browny1's past comments

  • 0

    browny1

    Reminds me of what James Cameron the director (terminator, aliens, avatar etc) said recently - Sky Network is already here.

    Posted in: Google teams with Oxford to teach machines to think

  • 0

    browny1

    This would mean cutting off the parasitic 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th tiers of labor scavengers - often with yakuza links - and taking appropriate responsibility for the overseeing and management of a crisis-borne dilemma.

    And at the moment, the spooners and comp. demi-gods have neither the inclination or power to do such.

    Posted in: TEPCO and the government should improve the work environment while taking into account the long-term decommissioning processes, and also make efforts to educate workers to improve their techniques.

  • 0

    browny1

    Frungy - I agree.

    The current situation of long term stays is a drain on valuable funds (of course benefiting institutuions), which could / should be diverted to establishing community health services, networks and support systems.

    At the moment many beds are filled because of a lack of alternatives, and as the world's # 1 aging society, Japan should be aggressively pursuing 21c substitutes for the all-too-easy system of leaving patients in beds forever.

    Posted in: There's no doubt hospital stays are too long in Japan. Shortening them would allow more patients to be moved through the system.

  • 2

    browny1

    Coconut - strange as it may seem - Big Hero 6 is a REMAKE of a Marvel Comic. The original is set in a Japanesque mega-city with the same hero - Hiro as the animation.

    I remember reading this comic about 12 years ago in an airport.

    Posted in: Disney pens love letter to Japan with robot film

  • 1

    browny1

    strangerland - thanks for commenting on my numbers.

    By millions, I meant millions - 10mill, 12 mill, 18mill, 25mill - who knows at the mo. At any rate, all of which equates to $100, 000s. And that is just the suspected amount at this point in time for theater tickets, baby clothes, leeks, baseball tickets and other sundry items.

    And I wholeheartedly agree with you re it's disrespectful to the tax payers. I'd actually take it a step further and call it theft from the tax payers.

    Posted in: Obuchi under pressure to resign over political donations misuse

  • 10

    browny1

    Stephanie - it IS a big deal.

    I'll never forget how jiminto hounded Maeda of minshuto over receiving a 5 man(few hundred dollars) donation from an 88year(?) old woman who was a life time family friend, and - oh - happened to be of korean descent.It was disgusting and played up as a national security issue.

    Here, Obuchi, a mere cut-out promoted by the obuchi clan machinations (as schopenhaauer pointed out), misused funds to the tune of millions of yen (100,000s of $), so she and the clan cronies should expect to get the full bench-press. The only rising star she represents is the star in abe's eyes when he mists over the good ol' days.

    And the only idiotic thing in all of this, is why such corruption has gone on unabated, without heavy scrutiny over the decades - weak opposition and weaker media.

    Posted in: Obuchi under pressure to resign over political donations misuse

  • 2

    browny1

    Strange going ons.

    Itami is govt. owned 100% through the New Kansai International Airport Corp. Currently they are seeking tenders to take over the management(together with Kanku) so as to nullify their colossal debts.

    At such a stage, why would they turn a blind eye to gang-connected standover tactics being openly and illegally used?

    Smells of Amakudari.

    Posted in: Kansai taxis flout laws in quest for more lucrative business

  • 4

    browny1

    marcelito - NHK already minimized this on last nights 9:00 news. It reported it, but went into far less detail than news station @ 10:00 (which is to be expected).

    But the classic comment was made by nhk's anchor when he said to the effect that " I hope she can correct this quickly so she can return to her important duties esp nuclear energy"

    Investigative, questioning journalism at it's best.

    Posted in: Obuchi apologizes after political funds misuse reports

  • 1

    browny1

    MiracleM - thanks for the welcomed insight into the legalities.

    Nichia had a legal obligation and not just a so called moral obligation.

    So they suffered.

    Posted in: Nobel winner Nakamura was salaryman who took on bosses

  • 0

    browny1

    Nathalieb - your summary covers the case well.

    Cleo - you raise the question often of why Nichia is getting flak. Well, as I posted earlier, their credibiility took a huge dive for me years ago when they trotted out the "Woe is us" claim that the LED development had reapt no windfall but in fact they had lost on it. The figures they produced at the time were absurdly huge. They publicly painted themselves into a corner over this and came out looking cheap, mean and lying.

