Tamarama's past comments

  • 3

    Tamarama

    Interesting decision to go to Peleliu. I best most Japanese have never heard of it. It's worth reading E.B Sledge's book 'With the Old Breed' that walks through the Peleliu experience from his perspective as a US Marine- it's a frank and forthright chronicle of the absolute nightmare of battle.

    I applaud them for going there.

    Posted in: Emperor, empress to visit Palau April 8-9

  • 12

    Tamarama

    So...they actually did research for the first time, huh. I would congratulate them were it not for the farcical nature of the whole charade.

    Posted in: Whaling ships return home from Antarctic with no catch

  • 1

    Tamarama

    Of all the countries in the world I could never possibly be a Buddhist Monk in, it's Japan.

    Posted in: Buddhist monk arrested for filming up girl's skirt on escalator

  • 36

    Tamarama

    This seems pure folly to me. Nature simply isn't that predictable for a start, and the nature of moving water and the forces involved in a major tsunami would make it virtually impossible to control. I can see the water finding sections of weakness and heading on it's merry way.

    The other thing that strikes me about this is that for a country of people who absolutely prize the aesthetic beauty of things, they sure do some damn ugly construction around their coastline.

    Posted in: Japan opts for massive, costly sea wall to fend off tsunamis

  • 0

    Tamarama

    That trailer looks fantastic in my opinion, right up my alley.

    Rinko is fantastic, she is certainly one of Japan's truly outstanding actresses, so I will wait with much anticipation for this one.

    Posted in: Rinko Kikuchi stars in film about girl who went looking for 'Fargo' buried money

  • 3

    Tamarama

    Fushimi Inari is one of the best sights in Japan. In the world even.

    Posted in: Drum roll

  • 1

    Tamarama

    As a kid I couldn't sleep for 3 days after American Werewolf in London.

    Maybe Freddy Kruger.

    And then I was at home in Itabashi one night in 2005, in the futon watching TV, when this strange movie came on. It had a weird vibe and then all hell broke loose - it was Juon. Freakiest, creep show ever.

    Posted in: What are the three scariest movies you have ever seen?

  • 8

    Tamarama

    A couple of observations.

    The attempt to improve English language skills is Japan isn't really working very well at all. I have a couple of nephews and nieces who study English in Elementary school and one in Junior high school and they can not speak or understand English in any kind of meaningful way at all. If I deviate out of very, very basic predictable language structures they are gone. Can't respond at all. I think this is because the systems of language teaching and learning are effectively useless or long outdated, and the teachers - especially the foreign teachers employed to teach it know absolutely nothing about the pedagogy of teaching and learning in any subject, let alone English. Being an English speaker doesn't mean you know anything about the language or how to teach it - part of the reason groups like NOVA dissolved: a vary flawed business model.

    My other observation is a general objection to the idea that the majority Japan need to be 'Englishized' in any way, unless certain sections of the population need, or want to. If it's purely for business - then let the business take care of it. Businesses are very efficient at undertaking programs or improvements to suit their needs. Perhaps they need to partner up with Universities whom they draw candidates from to outline the kind of skills in candidates they need. These Universities may in turn, set requirements of certain schools and so on.

    Perhaps English language need only be a specialised skill for those who are inclined or motivated, not some dull, lobotomised subject in schools that strangles any kind of love for the Language.

    Posted in: 'Englishisation' - Is it working?

  • 4

    Tamarama

    Certainly nor unique to Japan, this.

    Posted in: Some parents, adult children can't let go of each other

  • 2

    Tamarama

    Whether or not the dropping of second bomb that killed approximately 75,000 in Nagasaki was needed is even more debatable.

    This article is about the firebombing, not the Atomic Bombs.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

  • 1

    Tamarama

    Pretty robust debate here since I last looked.

    For what it's worth, I certainly don't think America or the Allies owe Japan an apology, in the same way I don't think the Allies owe Germany any kind of apology for what was perpetrated against it's cities. Japan were a fanatically ambitious and viciously destructive force in the 1930's and 40's - an Army almost unparalleled in human history in this respect. I think that within the context of the zeitgeist of the time is how things need to be assessed and judged, not from the comfort of a chair in front of a computer in 2015.

    Japan could have spared it's cities at any time by surrendering, but the stubborn, crazed and fanatical military let it's fellow countrymen die en-masse in pursuit of military strategies that were futile and failing daily at the time - that's as much a crime as anything in my book.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

  • 1

    Tamarama

    No Abbott fanboy here, no sir, but this is a difficult and complex issue he is addressing here.

    I worked with Indigenous people for 8 years, so whilst being no expert of any description, I have had some interesting exposure to this issue. I think that the Indigenous connection to 'Country' needs to be recognised and understood - it's something that broader Australia doesn't have and quite simply the people from remote places that I met were completely defined by this. In fact, the best way I could really describe this is that the land is who they are and separation from it tended to be only ever short term only.

