ambrosia's past comments

  • 7

    ambrosia

    As the saying goes, "Who, on their deathbed, has ever wished they'd have spent more time at work rather than more time with family?" Good for this woman for knowing what's important before it's too late. One would think that being a good parent who values time with her child would make her a better teacher, more sympathetic to both her students and her parents. Shame on her critics who clearly don't have their priorities straight.

    Posted in: Teacher criticized for attending son’s entrance ceremony instead of her own school’s

  • -2

    ambrosia

    randomman: There is no difference between Japanese or Canadian or Australian or US level of supervision of children.

    So, does it follow that there are no differences in the way kids are raised in Japan, Canada, Australia or the US? Are there no cultural differences between these places or do they simply not extend to the level of supervision?

    Posted in: What’s your impression of parental supervision of children when families are out and about in Japan?

  • 0

    ambrosia

    Ah-so: East Sea" is an utterly meaningless name,giving no clue as to where it is other than if you happen to be in Korea.

    Have you never heard the North Sea? The White Sea? The Dead Sea? How do any of their names give clues as to where they are? That's not to mention the numerous seas named after somewhat obscure explorers and old rulers.

    Wakarimasen: always amazes me that no-one takes umbrage at the name of the Yellow Sea.....

    It always amazes me how people choose to interpret things in a negative manner instead of doing a little simple research.

    The Yellow Sea derives its name from the color of the silt-laden water discharged from the numerous Chinese rivers that drain into its waters.

    vanostran: And how about the Gulf of California.

    How about it? It goes by more than one name already. It's know as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés or Vermilion Sea and locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or Mar Bermejo or Golfo de California.

    Posted in: Addition of Korean name for Sea of Japan becomes law in Virginia

  • 0

    ambrosia

    Loki520: You might wanna reread what he said, compare it to what you misunderstood, and then offer a correction

    I didn't misunderstand him so no correction will be offered. He called the people who came up with the study pencil pushers for putting two Japanese first on the list. The list has nothing to do with preparedness and everything to do with - natural disasters, hence the title being Cities Most At Risk of Natural Disasters and not Cities Which Would Be The Least Prepared for a Natural Disaster.

    He in NO WAY insinuated the article was a slight against Japan, nor did he say Tokyo is "less prepared" Contrary... he insinuated they are MORE prepared.

    Nor did I "insinuate" that he thought Japan was unprepared so perhaps learn how to read before you accuse others of misunderstanding things.

    Posted in: Tokyo, Yokohama declared cities at highest risk of natural disaster by Swiss insurance company

  • 0

    ambrosia

    willib: Where would these Swiss pencil pushers prefer to be, if a big one strikes, in a typical building in Istanbul (also overdue for one) or in Tokyo??

    Where did you read that Tokyo is less prepared for natural disasters than other places? All I read what the Tokyo and Yokohama are the top two cities at highest risk of natural disaster. No where in this article does it say anything about how well built buildings are, how prepared the residents are or how well trained the emergency personnel are. It's simply about what cities are the most likely to experience serious natural disasters. If you do live in Tokyo or Yokohama, then make sure you have an emergency kit packed and hope that the rest of the citizens are as well-prepared as you think they are. And for heaven's sake, stop being so defensive. I hardly think the article was a slight against Japan in any way so no need for you to come running to her defense over an imagined insult.

    Posted in: Tokyo, Yokohama declared cities at highest risk of natural disaster by Swiss insurance company

  • 1

    ambrosia

    She's attractive but she doesn't exactly possess a soft voice, like the article says she does. It's pleasant but not soft.

    Posted in: Prosecutor for Crimea becomes a hit online in Japan

  • 1

    ambrosia

    So, if you say "I love you" often you don't mean it but if you never or rarely say it you mean it more? How about, you mean it if you mean it no matter if you say it every day or once every ten years? I'm talking about saying it to a spouse or partner, not tossing it out randomly at someone you barely know. As Jimizo said, it's nice to hear. As others have said, actions speak louder than words. Both are true and are not mutually exclusive. If it's lost meaning for you and your loved one then there may be something else going on there but it's not up to you to presume the significance of the words to others in their relationships.

    Posted in: How come Japanese couples don't say "I love you" to each other as often as their Western counterparts?

  • 2

    ambrosia

    kibousha: Say "I love you" too often, the phrase loses its weight, saying it become an everyday occurrences, nothing special about it.

    My husband tells me he loves me all the time and the words have yet to lose their importance to me. Certain things like "have a nice day", "that's a lovely ....", "thank you" and "I love you" when said with sincerity don't have to lose their meaning over time. If you think they do then perhaps you're either saying them without sincerity or having them said to you without sincerity.

    Analogous, if everyone has super power, then no one is special.

    Not exactly. We're talking about words with actual meanings, not comic books. But having said that, if everyone had a different super power, a' la Heroes, than we'd all certainly still be special according to your definition.

