Tessa's past comments

  • -1

    Tessa

    For a country that prides itself on food, food quality and safety, there are far too many food poisoning cases and deaths.

    Yes, that is true. In many kitchens, hygiene practices leave a lot to be desired. Actually most Japanese people shrug it off as "one of those things" and are really shocked when I inform them that mass food poisonings are uncommon in other supposedly developed nations.

    By the way, there are plenty of smaller-scale cases that don't make it into the news, and are hushed up through payments and apologies. I've heard about them through friends and colleagues.

    Posted in: 300 suffer food poisoning at Nagano sports tournament

  • 0

    Tessa

    Andrew Tuck, editor of Monocle, a London-based global affairs and lifestyle magazine, said of his recent trip here: “Having good manners shouldn’t be difficult, but a country as well behaved as Japan has turned being nice into an art. And if I was in charge of marketing for Japan, I’d be bottling it and selling it. Being nice is nice.”

    Have you noticed that it's almost always males who say that? What's the reason for that?

    Posted in: Brand building: Why Japan plays catch-up with regional competitors

  • 0

    Tessa

    "Something irreparable" already has happened.

    Posted in: I'd like those concerned to make a responsible decision before something irreparable occurs.

  • 0

    Tessa

    Japan did really well without "womenonmics."

    Then why is the birth rate so low?

    Posted in: Womenomics: Is it working?

  • 0

    Tessa

    Tessa, the tissue packets and hand-held fans contain information, and are more likely to be read and referred to than flyers. It's a common campaigning and advertising tactic in Japan.

    I work in a high-traffic area, and on average, I receive five packets of tissues a week. That's around 250 a year. Honestly, I have never learned anything I didn't already know, or bought any product or service from, a PSA/ad on a tissue packet! Not even once! An informal survey of my students and co-workers suggests the same thing.

    Posted in: Police hold event to publicize danger of loophole drugs

  • 0

    Tessa

    Japanese capitalism is predicated on the fact that people are easy to exploit here.

    It also relies on the fact that traditionally, family bonds are extremely strong here, and family members give each other a good deal more support than in most Western societies. Whenever someone has a major life event - gives birth, starts school, gets married, moves house, gets sick and hospitalized, suffers a misfortune, or holds a funeral ceremony - you can be sure that their relatives (and to a lesser extent friends and co-workers) will help them out with cash infusions, sometimes quite large ones. It is entrenched in society, and I think it's a very good custom actually. However, there are growing numbers of people who seem to have nobody to help them out at all, and have to rely on poorly paid jobs to make ends meet. These people are easy to exploit.

    Posted in: Japan's child poverty rate hits record high

  • 2

    Tessa

    In these cases, there is something that you have to know about Japan: the bigger one always gets blamed, regardless of who is actually at fault.

    For example, if a car collides with a motorbike, then the driver of the car will be blamed.

    If a motorbike hits a bicycle, then the bike driver will be blamed.

    And if a bicycle hits a pedestrian, then the cyclist will be blamed.

    It's always the "bigger" ones fault. That's just the way it is here.

    Why did the grandfather let a 3 year old exit a car and go around the car by herself on a road where there is traffic?

    I'd like to know that, too. Most Japanese streets are incredibly narrow and lacking in proper pavements. We've all had experiences of being in homes or shops where you didn't even dare open the front door without checking for traffic first, let alone in vehicles.

    My sympathies to everyone involved in this sad case, including the driver.

    Posted in: 3-year-old girl hit and killed by car in Osaka; driver arrested

  • 8

    Tessa

    Oh, thank god!

    Posted in: Missing Okayama girl found unharmed; 49-year-old man arrested

  • 2

    Tessa

    Handing out tissues ... yeah, that's gonna keep people off drugs!

    Posted in: Police hold event to publicize danger of loophole drugs

  • 23

    Tessa

    One of the lowest birthrates and one of the highest child poverty rates! How on earth does a country manage that?

    Posted in: Japan's child poverty rate hits record high

  • 3

    Tessa

    My wife is half Russian and she doesn't share these views. In fact shes ashamed and disgusted about her heritage.

    I'm sad to hear that. :-(

    Posted in: Global anger intensifies over downed Malaysia Airlines jet

  • 0

    Tessa

    I can't speak, I'm so shocked.

