ThonTaddeo's past comments

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    Reckless, this is propaganda indeed! Look at this sentence:

    the nationwide core consumer-price index was flat from a year earlier, falling to zero growth for the first time since May 2013.

    They just tried to trick us into thinking that a rise in the consumer price index was the same thing as growth.

    I see the steady consumer prices that we have finally returned to as a thin silver lining in the terrible dark cloud of tax hikes and currency devaluation.

    How does this garbage get into print? If I submitted an article in journalism school with even half as many sentences of pure partisan propaganda, I would get an F.

    Posted in: Japan reports lackluster inflation, spending data for February

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    What makes this so disgusting is that the killer's name is kept secret. Kazuaki, you think he will be unemployable? That might be the case if his name were publicly available. As it is, he really does get to start a whole new life... without anyone around him ever being aware that there is a killer in their midst.

    We treat some poor sap whose arm brushed against a woman's breast on the train worse than this.

    The coddling of "juvenile" criminals has to stop. It's as if everyone up to 19 years, 364 days old has total license to do whatever heinous things they like, knowing that all they will get is a figurative slap on the wrist. I'd rather see light sentences combined with putting the killer's name in the public record than lengthening the sentence. This kid, that girl who killed her father with a baseball bat a few months ago, the Sakakibara decapitator years ago... the law gives them all total anonymity while someone over 20 who is even accused of a crime gets his name dragged through the mud.

    All guilty verdicts in murder cases, regardless of the perpetrator's age, should be public record. You can't take someone else's life and get to keep yours totally intact.

    Posted in: Youth gets 5-9 years in prison for killing Mie schoolgirl

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    The US is frequently castigated for retaining British measurements but doesn't get nearly enough credit for having "metric" money from the very beginning, when the mother country still had 4 farthings to the penny and 12 pence to the shilling, and even metric-inventing France still had 20 sous to the livre.

    Also -- and I could be wrong about this -- but at some point in the 1990s it was made mandatory to have metric measurement on packaging even if the contents were based on some round British measurement. So you could have "3.5 oz (100 g)" or just "100 g" but you couldn't have just "3.5 oz".

    I love the metric system and wish it would make more progress. I had thought that modern technology would lead the way -- if the default for things like GPS were metric, people would change over pretty quickly. Instead, when I use Google Maps, I have to manually tell the page that I want to use kilometers every time, because I made my Google account in the US!

    Posted in: Why doesn’t the U.S. adopt the metric system?

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    Isn't that one of the first things they teach you in driving school, that you should always be aware of pedestrians, animals, stray objects, etc., etc. when operating a motor vehicle? Why was this man exempted from such basic responsibility in riding his scooter?

    The maximum legal speed of a 50cc scooter is only 30 km/h. And this man was riding in a school zone, where the speed limit is presumably lower -- I live near such a zone, and yes, stray baseballs and soccer balls occasionally find their way past fences and netting. When I ride my bicycle or walk past them, it is my responsibility to pay attention to my surroundings. The scooter rider knows he's going right past a soccer field and should be aware. The boys have no idea that an 80-year-old guy on a scooter is suddenly going to come right down the street and swerve in just the wrong way as to break his leg. As a bicyclist and jogger, I literally can't imagine myself suing some school kids over something like this. What disgusting opportunism by the family of the deceased man.

    Posted in: Parents of schoolboy liable for Y15 million after wayward soccer ball leads to man’s death

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    Another wonderful thing about the shinkansen and other high speed rail is that unlike with the airplane infrastructure that makes trains like this one less viable in the USA, you can just buy a ticket and get on. No passports or other papers, no security checks, no hassle. You can't hijack a train that can only run on one line!

    Posted in: Japan's shinkansen best in world at safety, punctuality, tech, but not marketing

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    Let me make one addition. There is no author byline, so I have no idea whom I'm criticizing, but:

    While deflation may sound good for Japanese consumers, it means people tend to put off buying because they do not expect prices to rise and hope they might even get goods cheaper down the line.

    While copying and pasting the same paragraph (a biased, one-sided paragraph at that) into article after article for over two years may sound convenient for hack journalists, it means readers tend to stop listening what you have to say, stop trusting you, and wonder if you have an agenda at work.

    Posted in: Two years on, BOJ chief says war on deflation 'very challenging'

  • 12

    ThonTaddeo

    I realize that this isn't the point of the article, but in English-language journalism, wouldn't it be better to see the word "foreigners" (as a direct translation of 外国人) eliminated in favor of the words actually used in the English-speaking world, such as "immigrants"?

