browny1's past comments

  • 4

    browny1

    Supey - there certainly is a lot of "hearsay" re ag chemical use here and worldwide.

    But as this article is about Japan and the production of organic fresh foods, a basic fact about here - Japan - is;

    Japans use of pesticides at 13.1 kg / arable hectare (2005 ~ 9) , places it in the world wide top useage group.

    This in a generally compact, intensive farming country means a very large proportion of fresh produce has had chemicals applied, which in turn creates enormous problems for successful organic production. An often misunderstood point is that it is difficult to be a truly organic producer if your neighbours don't follow suit.

    Headways are slowly being made though.

    Posted in: Organic food rarely found on Japan’s tables

  • 1

    browny1

    Japan uses millions of tonnes of agri-chemicals.

    A lot of the (most) organic produce here would not pass the stringent certification necessary to be called such in EU, Australia, NZ etc.There is no national standardized system or anything remotely close to it. My friend is a low chemical famer. She grows an interesting variety plus some staples. She has said it's almost impossible to use no chemicals esp in the hot / wet summer. She told me it's necessary to spray cabbages 30 times, so she doesn't grow any vegetables that require such doseage.

    In addition, probably to many peoples surprise, mis-labelling, mis-reporting or understating is still common.

    Posted in: Organic food rarely found on Japan’s tables

  • 0

    browny1

    Sorry - that should read "....worlds Nuclear Weapon Free Zone"

    Posted in: Nuclear non-proliferation talks end without agreement

  • -1

    browny1

    While Japan is a signatory to the NPT agreement, I can't help but feel the Japanese Govt is really trying to play 2 hands in this.

    Being an NPT supporter sounds great, but in reality does little to prevent nuclear armed countries (and their associates ie USA - Japan)from continuing to play the Big Boy game.

    If Japan was really serious about nuclear weapons, and backed up it's correct portrayal as the only nation to suffer a nuclear attack, why oh why hasn't it established Japan as one of the worlds Nuclear Free Zones (other Asian countries have) or why oh why hasn't it joined the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons.

    I mean it's the least a govt can do, seeing it is the only country to have lost 100,000s of it's citizens to the evil of nuclear weapons. So weak.

    Posted in: Nuclear non-proliferation talks end without agreement

  • 3

    browny1

    While profit earning potential may well be the deciding factor in a movies production (studios are businesses), creativity still abounds in many films. Misting over "the good old days of golden cinema when films were creative and original" doesn't hold up to scrutiny as so many films have always been formulaic or followed trends.

    While the list noted may all be remakes or sequels - so what? Artistic movements have long existed well before film in painting, music, literature etc. I never hear anyone condemning Arthur Conan Doyle for repeating his Sherlock Holmes character over and over again. Did we we really need Rowling to write 7 Harry Potter novels? Where was her originality? Braque wasn't a real cubist, he just followed Picasso. John Mayall's blues lacks all originality, It's just a morphing of Lead Belly and Terry & Mcghee. No one says such things. This doesn't mean quality of interpretation is not important and in fact a refreshing approach is always awaited. But the idea of every stroke is to be truly original is rare in the world of creativity across genres.

    So I look forward to viewing the "summer releases" (or whenever they finally make it here) and will be enthralled by some and perhaps bored by some - but that will probably not be due to them being another chapter in a saga, but rather the creators interpretive skills.

    Posted in: Hollywood is bombarding us this summer with lots of sequels and remakes, such as “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Avengers: Age of Ultron,” “Terminator: Genisys,” “Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation," "Jurassic World," "Fantastic Four" and "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.," among others. Whatever happened to creativity and originality in films?

  • 0

    browny1

    Tina - I agree - the notion of cruelty is subjective. One person's cruelty is another person's love - eg corporal punishment?

    But in order to operate in the modern world we do need some basic set of standards to smooth out the processes of global interraction esp in the demanding areas of science..

    In this case, the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums has a set of basic rules to abide by. This helps all members for a common understanding.

    If you don't wish to follow the rules, then simply exit from the association and go your own way. No-one is forcing the aquariums under scrutiny to join.

    If you want to play soccer, then rugby rules won't cut it.

    Posted in: Japanese aquariums still rely on controversial dolphin hunt

  • 0

    browny1

    Tina - are you saying the members of WAZA base their science on cuteness????

    I thought it was based on ..."WAZA requires all members to adhere to policies that prohibit participating in cruel and non selective methods of taking animals from the wild".

    The round peg of cute doesn't fit the square hole of logic on this one.

