ThonTaddeo's past comments

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    Here's to hoping the media dont go into overdrive hyping the athletes and raising expectations to the level of near hysteria (again).

    I agree, Yubaru. Every time the Japanese are in a sports competition, I find myself torn between supporting the athletes of my adopted country while a small part of me wants to see them lose just so that the insidious media can get its comeuppance. .

    Rio “is a very important moment for us,” Murofushi told The Associated Press. “If the athletes do well in Rio, then more attention would be coming from the public, and then, throughout Tokyo 2020. So it is very important for athletes to compete well.”

    And props to Murofushi for supporting his team while making sure to use words like "if" and not placing too much pressure on them or taking medals for granted.

    Posted in: With Tokyo 2020 on the horizon, Japan aiming high in Rio

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    I really wish media pundits and executives would stop setting medal "targets", particularly ones that are wildly above past performances, for these over-stressed athletes. It's one thing for an athlete to boast that he "thrives on pressure"; it's quite another to say it about someone else.

    Hearing this kind of talk makes me miss the empty pronouncements of "we'll do our best, but so will our opponents" and "on any given day, anything can happen" that you typically hear from seasoned veterans. They well know the pitfalls of over-promising. I too would love to see Japanese athletes get a lot of medals, but it's like they won't even be able to enjoy it because of all the pressure the media puts on them.

    Posted in: Japan Olympic chief seeks 2020 lift-off in Rio

  • 6

    ThonTaddeo

    This article starts with a horrifying incident of Islamic terrorism, then jumps to a shoehorned-in desire for baggage checks on the Shinkansen as if they could somehow have prevented the suicide by an elderly man with zero connection to Islam or terrorism.

    It's as if the Powers That Be are so desperate to bring about their desired police state that they'll connect the most ridiculous things in order to justify what they have always wanted to do.

    Posted in: Will IS militants target Japan next?

  • 4

    ThonTaddeo

    Once again we see a pro-LDP slant in every article, and I'm not just talking about Abe slanting his hand upward in all his photos.

    This phrase here:

    boosting hopes for more monetary stimulus

    "Boosting hopes"? Surely just as many people were selling off their yen in fear of more monetary stimulus (or, to correct the LDP bias there as well, in fear of more currency devaluation).

    We continually see the positive word "boost" (and today we also see "shore up") used for all kinds of LDP-desired things like consumer price levels and inflation rates. A moment's thought shows that these are not things that benefit the public one bit.

    Also, there is a typo in the article:

    a program known as “Abenonics”.

    I only wish more members of the public had said "Abe, non!" ... but not enough of them came out to vote.

    Posted in: Yen slips as Tokyo stocks jump on renewed Abenomics hopes

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    “I know people near Toulouse. I’m happy to ride nearby with the red bib tomorrow,” Arashiro said in French.

    Big, big props to this guy for being able to communicate in French this well. And going by his name, he's Okinawan. I had never heard of Yukiya Arashiro before, but now I'm a fan!

    Posted in: Japanese rider Arashiro feels at home in the Tour de France

  • 7

    ThonTaddeo

    Do candidates in any other country make a special appearance before elections just for the benefit of a foreign press club? I've looked and have been unable to find anything comparable in any other country but I stand ready to be corrected.

    There is less of a need for a "foreign press club" in the west because many if not most major news organizations in the US/UK/EU/etc. hire immigrants as part of the regular staff..

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    The impact of the sudden inflation is said to be as strong as the punch of a professional boxer

    I wish someone had said this to Abe when he got elected, because the statement is just as true when talking about economics.

    Posted in: Air bags inflate at a speed of 100 to 300 kilometers per hour. The impact of the sudden inflation is said to be as strong as the punch of a professional boxer,

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    At least in people's homes they have choices about whether to cool their rooms and, if so, how to do it.

    In the workplace we have no such choice. Here in my office, just back from lunch, it's 29.3 degrees indoors. Computers everywhere; no fans running. I'd take a big pay cut to have things at a civilized 21 degrees like we once had.

    Also, I think the main article has an error:

    “If you reduce the set temperature by 1 degree the rule of thumb will be that consumption will fall by 10%, so a circulator will enable a reduction by 30 watts.”*

    The consumption should fall if you increase the set temperature, because the air conditioner will not have to cool the air as much.

