Knox Harrington's past comments

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    So what is abe looking for? A new restoration? Bet he would like the ring of that, huh? The Abe Restoration.

    Posted in: Abe pledges to carry out sweeping reforms

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    Ifhe wants to commit suicide, send him! Let him sign a bond that when he gets kidnapped and killed, Japan Government will do nothing. Then give him a one way ticket, send him! The fewer stupid people stays in Japan, the better.

    Thankfully, there is no such thing as a waiver to support from your government. At least not in democratic nations.

    The majority of Japanese have strongly agreed with their Ministrys actions. Theregore the people have indeed spoken.

    Who is this "majority" you're talking about? All the 53% of the people who coted in the last "election"? I do think many people agree with the decision, though. There we agree. Tragic that the Japanese can't see beyond these shores.

    Not to mention the trouble he would bring to the nation as a whole.

    Individual first. Then nation.

    Amazing to me that people are so gullible and obedient to whatever the authorities tell them. And the ones who don't agree almost never speak up. This 'meiwaku' BS they can stuff. People have the right to go wherever the hell they please. Confiscating passport does not occur in a democracy. Sugimoto would probably be welcomed in a more understanding nation. I wish him all the best.

    Posted in: Photographer says barring him from Syria sets a bad precedent

  • 4

    Knox Harrington

    All hallelujah. What a fantastic place Japan will become! This guy wants to do it all, and he wants to do it for you!

    Of course, if a normal functioning adult reads/hears this, (s)he soon understands the unsustainability of it all. Nevermind that. Let is pretend.

    Just waiting for the "banzai" in the streets...

    Posted in: Abe pledges to carry out sweeping reforms

  • 12

    Knox Harrington

    Golly, beheading two Japanese nationals sets a dangerous precedent for other journalists also.

    Perhaps you missed the fact that other journos lost their heads over there before the Japanese? How about that precedent? Was it not dangerous until it affected the Japanese?

    Maybe he wants to make this all about him?

    Maybe this is not about him at all, but a cause for concern. Can't you see that? What's next? People who want to go to Korea, prohibited from doing so? Might disturb the harmony and tranquility if bringing back disturbing new ideas?

    ...there's a little event called embedded journalists...

    Embedded journalism is not journalism. It's propaganda.

    Sugimoto's beef is a thin one; more for show than credible intent. Good luck to Sugimoto, the phone must be ringing off the hook to help this selfless defender of journalistic integrity.

    I find it worrisome to read posts like kc's and realize that many people probably reason in the same, naive way in Japan. It's all about meiwaku and the greater good (read calm) for the country, not understanding at all the work freelancers do or what it does for the world at large.

    For those of you still uninformed, I recommend a TED speech by the photojournalist James Nachtwey.

    Posted in: Photographer says barring him from Syria sets a bad precedent

  • 5

    Knox Harrington

    This is a pretty pathetic move by Japan. Not entirely unexpected, but pathetic nonetheless. Sugimoto seems to know what he's talking about and from this article it doesn't really seem he would venture into random daesh controlled areas.

    Hopefully (but doubtfully), the world will finally see what kind of a joke of a democracy Japan is. I especially like these lines:

    ...they could keep it for an unlimited time.

    and

    ...told him he would be arrested if he did not hand in his passport.

    "We can do as we please, so now shut up citizen." This is the speak of totalitarian regimes. Sounds like action I would expect to hear from Russia, Iran or NK, not Japan, but I guess it's time to wake up, right?

    Posted in: Photographer says barring him from Syria sets a bad precedent

  • 14

    Knox Harrington

    Yawn...

    This revisionistic attitude Japan seems to be stuck with has gotten pretty old. It feels like Japan carries a big dose of insecurity with it wherever it goes and desperately tries to assure everone of its power. Kinda like those shortlegged, stocky oyaji taking up more space than they can use on the subway.

    I think it's time to rethink this nationalistic BS. Most young people don't seem to give a frack about it and that is somewhat assuring.

    Posted in: Japan's global PR message could misfire with focus on wartime past

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    It's a solution that has been preferred by the Japanese for generations - throw engineering and technology at the problem and call it a day.

    A happy office derives from respect, challenging tasks, given responsibility and good pay. That and perhaps a few plants will work wonders. Oh, and ample time off to recuperate.

    There.

    Now give me ¥100000 yen/employee and year.

    Posted in: Wearable sensors let bosses know if they run a happy office

  • 2

    Knox Harrington

    How important it is for Japanese society to always, always, point out that people arrested are jobless, or what they do for a living. It's as if their whole lives revolve around... Oh, wait...

    Posted in: Man arrested for spraying graffiti near Yotsuya Station in Tokyo

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    Blatter is like the Hugo Chavez of the sports world. Leave the post to others, already! How come old men never know when to quit? It's like they become little mini-Caesars after a few years in power and just have to keep ruling. Kick him out.

    Posted in: Blatter likely to win FIFA election, but problems remain

  • -3

    Knox Harrington

    At the same, there is an expectation that the U.S. government would do what it can to assist U.S. citizens that find themselves in trouble, regardless of the circumstances leading them to be in the situation, even if it is limited and precludes certain actions, such as negotiating with terrorists. That is the job of the U.S. State Department/Foreign Service. That is what they are paid for.

