Sensato's past comments

  • 1

    Sensato

    Correction: The now defunct monopolistic book distributor was "Yohan" (not "Yaohan," which is a Japanese retailer).

    Posted in: Japanese publishers blast new Amazon book sale rules

  • 3

    Sensato

    This is a fun and well-produced commercial. I could see this one becoming a viral hit globally.

    Posted in: Toyota’s dance craze contest invites you to Wakudoki your way to Tokyo

  • 14

    Sensato

    All the bad press given to Amazon regarding its labor and business practices, the company has been great for consumers in Japan, especially if you regularly buy English-language books.

    Before Amazon came onto the scene here, Japan was a nightmare for book consumers. A company called Yaohan had a complete monopoly on the book distribution business in Japan -- and because of their stranglehold on the market, English language books were more than double what they would cost anywhere else on the planet. If a book/magazine didn't go through "the Darth Vader of book distributors", it did not get on the shelves. It was so bad that if a bookshop tried to sell even a small booklet without Yaohan's approval, the company would threaten to stop selling its books to that bookshop.

    Yaohan went bankrupt in 2008, and I am sure that was attributable in no small part to Amazon's entry into Japan's market. Thank you Amazon, at least for that (but now please clean up your labor practices).

    Posted in: Japanese publishers blast new Amazon book sale rules

  • 10

    Sensato

    Many of Japan's leaders seem to think that gratuitous denial of the nation's past wrongdoings and defiant backpedaling on former apologies makes them and the nation look stronger, which is far from true.

    Japan's current approach to peace where individuals are taught that they have been primarily martyrs and victims of history makes citizens cower in the face of international involvement. An approach to peace where citizens are taught that Japan itself as a past aggressor, but a nation that also had the strength to resolutely take responsibility for its actions, would make citizens feel a much greater sense of volition and pride.

    Posted in: U.N. issues fresh call to Japan over WWII 'comfort women'

  • 4

    Sensato

    I read somewhere else that another reason METI (industry ministry) is encouraging people to buy loads of TP in the name of disaster readiness is because they hope to boost sales, which have been soft since April.

    Apparently, TP is one of the items consumers stockpiled before the sales tax hike kicked in, meaning they are buying less now.

    Posted in: Gov't advises citizens to stockpile toilet paper

  • 0

    Sensato

    I want men-only cars.

    @Strangerland

    There is actually a growing movement in Japan by men calling for men-only cars.

    Shareholder activists of Seibu Holdings (Seibu Railway) got a motion for men-only cars put on the agenda to be voted on at the company's shareholders' meeting (the resolution was ultimately voted down). According to the shareholders' meeting notice, the proposal was inspired by an incident where a man was accused of groping, but video footage later showed that he had been falsely accused.

    Proposal 8 on page 65 of the meeting notice, if you are interested: http://v4.eir-parts.net/v4Contents/View.aspx?template=announcement&sid=17831&code=9024

    Posted in: Are women-only train cars illegal in Japan?

  • 2

    Sensato

    @tictactogo

    The quote you found was slightly different from the one I found. Interesting. Mine (below) came from the Japanese version of a Korean newspaper, which quoted Abe as saying: "「今日の平和と繁栄のために自らの魂を賭して祖国の礎となられた殉職者の霊魂に、謹んで哀悼の意を送る」"

    This quote uses "殉職者" which typically means "killed in the line of duty."

    The version you found (from a Japanese newspaper) uses the word "殉難者" (junnansha) which does translate as martyr. The Japanese-Japanese dictionary definition for "殉難" (junnan) is "[the act of] sacrificing oneself for the benefit of the public, the nation or religion." (国家・宗教や公共の利益のために一身を犠牲にすること。 ).

    Posted in: Abe sent support message to war criminal memorial service in April

  • 0

    Sensato

    “I express my grief at the death of martyrs… who sacrificed their lives to form the foundation of peace and prosperity in Japan today,”

    Abe referred to the fallen soldiers in Japanese as jyunshokusha (殉職者) which is sometimes translated as "martyr," but is also often translated as "[a person] killed in the line of duty" or something similar along those lines.

    Also, my Japanese-Japanese dictionary gives the definition of jyunshoku (殉職) roughly translated as "loss of life in the course of fulfilling one's duty. [example sentence: [He] made the ultimate sacrifice fighting the fire.]" ("職務を果たそうとして命を失うこと。 「消火活動で−する」 .")

    The Cabinet Public Relations Office (内閣広報室) probably should have put more thought into what the word "martyr" means.

    Posted in: Abe sent support message to war criminal memorial service in April

  • 1

    Sensato

    Apparently Keita Honno (本野恵太) is a first-year teacher at Tsuda Junior High School (横浜市立都田中学校) in Yokohama's Tsuzuki ward.

    Here is an ANN news report showing him: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EJccJxFC5Zo

    Posted in: 25-year-old teacher arrested for molesting student in Yokohama

  • -2

    Sensato

    “There is strong suspicion,” [Yokohama president Akira Kaetsu] said about the possibility of banana-waving being construed as racial discrimination.

    I commend the J League for taking swift action here, but I get tired of the wishy-washy language I so often here in these situations.

