Tessa's past comments

  • -2

    Tessa

    Regading Japanese women today, they are mostly lazy and wants a free ride without working.

    We must be living in the same neighborhood! What you say is true.

    Posted in: Are women Japan’s saviours?

  • 1

    Tessa

    @_Jack I've been in restaurants where my dining companions ordered whale and horse meats. I didn't join them, but I didn't judge them either.

    Posted in: Anybody care for horsemeat sushi?

  • -2

    Tessa

    Condoms are regularly handed out to athletes at major sporting events.

    But why? Surely they have other things on their minds?

    Posted in: Condoms hottest item at Asian Games

  • 0

  • -1

    Tessa

    BTW< teenagers have more accidents than "old people".

    Yes, but there are just so many old people in Japan! And a lot of them are drivers.

    Posted in: Truck driver arrested after hitting group of school children, killing 9-year-old girl

  • -10

    Tessa

    I don't get it. How can not drinking cause mental suffering?

    Posted in: Civil servant suing Fukuoka for one yen over employee drinking ban

  • 1

    Tessa

    Is it really true that a full third of all Japanese men smoke? Personally I find it very easy to avoid cigarette smoke in Japan (but then, I don't play pachinko or hang out in bars or izakaya).

    Posted in: Asia's rising tobacco epidemic

  • 0

    Tessa

    Why is the kimono market so stagnant? Have people finally started to realize what a rip-off the whole deal is? I have friends who have bought kimono costing more than $10,000 that they only wore once in public before mothballing them.

    Posted in: We’d like to introduce a new kimono culture while preserving their traditional charms. We recommend customers wear kimono and go out without worrying about formalities.

  • 1

    Tessa

    On a related note, I've been reading that her kid sister suddenly quit one school and entered another. I don't understand why this was such a big deal. Does anybody know?

    Posted in: Princess Mako leaves for one year of study in England

  • -1

    Tessa

    and yet there is a percentage of teachers who are themselves abusers......

    Children of school age spend far more of their waking hours with teachers than with parents, yet the vast majority of child abuse is committed by parents or their partners, not teachers or other caregivers.

    Increasingly we've seen pressure for schools to assume a wider range of roles. People want schools to do health checkups, babysit, host sports clubs and sporting events, give moral education, give psychological counselling and even discipline their children... the list grows longer and longer every year.

    I totally agree. I've worked closely with children for several years in Japan, and most of my students come from "good" families with caring parents. Yet recently I've noticed a trend in mothers who have no idea of how to raise, train or discipline their little ones to be members of society. You'd be amazed if you knew the things that parents expect me to do. Recently I was asked to toilet-train a five-year-old!

    Posted in: Schools are essential in the battle against child abuse because they can confirm the safety of a child by his or her attendance. The problem, however, is that they don't like to let others intervene to resolve issues, be it bullying or child abuse.

  • 1

    Tessa

    A few years ago UNESCO took the drastic step of revoking the World Heritage status of Dresden Elbe Valley in Germany, because of construction of a bridge that would alter its natural beauty. This was widely reported in the Japanese press amongst much gleeful cackling and "Nihon de arienai!" ("it would never happen here!").

    In a way, I hope the same fate befalls Mt. Fuji. It might teach a few people here that pride really does go before a fall. And more importantly, it might teach them to clean up their act.

    I've never climbed Fujii, but what they are describing in general sounds like what I see when I go hiking in other, even much less frequented, hills and mountains in Japan. The amount of garbage can be overwhelming in some places. Beaches and almost the entire coastline of the country is the worst, so much garbage gets washed ashore that you can't even see the sand in some places.

    Yes! I'd love to see Mt. Fuji up close, but so many Japanese friends have begged me not to bother, and to admire its great beauty from a distance. I think I'll heed their advice.

    Posted in: Large amount of trash and waste left on Mt Fuji

  • 4

    Tessa

    Mt. Fuji and surrounding area has always been used as a garbage dump, including industrial waste. The real reason it was designated as a cultural (rather than natural) heritage site is because of all the garbage, despite clean-up efforts.

    Like so many things here, better off admired from afar.

    Posted in: Large amount of trash and waste left on Mt Fuji

  • -1

    Tessa

    @bicultural: he lived in a house with sliding doors. It was summer, and one of them was unlocked. (And according to a friend, even a cat can open one of those, let alone a two-year-old child.)

    Posted in: Search for missing 6-year-old girl in Kobe enters 5th day

  • -6

    Tessa

    As such, earthquakes like this are the norm in Japan.

    Yes, but in Kansai (Osaka and environs) extremely rare these days. I look at all the news from Kanto about quakes and shakes, and think "do we even live on the same island?"

    Posted in: M5.6 quake jolts Kanto region; no tsunami alert

  • -2

    Tessa

    Oh, please be okay little girl!

    We don't know the whole story.

    One day I came across a half-clothed little boy riding his tricycle in heavy traffic. I plucked him from the road, and asked him where his mother was, but he was so small that he couldn't speak much at all. By a wonderful coincidence his next-door-neighbour saw us, and took us both to his home, where his distraught mother was calling the police. I found out that the mother had ducked out for a few minutes while he was napping to pick up his cold medicine from the pharmacy ... little did she dream that her feverish son would wake from a sound sleep, and decide to go for a bike ride. Kids do the darndest things! She was obviously very regretful, and I found myself sympathizing with her. As other posters have said, we don't know the whole story.

    Posted in: Search for missing 6-year-old girl in Kobe enters 5th day

  • 0

    Tessa

    Wow. Talk about just not getting it. No wonder 80 years hasn't been sufficient.

    I agree. You mean he thinks that the Asahi Shimbun is solely responsible for "staining" the reputation of Japan?

    Quite a few well-meaning Japanese acquaintances have pointed me to the Asahi's apology (English version) as if they really thought that that particular media outlet had previously given me a bad impression of Japan. Talk about out of touch!

    Posted in: It’s true that many people have suffered, and Japan’s honor has been stained in the international community because of the Asahi Shimbun’s erroneous reporting.

  • -3

    Tessa

    This happened to me a few times, actually. But yes, I agree, big yawn.

    Love to see a alternative Japanese version: "Wow, I went overseas and a man I didn't even know held a door open for me!"

    Posted in: Japanese customer service: So amazing that employees will burst out of the walls to help you

  • 1

    Tessa

    That's very cute!

    Posted in: Grande hug

  • -8

    Tessa

    I have heard many stories of young men being harassed by older females at work (not only in Japan, by the way!). They were placed in very awkward situations, and I have a lot of sympathy for them.

    I would never dream of harassing a younger male junior at work, there's no fun in that. I'm sorry to say that I have been the harasser of much older male co-workers. One of them - a happily married grandfather - refused to be alone in a room with me. The other tolerated my abuse for years without complaint, but eventually quit with a stomach ulcer. True story.

    Posted in: Female bosses not averse to sexual harassment

  • -3

    Tessa

    I love the way that in Japan a person can become a national hero for coming in second place, or even lower. Just about every conversation with my students and friends in the past few days has been about Nishikori's "win for Japan." Oh, and they never fail to mention the height of his opponent, (as if the dastardly man did it on purpose!). Of course, mention Michael Chang and they suddenly change the subject ...

    Posted in: Hero's welcome

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