    Exactly. the government us there for the people and should do whatever it can to help people with what means it can. Revoking passports to journalists is, as far as I know, unheard of in modern democracies. It is the way of least resistance, the way of heavy handed tactics when citizens won't listen. It says a lot about Japan and how it views personal freedom with how they have handled this case. Troublesome, but not surprising if you read what Abe+cronies want to do to current Japanese constitution. Maybe this is just a preview...

    Posted in: Gov't defends seizing journalist's passport over Syria travel plan

  • 3

    Knox Harrington

    Mental problems, no doubt, enhanced by communication ineptitude. Feels assuring Japan can't, or won't deal with its giant shaky mental health problem ever. Just smile, shop, shut your mouth, bow and pretend all is fine. How many people kill their own offspring every year in Japan? Seems an awful lot.

    Posted in: Chiba woman arrested for killing daughters aged 4, 1

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    We have a smoking room at my place of work. It's great - adjacent to the dining area! Great idea. The airconditionig system also seems to do a good job of somehow letting the smoke smell enter the dining area.

    Although I really dislike smokers and their selfish ways, I fail to see why some bureaucrats should be allowed to line their pockets with (almost certain) kickbacks from the construction industry for subsidizing this. Let smokers smoke outside. Don't let those asshats enter any building.

    Posted in: Offices in Tokyo's Chiyoda, Minato wards to build indoor smoking areas

  • -3

    Knox Harrington

    Goodness!

    All you people in here seem to have missed the fact that journalists are a necessity, and sometimes, they have to put themselves at risk. Most of them are aware of what they are doing.

    But, by the logic of all you safety junkies, nobody would have ever covered WW1, WW2, the Vietnam War, the Korean War, the Gulf War, well, any conflict areas, really. Thankfully, we have people not listening to naysayers like you and the world is a much better place for it.

    Journalism serves a purpose when all of us others zone out in the couch in fron of the TV, a few other brave souls risk life and limb to tell stories about how things really are. I respect that very much.

    Posted in: Gov't defends seizing journalist's passport over Syria travel plan

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    Geez, are they OK over there in India? Seems these sex crimes have taken epidemic proportions. Perhaps time to take some action?

    Posted in: Japanese tourist says guide in India raped her

  • 0

    Knox Harrington

    lose face and life on the international stage.

    Lose face? Seriously?

    I find the option of losing face far better than losing freedom.

    Zones' point of perhaps banning people from going to India struck me as well - it seems unsafe. How come they don't confiscate passports of people planning to go there as well?

    Posted in: Gov't defends seizing journalist's passport over Syria travel plan

  • -2

    Knox Harrington

    As I see it, there are only two roads: either make it illegal to travel to Syria, and, thus, no ine can go, or let people who want to go, no matter how foolish it may seem, go. There should be no other options.

    Here we have a clear case of Japan, still struggling with the concept of being a democracy. They still haven't quite figured it out...

    but doesn't mean what they did was wrong.

    Incorrect. That's exactly what it means. Either you let people have freedom, complete freedom, even to do stupid, pontentially harmful things to themselves, or you don't. If not, where do we draw the line? Can people go parachuting? Can they drive a car after midnight? Can they go fishing in rough seas? The confiscation of a passport is simple because one cannot travel without one, but daily in Japan, people act foolishly without the government interfering. How is that OK?

    I suspect more journalists have gone to Syria (and war zones in general) not having getting killed/injured than the ones who have.

    Posted in: Gov't defends seizing journalist's passport over Syria travel plan

  • 2

    Knox Harrington

    Have to... Sell. More. Stuff.

    Omotenashi is hospitality. Nothing special. Good hospitality comes from within, not from Dentsu HQ.

    Posted in: Group to promote 'omotenashi' brand around the world

  • -1

    Knox Harrington

    browny1 at Feb. 09, 2015 - 08:23AM JST You can fool some of the people, some of the time - but you can fool most of the people, most of the time.

    Except in Japan, you actually can fool all the people, all the time. They have been doing it since forever, and the band just marches on... More of the same.

    I find the Japanese to be an uninformed bunch. They don't know very much of the world, they don't understand it. It's all one big scary kaigai. It probably gives most of the locals a warm, fuzzy feeling of security when Abe, the Man, steps up and tells people what is what.

    Posted in: Abe's approval ratings rise in Japan after hostage crisis

  • 1

    Knox Harrington

    Milk this fear for all it's worth.

    Yeah, I know, right?

    It is somewhat ironic that Haruna Yukawa, who wanted to pretend to be something of a security consultant over in the ME, now helped boosting business for people such as himself, without credentials or experience (but with marketing skills), by getting killed.

    We can expect to watch all kinds of people coming out from the shadows now, hoping to cash in on this newfound "fear". And, seeing as how the Japanese like to pay their way to happiness and the feeling of safety and security, there will be a few people getting wealthy.

    Posted in: Japanese firms face wake-up call on threats of violence

  • -5

    Knox Harrington

    Of course they find money to be most important. How else are they going to buy all those brand wallets?! How else are they going to buy all those tickets to Disneyland? How else are they going to buy all that other crap they love to buy so much? It seems to me the whole (modern) Japanese identity is based on spending damn money. Being the islanders that they are, new concepts seem to have a hard time penetrating this society. Just look at the somewhat recent "eco" trend: All it communicates is get more stuff. "Ecobags" that so many women like to carry around, need to be brand bags. Energy saving appliances need to be bought, new stuff has to be purchased. And the Japanese can feel good about themselves...

    Romance is nowhere to be found here.

    Posted in: Cuddles or cash? 7 in 10 Japanese 20-somethings choose money over love

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