    Posted in: Int'l probe demanded after Malaysian airliner shot down over Ukraine

  • 2

    Tessa

    They look livelier than some of the people I see on the train every day.

    Posted in: Japanese androids take us closer to 'Blade Runner' future

  • 62

    Tessa

    I don't get it, why was the security camera footage not used in the original case?

    Posted in: Teacher's conviction for groping girl on bus overturned by Tokyo court

  • 0

    Tessa

    I've had several experiences of being the object of unrequited love, some in my home country, and some in Japan (and by the way, the Japanese ones were really,really creepy and persistent. Following me around on trains, calling my employers and asking for my work schedules, etc).

    My advice is: radio silence. Do not respond to emails or phone messages. Just act as if this person no longer exists in your life. Eventually he or she will give up.

    Posted in: If you are the object of unrequited love, what is the best way to deal with the situation so that it doesn't worsen?

  • 2

    Tessa

    And many people report that seeing airplane mechanics bowing to each arriving plane as one of the best things about Japan.

    Yes, they do. I fly a lot and I love getting a window seat and waiting for the moment that the ground crew bow in unison as the plane takes off.

    The conductors on the train often turn and bow briefly when leaving or entering each carriage. My overseas friends are utterly enchanted by this custom, as it doesn't seem to exist anywhere else in the world.

    Oh, and in my local supermarket, the staff even bow when leaving for the stockroom! (And I do not live in a fancy neighborhood.)

    Such a simple and respectful gesture, which costs no time or money at all. I hope it never dies out in Japan. On the other hand, I hope it doesn't catch on in other lands. Outside of Japan, it would seem creepy, servile, and robotic. I wouldn't want to raise kids in a land where they were expected to bow deeply to other people as a way of saying thankyou for giving me the pleasure of cleaning out your ashtray.

    Posted in: Why do Japanese cleaning crews bow at trains?

  • 3

    Tessa

    Kick females out of the work force and give their jobs to the hikikomori.

    You don't get it. Females in Japan have never been a major part of the (measurable) workforce. And I do strongly believe that indulgent, stay-at-home-mothers are largely responsible for the presence of hikikomori males. I've seen this dynamic in action many, many times (not only in Japan, by the way).

    You seem to long for a return to the Showa era. But if those days were so wonderful then why aren't we living in them now?

    Posted in: Society's shut-ins are getting older

  • -4

    Tessa

    @mikeylikesit Um, so what are you suggesting exactly, that Japanese women shouldn't be educated past high school level? Frankly, I don't see any difference.

    Posted in: A silver lining to Japan’s demographic crisis

  • 0

    Tessa

    By all means give 'em advice and guidance, but the ultimate decision as to what they're going to do with their lives is their own, no one else's.

    This sounds like the voice of experience! :-)

    Posted in: Rola changing DNA of Japanese pop culture

  • 4

    Tessa

    It's almost as if they're told to act like this by management. Oh wait... I could be on to something!

    You are definitely on to something, but I think that jpn_guy above got on to it first with his brilliant post.

    But not all mixed race people in Japan could, or even want to be, celebrities. Kids like mine just want normal lives. They might want to be a lawyer, a pilot, a shipbuilding engineer or a dental technician.

    I understand. One of my colleagues who was expecting his first baby told me how stressful it was that every Japanese person he met assumed that the cute haafu baby was going to become a model or TV talent or something like that. You see, the pressure starts even before birth. After his daughter was born, he and his wife decided to move to his home country, where their child could start with a blank slate and not be subject to all sorts of ridiculous assumptions and preconceptions.

    On the other hand, sometimes parents, not society, are the worst.

    A little girl told me crying, that her parents expected her to be a "bridge between east and west," and all she wanted to be was ... a dolphin trainer!

    Another little boy had had his whole life mapped out for him by his parents and grandparents. He was going to be educated in both Japan and the US, at high-level private schools. Eventually he was going to settle in Hawaii with a high-paying job, and he was going to invite his grandparents to live with him. This boy was four years old.

    Basically, as parents, you have got to decide what's right for your kids ... but sometimes, I think these decisions should be made before they are born.

    Posted in: Rola changing DNA of Japanese pop culture

View all