LFRAgain's past comments

  • 7

    LFRAgain

    Wow. Simply wow. What an utter d-bag. How can anyone take this asshat seriously? I never thought I'd say this, but Hashimoto is actually the good guy in all this.

    Posted in: Hashimoto, Zaitokukai chairman get into shouting match

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    darnname,

    what the hell is imminent domain

    Well, the actual correct term is eminent domain. My miss. So much for auto-complete. Regardless, it's defined simply as the power of the state, municipality, or private person or corporation to take private property in exchange for fair and just compensation when public demand clearly requires the use of said property.

    In the case of daycare centers in a society that that long since stopped being a throwback to patriarchal economic models where the wife stayed home as the child-rearer and the husband worked as the breadwinner, the simple reality is that modern Information Age families can scarcely survive on a single income. Women have to work now too, and someone has to help take care of the kids. Enter the daycare center.

    No amount of wistful pining for the "good old days" will change this. Japan needs more people working to pay into a social welfare system that society – especially retirees and soon-to-be-retirees demand. Since there aren't enough able bodied men to fill that role, it's going to have be women. And if the population is ever going to simply break even -- never mind grow, for Pete's sake -- then the families where women now have to work to simultaneously bolster the economy and make ends meet at home will need a better social support structure to allow them to work and have children at the same time.

    Again, pontificating about the virtues of children being raised in the home by mom or immediate family members is entirely moot given how the current real world actually functions. Honestly, I just want to slap the stupid out of people who still keep going on and on about how “mom should stay home and raise the kids,” as if it were really an option anymore when the choice becomes one of whether or not the mortgage can be paid and food can be put on the table.

    Posted in: New daycare centers held up by residents opposing noisy kids

  • 7

    LFRAgain

    It goes without saying that the most likely culprits are retirees, since they tend to be home during the daylight operating hours of a daycare. Which begs the question of how utterly daft and myopic must these grumpy old fools be? It goes without saying that children are the very lifeblood of any society, but what these selfish asshats have failed to realize is that without children to bolster Japan's shriking population and shrinking tax base, the social pension checks that these bitter old fools count on for their retirement would simply dry up.

    These pissy nuisances should be uprooted immediately from their overinflated positions of self-importance in said neighboorhoods via imminent domain and public policy judgements and removed to a distant mountaintop to enjoy all the silence they can handle.

    Posted in: New daycare centers held up by residents opposing noisy kids

  • 14

    LFRAgain

    [T]eachers noticed bruises and burns on his arm and notified a child welfare center. Welfare center staff visited the family in July; however, they found nothing out of the ordinary

    Let me guess... Child welfare checks are carried out the same way police raids of criminal behavior at companies are: With a warning well beforehand. "We'll be by next week." No wonder nothing was found out of the ordinary. Idiots.

    Child welfare workers in Japan are pitifully inept when it comes to safeguarding the welbeing of children. If the teachers noticed the bruises and burns, that should have been more than enough motivation for the welfare official officials to be more aggressive in their investigation. It's simply inexcusable that a fellow classmate would have to be the one to discover this child in desperate need.

    Posted in: Parents arrested for chaining 8-year-old son inside house

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    If one stays polite and sober as an accountant, what is the point of drinking?

    Nothing wrong with getting drunk and having fun. Not sure why doing so would also have to mean sexually harassing women around you.

    Posted in: The ugly truth of 'gokon,' Japan’s group blind dates

  • 3

    LFRAgain

    As defined on Wiki, "Cultural appropriation is most commonly used to denote the use by cultural outsiders of a minority, oppressed culture's symbols or other cultural elements."

    I would agree with this definition. As such, Japanese are by no means a minority in any sense of the word, and most certainly are not oppressed, being the third largest economy in the world.

    There's nothing wrong with these images whatsoever. Anyone looking to take offense desperately needs to cut back on their caffeine intake.

