lostrune2's past comments

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    lostrune2

    That's what SE Asians feel, and that's what counts.

    Posted in: New law to allow Japan to supply U.S. military in South China Sea

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    lostrune2

    Good on Japan helping friends in Southeast Asia

    Posted in: New law to allow Japan to supply U.S. military in South China Sea

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    lostrune2

    Thought the mentality is to grin and bear it

    Posted in: New anti-chikan cell phone stickers let you mark train gropers with sign of shame

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    lostrune2

    Well, I'm not going to pretend to be an expert, but I have read from a handful of some. Needless to say, they don't make it into the MSM.

    No prob; we're just here to discuss.

    From my understanding, the Houthis are fighting for their independence.

    And they can have it. And I mean, right now. Yemen used to be separate North and South. Houthis now control the government. The southern Sunni Yemenis won't mind secession. Houthis can separate Yemen again, either side going their separate ways.

    But as mentioned, Houthis likely won't want that. The oil fields are in the South. A Yemen government without the oil would be an impoverished government. But of course, the Southern Yemenis won't want to give up control of it.

    As I write this, the US are sending war ships to the area to "stop Iran weapons shipments". I don't believe Iran is sending weapons for a second as they have shown no proof of their claim. The Saudi / US campaign is an international war crime and should be discussed as so.

    Well, this is where it gets muddy. The last internationally recognized Yemen government is the previous Sunni administration, which is exiled from the capital but still exists. The US has diplomatic relations with that admin, who could then give the US the authority to patrol Yemen waters. So the US would have the legal cover to check Iran ships once it enters Yemen waters (in international waters, they can't do it), in addition to the UN-approved naval blockade of Yemen. Now, whether the US would actually do it, is another matter. If Iran ships aren't carrying weapons, then it shouldn't be a problem if they're searched. But that's why ya check.

    And this "legal cover" could also apply to Saudi Arabian air strikes. The Sunni admin is still the legally recognized Yemen government who would give Saudis approval to enter their airspace.

    "Yet, how many people now says that Saddam should've remained in power just for the sake of stability?"

    And there it is again. Your tacit acceptance of an illegal war. We humans make a lot of mistakes, but the 2nd Iraq was an illegal planned operation and there are a lot of Presidents who should be in prison right now including Bush and Obama.

    Please explain how my above statement leads you to believe my acceptance of anything.

    Posted in: Al-Qaida consolidates hold of Yemen province

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    lostrune2

    The points gap between #1 and #2 is now the largest in history

    Posted in: Djokovic beats Nadal to reach Monte Carlo Masters final

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    lostrune2

    Princess Leia slaves serving as flight attendants?

    Posted in: ANA's R2-D2 plane to spirit 'Star Wars' fans far, far away

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    lostrune2

    Remember the Taco Bell restaurant in the film Demolition Man?

    http://tacobell.wikia.com/wiki/Demolition_Man

    That's how it's gonna have to be to survive in Tokyo.

    Posted in: Taco Bell opens its first restaurant in Japan in Tokyo's Shibuya district on Tuesday. How do you think they'll do?

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    lostrune2

    Also, more and more travelers are preferring direct point-to-point routes, rather than going thru the extra hassle of transferring to connecting flights with hub-and-spoke routes. Now that 2-engine planes are getting closer to the distances covered by jumbo jets, there's less routes left exclusive to the jumbo domain, while smaller 2-engines could land in more airports without necessary runway expansions.

    The technology of airplane engines is one of the most exciting and dynamic areas to advance, with new materials (primarily ceramic-based but some metallurgical) combining with advances in computer design capabilities to make much bigger and more powerful engines than were dreamed of in the past. The result has been that really large airplanes are able to fly really long distances on just two engines.

    Two engines not only burn less fuel than 4, they also need less maintenance. Both factors have a huge influence on airline costs of operation. Some observers think that the era of “four holers” as aviation industry people call them, is over

    Posted in: Jumbo jet faces a make or break year

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    lostrune2

    For some countries with less advanced militaries, the nuke is the great equalizer. Those with advanced militaries may not mind if everyone is prohibited to have nukes since they will still come out ahead. But those whose militaries need catching up may want to skip straight to nukes, instead of taking the long road of building up an advanced military and infrastructures.

    Posted in: Should some countries have the right to tell other countries that they cannot have nuclear weapons?

  • -1

    lostrune2

    Guess no different than Shakespeare. Both are mass market entertainment in their days.

    Posted in: University offering 'Game of Thrones' course

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    lostrune2

    Hadi hasn't done a very good job of spreading the wealth because he's in Saudi's pocket. Maybe the Houthis could do a better job. That's what they are fighting for. Stop supporting puppet regimes if you really want peace.

    But some puppet regimes have kept stability. For instance, at one point Saddam Hussein's Iraq can be considered an US-puppet against Iran. Yet, how many people now says that Saddam should've remained in power just for the sake of stability? And the military that runs Egypt too, is still a huge recipient of US aid - how many would want the US to let the Egypt military crumble? In Africa, strongmen warlords in the past were propped up by the West. In the same vein, the Assad and the Shiite Iraqi governments can be considered puppets of Iran - should they go? It's not as easy as black and white.

