nigelboy's past comments

  • -3

    nigelboy

    So in other words, apart from an irrelevant observation about the sleazy methods used by one resistance organisation to raise funds, you have nothing to support your notion that hardly any Koreans opposed the Japanese or were harshly punished for it. So you won't mind if I dismiss what you say as fanciful hypothesis based on what you would prefer to believe. You could be right of course, but that's just coincidental.

    You asked so I answered. If you don't agree with the content, why not just respond with your version?

    As you can get in a country in wartime with draconian laws in place to control and censor the press, that is. In other words, not very. Well, if that is really the kind of thing you consider impartial, objective and reliable I'm honestly not sure what there is to say about it. If you found an article in the same newspaper saying the Emperor flew around Japan on a flying horse curing people of disease just by touching them, when he wasn't defeating the entire US Army single-handed, would you believe that too?

    Can you at least cite this "draconian law" where such reports of unfortunate suicides and dedications by certain people had to be placed in a newspaper article?

    Again, it's patently obvious that majority of Korean population were for the efforts of IJA so they should also start doing their apology tours and statements to other Asian nations.

    Posted in: Abe says he will stick to past apologies in new WWII statement

  • -5

  • -7

    nigelboy

    More important than the worldwide consensus, which you or I are not going to change, seems to me to be the fact that you don't agree with the Asian Women's Fund, which received support (tacit if not financial) from the Japanese government. Your opinion is also at odds with the Kono Statement, which your government (if you are a Japanese citizen) officials supports. With this in mind, perhaps your energy is misspent trying to dialogue with a non-Japanese audience when we are mostly educated differently, and mostly familiar with the work of the AWF and the official position of the government of Japan. It is hard for people to avoid labeling you as a 'denier' or 'revisionist' when you clearly want the official position to be revised. Maybe your efforts should be directed towards changing this official narrative (perhaps they already are).

    My views are simply mine alone based on the evidence I read and I don't get suckered into the often repeated "mainstream historian"(whoever they are) views which are simply copy/pasted and recycled by western sources over and over. And the AWF view and the Japanese government view are not even to close what's stated in the two paragraphs in the MCGraw Hill textbook so it's only natural that the latter complained.

    And let's be clear on the RAA. The primary reason it was closed is the self image U.S. had to maintain to the wives and girlfriends and the mothers back home (Susan Brownmiller). This policy still exist today which is a joke because if the servicemen overseas are forbidden from using such brothels, why on god's earth are the military doctors conducting periodic VD checks on the prostitute working at these brothels? Officially sanctioned or not. If you care about the rights of women under such profession, none of this matters. As Hashimoto said, the issue of exploitation of women should address all of them which includes the comfort women system incorporated by the Korean government to the U.S. Forces and the private brothels frequented by the soldiers all around the world.

    For what it's worth, I thank you back for it's been a while since I had an intelligent dialogue with someone with an opposing view.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -4

    nigelboy

    Sounds like a personal account to me, and yes, eyewitness accounts of victims are* all * considered primary sources. Of course people will lie or embellish, which I'm afraid to say you just seem to have done.

    Huh? It's a report based on interrogation of the captured unit and it's members including the comfort women at that time.
    Not some testimonies 50 years after the fact with politicized baggage already. For example, not a single testimony from the surviving Korean comfort women stated initially that they were abducted by the Japanese military.

    This seems to be a reasonable, if mild, assessment of life at comfort stations. It excludes the issue of how the women got there, but would that matter so much if they had all been well-treated and free to leave?

    I disagree for it overly exaggerates the hardships with play on words like "forced to render". It's a profession that was legal at that time and it still is in various parts of Europe.

    Again, I am confused about who you believe the comfort women were and how they were treated at comfort stations. Would you mind sharing your opinion with us?

    Private brothels attached or operated close to the military. It's an operation that exists even today. The most common in the recent past are local operators who recruit local women with no regulation to how these women were recruited or the labor conditions in which they were subjected to, attach closely to the newly occupied military. In regards to Japan comfort women system in general, the women were recruited by operators in their territories and were granted passage to the battle area overseas attaching themselves to a military unit or command area. Not even worth placing neither issues in textbooks,IMO.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -9

    nigelboy

    This personal testimony has been quoted often to support the position that there was no element of coercion in the comfort station system. Of course, there are other personal accounts that tell a different story.

