browny1's past comments

  • 0

    browny1

    Convention for the suppression of Unlawful Seizure of Aircraft Article 1 (a) is just a starter.

    As my earlier post stuggested, the capatain, by allowing to be co-erced / influenced by a passenger to redirect the plane in flight (inflight begins when the capsule is sealed) is the biggest concern. It appears the disturbance was solely of the woman's making, so she should bear responsibility with the captain.

    Posted in: Korean Air CEO apologizes for daughter's nuts tantrum

  • 0

    browny1

    yuri - sorry, but according to law she was wrong. No ifs or buts - she was wrong and as sfj indicated she committed a felony.

    International regulations are precise about this.

    And the flight cancellled? No! She should have been put off the plane instead of the staff member. Doing such would have incurred no additional loss of time.

    Posted in: Korean Air CEO apologizes for daughter's nuts tantrum

  • 5

    browny1

    The scariest thing in all of this, is that someone with no official right, essentially commandeered an international flight, in contradiction of all international flight security laws & protocol.

    The pilots locked in their cabins are supposedly beyond reproach in these post 9/11 days.

    So wtf happened?

    Posted in: Korean Air CEO apologizes for daughter's nuts tantrum

  • 0

    browny1

    Tinawata - last year 4 innocent people confessed to computer crimes that they didn't do. No DNA.

    Just bumbling procedures by police & prosecutors and of course heavy handed methods (because why else would normal intelligent people confess).

    Tina - you have no idea of what is below the proverbial tip. Seek.

    Posted in: Japanese right muzzling liberal media, say analysts

  • 2

    browny1

    My first experience with O-sechi was years ago at my future parents in laws. I didn't mind the taste so much - quite nice, but then shes a great traditional cook, but I was a little bewildered when the first day trays (about 5) became 3 trays on the 2nd day and 1 still going on the third. None of this food was ever refrigerated - a "samuii desu ne" was apparently enough of a spell to keep the food biologically intact.

    But I never ate it after day one, just shuffled it around the plate and howed down more piping hot Ozoni (no bugs) and said I was full.

    I'm sure many young kids brought up on pasta, curry rice and instant noodles would declare O-sechi inedible.

    Posted in: Why don’t young people in Japan like eating traditional New Year’s dishes?

  • 0

    browny1

    Fadamor - you could be correct - but I didn't mean the whole pig farm as the sties themselves would require internal access(walkways etc) that I imagined would be included in the building floorspace.

    But irregardless, as you suggested, they are not there to enjoy a life of grubbing, mucking & wallowing - but simply to be. And that be is at the whim of the flesh eaters whose profit margins are all that matter.

    Posted in: 2,000 pigs perish in fire in Chiba

  • 0

    browny1

    While the blowfish is certainly a fish to be handled expertly, there is a lot of hoo-haa over it. The mystique has built to urban legend status over the years, much to the delight of the industry and fanned of course by media blowups and The Simpsons.

    As I understand farmed blowfish - which accounts for a large % - is not dangerous, as the toxin producing bacteria come from the natural food that those in the wild eat.

    I would suspect more people die of mushroom poisoning, shellfish poisoning or offal poisoning than blowfish, but they don't have the exotic thrill of the dicing-with-death narrative of the almighty blowfish.

    Posted in: Blowfish, 'washoku' win Michelin stars as Tokyo keeps gourmet crown

  • 0

    browny1

    4,000 squ.m divided by 2,000 pigs = 2 squ.m per pig or much less I guess, considering access / storage / common areas etc - which means they were really being porked by the pig eating & sundry associates fraternity.

    Posted in: 2,000 pigs perish in fire in Chiba

  • 0

    browny1

    Max - again thank you. I agrre with a lot of your sentiments and as you suggest, speculation could go on forever. A critical point of disagreement however is you stating that it's not our right to comment or it's not our business.

    I quite frankly believe the opposite. When high profile, elite, sporting events are put to the public, we the fans are engaged and we the fans have participatory rights that may be as limited as expressing a view. But it is us the audience that creates the situation, for without the audience the $billions would not exist and the grand stage would not exist and the athletes abilities would not be appreciated. It is our business to know. We the fans have a right for transparency and clarity in explanation of the actions of the participants and their welfare. Hanyu's private life is his for his world, but when any athlete steps onto a public world stage they must accept the presence and scrutiny of observers(I'm sure Hanyu does).

