commanteer's past comments

  • -1

    commanteer

    ISIS was IS for a while, but now is ISIS again? IS my understanding correct? And what about Isis? I hate to see her name dragged through the mud. ISIS isn't Isis-like at all.

    Posted in: Still no word on fate of Japanese national held captive in Syria

  • -5

    commanteer

    I am surprised so many people want to see this man in jail. Doing so would be a loss to his fans, and a financial hit to the people he employs, his partner, his record company, etc. I don't understand why he was even arrested. Who was he hurting exactly? Why was it necessary to use vital police resources to conduct an investigation that ultimately led to his arrest? (If he was caught at customs when coming into the country, or during a traffic stop, that would be another thing.)

    With all the crime in Japan that goes unpunished, why did the police make him a priority??

    Posted in: ASKA gets suspended sentence for drug use

  • 5

    commanteer

    I found this comment on a Youtube video of (the same?) monkey:

    "Before anyone claims animal cruelty, I found out later that this woman and her monkey were staying at my hostel. After Interacting with them, I can honestly say I have never seen a person have such a strong, and loving, bond with their animal before."

    But haters are gonna hate.

    Posted in: Balancing act

  • 2

    commanteer

    We have plenty of toilet paper. But since we haven't stockpiled food, toilet paper will not likely become an issue. Like David Varnes said above, this reeks of cronyism. To be expected with the people currently in charge.

    Posted in: Do you have enough toilet paper?

  • 14

    commanteer

    Thanks, Sabrage and Jonathan, for your comments. Until I read that, it was pretty depressing to read the stream of callous comments above yours. The man never hurt anyone, and seemed like a decent, if disturbed, human being. Mental illness is not a crime. I hope he survives and manages to build a new life as well. The odds aren't good, though.

    Posted in: A broken man living on dreams pulls Japan into Syria hostage drama

  • 2

    commanteer

    I play guitar. I never thought much about air guitar players, except that maybe they were too lazy to learn to play a real guitar. But I quite enjoyed her show. Maybe air guitar is a kind of guitar-themed dance - I've been converted. At least in her case.

    Posted in: Air guitar champion

  • 2

    commanteer

    And why would the police have to give names for people that made a complaint?

    Because there is a strong possibility that the police could use the anonymous complaint excuse as a cover for police overreach.

    Posted in: Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art forced to cover up 'obscene' photos following complaint

  • 0

    commanteer

    Right you are lucabrasi. But I don't think it's picky to point out grammatical errors when the commenter goes out of his way to use not widely understood words that he hopes will make himself sound intelligent, and uses those words to call others "ignorant."

    Posted in: The fuzzy logic behind Japanese attachment to kanji

  • 4

    commanteer

    Look, sleazy is just a poor translation, or a word chosen by a non-native speaker. Give it a break. The article raised a lot of valid points. Apparently, the lack of titillating sexual content is enough to discredit the entire article to some.

    Posted in: Fanatic fans oblivious to sleazy side of Koshien high school baseball

  • 2

    commanteer

    According to the NHS, vinegar should not be used on any jellyfish stings at all: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/stings-marine-creatures/Pages/treatment.aspx

    Be wary when getting health info from news sites, blogs etc. Stick with the sites that represent medical professionals.

    Posted in: Portuguese man-of-war spotted on Kanagawa beach

  • 0

    commanteer

    Thou dost possesseth a wealth of ignorance.

    "Possesseth" is a 3rd person verb, though the subject here is "thou," which is 2nd person. Normally I wouldn't pick out grammatical errors, but it seems warranted here.

    Posted in: The fuzzy logic behind Japanese attachment to kanji

  • 0

    commanteer

    Sorry guys, but organic is not a magic wand. Organic means nothing unless the country specifies laws permitting use of the term. Yet, even where they do, organic monoculture and large-scale industrial farming are the norm. Yes, so the pesticides and fertilizers are approved organic. They are approved by the government, which (of course) we know to be completely immune to pressure from lobbyists.

    I'd rather rather buy from a company that I know practices responsible, sustainable and safe food production. To do that, I'd have to buy locally. If I can't buy locally, I might go organic, but I might not bother either way. But that's just me.

    The label "organic" is indeed mostly a marketing gimmick. It takes advantage of the general lack of knowledge that the public has about commercial food production.

    Again, nothing against the company represented here. I am sure their processed food is generally of better quality than the processed food you will find in your local supermarket. Though I doubt, if you have a healthy diet that is low in processed foods, it will make a difference to your overall health.

    Posted in: Organic food movement in Japan progressing slowly

  • 6

    commanteer

    Is this a joke? Hollywood stars have more resources at their disposal that 99.99% of the planet. Maybe we should take from funds from a homeless shelter and donate it to a suffering movie star? I liked Robin Williams, but movie stars come way down the list of people we should worry about. Way, way down.

    Posted in: Is Hollywood doing enough to help troubled stars?

  • 1

    commanteer

    As long as we make some people happy, I feel we have served a purpose.