    But, those communities are almost entirely mini welfare states, with people surviving only on complete funding by the State. People rarely travel for employment, assuming that they are in fact employable, because many are not. The communities are impoverished, racked by violence, alcohol abuse, sexual abuse, substance problems. There is very little to no local employment and entrepreneurial inclination to try to create some is even more scarce.

    The welfare state mentality is unique, and I encountered it a lot. It seems to manifest itself as a belief that the State should be looking after the people completely and that the people should be allowed to live and do whatever they want to in return. What I felt was that it's a very one sided transaction, one where a group of people are demanding/receiving complete funding by a 'community' - being the broader Australian community, whom many Indigenous people really seem to want nothing to do with and in many instances are openly hostile and anti-social towards.

    This is, I think what Tony Abbott is alluding to, but it is very, very politically incorrect to articulate currently in that country. It's kind of the elephant in the room, the Emperor's new clothes.

    Posted in: Fury as Australian PM calls Aboriginal communities a 'lifestyle choice'

  • 2

    Tamarama

    Not important news, not really anybody else's business really.

    Posted in: Agriculture vice minister in trouble for kissing married colleague

  • 21

    Tamarama

    This is what Robert McNamara cites as what would have been war crimes by the US, had the Allies lost the war for some reason. I cannot imagine what this must have been like.

    I was in Kumagaya recently and did some research on the fire bombing of that city. It's tragic for the people because the US sorties took off with rumours that the Japanese had surrendered and subsequently weren't sure if they were to proceed. For the people of the city, they experienced the horror of the firebombing only to discover that the Emperor surrendered the very next day and the war was done.

    My wife's grandmother watched the bombing take place from across the Arakawa river as a little girl. It sounded harrowing and nightmarish.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

  • 5

    Tamarama

    I remember watching the movie Tora!Tora!Tora! whilst visiting a friend's farmhouse in 1983 as a young kid. It left quite an impression on me at the time. Don't think it's the world's greatest war movie by any stretch of the imagination but we weren't spoilt for choice back then and as an impressionable kid I was transfixed!

    Posted in: 10 things you probably didn’t know about Pearl Harbor

  • 0

    Tamarama

    Yeah, count me out.

    Posted in: It's raining cats and tourists on Aoshima

  • 5

    Tamarama

    I've had a couple of old dudes who were drunk muttering away at me in different situations - once was actually a group of guys who looked homeless in a Park who were telling me I was a foreigner, didn't belong in Japan and should go home. That sort of thing. I've never felt scared in any of the situations, they are hardly intimidating figures.

    I head a great story from a mate who had an irate, racist salaryman berate he and a friend in Japanese in Yokohama. The guy just objected to them for no other reason that they were foreigners and tried to get them to move from seats they were sitting on. He even got the police to assist him, who came and saw what he was doing and ignored him. So my mate started to suggest (in cultured Japanese) that he himself was a foreigner because he looked quite a lot like a North Korean - mostly around the eyes. The guy went apoplectic, but when the two of them stood up and he realised the scale of the physical mismatch and took off.

    Posted in: Have you ever experienced racism or sexual harassment? If so, what did you do about it at the time?

  • 28

    Tamarama

    Manila was the second-most devastated city in World War II after Warsaw, Poland, said historian Ricardo Jose of the University of the Philippines. He called the city one of the worst battlefields in the world.

    This is something you rarely hear, and I wonder if it's not residue of the Eurocentric Colonial days where Manila is considered a secondary outpost when compared to the war in Europe at the time. I'm a bit ashamed to say I didn't know this.

    I never met a more hospitable, a more cultured, a more accommodating people, he said. How could a people like this have produced an army as barbaric as the one that came here and Nanking? ... Nobody has yet explained that to me.

    It's one of the great questions in regards to the war and perhaps this is the question that Japan itself still cannot reconcile. Modern Japan's Fathers, Grandfathers and Great Grandfathers were part of one of the most heinous, vicious, sadistic armies to have ever walked the earth. The rest of the world knows and remembers it all too well, yet Japan seems unable to fully accept it and unwilling to really properly acknowledge it. And I guess what makes me say that the most is pretty much every Japanese person I know has essentially no knowledge of what Japan did in WW2, which I just find extraordinary. It's also sad and quite unjust to all of Japan's victims.

    Posted in: 70 years on, survivors keep memory of Battle of Manila alive

  • 1

    Tamarama

    This is a really appalling case imo and from the limited information we have access to here on the electronic internet it seems very premeditated, very sadistic and very, very heinous.

    Trying to cut someone's head off with a box cutter?! It's like something out of a SAW movie fcs.

    I feel for his mother and family.

    Posted in: Police arrest 3 youths over murder of Kawasaki boy

  • 30

    Tamarama

    Nothing better to do in the offices of the State run media that manufacture some pithy, infantile swipe at one of your neighbours? Grow up.

    The toilet seats in Japan are entirely magnificent.

    Posted in: China media mock Japan's luxury lavatories

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