LFRAgain's past comments

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    Illegally occupied Guantanamo? Damages?! Was Raul drunk or stoned out of his mind when he made this little laundry list? Oh, well. So much for any sort of meaningful reconciliation. The U.S. may have to simply wait until the Castros die off before someone with a more reasonable mind comes along. Of course, that hasn't worked out so well with North Korea, but here's to hoping.

    Posted in: Raul Castro: U.S. must return Guantanamo for normal relations

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    After seeing news of the ruined food, he said he had felt better.

    He felt better after causing financial damage to a business -- with the added possibily of actual physical harm to an unsuspecting stranger? No, nothing clinically wrong with this sociopthic asshat, is there...?

    Posted in: Man arrested for poking needle into bread in Chiba convenience store

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    Almost all finds, without exception, are false positives...

    What on the earth are you talking about? AV software from the 90s?! False positives do indeed exist and have caused serious problems for computer users, but they are the exception rather than the norm. Your claim of *"almost quite contrary to what you would have readers believe.

    False positive frequency rates for various AV software suites is researched vigorously by a number of independent sources, including PC Magazine, AV Comparatives, and Virus Bulletin, and the results are publicly ranked for consumer perusal. Obviously, some software performs worse than others, but the claim that the vast majority of results given by AV software are false positives is patently untrue. At the low end, poorly-performing software had false positive rates of 10~11%. But some of the best performing software kept false positive rates down to less than 0.2 percent.

    It should be noted that in the realm of false positive research, Microsoft Security Essentials AV suite, the clear go-to AV solution for the casual PC user since it’s already automatically bundled with the oft-maligned Windows OS, consistently provides the best performance in the industry in terms of low occurrence of false positives. This is significant as the overwhelming majority of PC users simply never think about the AV protection while they click happily away to the next Nigerian diamond mine “trust me” e-mail. These folks need their AV software.

    Suggesting that people simply ditch their AV software and go commando, so to speak, is not only irresponsible, but also wholly unsubstantiated. The intentional spread of misinformation like yours is as much a part of the problem of virus proliferation as people foolishly opening files they shouldn't or believing in offers that are obviously too good to be true.

    Posted in: Tech identifies users vulnerable to cyberattack based on ways they use their computers

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    I dropped my return ticket on a trip to Kochi Prefecture and the station staff were waiting for me at the gate two days later when I was trying to return and found it missing from my wallet. A staff member took me into a office and handed me my lost ticket. Pretty spiffy, all things considered.

    Posted in: What’s the oddest left-behind item you’ve ever seen on public transport? Have you ever lost something on a train, and did it find its way back to you?

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    As recently as last week, Mickey D's Japan had found a way to deal with the potato shortage from the U.S. and is indeed selling fries again, and in all sizes.

    Not sure how KFC found themselves so unprepared, considering they had months to prepare for this, but as other posters have astutely noted, Japan has a lot of potatoes being grown up in Hokkaido. Buy them. Slice them. Sell them. Problem solved.

    Posted in: KFC Japan runs out of french fries due to U.S. industrial dispute

  • 7

    LFRAgain

    I'm not so certain meticulous planning necessarily negates the possibility that this girl is in desperate need of an extended stay in a mental healthcare facility -- say, for the next 70 years.

    Sociopaths and psychopaths can be very intelligent and meticulous while planning to kill. Many serial killers have been just that. Family court is not the place to try this girl, particularly when it means any sentence she receives will likely be fulfilled the moment she turns 20. I pity the community she chooses to live in at that point.

    Posted in: Sasebo girl who killed classmate judged criminally responsible

  • 8

    LFRAgain

    I think he thinks he's a lot more famous than he actually is.

    Umm....

    From Wikipedia:

    "[Southern All-Stars] has been one of the best-selling music groups in the past 30 years of Japan, selling more than 47 million albums and singles in Japan alone. They have had over 40 top-ten hit singles and 16 number-one albums on the Japan's Oricon Charts as of 2008. Their 1998 compilation Umi no Yeah!! has sold more than 3.3 million copies and became the best-selling double album in Japanese history.

    I think they are considerably more famous than you are aware.

    Their music is not my cup 'o tea, but anyone who does anything to get Abe's nationalistic feathers in a ruffle gets a hall pass from me. Cheers to him.

