ThonTaddeo's past comments

  • 4

    ThonTaddeo

    Looks like the media is ramping up the "poor Abe, his ministers' failings caused him to honorably resign" strategy which will see a new PM in office next year... but with Abe's catastrophic sales tax rise, planned inflation, and devaluation of the yen perfectly intact, as the LDP wants. Only the compliant newspaperswill be saying "it wasn't fair to Abe; he never had a chance to finish what he started" instead of "these charlatans stabbed us in the back", which is what anyone in Japan with savings in the bank should be thinking.

    Posted in: Abe's troubles may not end despite resignations of two ministers

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    Is Makoto Sakurai even this guy's real name? I thought it was a pseudonym. Why would the mayor even be willing to talk with someone who hides behind an assumed name while spouting this nonsense?

    Posted in: Hashimoto, Zaitokukai chairman get into shouting match

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    Edojin, I too was initially shocked when I saw how that game turned out and what the rules were, but the more I think about it, the more I agree with them. If the Hanshin Tigers and Hiroshima Carp were winners of different divisions and were meeting in the playoffs, then they should meet each other in the playoff series on an even footing, but as it is, the Tigers already beat the Carp in the regular season, finishing ahead of them. If all Hiroshima can do in a playoff series deciding game is tie Hanshin, then Hanshin is still the better team and deserves to go to the next round.

    And I'm not just saying that because I'm a Tiger fan. I detest the Yomiuri Giants, but if the same rules apply in the next series and the Tigers can only tie the Giants in a deciding game, then the Giants, who finished ahead of the Tigers, deserve to be league champions.

    Of course, this entire playoff system, in which a 140-game season is played just to see fully half the teams make it to the postseason, is silly. I vastly prefer the traditional syustem where the teams that have proven their superiority all season long meet for the championship. If they want more rounds of playoffs, they can face off against the champions in Korea or Taiwan.

    Posted in: Japanese baseball results

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    Unfortunately, it's true. On a percentage basis, how many people are employees, and how many are employers? If you were given a lot of money, what would you do with it? You would say the same thing everyone else says, they would pay off their debts, buy something nice for themselves, and use the rest wisely.

    This almost never happens ... I once went to cover a party held by one of the American states to celebrate the ten year anniversary of said state's lottery ... Almost every single winner in attendance had blown through all of their winnings, most were no better off than before they won.

    Sangetsu, I have to agree that this is a patronizing view of the average person, and want to remind you that "people who buy lottery tickets" are hardly representative of John and Jane (or Taro and Hanako) Q. Taxpayer. People who buy lottery tickets regularly are already predisposed to make bad financial decisions -- they made one when they bought a low-odds lottery ticket to begin with.

    I'm sure many people here have come into significant amounts of money and managed it perfectly well. I myself once received nearly two years' take-home pay in one big bonus when the startup company I worked for was sold off. That money sat unspent in my bank account for four years until it came time to purchase my home; I didn't even buy one single luxury.

    Many people are capable of such patience -- we just don't notice them because they don't mention the money they've got and have successfully put it out of their own minds.

    We don't need the IMF, BOJ, or Federal Reserve to do anything about the world's economies. We need these self-serving fools to get their hands off our money. We need to get their hands off setting interest rates, issuing bonds, and then buying them back themselves. We need them to stop pumping low-interest "liquidity" into the markerts, which is allowing companies to do the same borrow-and-spend nonsense to pump up their stock values.

    This part of your post I agree with entirely. Every time any of those three organizations does something or suggests something, the lower/middle class taxpayers are the ones bearing the brunt of the costs.

    Posted in: 'Abenomics' architect calls for BOJ easing, tax hike delay

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    What no longer even needs to be said is that regular people -- the ordinary, hard-working, money-saving, salt-of-the-earth average Taro -- are the biggest losers of all under a government devoted to devaluation and inflation.

    Things are bad enough now, but I'm really worried about what Japan will be like 20 years from now when the gap between rich and poor has widened far beyond what it is now. A whole generation of underemployed people barely able to save and whose savings are steadily devalued each year, against a numerically larger generation of property-owning rich elderly, protected from inflation by their indexed pensions and secure in the knowledge that the politicians always have their backs.