    Maybe you're right; maybe the Houthis could do a better job, but the means of getting there is plunging Yemen first into chaos. Is the means worth getting there, who knows. Both sides are just doing what they need to do. Houthis would want to take over, but the Sunni Yemenis would not want to give up control of their oil lands. Maybe they could've talked it over in negotiations and agreed to share and avoided chaos, but clearly they don't like each other enough to do that.

    Nice research on the blogger though, but to me, people who sound honest and knowledgeable is more important than a big name like Brain Williams. Why do I say that, because if you don't follow the MSM then why do parrot their words? Defining everything into a simple problem like a Spy vs Spy cartoon.

    But that's not his field of research or even his line of work. Ya don't have to look for a big name, but at least one whose field or line of work. It's not about big name comparisons but establishing some baseline. Has to be more than just sounds honest and knowledgeable - that's how quack doctors fool patients, or taking a non-lawyer best friend's legal advice. (For instance, ex-US Rep. Michele Bachmann was regularly jeered for taking any sources without vetting, such as her whole Obama India trip cost fiasco.)

    And those are my own words, not even using words from other people's blogs. So unless ya can provide actual accounts of these so-called MSM I'm supposedly parroting, please refrain from assumptions.

    Houthi-ignited chaos

    Talk about lame "one-liners"

    That's why I expound on my statements afterwards - all one has to do is ask, and it'd be my pleasure to explain. And that's all I've been asking of you to do the same from the start.

    Heck, we've been thru several rounds now, and you've yet to share with us your "deep" explanations of the Yemeni conflicts. I'm all for a healthy debate, but that's kinda hard when the other party isn't elaborating. We still don't know your positions, and we're still waiting for you to expound on them. Ya can't say people's takes aren't deep yet not provide your own.

    It was stable before the overthrow of the government.

    It's illogical to compare Syria to Yemen.

    Why do you think it's illogical then? So ya gonna have to elaborate on that too.

    The point was for you to address the whole reason for our conversation, why are you against a people who hate Al-Qaida and favor a people who support them?

    Not really against nor for (why is everybody going G.W. Bush nowadays "you're either with us or against us"), neither did express support a side or another, certainly not thru Al-Qaeda. First, lest we forget, the US hates Al-Qaeda as well - so what now, if you're against the US, then you're against a people who hate Al-Qaeda too? Also don't forget that the Sunni Yemen government, with US assistance, was attacking Al-Qaeda, not favoring them (US aid trumps their backsides). And so, the issue of Al-Qaeda becomes a wash, almost ancillary to the whole conflict; there are more significant factors above Al-Qaeda to both sides.

    But what the Yemen chaos did bring --just like in Syria-- is that all sides are too busy fighting each other that neither can spare any resources to fight Al-Qaeda at all. Neither the Houthis nor the Sunni Yemenis are attacking Al-Qaeda currently! Fight for survival first, worry about Al-Qaeda later, is what both sides are currently doing. There's really no good guy; either side may not even be bad guy. History just happens. AFAIC, both sides are just doing what they have to do from their point of view.

    Now it's your turn; let's hear your side. We'd like to hear more of your explanations; expound what you think of these Yemeni conflicts. Please use your paragraphs, not someone's blogs. Take as much space as you'd need; that's fine by us.

    Posted in: Al-Qaida consolidates hold of Yemen province

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    lostrune2

    Well lostrune2, you're the one reading off of the MSM teleprompter (Houthi-ignited chaos). It goes much deeper than those simple statements.

    Ah yes, more ad hominem attacks, and I don't even follow MSM. Can ya stick to the facts without resorting to this?

    This is a little better, but still very shallow.

    Ah again, talk about making simple statements without backing it up. But please don't stop there; now go ahead and expound on your own deep explanations first. All we see are your one-liners, not even a paragraph as support. Write paragraphs, not one-liners.

    Yemen was relatively stable, until the Houthis overthrew the government, Arab-uprising style.

    Saudi Arabia has been trying to destabilize the the country for decades. Here is some info for you if you like.

    It was stable before the overthrow of the government. Why would Saudi Arabia destabilize a Sunni-majority government it supports? At that point, there's no reason for Saudi Arabia to destabilize it! At that point, Saudi Arabia would want the opposite. (That's like Iran trying to destabilize an Assad government it supports - why would Iran do that?)