    Posted in: Japanese aquariums still rely on controversial dolphin hunt

  • 2

    browny1

    I like these toilets, but don't own one as where I live we are not even connected to common sewage. So It's nice "treat" to have the occasional blast, gasp & dry.

    But I have read a report ( can't find the link) which states that constant long term use of these anal cleaners has negative effects. Some I recall - are the constant "wetting" of the region has increased the cases of allergic anal irritation; the sparkling clean function destroys good bacteria(yes there are good bacteria there also) which has lead to other infectious problems ; water being too hot and too powerful causing anal / rectal tissue problems..........!

    Most of the associated problems were caused by "frequent users", those that used multiple times daily. When surveyed most owners fitted this category and in fact felt reluctant to use a "standard old fashioned" toilet, opting to hold on until getting to a modern version or home.

    So I won't be getting one, but instead continue to use on those "special occasions" when i feel like treating myself.

    Posted in: Japan proud of its high-tech toilets

  • -1

    browny1

    Frungy - well seems like I can't grasp it then. Sorry I'm way out of my depth here as it all appears to have escaped me.

    I concede.

    Posted in: Fukui accident victim wins claim against fellow victims

  • 6

    browny1

    Abe couldn't easily change the constitution,so as the exalted leader he is, he just bypasses it. Neat - eh!

    And the turncoats of Komeito, pretended to be be negotiating tough, when in fact by supporting Abe, they have discarded one of their basic principles - pacifism - no doubt troubling many of their long time supporters.

    Scare-mongering and poli-speak at it's best.

    Posted in: Abe says new security bills needed because Japan can't ignore real world

  • 0

    browny1

    Frungy - thank you again.

    re - reasonable man argument. I think you need to look at my previous postings and see what the main point of my focus was. Simply being - the non perpetrator was heavily penalized to the tune of 40million yen - approximately 60% of the penalty imposed on the perpetrator who maimed and killed. So all I suggested was it's "reasonable" (your word) to understand that many would raise a few eyebrows at such a percieved disparity. No further need of analysis. I never sided with any party - just made an observation. You were the one with the sheeple, lack of common sense, boo, hiss ballyhoo. re - having an opinion. Can't for the life of me believe I'm trying to "suppress" your opinion. Where on earth do you get that idea? And yes all opinions may or may not be equal - but the right to espouse such is equal. And your delving into the current status of american opinion tabooism may be interesting but is of no relevance to me at all in this discussion.

    And I think you feel you are under attack - where no attack has been made on my behalf - I'm not sure why you feel the need to defend yourself as a self-made man when my expression afforded no degree of un-earned privilege or patronising air at all. Just a way of saying some people are specialists in their fields as probably I am in mine.

    And as a final knob - my original post stated that I agree with you - just not the level of your tarring.

    Posted in: Fukui accident victim wins claim against fellow victims

  • 1

    browny1

    Frungy - thankyou.

    However I stand by my comment that the posters in question lack common sense.

    They merely made comment on a situation that most sensible citizens would think was questionable in the least.. That they used such "powerful" words as lunacy & absurd and with those words impact on an open comment forum, just reflects their feelings.

    I think you are probably adding to the situation in much the same manner with emotive expressions like boo & hiss.

    Not everyone is a film director, but all people can offer an opinion on what they see in a movie. Likewise people can offer an opinion on a situation - perhaps out of their legal depth - on a situation that for all accounts they deem to be absurd. Not everyone has the luxury of a manicured bacground on all topics.

    Posted in: Fukui accident victim wins claim against fellow victims

  • 1

    browny1

    Frungy - while agreeing with the gist of the dynamics of your explanation and decrying the perhaps woeful(in) action of the defending lawyer, your ridiculing protesters of the decision as lackiing in common sense is quite harsh.

    I htink many peoples objections to the decision are compounded by the questionable sum of money awarded as damages. The sole instigator of the accident, who killed and maimed, has to pay 67mil. The severely maimed other driver whao had no hand in the instigation of the crash has to pay 60% of that or 40mil/ How such an apportioning of monies was arrived at certainly would raise more than a few eyebrows.

    It has nothing to do with common sense.

    I have no legalistic background, but deciding on culpability as if it is a science set in stone is questionable.

