Tessa's past comments

  • 2

    Tessa

    There is possiblity that the person really did not understand you.

    There is also the possibility that the person wasn't willing to look beyond your foreign face. A well-known travel writer, who spoke fluent Japanese, was rudely turned away from a ryokan because there weren't any vacancies. A few minutes later he called the ryokan from a public phone and asked for a room (in Japanese) ... mysteriously there was a room available. He didn't take it. I've heard many stories like this.

    Posted in: How do you feel when you speak fluent or reasonably good Japanese to a Japanese person and they insist on answering you in English?

  • 3

    Tessa

    One of the strangest conversations I've ever had was on a bus tour in Naha. I was seated next to a nice middle-aged couple from Yokohama. The wife was friendly, the husband was shy but keen on talking to me. Here's how the conversation went:

    Husband: I like her watch, where did she get it?

    Wife: He likes your watch, where did you get it?

    Me: In Switzerland.

    Wife: She says she got it in Switzerland.

    Husband: Oh, that sounds like a nice place.

    Wife: He said that it sounds like a nice place.

    Me: You should go, it's great.

    Wife: She says we should go.

    And so on and so forth, for the duration of the ride.

    The strange thing is, we were all speaking in Japanese!

    Posted in: How do you feel when you speak fluent or reasonably good Japanese to a Japanese person and they insist on answering you in English?

  • -2

    Tessa

    I think you were good looking, so the Japanese persons were shy making eye contact with or talking to you. People act strangely when they are nervous.

    Nope. Recently I spoke with a British engineer (short, fat, bald and fiftyish - nice guy, but definitely not good looking) and his Singaporean colleague. They both complained to me that restaurant staff would only address the Chinese one, not the Brit. They were working all over Japan, and this issue was really annoying for them.

    Posted in: How do you feel when you speak fluent or reasonably good Japanese to a Japanese person and they insist on answering you in English?

  • 1

  • 11

    Tessa

    I uh, just don't know what to say. Coming hot on the heels of that bizarre solo wedding service article a few days ago, too. No wonder the birth rate's so low!

    Posted in: Mickey men: All-male trips to Tokyo Disneyland popular

  • -1

    Tessa

    I dismissed the idea at the time, and everyone told me I was wrong.

    Yeah, me too. I remember the hoopla and how much was made of her intelligence and supposed high-flying career (in contrast with Diana). I shocked people at the time by saying she would be regarded as little more than a baby machine, and I was right.

    Posted in: Recovering crown princess attends 1st imperial banquet in 11 years

  • 1

    Tessa

    English is not just "difficult", English is VERY difficult, maybe THE most difficult language in the world.

    No, it's not. It's so easy that it has become the third most widely spoken language in the world (after Chinese and Spanish).

    Posted in: Why does 'Engrish' happen in Japan?

  • 0

    Tessa

    And lets be honest, most men have seen this, too, and its an international problem, but so many dudes never wash their hands after pee-pee time.

    Speaking as a female, I've seen similar behaviour in women's lavatories. At the most, they run their hands under a cold water tap (often the only thing available) for a few seconds, and then wipe their hands on a worn cotton towel that they keep in their handbag. Many women brush their teeth in the same sinks, spitting their saliva everywhere. And when they pull out the full make-up kit and primp and preen themselves for half an hour ... well, don't get me started on the nasty stray hairs, used Q-tips, tissues, blotting papers, and face powder trails that they leave around the basin.

    by the way, I used to teach at a women's college that had a problem with students vomiting so much into the toilets that they got blocked up (eating disorders?), but somehow I don't think that's a problem unique to Japan.

    Posted in: 5 tips for staying healthy while traveling in Japan this winter

  • -1

    Tessa

    The homeless in this country are almost all males and to obtain any "social welfare payment" requires the applicant to already having an address.

    In cases like this, males are treated shoddily anyway. I've personally witnessed this at my local town hall.

    The other day in Hongo, Tokyo, I spotted a street vendor selling copies of The Big Issue Japan.

    I don't know how long you've been living in Japan, but Big Issue vendors have been around for a few years, at least in Osaka. I used to walk around with a foreign (European) boyfriend who made a point of buying a Big Issue from every vendor that he saw, even if it meant buying the same magazine several times a day in a language he couldn't understand. I urged him to stop doing so, because "homelessness is not a problem in Japan." I feel ashamed of my words now.

    Posted in: Undercounting Tokyo’s down and out

  • 1

    Tessa

    I am pretty much immune to Engrish in Japan, I prefer other-country versions (and c'mon, they all do it!).

    My personal favourite is a sign I saw outside a restaurant in Fiji, testifying to the speediness of the service.

    "YOU ORDER TODAY, WE SERVE YOU TODAY!"

    Now that's service!

    Posted in: Why does 'Engrish' happen in Japan?

  • -2

    Tessa

    3) Not a small number of guys who come to Japan had their own problems dealing with western women before they came to Japan, and that's without a language barrier.