    And if we could get indoor air temperatures from 28 down to 23 for a mere 150 watts per cooler, then it is shameful that companies won't shell out the money so that their employees can work in a reasonable environment. They have surely saved at least 150 watts per room when they switched from tube-screen computers to flat-screens and from incandescent lighting to LEDs. Divert that money to cooling the air. I've got sweat rolling down my chest here and I'm sitting at a desk doing zero physical activity.

    Posted in: Seeking power conservation measures while battling summer heat

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    The conservative fund had long kept the majority of its cash in super-safe and super-low return Japanese government bonds, generating anemic returns.

    These "anemic" returns would have been just fine if the currency had maintained its value and consumer prices had either stayed flat or had fallen slightly.

    Posted in: Huge Japan pension fund sees worst loss since financial crisis

  • 22

    ThonTaddeo

    Falling prices may sound like a good thing for consumers but they tend to delay spending, which in turn hits firms’ hiring and expansion plans, which is bad for the economy.

    Please stop copy-pasting this paragraph into article after article in the business section. It is biased LDP propaganda and isn't even true. When was the last time you put off buying a liter of milk because it might be one yen cheaper a year from now?

    Posted in: Japan clobbered by weak inflation, business confidence

  • 4

    ThonTaddeo

    Why are they concealing the name of the school,

    Streisand Effect. If they name it in public -- and they really shouldn't have even given the city it was in -- other kids, particularly technically proficient ones, might go looking for that file in hopes that it has been shared somewhere, and then the 24 kids whose data was leaked might get bullied even more than now.

    Posted in: Teacher accidentally leaks names, health records of students on school website 

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    As progressive as it would be to have a woman as governor of Tokyo, Yuriko Koike would not be my choice. Not only is she cozy with Abe and his Yasukuni revisionism, but she was also basically the inventor of "Cool Biz". Sitting in your office today all lethargic and sluggish because your indoor temperature is set at 28 degrees? Blame Yuriko Koike. She had spent time in the sweltering heat of Saudi Arabia and figured she could make all of Japan suffer like she had, and the cost-cutting-obsessed corporations, knowing they could counter their employees' complaints about the heat by just asking them to gaman more, went right along with it.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    Count me in with the people disappointed in dentistry.

    I had a cavity back in 2011 and went to a dentist in Aoyama, Tokyo, who disgnosed it on the first visit and filled it in the second visit.

    Then I had a problem with the same tooth on the other side in 2013 and, with the Aoyama dentist having closed, at a closer place it took almost ten visits to do what once took two. No anesthesia; no explanations; needless x-rays; annoying speech patterns from the dentist.

    And because I had to eat entirely using one side of my mouth (while there was a plastic filler in the hole he had drilled in the tooth with the cavity), the filling in my previous cavity got messed up and that tooth had to be looked at, too.

    Switched dentists and while this one has a better attitude, he still requires multiple weekly visits with only a little being accomplished each time. And this guy told me he was going to remove the nerve from my damaged tooth, and ended up slicing off half the tooth!

    Now I have half a tooth and will have to have some kind of cap put over it; who knows how weird that will look? The grand total will probably be 25-30 visits, split between two dentists, just from one routine cavity and its complications.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    Before the Americans forced Japan to open up in the mid 1800's, Japan do not have the capability to sail far towards Senkaku which is very near, about 224 km to Taiwan.

    Fre Okin, NZ2011 has already mentioned it, but if we're going to use distance-to-the-nearest-island as the standard, then the 150 km between these islands and Yonaguni would make them Yonagunian. And Yonagunian (and Yaeyaman) fishermen were already fishing around these islands long before the 1800s. Mainland Japanese may not have, but Yaeyamans most certainly could sail there, because it just isn't that far.

    Article Unavailable

  • 22

    ThonTaddeo

    This man is the most change-oriented Japanese politician in more than a decade -- with all of those changes good for him and his elites and bad for the public, mind you -- and he touts "stability"?

    The value of the yen had been stable at around 80 to the dollar for several years before Abe came in and did everything in his power to reduce its value. Each time it threatened to claw back any losses, he and his henchman Kuroda printed up more money to make sure that the rich stayed ahead and the masses kept losing. They're doing it again right now.