    Thanks for the comment. When I started, I forgot this was simply a promotional article. For sure, lot's of processed foods are unavoidable - take chocolate. Lot's of reasons to be wary of where chocolate comes from, and some dubious practices in the harvest of much chocolate in Africa. Nice to have an alternative that's safe.

    I just think Americans have been more fully sold on processed foods - to the point that they even buy processed foods that they could better make at home in under a minute, such as simple salad dressings. So naturally they will be big buyers of organic processed foods.

    I think the phrase in the article "help wake up the Japanese market" was annoying, but those were the words of the author, not you or your company. Best of luck.

    Posted in: Organic food movement in Japan progressing slowly

  • -2

    commanteer

    Suddenly it's a big no-no to blend almonds with water? No, sounds like a good idea. Assuming you do it yourself. It would cheaper, much easier on the environment and, most importantly, you would know what is in the almond milk because you processed it yourself. It might take 2 or 3 minutes at most - so why pay a premium for an inferior and ecologically harmful product?

    I do buy junk food, by the way. But I don't wear it as a badge of honor, as this article implies I should. What set me off was the tone of this article, which tries to make junk food seem like an enlightened choice - as long as it's organic. Using words like "progress" and "wake up" to describe people who fall for this marketing scheme is absurd.

    I don't blame these guys for trying to make sales. I have been in the food business, and the real profits are all in heavily processed foods, not fresh. That's where the money is. I might even use the same misleading copy to entice people to buy - saying that they are the enlightened and healthy ones. Business is business, after all. I just wish people would think about where they are being led. At a local store, I see young people buying single serving granolas to take home at 1000 yen a pop, the total daily food budget for too many families in Japan. Nobody should be proud of that.

    Posted in: Organic food movement in Japan progressing slowly

  • -2

    commanteer

    So I gather you only eat fresh fruit and vegetables, and nothing which comes out of a bottle or carton?

    Well, for example, I eat almonds. One could choose almond milk, with the additional processing, use of energy and water, and transportation of the much heavier finished product. It may be organic, but that's a band-aid that mostly serves to make the consumer feel better about his purchase. So I stick with almonds.

    Like I said, Mr. Delgorge will see profits if he hangs in there long enough to see junk food become more dominant in Japan. Whether Japanese are eating as much junk food as the west is beside the point. They are clearly headed in that direction, pushed mostly by marketing campaigns and lack of education about food. What follows will be the band-aid, the demand for organic processed foods, also driven by marketing.

    I'm saying the superior solution is to simply go fresh, and not have all of your food choices made for you by corporate marketing schemes. Sadly, that seems to be the future though. At least, by going organic, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing that you are eating better junk food than most poor people are. But it will still be junk food.

    Posted in: Organic food movement in Japan progressing slowly

  • -1

    commanteer

    Japanese are smarter than this, I hope. Almost everything his company sells is a processed food, which Americans love but Japanese are not (yet) so keen on. Stick an organic label on a processed "health snack" so people can feel good about eating their junk food.

    Unfortunately, intensive marketing is pushing younger Japanese toward the same processed and unhealthy diet that Westerners suffer from. That's step one.

    Step two is to introduce organic processed foods, charge a premium for it, and convince people that their diet will be healthier if they buy it.

    End result, great profits for the food business, because it's too much work to get rich selling people fresh and unprocessed vegetables. Mr. Delgorge has it backwards. His industry hasn't caught on here because it's aimed at people who already eat garbage. Of course, by riding on the coattails of Unilever and other processed food giants, he will eventually get his market. But it's like getting people addicted to cigarettes, for example, and then "helping" them by coming out with a new brand of reduced tar "safe" cigarettes - so people can continue to smoke but feel good about it. The trick is to not get on that conveyer line in the first place.

    Posted in: Organic food movement in Japan progressing slowly

  • 1

    commanteer

    99% of architecture anywhere is drab and unimaginative. If you take the time to look, there is some really inspiring architecture in Japan. There is a reason Japanese architects are often successful worldwide.

    Posted in: Japanese architects sell a lifestyle on global stage

  • 3

    commanteer

    Don't understand how the phone could come into contact with her buttocks. Way to close to get a decent picture. Maybe bumping her legs, but her buttocks? And I assume the police found at least one picture on his phone. Otherwise, not much of a case. Lastly, JT really should change "girl" to woman. Rather sexist to call a 27 year old a "girl."

    Posted in: SDF pilot arrested for taking photos up girl's skirt at train station

  • 1

    commanteer

    the law is very clear on this matter, if the target of your affection doesn't say "yes", further pursuit constitutes harassment.

    The vast majority of people know the difference between stalking and romantic pursuit -- they don't need hard and fast rules such as one "no" means you're a stalker if you continue. That's a draconian imposition on the 99% of people who aren't stalkers. People may accept those sorts of laws in the US, but most other places are more sensible. By the time the police are called, the stalker is well past any possible excuse of reasonable misunderstanding.

    Posted in: We're living in an age when anyone can become a stalker

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