    It's not a personal testimony. It's an exerpt from a report by U.S. Army right after the capture of a military unit. This is primary evidence.

    nigelboy and others, you people should present your distorted and cherry picked 'evidences' to all the mainstream world historians who have extensively studied this case and who all agree they were sex slaves of Japanese imperial army. And ask them why they don't get with the program that Japan is attempting to push.

    Hotmail,

    Why don't you do it for these often quoted "all the mainstream world historians"? Many posters here are asking for these ' hard evidence' from the works of these historians but not a single poster has provided them. What work(s) convinced you?

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -10

    nigelboy

    But notice it only names the army, it does not take any stance on the actual governments (at that time) involvement which seems to be the part that is most protested by the current government.

    Yes. That's why I question that textbook passage based on primary evidence which includes reports as below.

    "A prisoner of war, a civilian brothel owner captured with his wife and twenty army prostitutes near Waingmaw on 10 August 1944, stated:

    "Prisoner of war, his wife and sister in law had made some money as restaurant keepes in Keijo, Korea but their trade declining, they looked for an opportunity to make more money and applied to Army Headquarters in Keijo for permission to take 'comfort girls' from Korea to Burma. According to prisoner of war, the suggetion originated from Army Headquarters and was passed to number of similar Japanese 'business man' in Korea.

    "Prisoner of war purchased 22 Korean girls, paying their families from 300 to 1000 yen according to the personality, looks and age of the girl. The 22 girls were of ages from 19 to 31. They became the sole property of prisoner of war and the Army made no profits from them..."

    or

    "...The interrogations further show that the health of these girls was good. They were well supplied with all types of contraceptives, and often soldiers would bring their own which had been supplied by the army. They were well trained in looking after both themselves and customers in the matter of hygiene. A regular Japanese Army doctor visited the houses once a week and any girl found diseased was given treatment, secluded, and eventually sent to a hospital..."

    or

    POW Maekawa, Yasuo captured 22 February 1944 stated

    "Prostitutes in Rabaul had been sent away several months before he left because of the danger from bombing.."

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -5

    nigelboy

    The National Police Agency

    Metropolitan Police Department.

    Posted in: Haneda Airport strengthens security in response to France terror attack

  • -11

    nigelboy

    It seems difficult to see how slavery could be kosher with regards to POWs, but then so 'improbable' when it comes to women.

    The flaw in your argument is that is comfort women were POW when the evidence clearly suggests it's not.

    "...While in Burma they amused themselves by participating in sports events with both officers and men, and attended picnics, entertainments, and social dinners. They had a phonograph and in the towns they were allowed to go shopping..."

    "Every comfort girl' was employed on the following contract conditions. She received fifty percent of her own gross takings and was provided with free passage, free food and free medical treatment.."

    http://www.awf.or.jp/pdf/0051_5.pdf

    My goodness, revisionists and deniers hardly get enough sleep do they. Denialboy up at 4:20 , tut tut .

    Was this necessary? Concept of different 'time zone' mean anything to you?

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -4

    nigelboy

    Lets see the textbook and the passage.

    Then we can all agree (or decide) whether or not it is appropriate.

    Anyone got any connections?

    Comfort Women Tradition & Encounters:A Global Perspective on the Past, McGraw-Hill, 2011, p.853.

    "Women's experiences in war were not always ennobling or empowering. The Japanese army forcibly recruited, conscripted, and dragooned as many as two hundred thousand women age fourteen to twenty to serve in military brothels, called "comfort houses" or "consolation centers". The army presented the women to the troops as a gift from the emperor, and the women came from Japanese colonies such as Korea, Taiwan, and Manchuria and from occupied territories in the Philippines and elsewhere in southeast Asia. The majority of the women came from Korea and China.