    When asked why, he said "didn't you hurt your hands ? I thought I'd do the housework until you're healed". Actions and considerations.

    Nice story but why did he have to wait until she hurt her hand to help her out a bit?

    Posted in: How come Japanese couples don't say "I love you" to each other as often as their Western counterparts?

  • 1

    ambrosia

    darknuts: I left 5000 yen at a change machine once. Any other country and that money would have been gone.

    I've had my wallet returned to me, money and cards in full, three times in the States. My bike was stolen in Japan when I went into the store for maybe three minutes tops. Now before you go apologizing for bike thievery, this wasn't some rusty old mamachari either, not that that would have made it any better.

    I'm glad this guy got his money back but trying to use this story as an opportunity to bash other countries is just plain wrong, in both senses of the word. Stuff like this happens in plenty of places and if you don't believe me check out some of the stories I was very easily able to find, proving my point quite nicely.

    It's nice that you have positive feelings about Japan but there are good and bad people here, just like everywhere else.

    http://www.kwtx.com/home/headlines/Wedding-Ring-found-in-New-Baseball-Glove-Returned--246264141.html

    http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2013/09/16/glen-james-homeless-man-who-returned-bag-cash-honored-boston-police/yUZjfKiELlXDURjhQwQ23O/story.html http://listverse.com/2013/09/02/

    10-people-who-found-big-money-and-returned-it/

    Posted in: Nagasaki man gets back the cash he left at ATM

  • -1

    ambrosia

    roughneck: Maybe you haven't heard, being popular is not always being right. Else Justin Bieber would be a really good singer and the earth would go around the Kardashians.

    Being a fan of neither the Beib nor the Kardashians, I don't disagree with the sentiment. What I disagree with is your trying to make some kind of a point about something that is relatively inconsequential in the scheme of things and probably doesn't cause nearly as much disruption to your life as you're making out. Your sentiment towards people doing something as a way to set fitness goals, to encourage themselves to keep exercising or just for the beauty of a challenge is a bit off too for so many reasons, starting with the idea that it's a good thing for a country's people to want to be fit and if the goal of running a marathon encourages them to do that then that's a good thing and dare I say, more beneficial to the overall social and economic health of the country than whatever it is you're doing driving around for a few hours on a Sunday, one Sunday out of the year.

    If I need to keep track of "Tokyo Marathon" before I need to go out driving, it must be as disruptive as snow storm!

    I'm not really sure what your point is there but I didn't say you should "keep track of the marathon". My point was simply that you could find alternative routes. As for the marathon being as disruptive as a snow storm, hardly. A snowstorm will put out most of the streets, not the few along the course. The effects of a snowstorm can last for days while the marathon is over by mid-afternoon. A snowstorm doesn't give a month's warning so that whingy drivers can plot alternate routes. The marathon does. Get over it. No one likes a whiner especially one whining about how he can't drive his car one Sunday out of the year because those rotten marathoners are taking over every single street in the city!

    Posted in: And they're off

  • 1

    ambrosia

    roughneck: If you want to run, run any day. No need make it a business earning 360 million yen (and more from the sponsors) for 1 day and annoy all the drivers who are forced to go out, knowing that some Low self-esteem person feeling the urge of "proving themselves" will be clogging the road.

    That's your opinion and you're certainly entitled to it but the 36,000 runners, the 300,000 plus who applied to run it and the millions who watch it live and on the telly undoubtedly disagree with you and your odd assessment of the runners as "low self-esteem person".

    You get your self-satisfaction of being able run, good for you. The organizers get showered by the money of all of you "Being Fit" lovers...good for them.

    Yes, how terrible of those people to want to be fit and enjoy a run with other people. That aside, I'd say that the winners get far more than the "self-satisfaction of being able to run". The top runners win up to 17,250,000 yen and make a very descent living trying "to prove themselves".

    We, those who need to go out and drive, get nothing more than annoyance.

    If you know exactly when the marathon occurs and what the course is, including the blocked routes, which are posted well in advance, when not just plan an alternate route and stop your whinging? It really makes it seem like you don't have any self-esteem and just have something to prove.

    Posted in: And they're off

  • 3

    ambrosia

    roughneck: This event every year causes traffic jam.

    It causes traffic jams for one day out of the year. Can't you walk, ride a bicycle or take the excellent public transportation that Tokyo has to offer that one day out of the year and not contribute to the traffic jams? Or better yet, just keep your whiny self home that day.

    Can't they held it somewhere else? May be somewhere in Saitama or farther where they have wider roads?

    But then they'd have to change the name from the Tokyo Marathon to the Saitama or Farther Where They Have Wider Roads Marathon. It just doesn't really roll off the tongue the same way.