    Posted in: Southern All Stars singer Kuwata apologizes over concert antics

  • -1

    LFRAgain

    The gaping hole in this lingering suggestion that the U.S. is somehow trying to set up North Korea as some sort of erratic, belligerent rogue state is that (and I don't believe I'm having to even point this out at all) North Korea has carefully crafted the image of an erratic and belligerent rogue state all by itself over the past three decades. From abduction of foreign nationals to open military attacks on South Koreans to, -- oh, what was that little hiccup a few years back...? -- oh, yeah, the detonation of a nuclear device, North Korea has more than cemented itself in the international ledger as a bat-s#!t crazy nation willing and able to do bat-s#!t crazy things to prop up its leadership.

    The U.S. would gain nothing by falsely accusing North Korea of anything at this stage of the game. Nothing whatsoever. And to maintain, however obtusely, that a trumped-up charge of cyber-terrorism via the Sony hack is the best the U.S. could come up with in indicting the DPRK suggests a profound lack of imagination, particularly when one considers the Iraq WMD clusterf$#k that was unleashed on the world by Bush & Co.

    What astounds me out of all of this is the not-so-subtle implied suggestion among critics of the FBI that the DPRK is some poor, misunderstood, innocent victim underserving of closer scrutiny from the international community, despite having demonstrated in the past its penchant for trying to and on occasion successfully hacking other nations’ government servers, including South Korea’s. North Korea is no squeaky clean babe in the woods. It's a brutal, unforgiving, totalitarian regime that oppresses its people through violence and terror while allowing hundreds of thousands of its citizens to freeze and/or starve to death every year, at least when it’s not killing them outright in forced labor camps.


    Look, fellas'. I understand the sexiness and allure of a good old fashioned conspiracy is nigh irresistible, particularly for some of you. But in this case, I'll go with the Occam's razor approach to the issue. All these assumptions about proxy server bouncing and insider help are just that: assumptions. At the end of the day, the FBI has provided all the evidence it reasonably can to the public in a world in which cyber-attacks that make the Sony one look like child’s play are all but guaranteed to increase, not decrease, over the coming years.

    These demands that the FBI lay out all its investigative cards on the table in order to satisfy what really amounts to little more than the personal curiosity of so-called cyber-experts who are most decidedly not in the investigative loop are utterly asinine. Why in the world would the FBI announce to anyone, much less arm-chair conspiracy theorists, the full extent of their investigative capabilities? The answer is they wouldn't. And they shouldn't.

    Granted, this will inevitably give rise to a chorus of, “See? They’re hiding something.” But honestly, when I weigh the FBI maintaining the unknown quantity status of its cybercrime division versus the cries of foul from folks who really couldn’t give two whit’s about North Korea or its presumed innocence, I’ll side with the FBI nine times out of ten.

    Posted in: Sony case could cause bind, depending on evidence

  • 7

    LFRAgain

    85 involved cyphers and codes, 54 concerned defense equipment procurement and 25 regarded the activities of the Self-Defense Forces

    So, that leaves some 247 "secrets" that are entirely at the discretion of the Japanese government? Riiiiight.

    How many of these secrets involve corruption or abuse of office? How many involve suppresion of legitimate information that a free, democratic society deserves to know? Oh, wait. We can't know that now, can we? It's all been locked away as "Secret." Covenient, no?

    Two watchdog groups oversee implementation of the law, one directed by the prime minister.

    Oh, for the love of Pete... Talk about the fox guarding the hen house. I'd trust Abe and his undoubtedly hand-picked band of watchdogs to be fair and impartial only as far as I'd be able to toss them from the front steps of Yasukuni Shrine. The man's a snake.

    Posted in: Gov't designated 382 state secrets last year under new law

  • -5

    LFRAgain

    I have very little doubt that the FBI are correct in their assessment that North Korea is responsible for this. Logic and common snese would dictate that the FBI does indeed have the very type of smoking gun information that they would in no way, shape, or form have to share with the so-called "experts" arond the world who somehow seem to think they know better when it comes to the magnitudes involved in making this kind of accusation against another state in the international arena. North Korea did it, and their meager, half-hearted claims of innocence do little to help clear them of suspicion.

    Posted in: Sony case could cause bind, depending on evidence

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    luckyinnagoya1983,

    I'm lucky to be married to an amazing woman.

    That says a lot. You'd do well to remember your luck while you presume to bag on other posters for their experiences, going to far as to suggest, "It's not her, it's you," and making the wholly irrational assumption that you and you alone possess the ability to communicate effectively with your Japanese wife while the rest of the world plods along, clueless and in desperate need of your sage advice on how to keep a marriage together.