    That's what Abe and his 1950s-born cohorts are setting Japan up for. Today the young's hatred and envy of the old is tempered by the fact that today's elderly had to live through WWII, which was harsher than anything that has come after, and then they built Japan back up in the years after. But what happens when that generation is gone and it becomes plain that government policy favors a generation that has always had every advantage in life compared to their parents, their children, and their grandchildren?

    Posted in: The contrast will be notable between winners and losers under the current currency situation. We expect that the yen will continue to fall and the government will have to work out measures to support small and medium-sized companies’ financing.

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    The primary reason games take longer is television, specifically television commercials. The commercial breaks between innings get longer and longer and we're supposed to not notice.

    Today, if I'm not mistaken, it's 2 minutes and 10 seconds after every half inning on nationally televised games. That means 39 minutes of TV commercials, every single game. Today, advertising is everywhere inside the ballparks and is always in the background: behind the batter, on the outfield walls, above the dugouts. And still commercials are making games longer?

    No other major league sport plays by different rules in different divisions

    DIfferent "divisions"? The National League and the American League are two different leagues, and until Selig came along there were sharp lines between them. They each had their own presidents and offices, and one league almost never interfered in the other's affairs. That the author seems to not know this is another stain on Selig's legacy. I say bring back the autonomy of the two leagues: then they could each experiment with things and we would have more innovation and improvement.

    Posted in: Great game, but baseball in need of a fix

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    "Police quoted Hirano as saying that her husband had come home raging drunk and violently hit her. "

    An easy claim to make when the accused is no longer alive to refute it.

    Posted in: Manager of ryokan in Ibaraki arrested for murder of husband

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    Laguna, you'll be surprised at what happens once the 10-cent charge comes in. At my local supermarket here in Tokyo (where parking is also free -- that is to say, subsidized by all customers including those who cannot drive), just a few months ago they instituted a 2-yen charge for bags, I've seen people juggling items in their arms when a bag would really have helped, and have also seen angry customers berating the poor register staff for something that they had no hand in deciding on.

    And the points is not that they do eschew bags, but that they could. And they pay no additional charges for the massive infrastructure that stores have to build so that they can get their goods home easily, or for the environmental impact of that infrastructure. And we're charging people for something as trivial as plastic bags.

    As an environmentalist myself, I'd really have no problem paying 10 cents for a bag if those other big polluters were paying a dollar an hour for their parking spaces.

    Posted in: California to be first U.S. state to ban plastic bags

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    I notice that not a single word is being said about how almost all supermarkets outside major urban areas (and sometimes in them too) offer automobile parking at no additional cost. This is even written into the law in many places.

    So a pedestrian walks to the supermarket, buys some heavy items and needs a bag to take them home in, and is charged 10 cents. Another person drives to the supermarket, parks in the supermarket lot at no extra charge, buys some heavy items and doesn't need a bag because they can sit in the trunk of the car.

    The pedestrian pays money and the driver pays nothing. The pedestrian's impact on the environment is one plastic bag. The driver's car puts pollution in the air, contributes to the heat island effect, and takes up valuable space outside the supermarket (making that pedestrian's walk to the store that much longer).

    This is something that environmental groups are backing?

    Posted in: California to be first U.S. state to ban plastic bags

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    Because from a distance the kanji, which are more would just look like big blobs, and most names are only three characters long at most, so they don't really fit well across a player's shoulders like a romanization of the same name, which on average would be 8 letters long.

    On high school practice uniforms, which are unadorned plain white with nothing printed on them, you sometimes see players write their names in big kanji covering their entire backs. Those are very readable, just as numbers on the backs are, as seen in thie picture: https://www.sports-nakama.com/hosoi/bbs/bbs_Image15.JPG

    Back when baseball was just beginning in Japan, there were no numbers on the jerseys, and many teams had English writing on the front while others had Japanese. When numbers became standard in the 1930s, you sometimes saw kanji numerals on the backs (most famously by the touring team that would eventually become the Tokyo Giants). Then during the following more militaristic period, English team names disappeared along with the numbers on the backs. When baseball resumed under the US Occupation, English was back in favor, and all professional team names and numbers were in English. So by the time names on the backs started to appear in the 1960s and 1970s, the Anglicization of Japanese baseball uniforms was a foregone conclusion, and there was never any consideration of anything other than romanized names.