    Once forced into this imperial prostitution service, the "comfort women" catered to between twenty and thirty men each day. Stationed in war zones, the women often confronted the same risks as soldiers, and many became casualties of war. Others were killed by Japanese soldiers, especially if they tried to escape or contracted venereal diseases. At the end of the war, soldiers massacred large numbers of comfort women to cover up the operation. The impetus behind the establishment of comfort houses for Japanese soldiers came from the horrors of Nanjing, where the mass rape of Chinese women had taken place. In trying to avoid such atrocities, the Japanese army created another horror of war. Comfort women who survived the war experienced deep shame and hid their past or faced shunning by their families. They found little comfort or peace after the war."

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -5

    nigelboy

    So, let's hear the police finally start using their ability to charge minors as adults

    Smith. The police "charges" individual based on the criminal code, whether that be minors or adults.

    Posted in: YouTube prankster on the run after police issue arrest warrant

  • -12

    nigelboy

    Nope. The international treaties Japan signed onto were not covered by the 1965 treaty - which let's be honest if it was offered today it would be rejected by the South Korean people. The military dictatorship which ruled South Korea at the time accepted it out of expedience. If you read the link I posted previously this is made clear.

    What a lame response. Why on god's earth would Japan offer what will be a 'supplemental' deal on top of the one received in 1965? And don't be so quick to judge that SK would reject it considering the fact that it's what they are seeking which is 'compensation'.

    Your position that the 1965 is invalid due to the nature of the 1965 government reasoning resembles that of mob like extortion tactic. But the again, that's essentially what the South Korean government has been doing for the past couple of the decades or so.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -3

    nigelboy

    What, is that it? None of your usual links to .pdfs in Japanese that I seriously doubt anyone bothers to look at?

    That's it, since like you said nobody bothers to look at it.

    They look about as impartial, objective and reliable as such other fine periodicals as Pravda, Volkischer Beobachter and Der Sturmer.

    Lame examples. The newspaper articles on incidents at that time is as impartial, objective and reliable as you can get. It's not an editorial for god sakes.

    With the passage rate 1 in 60 in some years, I can see why some Koreans were dissapointed and decided to take their lives.

    Posted in: Abe says he will stick to past apologies in new WWII statement

  • -2

    nigelboy

    The one doesn't imply the other, especially as reasons were given to negate "Neither did Kato, then". Already been through that, turbotsat, as paraphrased from a thread recalled from memory, that I can't be bothered to google since you can't either, apparently: 'Kato made the connection by explicitly connecting two sections of Choi's article that Choi himself did not connect except by including in the same article, probably from cleverness stemming from a desire to poke at authority and still avoid prosecution, rather than any actual state of innocence'.

    I've read both columns and the so-called 'defense' used by the author of Chosun Ilbo is quite lame, IMO. Seriously. It's him who mentioned the recently divorced status of the ex-staffer. But as the testimonies indicate, the only reason why Chosun Ilbo's author is not targeted is simply because the citizens haven't filed a complaint to the prosecutors.

    Or, the ROK feds would like to prosecute Choi, and can't, he being too cunning, but can prosecute Kato, and have, he falling into Choi's trap. Lots of interpretations available. BTW, the 'other media' hasn't seemed to be too interested in ferreting out details freely available but detrimental to their case arguing 'hypocrisy and double standard', so I don't feel a need to give much weight to what they point out.

    See above. As the testimonies indicate, the accusers really don't care the contents of Chosun Ilbo nor the tabloids but wanted to file a complaint to Sankei simply because it's deemed to them as "right wing, anti-Korea" journalism.

    Or, he (Kato's colleague) is just smart enough not to step in it. Is it wacky for Korea to prosecute defamation? Should they check with nigelboy for a briefing on the the relevant statutes from his home country in the Commonwealth (or wherever the hello nigelboy hails from), before proceeding with prosecution of a Korean case in Korea? It appears Kato's colleague has got a better idea of the possibilities than you or Kato had.

    Where I'm from, such moronic case would be lucky if the court ever goes through a civil defamation case. Even in a civil case, it would be the plaintiff (him or herself) that would file a complaint, and not a third person.