    Hammer, nail, head!

    Posted in: Worst date ever! Japanese ladies reveal the top five date ideas to avoid

  • -1

    Tessa

    Come to think of it, I really have noticed fewer street people, at least in Osaka. They used to be everywhere, and "tent cities" (those distinctive blue tarp communities) used to be a common sight. What happened to them?

    Posted in: Undercounting Tokyo’s down and out

  • 0

    Tessa

    In any other country if the lady saw that when she showed up especially with the way she was dressed she would just walk away without so much as a call later on as to what happened.

    I totally agree Jason, but his flaxen hair and big blue eyes cover a multitude of shortcomings, I'm sure. She was probably just happy to be seen with him.

    A Japanese woman's idea of the worst kind of date is the one where she has to pay a bit of money.

    Ha ha! So true!

    Posted in: Worst date ever! Japanese ladies reveal the top five date ideas to avoid

  • -2

  • 0

    Tessa

    I saw a huge dating cultural clash in action a few days ago that probably wouldn't happen with J-J couples. He (Aussie guy) showed up at the appointed spot dressed in sandals, baggy cargo pants, and a slightly wrinkled t-shirt, all the better to accentuate his beer gut. She (Japanese lady) was attired in a tight-fitting, glittery dress, inch-thick make-up, carefully styled hair, and killer heels. From what I could make out of their conversation, they couldn't decide whether to go for a beer at a sports bar (his idea) or a leisurely stroll along the main shopping street (hers).

    A match made in heaven! I'm sure they'll make beautiful babies.

    Posted in: Worst date ever! Japanese ladies reveal the top five date ideas to avoid

  • 2

    Tessa

    It really is astounding DoubleThink that a place where soap is considered optional in lavatories can consider itself such an epitome of cleanliness.

    And don't forget the charming custom of carrying around toilet paper (well, what do you think those free tissue packets are really used for?), and for the ladies, cotton hand towels that are kept in the handbag to be used over and over again in the course of a day, not just for hand wiping but for mopping up sweat, spilled drinks, etc.

    Posted in: 5 tips for staying healthy while traveling in Japan this winter

  • 2

    Tessa

    The boom period was in the late 1990s when we had 600,000 Japanese a year.

    Just about every woman I know over a certain age has been to the Lake District. Something about a rabbit.

    Posted in: Bringing Britain to life for Japanese visitors

  • 6

    Tessa

    It is interesting that the main problem seems to be a lack of cleanliness and hygiene , which contradicts what every Japanese tells you about Japan.

    I agree, I thought this article was going to be about avoiding collisions on the slopes. When I first came to Japan I caught every bug, germ and virus going around until my system toughened up and became immune, a process that took more than two years, not two weeks!

    Rather than going for cheap, go for clean.

    One of my pen-pals visited Japan just to stay at a ryokan in Kyoto. She was shocked to find dust all over the place and bloodstains on the bedding. It wasn't one of those budget places, either.

    Bacterial hand wash is everywhere in Japan.

    Does the writer mean those squirt bottles filled with weak alcohol solution that I've never seen anyone using? How effective can that stuff be anyway? I'd gladly exchange it for hot water, soap, and paper towels in all restrooms. Unfortunately, those seem to be about as rare as men who don't spit, or people who actually think to cover their mouths before sneezing.

    Posted in: 5 tips for staying healthy while traveling in Japan this winter

  • 1

    Tessa

    @TrevorPeace: talking a stroll around a temple garden is actually a nice idea! It's quiet, peaceful, and you can gauge each other's level of interest by talking about rocks, moss, garden, religion, life, and the universe (in no particular order). I wouldn't go for lunch, I'd probably just settle for an ice cream on the first date. Thanks for the idea!

    @tinawatanabe: read the above.

    Posted in: Worst date ever! Japanese ladies reveal the top five date ideas to avoid

  • 1

    Tessa

    This is terribly, terribly sad, but what does religion have to do with it?

    Posted in: 2 children among 4 dead in fire at Ishikawa religious facility

  • 海外営業事務

    海外営業事務
    株式会社セドナエンタープライズ、Tokyo
    Salary: ¥220,000 ~ ¥400,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Sales & Marketing Staff

    Sales & Marketing Staff
    Nicolai Bergmann (ニコライバーグマン株式会社)、Tokyo
    Salary: ¥230,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Social Media Manager

    Social Media Manager
    Nicolai Bergmann (ニコライバーグマン株式会社)、Tokyo
    Salary: ¥230,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Cafe Kitchen Staff

    Cafe Kitchen Staff
    Nicolai Bergmann (ニコライバーグマン株式会社)、Tokyo
    Salary: ¥200,000 / Month Negotiable
  • Cafe Manager

    Cafe Manager
    Nicolai Bergmann (ニコライバーグマン株式会社)、Tokyo
    Salary: ¥250,000 / Month Negotiable

View all