Sensato's past comments

  • 3

    Sensato

    Satoshi Uematsu, a 26-year-old former employee at the facility,

    The fact that Uematsu worked at this facility is extremely troubling, but I haven't heard the media report anything about what these patients may have endured under his care. The thought of him spending time one-on-one with these patients is very troubling, and there must have been red flags long before he made remarks about euthanizing disabled people.

    There are fairly frequent stories about deranged and sadistic caregivers at Japan's long-term care facilities torturing and even murdering residents. Obviously, the nation's labor shortage means that these facilities don't vet employees as well as they should, and keep workers on the payroll even when they are obviously mentally unfit.

    Still, the Japanese government keeps non-Japanese caregivers at bay by imposing absurd hurdles on their employment, on the premise that patients/residents prefer caregivers who are Japanese nationals. I think this nation would be able to offer a much higher standard of care with more non-Japanese caregivers. From what I have seen first-hand in the U.S. many of the best caregivers there are non-U.S. born.

    Posted in: Knife attacker said 'Hitlerism' occurred to him in Feb

  • 6

    Sensato

    She was later threatened with a 30,000 yen ($280) fine or six months in jail if she kept renting.

    Assuming the 30,000 yen fine is a one-off, and that the courts would virtually never tie up scarce and costly jail space for a non-violent misdemeanor, I think most BnB renters would opt to pay the fine and stay in business. Slap on the wrist.

    Posted in: Japan latest battleground in Airbnb home-sharing war

  • 12

    Sensato

    Niantic offers a form to request exclusions, but it’s neither automatic nor guaranteed.

    If for no other reason than Niantic/Nintendo's own self interest, you would think the company would have excluded many selected sites before the game was even released — solemn sites like the atomic bomb memorial, areas that are off limits like nuclear power sites, and sites where being engrossed in a game would be highly dangerous like train station platforms.

    Maybe this was utter lack of foresight on their part, maybe its because of an attitude that "even negative publicity is good publicity." Still, I could see hefty lawsuits coming their way due to this lack of due diligence on Niantic/Nintendo's part.

    Posted in: Hiroshima unhappy atomic bomb park is Pokemon Go site

  • 3

    Sensato

    I hope the Emperor can inspire Japan's dairy industry to substantially up its game, or otherwise be willing to allow more imported dairy products. The industry could do much better.

    Japan produces plenty of milk at somewhat reasonable prices, but forget it when it comes to dairy products beyond milk. There are regular shortages and rationing of butter (inexcusable for a first-world economy), sour cream costs over 200 yen ($2) for tiny 100 gram container, cheese is similarly overpriced, mediocre quality and little variety.

    Posted in: Emperor, empress visit dairy farm north of Tokyo

  • 1

    Sensato

    As is so often the case with many other outdated gadgets, the high-tech land of "Domo arigato Mr. Roboto" is the last to do away the VCR.

    It wasn't that many years ago that many people were still renting movies in VCR format from the local video rental store.

    Posted in: End of an era: VCRs headed for outdated tech heaven

  • 5

    Sensato

    The pros outweigh the cons, but there is at least one big con.

    If things go reasonably well cohabiting, it is easy to become lulled into a false sense of complacency thinking life as a married couple will be identical to what it was pre-marriage.

    Often you don't experience your partner's true colors until married, particularly once kids come into the picture. I see lots of happy cohabiting couples, few happily married ones.

    Posted in: What are the pros and cons of living with someone before you marry him/her?

  • 0

    Sensato

    As childish as it seems, Pokemon Go is an interesting concept, and probably a game changer.

    Given that Pokemon itself is geared to the mentality of nine-year-old children, I predict that Pokemon Go's novelty will eventually wear thin, making it a somewhat long-lived fad (but still generate lots of revenue in that time). Still, I think it will give rise to a new genre of massive multi-player scavenger hunt adventure games aimed at all ages, some involving substantial prizes, rewards and product promotions.

    This video "Chardonnay Go- A 'Pokemon Go' game for moms" is a spoof that has now gone viral, but I wouldn't be surprised to see a whole slew of applications along these lines: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-UxDbxBuvo

    Posted in: Is Pokemon Go just a fad?

  • 7

    Sensato

    Hats off to the pilot for keeping the passengers and crew safe.

    Posted in: Emergency landing closes runway at Tokyo's Haneda airport

  • 1

    Sensato

    The name of the current law providing for school meals, which went into effect in 2005, contains the term “shoku-iku kihon” (basic instructions in a proper diet) and this... is responsible for sweeping changes that have led to tie-ups with farmers...

    In many ways I give a resounding thumbs up to Japan's "shoku-ku" (food education) curriculum and the way it is tied into school lunch programs. For instance, at my children's pre-school/daycare there were activities from seed to table where the children planted a vegetable garden, then tended it and harvested the produce, and helped in using the vegetables to make a healthy school lunch. They also had a full-time nutritionist on staff. The lunches were always healthy.

    This was in sharp contrast to the school lunches my children were served while in the U.S. One of the lunches there, which I saw, consisted of tortilla chips with a small dose of salsa (the vegetable), smothered with fake cheese. Not even a healthy snack, let alone a "meal."

    On the negative side, the "shoku-iku" is used as an inroad for the JA and other Japanese agricultural and food industry special interests (who I am certain were behind the "shoku-iku kihon") to disseminate their food propaganda to young, malleable minds. This involves lots content about "Japanese food culture" that is implicitly and explicitly slanted against imported food, and involves things like occasionally serving whale meat (once a year in my children's case) to "teach" them about the integral/historic role of whale meat in Japanese food culture.

    Posted in: Japan's once-spartan school lunches go upscale in big ways

  • 7

    Sensato

    Japanese TV used to be a lot more risque back in the late 1980s, and truly bizarre even compared with what it is now. The censors have since tightened the screws and cleaned it up a bit.