    Posted in: And they're off

  • 4

    ambrosia

    The first paragraph says he sent her countless messages. The second says he began sending (her) 10 malicious through the app Line and that she committed suicide the next day. First. the story is a little vague so it's hard to come to any real conclusions other than that he's a real jerk and she was fairly unstable. Second, while I in no way condone sending such messages to anyone, I would be curious as to where the legal line is drawn when it comes to "instigating the suicide" of another. Is one malicious message enough to get you arrested? Would it have to be more than 5? Would you have to have a proven knowledge that the person who committed suicide was indeed suicidal? What period of time has to have been covered? Is one day after sending such messages enough? Would it have to be a week? It just seems like there would be so many contingencies in a situation like this that it would be extremely difficult to fairly prove a case, one way or the other.

    Nice to know that there are always going to be a couple of posters who apparently feel that prison rape is an amusing and acceptable thing and those that are happy to condone others to hell or otherwise advocate violence. Consistency has its comforts, I suppose.

    sensei258: Don't drop the soap" or "How's it feel being your cell mates love toy".

    elbuda mexicano: May he burn in HELL!!

    Posted in: Keio University student arrested for instigating girlfriend's suicide

  • 1

    ambrosia

    sillygirl: @ambrosia yes, so have but it sure is more of an **ordeal as a woman.

    It certainly isn't as easy as a guy just being able to whip out Mr. Johnson but nor would I call it "an ordeal". Maybe if you're all wrapped up in petticoats and pantaloons but in all my vast experience of peeing outside, I'd say it's just a matter of balance and aim.

    Posted in: Japanese women describe things they’d most like to do if they were guys for a day

  • 0

    ambrosia

    kaimychal: Those were the good old days! So sad to read this!

    Oh, please! It's not as if people don't continue to be kind and helpful to others. All three of my brothers shovel and plow for their elderly neighbors all winter long and living in the snow belt, as they do, they've got their work cut out for them.

    As for this woman and her family, any assumptions that they wouldn't help her are just that - assumptions. Elderly people can be very stubborn and she may simply have refused to let them help. They may not live nearby and thus can't get out to help her as often as they'd like. Her kids would very possibly be in their 60's and while that's not old, it's not young either and who knows what their health situation is. She may not even have had kids but just other similarly aged relatives.

    Posted in: Body of elderly woman found covered in snow in Nagano

  • -1

    ambrosia

    Well done Maddie!

    Posted in: Happy hug

  • 1

    ambrosia

    sillygirl: Pee outside

    Why can't you do that now? I've peed outside plenty of times.

    There are some rather odd answers in that article. Why in the world would you assume guys can and you can't lift something heavy, change a lightbulb, run as fast as you can or take part in an eating contest? You'd think that some of the women answering didn't have a muscle between them or were raised in some sort of completely sex segregated society. They don't even seem to be aware of what they can do, let alone what not all men are capable of.

    Posted in: Japanese women describe things they’d most like to do if they were guys for a day

  • 0

    ambrosia

    lostrune2: Aren't there usually employment laws against minors working past 10pm?

    The Japanese constitution prevents employers from hiring anyone under age 18 for work at night or for work involving more than 48 hours a week or eight hours a day, except under certain conditions. Night work is defined as between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. Males over age 16 are allowed to work at night if they are working a shift system. Minors are also not allowed to be assigned any work which is dangerous or hazardous to health--for example, mining work, repairing machines that are in operation at the time of repair, or handling poison or explosives.

    connorh93: 2am is definitely too late to be working whilst in high school, this accident may have been partly to lack of sleep plus the lack of sleep could have affected his school work. I hope for a speedy recovery for him.

    While I'll grant you that 2 a.m. is late to be working the majority of Japanese students in their final year of school do next to nothing besides looking for a job or studying for university exams, which he'd have already taken.

    My question is how he got his hand stuck in a snowplow. A snowplow pushes snow with a big flat or curved piece of metal attached to the front of a vehicle. There is no rotor for one's hand to get caught in. A snowblower has a rotor and can be quite dangerous if you don't know what you're doing - Turn it off. Disengage the clutch. Remove the key, if there is one. Wait a good five to ten seconds to make sure the blades have stopped moving.

    18 is certainly not too young to be using a snowblower but there is no safe age to use it if you haven't been trained and don't follow proper safety procedures. I feel bad for the poor guy and hope he'll be alright in spite of what he's just been through.

    Posted in: Youth has hand amputated at wrist after getting it caught in snow plow

  • 1

    ambrosia

    toshiko: In the state I livew in USA, when my daughter drives, I have to get out when she get out. Even old people can not stay in none moving car.

    I'd really like to know what state that is and to see a citation of the law you're claiming exists because I'm having an extremely hard time believing that. It sounds like you either misunderstood something or your daughter told you that because she was worried about your being alone in the car.

    Posted in: 1-year-old boy chokes to death on seatbelt after being left in car

  • -3

    ambrosia

    Isao Hoshi: So what? Whomever he dates, that's his business. If he is happy, that's all counts, folks!

    If you really feel that way then I've got to wonder why you bothered clicking on the story.

    Posted in: Darvish denies relationship with Kato-pan

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