    I, as well as you and all the other posters, are not privy to details of 20 years of Nichia company life or Nakamura's same 20 years of employment, so supposition is just that, supposition.

    But I do know as fact, the way Nichia handled itself, was consistent with stand-over tactics used by many companies and they backfired, losing credibility.

    So I feel comfortable to view them negatively.

    Posted in: Nobel winner Nakamura was salaryman who took on bosses

  • 2

    browny1

    gaijininfo - now that's a bold statement - "businesses don't exist to give people jobs".

    However - "businesses cannot exist without jobs"

    Hence "jobs are an integral part of a businesses survival"

    And "long term survival is certainly short circuted by panic job decision making".

    Scaredy. rabbit-in-the-headlights hiring programs won't cut it in the long run.

    Yoshiyona tried that and it's name is mud.

    Posted in: As volumes and profits have dropped in many Japan McDonald’s restaurants, managers have tried to switch to cheaper part-time workers, to reduce hours, and generally to increase the stress level on employees.

  • 4

    browny1

    Tessa - I agree, as I posted earlier - there are always 2 or more sides. You've heard 1 side from a person and I actually have heard a side also from a person who lived and worked in Annan town. Who to believe.

    My story was Nakamura was maybe a head strong person who didn't like to hear no for an answer. This caused consternation at times esp when you're the younger junior element of the process. He had the support of some but maybe lost that after treading on toes. So he went his own way - and yes he was using Nichia funds & facilities in doing so. So it seems his disrespectful manner indirectly contributed to his success. Right or Wrong!!!

    In all of this though, one thing really stuck in my craw years ago when the first hearings and trial was on. When Nakamura first claimed a % or bonus was due to him, Nichia had it's accounting / legal bods draw up reams of "evidence" which stated that actually the led has earnt us no money at all, and that this research has cost untold millions and we are in the red over it. This was publicly announced and reported repeatedly.

    It seemed like such a slimy cop out years ago and still does now. An attempt to bully and discredit the "outlaw". They didn't need to go that way but they did and lost huge credibility. A joke really.

    And as I and others see it, Nakamura's gripe was not just the money, but the institutionalized hypocrisy and discrimatory practices played out by the educational and corporate world. They exist everywhere, but going against the grain here, in Japan , will soon have you planed over.

    Posted in: Nobel winner Nakamura was salaryman who took on bosses

  • 8

    browny1

    Cleo - I appreciate your comments - but I believe you haven't read through much of the background info re Nakamura.

    Always 2 sides(or more) to every story, but in this case I'll side mostly with Nakamura. The other side(s) have a handful of points to be respected, against Nakamura's bucket loads.

    It's not new news. It's been out there for yonks. Also interesting is when he won the Millenium Technology Prize (the equivalent of the Nobel for technology) in 2006 he was not exactly heralded in Japan.

    Posted in: Nobel winner Nakamura was salaryman who took on bosses

  • 1

    browny1

    Essentially means nought - because as recently as this week the electricity supply monoliths (tepco & co) have decided to not accept energy from renewable sources.

    One industry spokesperson said yesterday that solar energy production is unstable so we can't accomodate it. But no comment when the non-acceptance included energy from private thermal sources available 24 hours a day 365 days a year.

    Too much is invested in their nuclear dream and control - can't bear the thought of change outside their sphere.

    Posted in: As long as the world was dependent on fossil and uranium fuels for energy supply, Japan was a resource-poor country. On the other hand, when technologies are economically available to harvest renewable energy, Japan can become one of the energy-rich countries in the world using the large resources of wind, solar, biomass and geothermal energies available among the Japanese islands.

  • 12

    browny1

    Cleo - your description of the reality of the situation is superficial in the least.

    Nakamura's struggles are well documented through his own book and the trials.

    Hierarchial japan had no time for an essentially unknown man(technologist not a scientist), from an unknown town, who graduated from an unknown university and worked in an unknown company. And the hierarchial structures were alive and well in his unknown company as well.

    Defiance, resilience and unswerving diligence to his task created the blue led.

    Posted in: Nobel winner Nakamura was salaryman who took on bosses

  • 0

    browny1

    Educator - thank you.

    I agree - on many news agencies reports, I didn't hear a reference to "stranded". But it was reported on nhk, so I mentioned it.