    I'm glad that you have a good marriage. Enjoy it. But do realize that some folks haven't been so lucky as you and that it has a lot more to do with Japanese cultural differences than you seem willing to admit. To flippantly dismiss volumes of anecdotal evidence with your sole example of marital bliss suggests no small amount of willful ignorance combined with an unhealthy does of arrogance on your part. Look at Japanese social science research done by scholars like T. S. Lebra and Takeo Doi before you make offhanded remarks that seem more rooted in schadenfreude than in any real desire to contribute meaningfully to the discussion.

    Posted in: Is being in an international marriage any more or less difficult than a "regular" marriage? What are some issues that you think might torpedo an international marriage (or relationship)?

  • 13

    LFRAgain

    choiwaruoyaji,

    A sexless marriage is so common in Japan that it has almost become the norm (or else it actually is the norm).

    This is sadly true. And "sadly" is really the best word for it. Having experienced my wife's unilateral decision to end sexual relations firsthand, I was compelled to look into the issue by asking female Japanese friends and acquaintances about this sudden change of heart. Turns out it is indeed the "norm." Apparently, the prevailing attitude is that after a child enters the picture, the interpersonal dynamics are no longer that of "wife and husband," but rather one of *"mother and father." Sexual desire is not something one experiences for a "father" because it's, well, uncomfortably wrong somehow. Conversely, the women I spoke with said they could no longer feel sexy in the eyes of their husbands because they were now "mothers" first an foremost. Something that needs to be said, however, is that it wasn't a situation where sexual desire itself was extinguished. Rather, sexual desire with one's one husband had diminished since he now wore the primary title of "father."

    I asked how this worked out when they wanted another child beyond the first, and many said they simply grinned and bore sex with their husbands as an unfortunate necessity. Others said they still had sex with their husbands, but only because they felt bad for him or that sex was a "duty" they had to fulfill as "wife."

    The fact is that many Japanese women decide that they no longer need/want/like sex and just shut it down

    This, even more sadly, is patently untrue. The desire for intimacy and sexual activity still exists. But not with the husband. Enter infidelity.

    To be fair, these are all issues for Japanese husbands as well. One of the most depressing conversations I had ever had was with a co-worker one night after a bit of drinking. He confessed that while he loved his wife as a good person and as the mother of his two children, she was not the one he was "in love" with, and that he had been carrying on a secret affair with a woman with whom he was truly "in love" for several years, supposedly unbeknownst to his wife. When I asked if he had ever considered divorce, he replied, “Why would I? The family is solid, so there’s no need to change anything since everyone is getting what they want.”

    It's depressing, but the number of Japanese "sexless" marriages that are anything but would shock even the most jaded Westerner, I suspect. That Japanese couples seem almost resigned to this unending, cynical dynamic is even more disheartening; As long as the husband fulfiils his "role" as provider and the wife as "nurturer," no one seems to see a need to change anything, and infidelity continues unabated. Granted, if it works for Japan, then who am I to criticize? But with Japanese society wrestling with the riddle of why its young are turning their backs on marriage in droves, I'm not so sure this dysfunctional version of marriage actually does Japan any favors.

    For any marriage to succeed, international or otherwise, the lines of communication have to open and unimpeded. Language differences can give rise to the inability to express hopes, desires and expectations born of one's cultural and social upbringing. If an international couple goes into a marriage not knowing any of the above, for example, it can cause a catastrophic disintegration of the marriage. But if a couple can find a way to navigate the and misconceptions and misunderstandings that will invariably arise in the face of two different cultures meeting (and clashing), then the relationship has about as good a chance of survival as any.

    Posted in: Is being in an international marriage any more or less difficult than a "regular" marriage? What are some issues that you think might torpedo an international marriage (or relationship)?

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    Kitty,

    Strange, I thought Prep school was for 3-4 year-olds. So a minor indeed!

    You're thinking of pre-school. Prep school is for students seeking to prep (prepare) are for college entrance exams.

    Posted in: Prep school student arrested for stabbing classmate

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    wtfjapan,

    there are plenty of sheeple that would still buy it even if it was turd in a pretty cover.

    This is a childish comment. Regardless of how you feel about Apple users, Apple products (iPhone, iPad, et al.) are sophisticated pieces of hardware that have received praise from tech reviewers the world over, tech reviewers, I might add, who are vastly more qualified than you or I to make such assessments.