    One of the first shows I watched here when I was fresh off the boat in that era was soft porn-comedy mishmash involving a tricycle race among young women wearing short skirts. The footage was chock full of gratuitous panty shots and inane remarks by the always present panel of "talento" commentators. That one has been etched in my mind for decades now.

    Posted in: The key to loving Japanese TV if you're a foreigner

  • 15

    Sensato

    This is one of those JT articles where many of the comments are much better and spot on than the article itself. For what it is worth, here's my two cents.

    People in Japan have a very high tolerance for repetition, whether it be working on an assembly line in a factory, doing endless drills nearly every single day for years on end in sports training, or television with the exact same content played endless loop decade after decade.

    One genre that I don't think has been mentioned yet is the comedy/game show torture and endurance style program. Those are sometimes downright warped in my opinion. One of the common situations that has been repeatedly shown for at least three decades is the one where people take turns sitting in a tub of ice water to see who can withstand the cold the longest. For some reason, that one never seems to get old.

    Posted in: The key to loving Japanese TV if you're a foreigner

  • -1

    Sensato

    It was the first time that Karpeles—noticeably thinner with long hair in a pony tail and wearing a baseball cap—has been out of custody since his arrest

    If anyone is looking for an effective diet and weight loss program, I think I've found it — the Japanese prison food diet, works every time.

    Posted in: Bitcoin CEO released on bail in embezzlement case

  • 0

    Sensato

    a central bank who accepts [implements] a helicopter money policy is buying government bonds in exchange for currency, that the government gives directly to the general policy [population], that will never be called in and therefore be in a condition of perpetuity or permanence.

    @Gary

    I stand by what I wrote, with one correction, a helicopter drop could involve the BOJ using the mechanisms you describe, with the government borrowing money from the BOJ and turning around and putting it directly into citizens' pockets. (But in that case the government would be obligated to repay the borrowings at some point, making this creation of new money "temporary." If the BOJ-government arrangement involved perpetual bonds, then the government would be obligated to pay a coupon against the borrowings forever.)

    Alternatively, a helicopter drop could involve leaving the government out of the picture, with the BOJ giving vouchers directly to citizens (no need to buy government bonds). This sort of creation of new money would be "permanent" in that the money created is not provided as loans, so there is never any repayment to the BOJ. So in this scenario, there is no "indefinite financing of fiscal spending" and no "perpetual bonds."

    Also, QE redistributes wealth to the 1% (makes the rich richer), but helicopter money redistributes wealth to the lower and middle classes.

    QE is theoretically a trickle down approach, which has yet to work as theorized — the BOJ prints money BOJ buys government bonds with it interest rates fall the wealthy use the cheap borrowings to create new jobs citizens earn more money and spend it overall consumer spending and inflation rise.

    A helicopter drop is different in that the money goes directly into the hands of citizens who spend it.

    Posted in: No chance Japan will adopt 'helicopter money,' say officials

  • 0

    Sensato

    “helicopter money,” a policy in which the central bank indefinitely finances fiscal spending through perpetual bonds

    Helicopter money is not "a policy in which the central bank indefinitely finances fiscal spending through perpetual bonds," as this article claims.

    According to Investopedia, helicopter money (a helicopter drop) is an "unconventional tool of monetary policy that involves printing large sums of money and distributing it to the public in order to stimulate the economy."

    So, helicopter money can be as short or long term as the central bank deems appropriate (so not "indefinitely"). Also, it does not involve bonds, nor does it involve financing fiscal spending (ie. "printing" money and giving it to the government). Instead, it involves the central bank (Bank of Japan in this case) creating new money and putting it in the hands of the citizens/residents of Japan who are most likely to spend, thereby fueling economic activity and spurring a measure of inflation.

    Posted in: No chance Japan will adopt 'helicopter money,' say officials

  • 1

    Sensato

    @lonelygaijin

    I realize that you downloaded Pokemon Go from the Aussie store, but are you now playing it in Japan? If so, I didn't realize that was possible.

    Posted in: Property owners: Get off my lawn, Pokemon!

  • 3

    Sensato

    I don't think it's unique to Japan at all. Murder and trying to dispose of the body is a pretty nasty thing to even just hear about.

    @theperson

    I agree that this is in no way unique to Japan, but just looking at the news on a regular basis gives the impression that a much higher percentage of murders in Japan involve dismembering the victim.

    Article Unavailable

  • 6

    Sensato

    When they finally do release Pokemon Go in Japan I expect there to be mayhem. I envision daily Japan Today articles about aficionados stepping off train platforms and many other tragic scenarios.

    Pokemon Go is a deluge of accidents waiting to happen.

    Posted in: Property owners: Get off my lawn, Pokemon!

  • 3

    Sensato

    It seems like not a week goes by that there is not a story of a murder in Japan involving dismemberment.

    It makes me wonder why cutting a body into pieces is so prevalent in homicides here. Sure, it happens around the world, but it is such a common theme in Japan for some reason.

    Article Unavailable

  • 6

    Sensato

    I wish this poll had an "unsure" option.

    If I'd been asked this several years ago, my answer would have been a resounding 'yes.' But now, I'm not so sure, particularly given the lesser of two evils in the U.S. presidential race, and the British population's unwise vote to leave the UK.

    Posted in: Do you think democracy is the best form of government?

  • 1

    Sensato

    This is a happy day for Abe, not so much for Japan's international community.

    As for the markets, I am guessing that this landslide LDP victory will cause the yen to get even stronger due to an increase in safe haven forex flows, particularly given the negative buzz surrounding Brexit.

    Posted in: Ruling bloc wins landslide in upper house election; voter turnout at 54.7%

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