    Consumer prices had been stable for nearly two decades before Abe tried to hoodwink the public into thinking rising prices would somehow lead to prosperity. He has been proven wrong, of course, and the public is stuck paying more for daily goods.

    Most importantly of all: the nation had been stable in its commitment to pacifism and to its pacifist constitution until this fool started agitating to re-militarize the country and presumably make his dead grandfather happy.

    If the Japanese voters truly wanted stability, they would boot Abe right out of office and go back to the new-PM-every-year system of ~2010. Back then, the public did reasonably well going to work, saving money, and getting ahead while not really paying much attention to the ineffectual clowns in politics. Unfortunately the ineffectual clowns have been replaced by evil, malevolent clowns. Clowns that are really good at taking your money, slowly impoverishing you, and making you less safe. All while pretending it's for your own good.

    Posted in: Abe campaigns on 'stability' ticket as Brexit rocks markets

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    most of those savings are of the older generations made during the boom years

    This is true if you only calculate the absolute value of the savings.

    It is less true when you consider what percentage of each generation's savings is exposed to currency manipulation and devaluation, both now and in the future.

    Wealthy elderly typically own stock, property, and often precious metals, all of which maintain their value in inflationary times. Younger people (and this means up to about 50, in Japan) have only cash in the bank -- the target of Abe and Kuroda's attack. They're saving to buy their first homes, or put their kids through school: things that are near enough in the future that risky stock investments are unwise. These people need a solid currency to save in, and their entire net worths are typically in cash.

    The elderly are shielded from current and future inflation to a much greater extent. Their pensions are indexed to the price level, and given their collective power in politics, there is little likelihood of those pensions being taken away or of the indexing bring removed.

    The wealth gap between young and old here is already huge, and the GOJ's policies are actually making it worse. If they wanted to reverse this, they would engineer high interest rates on savings accounts with higher capital gains taxes on stocks, and higher taxes on capital gains when selling real estate with low or zero tax when acquiring it.

    But they continue to do the opposite: destroy cash, goose the stock market, punish people who want to save for their futures: favor the old and rich at the expense of the younger up-and-coming.

    The idea that a weak currency somehow helps Japanese jobs is false. We've already seen how the big corporations produce their goods in places where the currency is so weak that the average person lives worse than the most impoverished of Japanese, and then hoards all the profits. Do you really want to have the same standard of living as China? Chinese companies produce a huge variety of goods and sell them abroad for stronger currencies... and the average Chinese person still doesn't live well.

    Posted in: Tokyo stocks dive 3.5% as Brexit fears spark yen rally

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    Amazing how relatively few people buying and selling stock market shares can ruin things for everyone else on the planet.

    The article is too focused on Toyota stock dropping in value to mention it, but the yen going up by 1.14 against the dollar means that millions of Japanese workers just gained more than 1% in the value of their savings.

    Of course, this isn't what Abe and Kuroda want, so either the focus is taken off it or it is spun to somehow be bad news. They did this with energy prices too, using words like "slipped" and "weak" when talking about a decline in the price of oil. It is tiring to have to mentally translate all this backwards verbiage from "what does the BoJ want" to "what does the common man want" all the time, because they're such opposites.

    Posted in: Tokyo stocks dive 3.5% as Brexit fears spark yen rally

  • 11

    ThonTaddeo

    There is more to this than the cops just stopping this woman because of having a different license plate.

    Yubaru, according to the article: "The family of the woman in her 30s had asked police in neighboring Yamaguchi Prefecture early Wednesday to search for the three"

    The police probably had looked up her car's plate number as well and were on the lookout for it.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    “One notable thing in the economy is the rising yen, which has taken a big toll on companies,” said Taro Saito

    The yen dropped almost 40% from its 2010-2012 level in a steady decline starting as soon as Abe is elected. It then rebounds back 5-10% and we get quotes like this? Abe's devaluaion took "a big toll" on every saver in Japan, but when the news gets reported, all anyone cares about is the big corporations' bottom line.

    Posted in: Japan revises first-quarter GDP growth up to 0.5%

  • 8

    ThonTaddeo

    Once again a photo of Abe with his hand pointing diagonally upwards like some kind of hamfisted subliminal trick. Everything this buffoon does pulls the standard of living down for the average worker.

    Posted in: Abe pushes equal pay for temp workers to lift economy

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