    Posted in: Apple sued for promising more available storage space than it actually delivers

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    Just to be clear, the article states the guy was trying to make an offering to the shrine, not burn it down. Granted, the offering in this case was was his own charred corpse, but it was an offering all the same. Not sure what his abject failure says about the can-do spirit of these nationalist loons however.

    Posted in: Man arrested for setting fire to wall at Yasukuni Shrine

  • 2

    LFRAgain

    Chris,

    Respectfully, no one's forgetting that "dodgy day care centers" exisit. However, the daycares, kindergartens, and public schools that are being complained about are established, licensed facilities, not back-alley operations. The very fact that lawsuits have resulted in the facilities simply being asked by officials to keep children indoors rather than their law-breaking owners being paraded in handcuffs before a wall of media more than suggests this is the case. The illegailty and abuse at these so called fake schools is a completely unrelated issue.

    Posted in: Complaints lead to debate about whether noise from schools should be regulated

  • 0

    LFRAgain

    I'm inclined to agree that this is a bit of a silly lawsuit, not to mention a fairly obvious money grab, particularly since devices that run on Android face precisely the same issues, yet are inexplicably spared a similar "class action" onslaught.

    Best case (or worst, depending on where you sit in the lawsuit), Apple losing this lawsuit should reasonably result in no more than Apple offering its customers free cloud storage equivalent to whatever the iOS takes up on the device. And that's it.

    Posted in: Apple sued for promising more available storage space than it actually delivers

  • 5

    LFRAgain

    Trevor,

    Thanks for the comment, however, my choice to lay blame at the feet of Baby Boomers wasn't misguided. The people primarily complaining have tended to be in their mid-70s, not 80s or 90s. (To be fair, though, they've also been in their 50s an 60s, with even a few 40-something housewives throwing their hat into the ring about noisy children and acceptable decibel levels during mid-day. But it's the Boomers who really get my goat). :-)

    Posted in: Complaints lead to debate about whether noise from schools should be regulated

  • 3

    LFRAgain

    This "debate" is patently absurd and offensive on more levels than I can count.

    Comments above about overzealous use of PA systems make some sense, but Sports Festivals? These happen but once a year and monopolize, at worst, two months’ time, with the average being closer to one month. And during daylight hours no less. What about the other 10 months of relative peace? Also, with regard to people with non-traditional working hours: They represent but a small fraction of working society. Furthermore, these people aren't filing the lawsuits. The elderly are.

    In any case, PA systems aren't the issue, regardless of some posters' personal observations. As this and previous articles on the subject have clearly pointed out, these grumpy old fuddy-duddies are taking schools to court specifically to restrict children's outdoor playtime. It's not the PA systems that are being challenged, but rather the sound of children at play that's being objected to.

    Take a second to chew on that statement: These people are objecting to the sound of children at play.

    There is no "debate" to be had. Children play. Children run around and jump and burn off that excessive energy that we all wistfully wish we has just a little bit more of. And Children make noise; They get excited; They get enthusiastic; They scream in delight and yell when affronted. They're children and this kind of active interaction and socialization is essential to their healthy physical and emotional development.

    It should go without saying that children are the very necessary lifeblood of a society, particularly one as desperate for new children as Japan's is. But apparently it does need to be said.

    The teeth-grating irony to be seen here is that these whinging old curmudgeons are the very same generation that did virtually nothing to address desperately needed changes and adjustments to a Japanese society that is all but hostile to the idea of raising a family. This is the Baby Boomer Generation that all but tossed Japanese traditional family values out on their ear as they re-dedicated their lives to Japan, Inc., and the unfettered acquisition of wealth during the heyday of the Bubble.

    And now that they've got theirs, including retirement benefits from a system not yet depleted, but soon to be a victim of the very same Boomers' political and social apathy and complacency, screw the rest of the world, eh? Selfish, myopic, asshats with selective memory loss, the lot of 'em.

    They want peace and quiet? They should sell their places and move into the more tightly controlled, wholly regulated environment of a distant retirement community. Boom! Everyone wins.

    Posted in: Complaints lead to debate about whether noise from schools should be regulated

  • 1

    LFRAgain

    Knox, you beat me to it.

    Bid rigging in Japan?! Say it ain't so!!

    Posted in: Work still hasn't begun to demolish Tokyo's old Olympic stadium

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