    Posted in: Miranda Kerr’s photo shoot for Vogue Japan stirs up controversy

  • 10

    LFRAgain

    Hopefully, if all this is true, this sick pup will get locked up, and spend many years in jail being 'approached from behind'.

    Again with the "prison rape is an appropriate form of justice" comments? Rape isn't a punchline.

    Posted in: 37-year-old man arrested for kidnapping 12-year-old boy in Chiba

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    Find me a man, who is polite, when he gets drunk.

    One of the first symptoms of being drunk is to lose objective view of oneself and surroundings.

    I've been the designated sober driver for nights out with friends, and I can say without reservation that the men I count as friends are polite and courteous to women even when drunk. This effort to paint most men as closet sexual predators simply waiting for alcohol to set them free is absurd. I'm not sure who you guys hang around with, but you might want to consider getting a new group of friends.

    Posted in: The ugly truth of 'gokon,' Japan’s group blind dates

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    @Scott Ryan,

    Do you think America has ever saved up trillions of dollars over the last 20 years? Or do you think they 100% never saved up anything, because of the way the $ works?

    I'm not sure I understand your question. What savings are you referring to specifically?

    Posted in: U.S. assault, gunfight leave 23 militants dead in Pakistan

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    I guess it all depends on how much the glasses bring to the table in terms of increased productivity. I wear contact lenses specifically because I don't like having to correct my eyesight with bulky glasses. But the Sony glasses, like Google Glass, aren't seeking to convince people to return to eyeglass-based corrective lenses. They are pitching their products as additional tools in the modern drive to be even more connected to information than ever.

    It's a natural progression really: We started with desktop computers where our access was limited to how soon we could get back to our desk. Then we miniaturized with laptops, then ultrabooks, and now the ubiquitous smartphone. Access to information is only as far away as arm's length. So, what would be better than having it right in front of our eyes, literally, hands-free, ready to go?

    There's a market for these things, and it's only a matter of time before this kind of tech gets further miniaturized into something far less clunky and more easily concealed, like contact lenses or more permanent optical implants.

    Posted in: Sony develops 'SmartEyeglass'

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    Stranger,

    Sadly, you're more correct than not. Even worse is that the money that's being spent isn't even ours. It's most likely China's.

    Posted in: U.S. assault, gunfight leave 23 militants dead in Pakistan

  • 3

    LFRAgain

    When I was younger, that was the way to get the girls. To be able to handle a few drinks and remain courteous and polite.

    It still is the way to get the girls. Or at least a girl that you have a reasonable chance of being happy with. Mutual respect is the operative concept here.

    Posted in: The ugly truth of 'gokon,' Japan’s group blind dates

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    Can it be that all of you men commenting above me have never been done wrong by a woman or experienced bad/inappropriate women?

    I've never had my drinks spiked, been felt up without consent, openly commented about with other women while I was standing there but as if I wasn't present about how endowed I might be or how proficient I might be in bed with my (physical feature/appendage here). Oh, and I've never been raped.

    So, that list you want.... What exactly do you mean by, “Done wrong” that suggests anything even remotely on par with the organized, predatory sexual harassment and date rape that occurs at some gocon?

    And I'll ignore your very thinly veiled suggestion that women who attend gocon are asking for the predation and harassment by simply being there, because, hey, when you look at how they dress, they’re practically begging for it, right?

    Posted in: The ugly truth of 'gokon,' Japan’s group blind dates

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    I realize I'm playing armchair general here, but is launching two Hellfire missles at a jeep with three men standing nearby the most cost-effective way to utilize the U.S.'s advanced military hardware capabilities? These missiles cost US$110,000 each. Are we, as Americans, suppose to actually cheer to hear that it took $220,000 in ordinance alone to kill two bad guys -- and possibly wound a third? We're talking about missles that were originally designed to be "tank-busters."