    It is interesting to think about what might have happened if baseball history had been a little different. If the concept of player names on uniforms had preceded that of numbers, we might see big kanji names on the backs instead of numbers. And Westerners would be asking why the Japanese don't use numbers like the rest of the world does.

    Posted in: Why do Japanese pro baseball team uniforms have the players' names in romaji instead of kanji?

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    I suppose I should write all my passwords and bank account PINs on printed-out naked pictures of myself. If anyone uses them to access my account and steal all my money, they'll be punished more for seeing the picture than they will for stealing my savings!

    Posted in: Should naked photo hacking be considered a sex crime?

  • -1

    ThonTaddeo

    That's like asking for a charity to raise money for the young, rich and healthy.

    Luca, very few people in Japan are all three of those things. If you're the first and third, you're not the second, and if you're the second, you're certainly no longer the first.

    Posted in: New Gender Equality Minister

  • 5

    ThonTaddeo

    As a long-time player of nanshiki yakyu, let me clarify one point for people claiming that this sport is somehow related to softball: it isn't. It's baseball.

    The ball was invented in 1919 by a certain rubber-making corporation specifically for use in amateur baseball; it weighs the same as a cork-rubber-and-horsehide ball and is the same size, but is much cheaper to make and can be washed, making it ideal for baseball on a budget.

    You wouldn't think so given the increase in rubber in the ball's composition, but it actually wasn't as "lively" as a real baseball originally -- turns out that the rubber flattens out more than the string and horsehide do. So the ball has been tweaked over the years so that it better approximates a real ball.

    And come on, Probie, you of all people should appreciate the beauty of a low-scoring game. Imagine two indefatigable goalies making save after save, stopping shot after shot, with the tension steadily building as the fans start to wonder who will finally put the puck in the net and break the scoreless deadlock? I enjoyed watching many such games in the Stanley Cup playoffs in the 1990s, where seemingly every game was a multiple-overtime low-scoring nail-biter. It was great, and so was this extra-inning baseball marathon.

    Posted in: High school baseball championship sets record for longest game: 50 innings and four days

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    Klepinger, Nishimura did in fact use the correct phrase, which is "percentage points", not "percent'. (In Japanese this is ポイント rather than パーセント.) Plenty of other reporters get this wrong, as do politicians looking to hide the impact of their tax hikes, but this time the Vice Economy Minister was not mistaken. His organization's policies, on the other hand...

    Posted in: Vice economy minister: More caution needed on next tax hike

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    Scrote, I don't think it's a matter of Abe having the "guts" to raise the tax; lowering it, or refusing to raise it, would take more guts. Instead, we're going to get higher taxes and more spending and more debt and higher consumer prices and more currency devaluation -- all things that chip away at Taro Q. Salaryman's quality of life but make the government and their cronies even richer.

    Posted in: Vice economy minister: More caution needed on next tax hike

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    The US military was directly above the crash site two hours after it happened, and had men ready to rappel down when they were ordered to turn back, and when they returned to base, they were commended but were ordered "not to talk to the media about any of this". A JSDF helicopter arrived two hours after the Americans did, but didn't attempt to reach the site until the next morning.

    The Stars and Stripes (from which I've quoted above) reported on the incident, a decade later:

    http://www004.upp.so-net.ne.jp//imaginenosekai/yokota-ss.JPG

    I too watched that television special yesterday and was disgusted to see that no mention was made of the US Marines' quick response, or of the many other survivors (children and adult men) that Yumi Ochiai heard while conscious after the crash. Supposedly the husband and father of two of the survivors was also alive at that point.

    Disasters like this one are not the time to be standing on organizational or national pride. And that goes double when reporting on it nearly 30 years later. Shame on that TV station.