    Someone who moves to London or New York or Melbourne (or East Podunk, for that matter) and takes up residence there is not a "foreigner". This person is an immigrant. There are short-term immigrants and long-term immigrants, and permanent immigrants, but "foreigner" carries the connotation of being a non-resident (and one who probably doesn't understand the language).

    It's a small semantic issue, but who wants to move to another country and still be called a "foreigner" even decades after moving there, integrating oneself, learning the language, etc.? The Anglosphere nations have their problems with immigration, but at least they do not foist this indignity on the people who take up residence there.

    Posted in: Increase in foreigners points to diversified future for Tokyo

  • 2

    ThonTaddeo

    “I think it’s okay even if the BOJ doesn’t achieve 2% inflation in fiscal 2015. It’s important, instead, to guide policy so that the economy can continue to grow around 2%.”

    Finally, someone talking sense!

    Posted in: Lower house approves Harada for BOJ board

  • 7

    ThonTaddeo

    Treatment of convicted prisoners and that of detained suspects are different. Suspects do not waer prison clothing.

    What we call the clothing does not matter; what matters is that the detainess cannot bathe

    How about the State of Florida in the United States of America?

    Now I think you're just trolling. Read the link you provided us with: After the arrest, you will be booked at the police station, ... you will be held in custody pending a court hearing that will be held within 24 hours of your arrest.

    Wow! Imagine that happening in Japan! And after that next-day court hearing, you can be bailed out of jail immediately! Sometimes you even get released without bail:

    If your crime is not serious, you could be released without bail and on your own recognizance or ROR. If you are in jail and cannot afford bail, the prosecutor has 30 days from your arrest date to file formal charges against you, although on the 33rd day and after notice to the state, you must be released on your own recognizance.

    So the Florida system basically presupposes that arrestees can and will be bailed out of jail.

    Then during this 90- or 175-day period which you dishonestly try to compare with daiyo kangoku, these arrestees can then, from the freedom of the outside, prepare a defense for their upcoming court date, contact a lawyer, look for exculpatory witnesses, and even get their affairs in order if they know that they're going to be found guilty.

    And they get to bathe and change clothes as often as they like.

    I'd prefer a 175-day investigation period in which I am on the outside on bail, communicating with family, working to earn money at my job, eating well, sleeping in my own bed, and preparing my defense, to a 23-day period in which I am locked in a cell, undergoing daily questioning, filthy, and unable to communicate with the outside world except in limited circumstances. How you can possibly equate these baffles me.

    Posted in: Amnesty Int'l criticizes Japan in 2014/15 human rights report

  • 15

    ThonTaddeo

    What the system is called, and where the jails/prisons are located, are secondary to the conditions inside these facilities, which is what Amnesty International is justly concerned about.

    One of the most shameful things about them is that prisoners are typically only allowed to bathe once every five days, and must wear the same unwashed prison clothing for days on end. I cannot think of any sensible reason for this. If the presumption is that these people are guilty of crimes, is not keeping one's body clean an important psychological component of rehabilitation?

    Denying human beings (and remember, these people have not yet even been charged with of any crime, let alone been convicted) the right to cleanliness is a form of torture. If the issue is cost, I'm sure any detainee would gladly pay the few coins that soap and water would cost. This is a system that I simply cannot find any justification for. I would like to hear one, if one can be imagined.

    Posted in: Amnesty Int'l criticizes Japan in 2014/15 human rights report

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    I see that teachers, too, will be required to come in one extra day each month. Will they be getting a 5% salary raise to make up for the fact that they're now working 21 days a month instead of 20?

    And if not, what are their plans to combat the likely decline in teacher quality as talented potential teachers choose other professions which don't suddenly extend the work week?

    Posted in: Kagoshima schools to resume Saturday classes once a month

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    I wish Japan could go back to Edo era.

    Your beloved Abe and his LDP are doing their best to bring us back there.

    Posted in: Edo-style divorce

  • 3

    ThonTaddeo

    Almost 10% of Americans couldn't get July 4th?!

    I wonder if any of them saw different dates as the true founding of the USA. You could argue that the nation began not on the date when the first person signed the Declaration of Independence, but also on the date of the first shot of the revolution in April 1775, in 1781 when Cornwallis was defeated at Yorktown, the signing of the treaty with Great Britain, formalizing independence, in 1783, or even the date in 1787 when the Constitution was written.

