albaleo's past comments

  • -5

    albaleo

    I disagree with Harvey's views. The "Je suis Charlie" phrase was exactly what Nessie above says, about solidarity. It says that if you want to win, you'll have to kill me too. All mouth maybe, but I don't see anyone else around here doing anything better to save the guy.

    Posted in: Rally for hostage

  • -10

    albaleo

    @Geoff

    They hurt me every time they talk and act. Won't you stand with the weak?

    Posted in: Rally for hostage

  • -15

    albaleo

    They hurt Kenji, they hurt me.

    I am Kenji.

    Posted in: Rally for hostage

  • 1

    albaleo

    "Microsoft Security Essentials AV suite ...,consistently provides the best performance in the industry in terms of low occurrence of false positives. "

    I've read that MSE has slipped down the rankings for security since 2009 when it ranked top. So I'm wondering if a low occurrence of false positives is just a consequence of low positives overall. I see it described these days as "baseline" security. On the other hand, it's what I use on Windows 7. (But I only use Windows for a few tasks, and never for e-mail.)

    Posted in: Tech identifies users vulnerable to cyberattack based on ways they use their computers

  • 2

    albaleo

    For those averse to nipples with their news, but still like the xenophobia, there's always the Daily Express.

    "I've seen the poison letters of the horrible hacks / About the yellow peril and the reds and the blacks / And the TUC and its treacherous acts / Kremlin money - All right Jack / I've seen how democracy is under duress / But I've never seen a nipple in the Daily Express" (John Cooper-Clarke)

    Posted in: Topless page 3 returns to Britain's The Sun

  • 2

    albaleo

    "I think the media keeps it alive."

    It's kept alive in many ways. One of those is the requirement at schools in the US (and other countries) to tick boxes assigning kids to a particular race or ethnicity. Asian, Black, Hispanic, Native American, Pacific or South Sea Islander, White. There's still no box for "human being".

    Posted in: U.S. remembers Martin Luther King amid racial tensions over police killings

  • 1

    albaleo

    "a 6.7 million yen price tag"

    It seems you have to be rich to be good.

    Posted in: Toyota swamped by orders for its first mass market hydrogen fuel-cell car

  • 4

    albaleo

    "You cannot insult the faith of others."

    Do they still teach that non believers will rot in hell? That's my memory. I still feel insulted. I still haven't bothered to gun up.

    Posted in: Pope on Charlie Hebdo: There are limits to free expression

  • 6

    albaleo

    I apologize. In my rant above, I skipped the notion that women were physically kidnapped and forced to have sex. I believe that happened too.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • 5

    albaleo

    @speed

    Having worked for McGraw-Hill and Japanese publishers of textbooks, I'm pretty sure they will all do what they see as best for their bottom line.

    There seems to be a push to view these women as either sex slaves or whores. Black and white. Pure and evil. I'm sure some were caught somewhere in between, in the place most of us live. A need to feed the family, a wish to escape the family, or just taking every day as it comes? Life is difficult sometimes. I'm told life during wartime is far worse. I believe that. Let's just tell the story and skip the judgement.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • 2

    albaleo

    @daveyc "why even throw it out there"

    WilliB was making the interesting point that religious literature is exempted from hate speech. But he implied only Islamic literature contained such writings. That is not the case.

    I posted on another thread recently that most ancient religious texts are littered with lists of violent, hateful punishments. But I said that isn't really an issue for me if religious organizations no longer teach those writings as correct. I would be unhappy if my government (UK at the moment) gave special special status to religions that do teach such hateful things. As far as I know, no mainstream religious organization in the UK, including Islamic groups, does so. But I may be wrong about that. Recently, I was trying to find whether any UK Islamic groups endorsed the death fatwah on Salmon Rushdie which I understand is still in place by some Iranian clerics. I couldn't find anything that says they do.

    As far as I know, none of my Muslim acquaintances have ever killed someone because of something they read in a religious text. But, of course, I read that there are others who do. On the other hand, I know of cases in Glasgow where people have been killed for wearing the wrong team's football scarf and therefore, by implication, follow the wrong religion.

    I miss attitudes to religion in Japan, where generally it's all teated as a kind of harmless superstition.

    Posted in: France arrests 54 in crackdown on hate speech; Charlie Hebdo's new issue sells out

  • 3

    albaleo

    @WilliB "Only islamic scripture contains aggressive condemnations of other, existing religions."