    Posted in: S Korea extends travel ban on Japanese journalist on trial for defaming Park

  • -12

    nigelboy

    Oh, and as this link shows Japan didn't fulfill its obligations to Korea with the normalisation treaty of 1965. http://www.japanfocus.org/-Totsuka-Etsuro/3885

    The concept of "State is bound by the obligation to make reparation, namely compensate, if the State breaches the obligation to punish" is far fetched considering the fact that none of these comfort women identified their Korean parents, Korean recruiters, and their Korean operators. Even if they do so (if they are alive that is), they have the legal recourse to do it in their own country which they have not done so.

    The 1965 agreement is clear. The issues between the countries "have been settled completely and finally.'

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -12

    nigelboy

    Not to be rude BUT, you COMPLETELY missed the point. It's called a hypothetical situation where I was questioning the individual I was responding to on this story and whether that individual would accept personal testimony and confessions, NOT whether any court around the world would do so!

    Of course you are free to accept them. But without cross examination by the accused and collaborating testimonies who attest to the incident, it simply stands as an accusation more or less.

    With NYtoday's link above, it basically confirms my suspicions.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -10

    nigelboy

    The other terms Allied used in their reports (which CH3CHO linked) includes prostitute, hostesses, geisha to describe comfort women. Brothels, House of relaxation, special clubs to describe comfort houses.

    PC has evolved quite a bit in the past 70 years but I'm quite positive that the Allied officers who captured these Japanese units could distinguish between Slavery and what is not.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -1

    nigelboy

    1) did not make the connection Kato did between the President and the staffer

    Neither did Kato, then.

    2) condemned Kato in a later article for making the connection, and

    See above.

    3) is not under charge by the Korean governmen

    That seemed to be the 'hypocrisy' and double standard that the other media is pointing out.

    own Japanese colleague on the Korean board of Kato's newspaper said that he himself would not have make the mistake Kato did

    Because he knows how wacky Korea can be.

    that if implying an improper relationship between the unmarried President and a married ex-staffer

    The ex staffer was divorced. There is nothing improper.

    only on connecting dots the original Korean article's author didn't connect and on anonymous comments in a financial markets blog isn't defamatory, what is

    Chosun Ilbo named the ex staffer. Financial newsletter and the tabloids connected the dots. Kato merely reported those events.

    Now my question.

    What civilized country can a prosecution indict an individual on defamation charges filed by a third party who has no relationship with alleged accused?

    Posted in: S Korea extends travel ban on Japanese journalist on trial for defaming Park

  • -14

    nigelboy

    I guess we just have to rely, IN PART, on what every court around the world recognizes as evidence, personal testimony and confessions! If a family member of yours was raped, you would accept personal testimony and confession as evidence wouldn't you? If the man accused denied raping your family member, you would surely accept your loved one's testimony as evidence, wouldn't you.

    Not to be rude again but I don't think any court will base the credibility of the victim's testimony on whether or not the family members believe them or not.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -15

    nigelboy

    Do you still call that prostitution?

    Not to be rude or anything but the said report you quoted does state "A "comfort girl" is nothing more than a prostitute or "professional camp follower"..." in its preface.

    Common sense and logic always tell me that historians should always carry more weight on these type of reports which is a primary "at that moment, on the spot" detailed report than that of memoirs, unverified testimonies decades after , or the ever evolving nature of political correctness.

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

  • -17

    nigelboy

    Nigelboy, please tell us that the US publisher has it all wrong about the sex slaves, uh, I mean, comfort women. Everyone's just out to get Abe and his right-winger pals, right? Ch3cho has got the ball rolling for ya!

    They do. Is it too much reading for you there (CH3CHO links with primary sources)? The ATIS section is in English so it shouldn't be too hard.

    It's pretty lame that the U.S. 'historians' who wrote this passage didn't read the U.S. Interrogation Report which states

    "A "comfort girl" is nothing more than a prostitute or "professional camp follower" attached to the Japanese Army for the benefit of the soldiers"?

    Posted in: Japan asks U.S. publisher to change 'sex slave' reference in textbook

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