    Re how death is reported I already acknowledged that in my first post (We all know the custom here re this,..)

    And I'm with you re philly's comments - and as he indicated it could well be sloppy/unskilled reporting by nhk - which occurs relatively often.

    Re my comfort with the term "passed away - actually I said passed on" - yes it is a euphemism. But within the limits of my English world, in the event of a deadly tragedy passed away/on has only one meaning - death. No dying, no half-dead, no coma - just dead. So it's appropriate. Stranded doesn't mean cardiac arrest or death - that's all.

    And my reference to heaven was in reply to your use of heaven and my full statement which you didn't quote was " For believers, heaven is where dead people go". Believers being the operative.

    All languages have their own idiosyncracies, nuances, usages etc - more often than not reflecting a cultural leaning - just sometimes, even with the allowances of such shifts, I feel an inappropriateness in expressions used, esp in a society where the avoidance of treading on toes is a daily affair. But i guess, from a positive point, that's what contributes to the fascination of languages and cultures. Like calling school girl prostitution enjo kosai ( helping relationship)? Veil it.

    Posted in: 16 still missing on volcano; typhoon threatens recovery effort

  • 0

    browny1

    Educator - thanks for your response.

    The "bodies in bags" i were referring to were the more than likely deceased victims I saw on footage, wrapped and strapped onto stretchers being taken off the mountains. I don't think they had been officially declared dead at that time.

    I never suggested that bodies were kept in that condition for 5+ days.

    And concerning your reference to "language". I also agree, most people would not believe or be mislead to believe that people were actually alive, my point was and is, why use an expression such as "stranded on the mountain" when we can all safely assume 5+days after in horrendous conditions that there is no-one stranded.

    Saying "missing" or "whereabouts unknown" is quite appropriate, but stranded is just too far off the mark. Whether people accept it or not, "stranded" does have connotations of "still alive". The medias reluctance to convey directly the situation (esp in the circumstances I noted) is not confined to this story alone. It's commonplace. If someone has obviously with no doubt passed on, why veil it in a vague euphemism?

    And I'm not sure how your heaven analogy fits. For believers heaven is where dead people go.

    Posted in: 16 still missing on volcano; typhoon threatens recovery effort

  • 1

    browny1

    I think nandaka... is just questioning why after 5+days the obviously deceased can't be referred to as such until declared so by a doctor.

    We all know the custom here re this, but I think that by now it's common sense as well as respectful, to refer to a lifeless person in a body bag as deceased.

    Tonights nhk news was still referring to the 16 people "trapped" on the mountain. I'm a great believer in hope, but with science explaining well the horrific conditons on the volcano (300km/h falling rocks, 100+c degrees, layers of scorching ash as well as the impenetrable barrier of deadly toxic gases) after nearly a week, I feel it's wrong to infer people are still alive and awaiting rescue.

    Hopefully I will be proven wrong and I will offer a thousand sincere apologies.

    Posted in: 16 still missing on volcano; typhoon threatens recovery effort

  • 0

    browny1

    A little strange, is the fact that it is marketed towards the elderly who especially may be alone, and acknowledges that hugging has positive emotional, physical therapeutic value that would likely be welcomed by the aged recipient.

    But as others have stated, no-where is there a mention that hugging in real life as a custom of affection,warmth and trust should be practised.

    I would never advocate the imposing of other cultural values, ie hugging onto the Japanese populace at large, but something inside me tells me that touch (hugging) is an innate human characteristic that we all feel for, and it is only by the moral / cultural / religious / autoctratic imperialism of societies heads that this joy of life has been subjugated.

    The hugging chair is a quik-fix - let's rekindle the lifelong warmth of touch.

    Posted in: Unicare unveils 'anti-loneliness' hugging chair

  • 0

    browny1

    I'm decidedly old school. Holding it is better than imagining holding it.

    I know CDs won't win in the long haul, but that will be another tactile loss for all.

    Other day a visitor from Florida remarked on my awesome(his words) wooden slab kitchen counter - 2m X 0.5m - but had to add that granite, glass, marble, stainless are better because....blah, blah. He was serious and not being condescending.

    I told him I like wood. I like it's feel. I like it's sensuality and I like the extra work (time & effort) that goes into maintaining it. Honest!

    The rush of the digital world is full of digits.

    Posted in: Japan overwhelmingly favors CDs to digital music

View all