    Yes, I know the U.S. and its allies are loath to put boots on the ground in the battle against terrorists, but is blowing nearly a quarter of a million dollars in ordinance to kill just two guys standing around drinking water really the most effective use of our capabilities, particularly when the guys killed appear to be little more than low level foot soldiers? A .50 machine gun round would do the job just as well for as little as $3 per round.

    Posted in: U.S. assault, gunfight leave 23 militants dead in Pakistan

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    How about an article for what guys should look out for? It's not like Japan is filled with blameless princesses who do no wrong...

    And what would such a list entail, exactly? Warnings against women racing against a social or biological clock? Unattractive women? Gold diggers? When the worst-scenario for women meeting the wrong guy at a gocon is rape, any complementary list for men seems petty, if not insulting, wouldn't you say?


    I agree with the first poster that it seems awfully strange for an article that goes out of its way to discredit any serious tone it may have had to go ahead and mention by name established companies. Why not just change the article's headline to "These Companies Hire Date Rapists"?


    Re: Comments about gocon being so (barbaric / outdated / unique / desperate / et al)...

    Please. The gocon is scarcely different from Western men and women meeting in bars and dance clubs and getting hammered until someone decides to go home with someone else, complete with all of the embarrassment, regrets, and dangers mentioned in the article above. I'll see your Japanese Goldman Sachs investment banker and raise you one Sigma Chi frat boy-turned-corporate-a-hole. Using alcohol to get laid has been a human practice since people built their first distillery. But beng a sexist, predatorial asshat while they do it? It's all in the individual. Some people seem to excel at it better than others.

    Posted in: The ugly truth of 'gokon,' Japan’s group blind dates

  • -1

    LFRAgain

    "Apology" not accepted, since it wasn't an apology so much as a justification for the original comments made. Sun is a prime example of the infantile attitude an alarming number of Chinese, young and old, demonstrate when faced with anything having to do with Japan. He's a snot-nosed brat, is what he is, and he's tarnished the sport of swimming with not only his his immaturity, but also his ignorance.

    Posted in: Sun apologizes for 'ugly' anthem jibe

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    It's terrifying to know that there are at this many child predators loose on the streets of Japan. If there ever was an impetus for communities to smash down those artificially imposed barriers of social decorum that prevent neighbors from even acknowleging one another in the mornings, this is it. The police are not up to the task of addressing this issue. It takes close-knit communities to protect our young.

    Posted in: NPA says 94 children targeted by kidnappers in 2013

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    I think those trying to defend the privacy (with all kinds of obtuse reasoning) of the perverts who bought these contraptions are possibly worried about their having own "privacy" violated for some reason or other.

    Ah, the classic, "If you're not with us, then you're with the terrorists" defense. Could there be anything more infantile? I think not.

    No one here has supported the existence of these shoe cameras. Everyone here roundly agrees they are obnoxious to say the least. The issue is with how the police have gone about rounding them up. Judging by how easily some here are willing to toss their privacy rights in the trash can for the illusion of safety, let me just say for the record that when -- not if -- it's your privacy rights being trampled upon by the police, I'll still defend those rights, even when you lack the backbone to do so yourself.

    Posted in: Own a pair of secret camera shoes? The police should be by shortly for a visit

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    The use of these devices is ABSOLUTELY illegal. It's illegal to film upskirts in Japan.

    No, it is not "absolutely" illegal to use these devices. What is illegal is the use of these devices to take unauthorized photos of people in public. Nothing more, nothing less. The fact that these shoes are not illegal is precisely why the police chose to adopt an underhanded approach towards taking them out of circulation.

    This is akin to a vendor selling tools used for breaking and entering such as a lock pick set.

    No, it is not akin to your lock pick analogy because the possession of lock picks is strictly prohibited for regular citizens by Japanese law. These camera shoes aren't. Also, do keep in mind that the shop owner wasn't arrested for selling these shoes specifically. He was arrested for "aiding voyeurism" in violation of the Nuisance Prevention Ordinance. Again, at the point of tedium, there's an important legal distinction to be made here. This is in no way the same thing as being arrested for selling illicit goods, like drugs, just as a charge of failure to properly dispose of a body is in no way to be construed as a charge of murder.