    You can't say that war started in Yemen in 2004, because it had never really stopped. But "the fighting" definitely stepped it up a few notches that year, as the Houthi militias, recruited from Saada Province itself, started taking their home province back from the Yemeni government and its Saudi ally.

    http://pando.com/2015/03/30/the-war-nerd-to-lighten-the-mood-heres-the-cheery-tale-of-dammaj/

    1) Dude, who's Gary Brecher and why are you reading from his blog? Ah wait, this Gary Brecher:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_Brecher

    Brecher claims to have been born in 1965 and to have attended community college after high school, dropping out before graduating.[6] He claims to be employed as a data entry clerk in Fresno, California and deeply unsatisfied with his job.[7] Around that time he met Mark Ames, editor of the Moscow-based, English language newspaper the eXile, who offered Brecher a column. He wrote in his first eXile column that life in Fresno is a "death sentence" and that he spends 15 hours a day in front of a computer ("6 or 7 hours entering civilian numbers for the paycheck and the rest surfing the war news").

    On June 25, 2008, the following revelation is made on citypaper.[12] in the course of a review of the War Nerd book: But the War Nerd is, in fact, neither of those things. He is not even Gary Brecher! Brecher is the creation of John Dolan, a poet, novelist, lecturer in English at the University of Victoria, and The eXile co-editor.

    Suggest ya cite better sources.

    2) The Houthis are doing what the Sunni majority is doing in Syria - taking their lands back from Assad's Alawite government. And just like that the Syrian civil war started long before 2011; yet some people seem to think it started with the Arab Spring. The Sunnis in both Yemen and Syria would be OK with just separating from the current governments, but the governments won't let them. Again, you're not seeing the parallels here?

    the Houthis would've attacked it anyways since they don't like each other

    It's as simple as that eh?

    Yes, as simple as the US meddling in the Middle East just because of oil that a lot of people espouse. No, of course not - that's what I've been writing paragraphs about, including the Houthis wanting to control the oil revenue in the Sunni southern Yemen.

    And please take your time to answer how the recent growth and success of Al-Qaida in Yemen because the US/Saudi campaign is attacking the Houthis who are Al-Qaida's sworn enemy is OK with you.

    And where did I say it's OK? Go ahead, look for it. Otherwise, please don't fabricate straw-man arguments.

    Posted in: Al-Qaida consolidates hold of Yemen province

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    lostrune2

    Houthi-ignited chaos

    Now, the US/Saudi plan is to attack the Houthis and ignore the growing successes of al-Qaida in Yemen created by this vacuum.

    A vacuum ignited by the Houthis. Yemen was relatively stable, until the Houthis overthrew the government, Arab-uprising style. If the Houthis had just left the majority Sunni Yemen government, like if Assad is left on Syria, then the country would still be stable. Don't ya see the parallel here?

    Furthermore, the Houthis couldn't care less that the US backed the Sunni government. Even if the US did not back the Sunni government, the Houthis would've attacked it anyways since they don't like each other (the government killed their Houthi namesake and former Al-Haqq Islamic party member) and they want to take over. The US being there is just ancillary to their goals.

    And yes, we read up on history, college minor. How about you? Just watch TV and newspapers? All you do is make statements and not back it up. You tell us to read up on history, but how do we even know you read up on yours? Nothing you've said so far suggest some research.

    Posted in: Al-Qaida consolidates hold of Yemen province

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    lostrune2

    Or should I try to tell the truth that the Houthis are trying to take back control of their country

    No they're not. Houthis are a Shiite minority in Yemen. It's more a Sunni country than Houthi country.

    But here's what's really happening: surprise surprise, oil.

    The Sunni Yemenis don't trust the Houthis. The Sunni-dominated southern Yemeni provinces have already announced they won't take orders from a Houthi-led government. But the south is where the oil is, so any group wanting to set up a Yemen government would want control of it, but of course the Sunnis won't want to give it up.

    So once again, it's a fight for oil. It's to be expected.

    Posted in: Saudi-led coalition says U.N. vote victory for Yemenis

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    lostrune2

    Who's bullying who? A government body bullying a business? Most of ya guys use Google search.

    The company has a market share of over 90 percent of Internet searches in the EU, compared with around 70 percent in the U.S. Vestager said that one in four companies complaining about Google were U.S. rivals.

    More Europeans use Google than in the US.

    Rejecting suggestions that the EU was pursuing an anti-American, protectionist policy, Vestager, a liberal former economy minister, said about a quarter of the firms which had complained to the EU authorities about Google were themselves U.S.-owned.

    Posted in: EU raises stakes in Google battle with antitrust charges

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    lostrune2

    Wouldn't have happened if there was no Houthi-ignited chaos

    Posted in: Al-Qaida consolidates hold of Yemen province

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    lostrune2

    Not surprising. China leads the world with at least 45 jailed journalists. And this is the country where Snowden initially fled to, ironic.

    Posted in: Veteran Chinese journalist Gao Yu sentenced to 7 years

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    lostrune2

    Less foreign holdings of debt is a good sign

    Posted in: Japan bumps China as top holder of U.S. Treasury debt

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    lostrune2

    Cuba has its own past to answer to - Cuba used to support the FARC terrorist activities in Colombia, but they're now hosting the peace negotiations.

    Posted in: First Iran, now Cuba: Breakthroughs and hard sells for Obama

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    lostrune2

    The best artists tend to be passionate about some things.

    Posted in: Leveraging English teaching to get into the anime industry

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