    I agree that July 4, 1776, is probably the best date to pick if you're choosing a single National Foundation Day for the USA< but I wouldn't say that any of those other candidates are outright wrong.

    Posted in: 8 out of 10 Japanese didn't know Feb 11 was National Foundation Day

  • 4

    ThonTaddeo

    Whenever I see movements like this, which focus on making people take more days off, and then talking about how the days should be consecutive, the cynic in me thinks that the government just wants people going on trips and spending money; we all know that the government cares far more for keeping those consumption taxes rolling in than it does for the people's well-being.

    I'd much rather see a campaign to limit the number of hours in a day. This is what's so soul-killing about Japanese companies. You get up on Monday morning knowing that with five 12-to-14-hour days ahead of you, your exhaustion, sleep deprivation, and misery are only going to increase -- until Saturday when you can sleep in (and then get a form of jetlag). When I had this kind of schedule, with 60 hours of work to do every week, I wanted to get enough sleep on the weekdays and would have been willing to come in on Saturday to make up for it. Instead, the company treated the weekends as sacred (OK) but completely ignored the health risks of being at work from 9 AM to the last train every weekday.

    The 8-hour day has become standard for a reason, and I'd like it to be even shorter. When you're home for dinner every day and always get enough sleep, you're a more efficient worker and a healthier person.

    Posted in: Japan eyes compulsory 5 days' paid holiday a year

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    Warispeace, you said it better than I ever could; agreed on all points. I had never seen those figures on how much of Japan's national income goes to the top 1%; thanks for them.

    I shudder to imagine what will happen when the next oil price spike comes -- and it is coming, some day. You would think that Abe, Kuroda, and the BOJ would welcome the unexpected windfall that is today's low oil prices; they mask some f the worst effects of their currency devaluation, though of course Japanese consumers are not getting anywhere near the full effect that these low prices should be bringing us. This should be the impetus for a genuine economic boom: lower energy prices means lower costs all the way around, and should mean lower prices and higher demand. But Abe and Kuroda's wrongheaded determination to have higher computer prices no matter what might mean even more money printing -- which will make the uncontrollable inflation that comes when oil once again hits $100 that much worse.

    Posted in: BOJ in bind as oil slump makes for slippery price goal

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    "And then I told those sheep that inflation and higher taxes would be good for them!"

    Posted in: Light moment

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    I just cannot see the point of this.... I would guess the majority of people who drive cars enjoy doing so. Where is the enjoyment in a driver-less car?

    Imagine your eyesight is below the legal limit to obtain a driver's license, and your employer transfers you to a location where there is no public transportation. (Unlike, say, making someone in a wheelchair work on the second floor of a building with no elevator, no one will raise a fuss if a boss does this to someone..)

    Wouldn't you be very thankful for the existence of automated cars in such a situation?

    Posted in: Google expects public in driverless cars in 2 to 5 years

  • -2

    ThonTaddeo

    In fact, I know lots of cases of Japanese women I personally know having affairs. I think it's fair to assume their husbands are doing the same.

    Is this really the right assumption to make? I would think that a man who was rejected by the person he had committed his life to would lack the self-confidence and self-worth to attract an affair partner. How do you mentally come back from being denied like that? Wouldn't it show through in your daily behavior, particularly around the opposite sex?

    Posted in: Is being in an international marriage any more or less difficult than a "regular" marriage? What are some issues that you think might torpedo an international marriage (or relationship)?

  • 1

    ThonTaddeo

    This article needs a correction; Kuroda wore number 18 for the Yankees (and the Carp, if memory serves), not 15. Number 15 was most recently worn by catcher Thurman Munson, who was tragically killed in a plane crash; his number was then retired in his memory.

    Posted in: Kuroda to rejoin Hiroshima Carp

  • 0

    ThonTaddeo

    GW: Things have changed; I was there a few weeks ago and picked up the brochure also available online here: https://www.citibank.co.jp/en/loan/products/pdf/housingloaninterest.pdf (or google for 'citibank japan home loan' and look for the PDF entitled 'Citibank Housing Loan Interest Rate Plans Dec 2014 ').

    You have to borrow a significant amount of money (10M or more) and the fees are not cheap, but all you need to be is a resident of Japan with a sufficient income.

    I've never tried Shinsei but have extensive dealings with SMBC and Citibank and use the former for my daily banking needs but the latter when moving money into other currencies or abroad. I'd hate to lose the superior international services that Citibank offers, though if Shinsei's are even better, I could certainly look into them.

    Posted in: Citigroup to sell Japan retail bank unit to SMBC

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