    And by my comments re the medical check, I was not questioning "they said it's ok", I was questioning whether they, and as you mentioned other medicos, are really up to it - you know beyond the "how many fingers am I holding up" level. A lot of poor support nets still out there. A doctor at a prefectural judo event a while back didn't know how to perform cpr. But I digress. Thanks for the discussion.

    Posted in: Hanyu defied crash warning, says coach

  • 0

    browny1

    Max - thanks for your reply.

    Re - making a comment - yes I wasn't there & don't have detailed information, but I believe I can make a comment based on the known facts. The known facts: 1) Hanyu had a heavy collision. 2) Hanyu had head lacerations that required stitching and stapling. 3) Hanyu had cranial bruising (ie some level of internal bleeding) 4) Hanyu had a leg / ankle injury. 5) Hanyu fell 5 times during his performance (not a good sign after a head impact) 6) Hanyu was wheel chair bound after the tournament and for his return home.

    These known facts enabled me to make an educated guess on whether he was in a fit enough condition to compete, especially with the possibility of further injury if he fell heavily.

    And as I said - if you are familiar with current sports practices you will know that head injuries of the type Hanyu sustained would be closely monitored for an extended length of time.

    I don't know, but it appears he made the call himself to continue and no one was stopping him. A head injured person often cannot make the correct call.

    Posted in: Hanyu defied crash warning, says coach

  • 0

    browny1

    Max - I agree - Hanyu was not reckless.It's not his fault. He was not in the position to make a sound judgement. His handlers and the medicos were however reckless.

    No matter how much this is spun - all the latest research indicates the best procedures will always err on the side of caution re head injuries. Always. There is a mountain of supporting evidence & material out there.

    Posted in: Hanyu defied crash warning, says coach

  • 0

    browny1

    Educator - my thoughts exactly. He came home in a wheel chair, so one would suspect that his ankle(?) injury would have left him less than capable of performing well.

    And I'll say again - the manner in which this incident was treated is a reflection on the far less than adequate assessment procedures necessary for a head injury. The fact that he fell 5 times in his performance confirms that all was not ay - ok!

    And this has nothing to do with Tohoku Ganbarimasu Samurai Spirit. But it has a lot to do with inferior sports medical practices in the 21st C.

    Posted in: Hanyu defied crash warning, says coach

  • 1

    browny1

    I re-iterate what I said in an ealier posting - it's not the athletes call.

    In modern pro sports (and many amateur) any injury to the head is viewed as in the "most serious category".

    Without calling out the skills & professionalism of the attending medicos in Shangai, it's extremely doubtful if an accurate appraisal of Hanyu's injury could be made in such a short time. All cases are different and no text book can cover any one scenario.

    The fact that he had cranial bruising, skull & jaw stitching and staples leaves little room for doubt over whether to continue or not. Would any top athlete have been allowed to continue with such injuries? Would Federer continued playing a grand-slam?

    As much as there are certain acknowledgements for the coach Orser's predicament, it should just have been written-in-law that any competitor involved in such an incident is retired from the event.

    Athletes health is the #1 priority in sports, elite or otherwise. No glory in blood on the ice.

    Posted in: Hanyu defied crash warning, says coach

  • 3

    browny1

    Tina - "I think the press officer(if any) is on the campaign trail too" - please explain clearly what you mean. I'm not sure I get your drift.

    Posted in: LDP accused of avoiding election questions from foreign journalists

  • 4

    browny1

    Sensato - all of the most famous temples & shrines do not get rebuilt every few decades.

    A handful do. Most go through the normal maintenance / renovation that is necessary to keep them in operable safe condition. Japan abounds in 1,000s of old shrines and temples, still standing in fine condition after 100s of years.

    As was earlier noted, the complete disposable house syndrome is a relatively new phenomena, perhaps originally created by a shortage of quality materials post-war and then continued by the avarice of a construction industry hell bent on screwing the locals for all they're worth.

    Finally some commonsense and sanity is returning to the building world.

    Posted in: Cultural lessons in housing and construction

  • 1

    browny1

    JoeB - thanks for the sagely advice. I'll store it in my "Advice from the Sages" file for quick access.

    People have a right to comment on the politics of the country in which they are living and working - unless it's NK where question marks loom.

    Since when does non-citizen ship deny one the right to make observations and statements about the local govt. Other than my home country, I've lived for extended periods in 3 countries and have made comments about the political / social situations in each. That is what democracy in the free world is. And many such comments have been positive as well as negative.

