current events aren't what Allah wants? With that in mind, to speak out in opposition could be seen to doubt one's belief. The way the Quran deals with unbelievers, it's not surprising that believers are unwilling to speak out against current events.

    The ideology is the battle that the world needs to start fighting. The problem becomes inflated when politics is factored in.

    The only way ISIS will be defeated is if other Muslims fight against it. This means a 'civil war' or an 'internal war' within Islam. This is already underway (and has been for centuries with Sunni vs Shia etc), and is taking shape in the Middle East with the Sunni countries of Qatar, Saudi, Bahrain, UAE etc looking to destroy the Shia led economies of Iran, Iraq and Syria. The obvious issue here is the conflict of interest for the US (interests and responsibilities in Iraq vs the Saudis who may or may not be funding ISIS). It is an official mess.

    So yes, I agree with Obama that 'decent' Muslims should be doing more because without trying to force a shift in ideology nothing will ever change - and the only people who can possibly force a shift in Islamic ideology are the Muslims themselves.

    Posted in: Obama says Muslims must fight 'twisted interpretations of Islam'

  • 1

    HollisBrown

    Which banks in Japan?

    Posted in: Over 100 banks hit by sophisticated cyberattack

  • -2

    HollisBrown

    (Re-post for clarity!)

    Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children Macnuggits

    The Cunnin' Lynguists

    Posted in: What do you think are some of the worst music group or band names ever?

  • -1

    HollisBrown

    Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children Macnuggits The Cunnin' Lynguists

    Posted in: What do you think are some of the worst music group or band names ever?

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    @wontond The debate is long past whether its right or not for non-Muslims to print such cartoons. I can see both sides of the argument with regards that. In our 'civilized societies' (UK, Holland, Denmark, France, Japan etc), we have laws that protect people from slander, hate crimes etc. and punishments for those who break them. We don't need these groups dishing out their own punishments and deterrents.

    The debate is now whether its acceptable for these Islamic groups to react in the way they do, claim offense even when living within non-Muslim societies, and demand that non-Muslim groups actually adhere to their Muslim belief system and as such have their non-Muslim beliefs suppressed.

    The irony here is that traditional Islamic law says that Muslims who live in non-Muslim societies must obey the law of the majority. Maybe the minority need reminding of this.

    I'm very willing to follow Islamic rules if I'm in an Islamic society, that goes without saying. However look at the history: Salman Rushdie in the UK, Theo Van Gogh in Holland, the Danish cartoons, Charlie Hebdo in Paris - there are probably more examples that slip my mind at the present time. The main argument against publishing such materials now is simply fear of violent reprisals. That, I contest, is wrong.

    Posted in: Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

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