    Posted in: 29th anniversary of JAL jumbo jet crash marked

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    Under pressure from Abe, companies have raised wages and bonuses but not enough to offset the tax increase and higher prices. Wages fell 3.8% in real terms in June from a year earlier, the 12th fall in a row.

    Wow; this sentence is pure Abe propaganda. Wages actually went up this year; they just didn't go up enough to cover the inflation created by Abe (which itself is mis-represented in the article, as the consumer price index is supposed to include sales taxes, not strip them out). Presenting this as "the 12th fall in a row" is completely disingenuous.

    We've seen an awful lot of one-sided, propagandistic articles since the LDP took power that look like they came straight from the desks of loyal Party apparatchiks who don't care in the least for how transparently false their . This one, in which we're meant to cheer on companies with the biggest and greediest price hikes, and in which we're meant to sympathize with the poor beleaguered LDP and BOJ and pretend that their wrongheaded policies aren't slowly pulling the middle class down into poverty, appears to be the most ridiculous one yet.

    Posted in: Japanese firms finally get pricing power just as economic growth sputters

  • 8

    ThonTaddeo

    Now we see the real reason why these Olympic Games are scheduled for perhaps the worst (and most dangerous) two weeks of the year: construction money!

    I also wonder if it is a coincidence that the Games are scheduled so that August 6 and 8 -- the 75th anniversaries of the atomic bombings that ended WWII -- are right near the end. I can see the Japan-as-victim, persecution-complex folks making hay on those dates.

    The Sydney Olympics of 2000 -- another place infamous for its hot summers -- were held at just the right time, beginning in September and ending in October. Springtime in the southern hemisphere, and here it would be early autumn. In an era of rising temperatures and stroke-inducing heat-island effects, this should be the standard.

    Technical and engineering marvels, Mr. Ishihara? How about a different kind of marvel: a bureaucrat putting the people and the athletes ahead of the corporations and moving the games to the already-established month of October?

    Posted in: Heatstroke countermeasures already being prepped for 2020 Olympics

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    The number-one way to prevent costs from rising -- and it isn't even close -- is to use existing ssports facilities rather than build new ones. And every world-class city (of which Tokyo is one) already has such facilities. The 1954 Olympic Stadium, the Tokyo Dome, Jingu -- these are all high-quality venues that can and should be used. Instead almost everything is in Odaiba, an area with little flavor or culture but rife with construction projects that politicians going back before Ishihara have been itching to develop and make money from.

    But existing facilities in the "real" Tokyo wouldn't be profitable for the construction industry and the politicians, now would it?

    I'm also wondering about how much money is being taken up by the National Police Agency and their over-the-top "security" which has heaped insane costs onto many recent international gatherings, sporting and otherwise, including the 2002 World Cup.

    Another entrenched organization siphoning taxpayer money.

    And still no talk of moving the games to October when people will not be passing out from heatstroke? (And if "Cool Biz is still in effect, people will even be passing out indoors.) It makes Sports Day, October 10, which celebrates the perfectly-timed 1964 Tokyo Olympic Games, look like a cruel joke.

    Posted in: Tokyo governor defends venue relocation plans

  • 6

    ThonTaddeo

    Gentle deflation is the friend of the person who wants a simple, independent life living off the fruits of his or her labour: not enviously looking on as speculators make easy fortunes flipping real estate or shares

    Could not have said it better.

    At first I thought this was going to be yet another pro-Abenomics party-line piece, and I was very pleasantly surprised by the author's support for the poor and middle classes, which are being (slowly, I admit) hammered down by inflation and higher taxes.

    You are beholden to no one. You save your hard-earned money, and it looks after you.

    As recently as 2012 I was confident that this state of affairs, which has served the average Taro just fine in many economies and many eras, was what would keep the Japanese people prosperous for years to come. But that wasn't enough for Abe, the LDP, and their one-percenters, was it? And they have insulted us with facile, childish propaganda all the while. When will this thief be out of power?

    Posted in: Inflation vs deflation: Which is right for Japan?

View all