HollisBrown's past comments

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    I wonder if this person also offers etiquette advice to corporations about how best to make employees redundant. Lets face it, there are a lot of HR departments out there who don't give two for how they treat soon to be axed employees.

    Posted in: Modern etiquette: Proper protocol when leaving a job

  • 3

    HollisBrown

    I think 100 people each giving 10,000 is the least of the corruption worries!

    I'm fairly confident that there will be big corporations out there finding ways to funnel funds in exchange for favors. It's strange that it's often these small cases that bring people down here.

    Posted in: Education minister denies receiving illegal funds

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    These people will either be 'yes men' or 'ignored'!

    Many world leaders will have speech writers - and that is essentially what this is - so I haven't got a problem with that.

    My issue with this is that due to the fact Abe is a politician, his speech will be laced with 'politics'. I don't really understand what this will achieve besides further aggravation, especially on a more focused anniversary.

    Surely it would be a lot more meaningful and constructive for the Emperor or his son (who spoke intelligently about the issue earlier in the week) to make 'the' speech, or 'a' speech with Abe standing beside him, and maybe offering a few words of his own.

    Posted in: Panel meets to discuss Abe’s speech for anniversary of WWII end

  • 3

    HollisBrown

    As stated a few weeks ago - totally unnecessary and simply illogical.

    It would have made much more sense to have deployed the officers on bicycles. The same number of officers doing 20km each on bicycles instead of 10km on foot would have effectively doubled the 'security'.

    And what on earth is 'anti-terrorism gear'??

    I can state with 99% certainty that having these officers run made no difference whatsoever to the safety of any of the runners.

    Posted in: Running police keep the peace at Tokyo Marathon

  • 5

    HollisBrown

    And now he is telling decent people who follow Islam they must Do something about the terrorists, implying somehow decent Islamic people are purposely doing nothing, implying further they may accept what the terrorists are doing.

    This is quite important in my opinion.

    I think a significant number of older Muslims may generally 'understand' what ISIS is doing, even though they cannot openly 'accept' it or 'support' it.

    Why aren't they speaking up about it? Well, Its vital to understand the underlying theology of Islam. Muslims have been dreaming about a Caliphate that can unite the entire Muslim world and rule with strict Islamic code ever since the death of Muhammed. A caliphate is the Islamic form of government representing the political unity and leadership of the Muslim world. Besides uniting the Muslims, the goal is to arrange a massive army and call for Jihad against infidel states for the expansion of the Caliphate.

    This is all stated in the Quran, and preached by the Imams. It is not something that only the extremists believe in.

    The Quran also makes it very clear that those who resist Islamic rule are to be fought until they are either killed or fully humiliated and forced to acknowledge their inferior status by converting to Islam or by paying a poll-tax and otherwise accepting the subjugation of their own religion.

    So you can see the dilemma. How does a 'decent Muslim' know that current events aren't what Allah wants? With that in mind, to speak out in opposition could be seen to doubt one's belief. The way the Quran deals with unbelievers, it's not surprising that believers are unwilling to speak out against current events.

    The ideology is the battle that the world needs to start fighting. The problem becomes inflated when politics is factored in.

    The only way ISIS will be defeated is if other Muslims fight against it. This means a 'civil war' or an 'internal war' within Islam. This is already underway (and has been for centuries with Sunni vs Shia etc), and is taking shape in the Middle East with the Sunni countries of Qatar, Saudi, Bahrain, UAE etc looking to destroy the Shia led economies of Iran, Iraq and Syria. The obvious issue here is the conflict of interest for the US (interests and responsibilities in Iraq vs the Saudis who may or may not be funding ISIS). It is an official mess.

    So yes, I agree with Obama that 'decent' Muslims should be doing more because without trying to force a shift in ideology nothing will ever change - and the only people who can possibly force a shift in Islamic ideology are the Muslims themselves.

    Posted in: Obama says Muslims must fight 'twisted interpretations of Islam'

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    Which banks in Japan?

    Posted in: Over 100 banks hit by sophisticated cyberattack

  • -2

    HollisBrown

    (Re-post for clarity!)

    1. Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children Macnuggits

    2. The Cunnin' Lynguists

    Posted in: What do you think are some of the worst music group or band names ever?

  • -1

    HollisBrown

    Bobby Joe Ebola and the Children Macnuggits The Cunnin' Lynguists

    Posted in: What do you think are some of the worst music group or band names ever?

  • 1

    HollisBrown

    @wontond The debate is long past whether its right or not for non-Muslims to print such cartoons. I can see both sides of the argument with regards that. In our 'civilized societies' (UK, Holland, Denmark, France, Japan etc), we have laws that protect people from slander, hate crimes etc. and punishments for those who break them. We don't need these groups dishing out their own punishments and deterrents.