    Sorry, but only a shallow mind could try to play the old "go home if you don't like it" card, especially considering the topic at hand which is discussing the merits of the govt.

    If you travel / work / live in other places - do you follow your own sagely advice and zip your own utterances for fear of failing the citizenship test (read - the right to speak)?

    Posted in: Voters to Abe: Why call an election now?

  • 2

    browny1

    Tina - thank you - your grammatical explanation sums up whyJjapanese people have difficulty using English. They think too much about making mistakes. My posts were focussed on the art of communication which is NOT analyzing the structure of a sentence, debating the whys & why nots of an article, translating a question into the mother tongue then formulating an a response into the target language. This is exemplified by your comments. Comunication is NOT a test.

    You suggested why not "eating" instead of "to eat" - why "at" not "in"? So you are hung up on the intricacies of linguistic notions and NOT communication. A perfectly simple sentence for an English language learner, which would be UNDERSTOOD by all native listeners in the same context as I wrote earlier -

    Native speaker - What restaurant do your prefer to go to ? (some tricky grammar - eh?) Japanese English learner - I like eating Italian - or I prefer eating Italian - or I like Italian - or Italian.

    All responses would be easily comprehended by the listener. and a successful communication moment would have been had.

    To the Test Bashed Japanese mind, subjected to zillions of act scrutiny re whether or not an article is correct or a prposition is misplaced, I can only reccomend - When you communicate in a foreign language with foreigners you are free from the constraints of the burden of the "don't make a mistake or else laws of Japanese protocol.

    Get it. It is NOT Japanese. Relax. Talk. Have fun! Laugh!.

    Posted in: Education minister proposes English education for 3rd grade

  • 2

    browny1

    Tinawata- thank you for your comments.

    While not debating whether or not concepts are more "precise" in English, which in turn you suggest puts Japanese English learners at a disadvantage, I do believe this has little to do with ability in general basic daily conservation. Stating "I'd prefer to eat at the Italian restaurant" or "It's a nice day, lets go to the park" is a very easily understood concept I imagine in most languages. Just that the students here in Japan in many cases, are not taught, shown, encouraged or engaged in the art of communication in a foreign language to the point of being able to use it confidently in simple situations. As I said before it's not rocket science.

    And re Active Learning - you are correct - it hasn't been proven if it works in Japanese Schools, because it hasn't been implemented on a broad consistent scale. And it's use as mentioned by the ministry was to be in many subject areas - science, history, maths etc - not only English.

    And I'm not sure if you can call private English Conversation Schools , often utilized part time, as examples of failed active learning. They bear little in contrast to mainstream educational institutions.

    Posted in: Education minister proposes English education for 3rd grade

  • 5

    browny1

    Tinawata - you made a comment about how difficult it would be for non-native Japanese high school students to learn Japanese in their home countries, and you are correct it is difficult.

    But it's interesting that my limited contact with high school students from Australia, Thailand and France who had been studying Japanese in their homelands, when homestaying in Japan could converse quite well re daily conversations. They could easily indicate their wants, needs & interests in simple, correct Japanese. People here were often amazeed that they could - shock, horror - "talk". While their knowledge of kanji and advanced grammar was limited, they could cheerfully and confidently Communicate. Why? Simply their courses of study were focussed on that - communication. No rocket science. Many in the thin air echelons of Monbusho haven't quite clued into that yet. Living Language is an active dynamic phenomena not a passive analysis of rules subject to an assay. That can happen later with in depth liguistic studies. The few dozens of overseas students I've witnessed here have taken the rare chance to communicate in living Japanese in their grasp and "gone for it". Needs to be more of a "go for it" approach here.

    And I must say that Shimomura's talk about promoting the new style of learning - Active Learning - brought a cheesty grin to this dial. Actually I watched this being reported on NHK last night and the excitement over Active Learning was more surprising than anything. For those in the education field esp out of Japan, know that "Active Learning" as it is called here, has been a mainstream component of educational practices in many countries for decades & decades.

    It just showed how out-of-touch they really are.

    Posted in: Education minister proposes English education for 3rd grade

  • 6

    browny1

    nigelboy - you asked for an alternative and one was given - no election.

    Many people from all sides of the political spectrum have expressed their opinions staitnig an election is unecessary(he already has a clear mandate), time consuming and costly.

    It can only be about him and his standing in the ldp. He needs it for himself to push off those eying his spot and to get another 4 years in before his poll #s decline too much.

    Posted in: Voters to Abe: Why call an election now?

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