    Instead of saying that there is "strong suspicion" that this might be construed as racial discrimination, why couldn't the league have resolutely said "This is an obvious instance of racial discrimination and is unacceptable to us." They would have much more credibility if they would avoid such non-committal language.

    Posted in: J.League club bans teen for waving banana at Brazilian player

  • 1

    Sensato

    This is the first time Japan has faced a labor shortage since the late 1980s. Good news for young job seekers. For the last 20 years before this it was quite the opposite, with fresh university grads struggling to find jobs.

    Essentially, the prevailing labor crunch is a result of demographics. Young people now entering the workforce were born in years when births in Japan were barely above 1 million, and they are replacing people retiring who were born in the immediate-post-war baby boom when births were well over 3 million each year. Young people entering the workforce five or so years ago weren't so fortunate.

    Posted in: Japanese firms hit by labor crunch

  • 2

    Sensato

    The original article had the sentence "我々日本人は、世界有数の「ケチ民族」だという。" which is translated here as "“Japanese are among the stingiest people in the world," with the word "kechi" (ケチ) translated as "stingy." But, given the article's content, I might argue that a better translation would have been "Japanese are among the pettiest people in the world."

    "Kechi" is one of those words with a very broad meaning that is not always readily captured in a single English word, and the J-E dictionary gives dozens of English words as possible translations for it.

    So, this article is referring to much more than stinginess in terms of a person's unwillingness to share time/possessions/money/resources. It also refers to "kechi" in terms of pettiness, anal retentiveness, and just an overall nit-picky attitude.

    Posted in: Anxiety makes Japanese stingy, says psychologist

  • 6

    Sensato

    According to police, the girl, an unemployed resident of Niigata City’s Higashi Ward

    The media in Japan invariably report whether or not perpetrators are employed. You would think unemployment itself is a crime in this country.

    It's particularly strange in this case where the perpetrator is 17, and her employment status has nothing whatsoever to do with the story.

    Posted in: 17-year-old girl arrested over death of newborn infant

  • 0

    Sensato

    @Mick_Hardwick

    I hope you realize that The Japan Wanko is satire — a Japan-oriented version of The Onion.

    Posted in: Bob Sapp tops bill for Pyongyang fight night

  • 0

    Sensato

    Bob Sapp is one of my favorite celebrities on Japanese TV, and he conveys a positive image of the foreign community in Japan.

    He comes across as intelligent, gracious and down to earth, and he seems to enjoy the different roles he plays.

    Posted in: Bob Sapp tops bill for Pyongyang fight night

  • 0

    Sensato

    I was surprised to read it, but apparently people climb Mount St. Helens year round. It is a 7 to 11 hour round-trip hike, and can be completed by beginners.

    Here is the U.S. Forest Service website on the hike: http://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/mountsthelens/home/?cid=stelprdb5144806

    Posted in: Remains found on Mount St Helens identified as Japanese hiker

  • 1

    Sensato

    My local supermarket in Japan is an utter madhouse, with narrow isles and numerous store workers constantly scrambling from point A to point B in the process of stocking shelves and other duties.

    I've noticed that most often the workers' loud hollering of "irrashaimase" is used as a way of getting shoppers to clear the way as they pass by. They frequently come right up behind shoppers and do this. Nearly every time it happens to me I almost jump out of my skin.

    The constant high-decibel bellowing (and sometimes loud, obnoxious music) really stresses me out, and has caused me to cut my shopping trip and spending short at many stores.

    Posted in: Japanese people reflect on examples of excess customer service

  • 8

    Sensato

    On Aug 15, 1945, Emperor Hirohito announced Japan’s surrender on the radio, the first time the general public had ever heard his voice as he had been considered to be almost divine.

    The Emperor Hirohito's speech given on that day is known as the Gyokuon Hoso (玉音放送). As a child, before I ever knew anything about Japan I remember hearing the most famous line from that speech where he said that with the surrender the people of Japan would have to "endure the unendurable and suffer what is insufferable" (堪へ難きを堪へ、忍ひ難きを忍ひ in his words, or 私はこれから耐え難いことを耐え、忍び難いことを忍んで in modern Japanese).

    I have always found that line ironic, because the Japanese people had been suffering the insufferable during the war, but the surrender has brought decades of peace and more prosperity than Japan has ever known.

    Posted in: Abe pledges Japan's commitment to world peace

  • 0

    Sensato

    Japan's foremost trump card over the near term will be the reallocation of Government Pension Investment Fund money from JGBs to foreign/Japanese equities. As I understand it, the GPIF will announce the new fund allocation plan for January sometime in or after September, and other smaller pension funds will likely follow suit.

    Large sums of pension fund yen will be converted to dollars which will weaken the yen and drive up profits for Japanese exporters. This will buoy the Nikkei, and hopefully drive some economic growth.

    Posted in: Japan heads for third quarter rebound but pressure on BOJ, Abe may build

  • 9

    Sensato

    Francis called on South Korean Christians to combat “the spirit of unbridled competition which generates selfishness and strife” and to “reject inhuman economic models.”

    This is such a breath of fresh air in contrast to so many other evangelical religious leaders and prior popes.

    Posted in: Pope warns of 'cancer' of despair in S Korea sermon

View all