    The debate is now whether its acceptable for these Islamic groups to react in the way they do, claim offense even when living within non-Muslim societies, and demand that non-Muslim groups actually adhere to their Muslim belief system and as such have their non-Muslim beliefs suppressed.

    The irony here is that traditional Islamic law says that Muslims who live in non-Muslim societies must obey the law of the majority. Maybe the minority need reminding of this.

    I'm very willing to follow Islamic rules if I'm in an Islamic society, that goes without saying. However look at the history: Salman Rushdie in the UK, Theo Van Gogh in Holland, the Danish cartoons, Charlie Hebdo in Paris - there are probably more examples that slip my mind at the present time. The main argument against publishing such materials now is simply fear of violent reprisals. That, I contest, is wrong.

    Posted in: Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

  • 3

    HollisBrown

    @wontond - RE: Civilized society and respecting other religions - You clearly know very little about the teachings of the Quran!

    Regarding your point 'They tell you not to do something and it makes you want to do it even more':

    Is this the culture Islam wants us to have in relation to it - one of preemptive submission and cowering backed by the fear of force? Do these people want to live in an open multicultural society because that isnt multiculturalism - in fact its the absolute opposite of what a multicultural system would be like.

    Taking offense over a cartoon, and going to the lengths of protesting, is largely pointless in my opinion when you consider that as non-believers we are all destined for hell anyway.

    @raf RE 'Lets mock and caricature those ISIS murderers' - The cartoons were designed to satirize and ridicule the fundamentalists who use their religion as an excuse to commit violent acts - so you have completely missed the point of them!

    Posted in: Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

  • 1

    HollisBrown

    Islamic groups throughout Japan spoke up in protest against the book saying - To print a book with depictions of Muhammads, blurred or not, is a direct affront to the religious beliefs of Islam. - They said freedom of expression should not be used as a reason for insulting ones religious beliefs.

    OK, if this book was published in the Middle East, or by a Pakistani company (for example), then I might agree with the quote above. However, last time I checked Japan wasn't an Islamic country and I'm quietly confident that Daisan Shokan isn't an Islamic company. Nobody has broken any 'rules' here. The Islamic groups that choose to live (continue living) in Japan need to understand that the rest of us 'non-believers' don't have to live by their 'rules' and belief systems.

    I know this kind of comment is often seen as being overly harsh, but I believe it's important. It's about time people stood up to these protests by saying quite firmly 'No'. Muslims don't have any more right to be offended than the rest of us.

    How often do we hear of non-muslims protesting about how Islamic preachers teach that Allah condemns all non-Muslims to Hell - how hateful is that? How about how the Quran refers to all non-believers as animals, beasts, cattle, and panting dogs? How dare their holy book say that Muhammad believed rats to be "mutated Jews".

    About 19% of the Quran is devoted to the violent conquest and subjugation of non-Muslims. Referring specifically to non-believers, one particular verse reads: 'Fight them, Allah will punish them by your hands and bring them to disgrace' (9:14).

    I could go on, but I won't. This is all hateful stuff, but we all pretty much ignore it, accept that people have a right to believe it, and get on with our lives.

    Posted in: Book containing Charlie Hebdo cartoons of Muhammad goes on sale

  • -1

  • 8

    HollisBrown

    What is the logic of having them running? Wouldn't it be more logical to have them on bicycles or motorbikes riding the edges of the course?

    Another tick on the 'create an atmosphere' list though I suppose - or should I say 'create an atmosfear'?.

    Posted in: 'Running police' to take part in Tokyo Marathon as security precaution

  • -1

    HollisBrown

    @theeastisred - I don't disagree with that!

    As long as a manager is succeeded by another manager who plays the game in a similar way then nationality and language isn't a huge issue. The JFA needs to decide how they want Japan to play football, and then select a coaching team who can implement those principles throughout the age groups.

    Without a continuity plan in place, there is no hope of sustained success.

    Hara is still Technical Director as far as I know. With his Spanish coaching education and playing philosophy, the JFA must appoint someone who shares that approach to the game - so I'll expect the next coach to have coached in La Liga, or South America.

    Or as a left-field choice then someone like Kazu - supported by coaches who have a Spanish / South American outlook on the game. Kazu actually started his career playing in Brazil, so he might very well be the perfect fit for the next 10 years.

    Posted in: Japan's players lament Aguirre's exit

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    @theeastisred - Sorry but I disagree. Exposure to knowledge and training methods can help yes, but the players get this day-in-day-out at their clubs.

    Successful national teams tend to have an identity and a style of play that is fairly consistent. I can't think of another country that aspires to be in the top 20 in the world that has had 7 coaches of 6 different nationalities and languages in the last 15 years.

    National team coaches don't have the time to 'coach' during the short and infrequent time they get with the group of players. Trying to install a brand new playing philosophy through translators (who are also different each time and don't know the players) every 2-3 years is ludicrous.