    From Deuteronomy

    “Only in the cities of these peoples that the Lord your God is giving you as an inheritance, you shall not leave alive anything that breathes. But you shall utterly destroy them: the Hittite and the Amorite, the Canaanite and the Perizzite, the Hivite and the Jebusite, as the Lord your God has commanded you, so that they may not teach you to do according to all their detestable things which they have done for their gods, so that you would sin against the Lord your God”

    Posted in: France arrests 54 in crackdown on hate speech; Charlie Hebdo's new issue sells out

  • 1

    albaleo

    For those asking for a sense of humor from Islam, this is from Iraqi TV:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yx0Gu0PlNjI

    Posted in: Why cartoons depicting Mohammed anger many Muslims

  • 3

  • 3

    albaleo

    One problem I have is with the way our political leaders react to these events. They may describe the perpetrators as vicious thugs or cowards, but that will have little effect on those that believe they are right in carrying out these acts. For whatever reason, perhaps out of fear of stirring controversy or causing offense, they seem to stop short of saying what I hope they really think. They should speak more starkly. These are words I would like to hear from our leaders:

    "If you think it is right for women to be stoned to death for adultery, then you are sick and crazy. If you think someone shouldn't be allowed to follow a religion of their choice, then you are sick and crazy. If you think women are not entitled to education, then you are sick and crazy. If you think you will be rewarded in heaven for murdering a cartoonist, then either you are sick and crazy or Allah is sick and crazy. If you believe in any of these things, you have no right to consider yourself civilized."

    Posted in: Police strengthen patrols around French Embassy, other buildings

  • 8

    albaleo

    "we should be able to show some respect to any religion"

    I disagree. Most countries in the west and also Japan support religious freedom, and they often offer special status to religious organizations such as tax breaks. But it is not very clear what constitutes a religion. The European Convention On Human Rights talks about freedom of religious belief, worship, practice and teaching. I support absolutely freedom of belief but less so practice and teaching. For example, I have no respect for religions that advocate physical punishments for transgressions, and don't think any special rights or freedoms should be given to such religious organizations. I'm not talking about the content of ancient religious texts such as the bible or koran. They are littered with descriptions of gross punishments. But I am talking about religions that still teach those parts of the texts as "correct". Such religions are not worthy of respect.

    Posted in: Police strengthen patrols around French Embassy, other buildings

  • 9

    albaleo

    "but firearms edukation would make them safer"

    But some people don't do too well with education. Perhaps just ban people with an IQ of less than 100 from keeping a gun. It would be a start.

    Posted in: 2-year-old accidentally shoots his mother dead in Idaho Wal-Mart

  • 0

    albaleo

    @scipantheist

    "but people should be free to do what they please if it is non-violent"

    My comment wasn't based on my own views on freedom, but on what I see around me. I think if someone erected a pornographic image on public view anywhere in the world, there would be public outrage. I have some superstitious relatives (in-laws) who I know would be creeped out if there was a large cross or other religious symbol (except they ones they worship) on view where they lived. I'm not saying this is right, just that it happens. Which is why I wondered whether it was an act of repression or an outcome of public opinion which we might describe as democracy.

    Posted in: Chinese authorities tear down cross on Christian nursing home

  • -5

    albaleo

    Repression or democracy? The article implies it's the former, but I wonder. I can believe that a lot of people get creeped out by the prominence of religious symbols that they see as representing some kind of non-standard, superstitious "magic". In parts of the USA or Europe, if there was suddenly a wave of pentagrams or inverted crosses appearing on otherwise public buildings such as hospitals and schools, I think the locals would be putting pressure on the authorities to get rid of them somehow. Perhaps not under any anti-religious laws, but using planning regulations or some other "rectification" of illegal structures.

    I seem to have undergone a conversion after being presented with a bottle of Jura Superstition whisky for Christmas, which features an ankh symbol as its logo. I can understand that people might think I've been bewitched.

    Posted in: Chinese authorities tear down cross on Christian nursing home

  • 1

    albaleo

    My first thought was that it was wrong gear selection while parking, and then wrong pedal from the panic of unexpected movement. That's also possible with a manual drive, but usually with less severe consequences, the first panic reaction being to depress the clutch.

    Out of interest, does anyone know what percentage of automatic drivers use both feet to operate pedals? I'd guess people who started off with a manual would continue to use a single foot for gas and brake, just out of habit. But how about those who have only used an automatic?

    Posted in: Woman dies after car plummets from rooftop car park

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