    This has nothing to do with the Benesse case at all . . .

    I only mentioned the Benesse case because you seemed to be implying Japan had a lax attitude towards the confidentiality of customer data. It wasn't brought up to compare and contrast with how the data was acquired by the police in this case.

    Posted in: Own a pair of secret camera shoes? The police should be by shortly for a visit

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    Fadamor,

    I'm sure the police went to the door with something along the lines of, "You can hand over the shoes now and we're done, or we can go the full route and publicly seek a warrant to search your home. It's up to you whether you want your name in the papers regarding the warrant."

    I'm pretty sure that's likely how it went as well. However, it's important to note that their threat of obtaining a warrant would have been a false and illegal one. In short, the police lied and used intimidation in order to achieve an outcome that the law does not provide for. Credibility has absolutely nothing to do with, well, anything here while the manufacture, sale, and possession of these shoes still remains legal.

    "I spent good money to buy these camera shoes but I never intended to use them."

    What if the person in question amended that by saying, "I never intended to use them for anything illegal." Then what? While you may not agree with it, there are legitimate, credible uses for miniaturized cameras mounted in shoes that aren't illegal, including, but not limited to security, art, scientific inquiry. Yes, farfetched uses to be sure, but not entirely discountable. And certainly not entirely discountable when the owner has yet to commit any crime that they police are aware of. In a situation like this, credibility becomes and entirely subjective and arbitrary concept, particularly when no crimes have been committed and no charges have been filed.

    Consider this: What if a person purchases a Nissan Skyline GT-R, with a stated power rating of 276 hp (206 kW), but an actual tested rating closer to; 325 hp (243 kW), allowing it to achieve a top speed of 193 mph (311 km/h)? What if this perfectly legal purchase is then upgraded with another perfectly legal purchase in the form of something called the VR38DETT super response engine, which effectively more than doubles the power output to (588 kW; 789 hp) and allows the car to travel well in excess of 193mph?

    Now, you and I know perfectly well that this type of vehicle is built for speed and that it is used to break Japanese traffic safety laws regularly. But it’s not regulated. It’s not outlawed. And we most certainly don’t see the Japanese police raiding Nissan headquarters, arresting Carlos Ghosn for contributing to the creation of a public nuisance, seizing Nissan customer data, and going door-to-door “requesting” that ay citizen who bought a Nissan Skyline GT-R forfeit the car after signing a document declaring that they intended to use the car to drive over the posted speed limit. Do we?

    Sound ridiculous? Consider that there isn’t one iota of difference between the Skyline GT-R and these ridiculous camera shoes. Both are entirely legal to manufacture, sell, and purchase. And both also possess capabilities that are almost certainly for the purpose of breaking the law. So, why doesn’t the NPA go after Nissan? Why doesn’t the NPA simply assume that owners of the GT-R are accidents waiting to happen and go after them? I think even a brief consideration of the answer to this reveals the absurdity of harassing car owners for simply possessing a car designed to leave speed limits in the dust, even when there is no evidence of them having ever done so.

    Presumption of innocence: It’s probably THE most critical and fundamental cornerstone of modern democratic legal systems. It astounds me how quickly some are willing to offer up their civil rights in a effort to feel more secure. What is it about the shoe camera that makes it less acceptable that cars built to blast down the highway at 300 km/h? Is it the ick factor? Speeding in car = macho, camera-shoes = creepy. Macho wins, creepy loses? Again, “creepy” isn’t an actual legal definition in any modern law book.

    I agree that these cameras need to be dealt with, but they need to be dealt with within the scope of the law.

    Posted in: Own a pair of secret camera shoes? The police should be by shortly for a visit

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