    Who can possibly declare outright that a 0.5sec faster braking reaction time would have resulted in non-death? Who? How many fatalities have occured in lower speed head on impacts? At a combined speed of 60kmh? 70kmh? 80kmh? 90kmh? !00kmh? Was the deceased weraing a seatbely? If so was it secured and fitted correctly? Did the car have airbags? If so were they functioning correctly? Did they inflate as manufacturers intended? What was the poiunt of impact of the 2 vehicles? Would a veering by the oncoming driver, initiating an angled impact resulted in similar damage to cars and occupants? Would an angled impact as the result of trying to avoid the collision have brought other unforseeen dynamics into play? Would a side collision have forced the cars into other traffic? What are the results of the 1,000s of simulation conducted by safety experts in such head on scenarios. What is the exact science defining individual reaction modes and times in cases of sudden, startling catastrophic stimuli being applied? Can a judge who may or may not be a driver, asses such variables and extrapolate a monetary penalty?

    For me just too many ifs - which all leads back to my earlier comment, that your application of "lacking in common sense" upon posters only cuts it if you think inside the box.

    Posted in: Fukui accident victim wins claim against fellow victims

  • 0

    browny1

    Fox - thanks for your run down on the state of affairs in Wales. Sounds stressful.

    However,I'm not mistaken, as the the point of the discussion I believe, was about customers here in Japan rarely acknowledging staff with even a simple hello or thankyou.

    If you witness it daily as I and many others do, you'll soon understand the situation. The chances of being nagged / questioned to death here, is so remote that people would collapse with shock.

    That's the point.

    Posted in: Blogger lists three things foreigners do that impress the Japanese

  • 0

    browny1

    Tama - whole heartedly agree.

    Posted in: Yoko Ono designs coffee cup line inspired by tragedies

  • 0

    browny1

    Jane - thank you for your comments. I agree with all of what you say about the positive benefits.

    I wasn't complaining, but rather commenting on and pointing out that often the "clamouring" for world heritage status imo, appears to be overly based on the finacial rewards to be reapt. As you stated money & publicity will draw attention to the sites, furthering more recognition - but sometimes that recognition goes against the grain of preservation.

    Try accessing the wonder of Shirakawago. I've been twice - once thankfully on a beautiful winters snowy Thursday and it was amazing with no crowds. A later date I went on a weekend and it was shoulder to shoulder with those bussed in in their 1,000's. Certainly lost a bit of charm (or more).

    Or the wonderful wilderness that is Shiretoko in Hokkaido. I recall after it was granted status the numbers of tourists increased dramatically - so much so that one of the areas leaders (mayor?) recommended culling some of the bears as they were a danger to the hordes. Er - the park is a world recognized wilderness conservation zone - how about culling some of the tourists I and others thought.

    And the other point I mentioned which is critical - is, are all of these places really, truly of world significance? Somehow I have my doubts. Perhaps a tiered system with "stars" (michelin ha, ha!) might be more effective in establishing universal worthiness.

    It all reminds me a little of how so many people think the Nobel prize is a competition that one trains and aims for - like an olympic medal. How wrong! And perhaps many of those same people think world heritage status is a competition to win.

    Posted in: Visitors flock to UNESCO World Heritage Site recommendations

  • 3

    browny1

    This clamouring for world heritage status is all becoming tedious - and not just Japan.

    As I understand it the guiding principle is of "Outstanding Universal Value". Meaning the sites significance is so great that it (to borrow from a leaflet) transcends national borders and makes an impact on the whole world.

    The current nominations in Japan include a few remaining stones of an old smelter, an old shack-like classroom an old steel framed workshop and other structures - some much more imposing. I know they have applied for a serial nomination meaning a "group of structures of related importance" being nominated, but these places are hardly of world significance. They are in fact important national heritage sites and should be preserved for posterity. I think you will find many many examples of countries emergence from essentially feudalism via the industrial revolution to modernity. 1,000s of interesting sites abound - and there protection is the responsibility of local and national govts.

    But pushing the world heritage barrow, now seems to be a way to promote a "soft nationalism" while hoping to reel in a financial bonanza through tourism and associated commercial activity.

    Cheapens it all.

    Posted in: Visitors flock to UNESCO World Heritage Site recommendations

  • 0

    browny1

    Sensei258 - thanks for the info re bag & size limits. Out of curiousity what are they?

    Locals here take any size & any amount from the beaches.

    Posted in: Clam crowds

  • 1

    browny1

    Obviously no size or bag limit there.

    As Sabrage said - sustainability at it's best.

    Posted in: Clam crowds

  • -2

    browny1

    Fox & M3 - you've escalated a discussion on a simple ackowledgement of existence through a friendly greeting - hello - to an invasion of privacy - or so it seems.

    I'm sorry if you really have to encounter such intrusions daily.

    Posted in: Blogger lists three things foreigners do that impress the Japanese

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