    Also, how do the national U21s and U18s play? Do they also change philosophy? If not, how are they expected to move up into the senior team during those 3 years - most young players play in Japan and aren't familiar with the national team's 'foreign' style of play. If they do change, it's clearly detrimental to change again 2 years later as those years - key to the development of the younger players - has been a total waste of time.

    The JFA needs a plan. It's OK going for high profile foreign coaches as long as the coaches they get in all play the same style of football. Troussier, Zico, Osim, Okada, Zaccheroni, and Aguirre all have very different approaches to the game. There is no logical plan of appointing these managers one after the other - and then firing them after 3 years.

    *Hara was the 7th and ironically would have been a decent choice of continuing on after Okada. He'd been technical director during Okada's time as coach, he'd worked with the younger upcoming players, he was made interim coach when Okada left and won 2 out of 2. As a coach he went to study in Spain and implemented a Spanish mentality at Urawa and FC Tokyo for 15+ years as a coach...and then the JFA went and appointed Zaccheroni a defensive minded Italian with a style very much removed from the Spanish way of playing. OK...so why have Hara as the technical director with his Spanish influences working with younger players for the 2 years prior to that?

    There is no logical plan, and the Japanese national team will not have any meaningful success until there is.

    Posted in: Japan's players lament Aguirre's exit

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    A bit picky I know, but I'd hardly say they are 'lamenting' his exit.

    They are the stock answers I'd expect any team player to give when asked about a departed coach.

    Ask them what they think about the JFA's coaching appointment decisions over the last 15 years. 7 coaches of 6 different nationalities and 6 different languages I think.

    Posted in: Japan's players lament Aguirre's exit

  • -2

    HollisBrown

    Sounds like another decision made just for the sake of it.

    I don't see any logical reason to have such a system at Narita. Those with checked-in baggage will have to wait at the luggage carousel like everyone else anyway: no benefit. The majority of those without checked-in baggage will likely have flown non-economy class therefore get out ahead of everyone else: no benefit. Narita now has a 'fast lane' retinal scanner (does it not?) so there's already a fast choice for all Japanese nationals who want to get through customs more quickly: no benefit on top of this.

    http://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/japan-testing-automatic-passport-control-gates

    Life in Japan would be a lot easier if workers just went home on time. The longer people stay at work (managers in particular) the more likely needless initiatives will be set up.

    I'd love to be in these meetings! How about a drop off over Kanto - that'd speed things up immensely? How about moving the customs officers to the plane doors? How about we just go home and be with our families and stick with the efficient system we've already got?

    Posted in: Narita to establish 'fast lane' for passengers needing to be out of airport quickly

  • 0

    HollisBrown

    @Fadamor - I understand that. It raises 2 points though:

    1) How is it right that a company can effectively escape its liabilities by simply leaving that market? It'd be like a language school leaving Tokyo to move to Seoul and telling its customers who still had lesson tickets 'No you don't get compensated because our company is still operating. If you want to use your remaining lesson tickets you can take classes in Seoul'. Virgin Atlantic Japan has ceased operations and as such all their Japanese liabilities should be settled reasonably. The options available to redeem earned miles are no longer reasonable.

    2) Virgin have publicly endorsed ANA and recommended that its customers take their future business to ANA. Surely VA could have negotiated some kind of deal with ANA that allowed mileage exchange (80%, 75% etc) in exchange for their free endorsements.

    It's simply a lack of foresight in terms of planning, and more importantly a complete disregard of their customers. I've learned that the 'loyalty' part of a 'loyalty card' only refers to the customer. The company should also show loyalty to their customers, and that loyalty should be reasonable i.e. if they are suddenly going to remove all their services from a market, and with it 99% of the ways to redeem earned mileage - they should be offering a reasonable alternative for how those miles can be redeemed. Sure it might cost them money to set up options / relationships / short term partnerships - but that's the cost of their actions in leaving the market.

    Posted in: Virgin Atlantic ends service to Japan

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    @zootmoney - Oh I have, don't worry about that!

    Posted in: Virgin Atlantic ends service to Japan

  • 2

    HollisBrown

    Japan hasn't had a plan for the last 20 years. They've gone from French coach, to Brazilian, to Serbian, to Japanese, to Italian, to Mexican. That's 6 complete changes in style as well as language! No wonder the players haven't got a clue - by the time they get used to something it's all change.

    A national team coach needs to be able to motivate the players, as well as have the respect of the players. He doesn't need to be the best 'coach' as the time spent with the players is minimal.

    Kazu would work for Japan I think.

    Get Kazu in with a group of experienced coaches, and give him 6 years minimum. What is there to lose?

    Posted in: Japan Football Association fires coach Aguirre

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