sangetsu03's past comments

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    Kuroda was told to adopt a negative rate while he was in Davos, prior to his trip, he stated clearly that he would do no such thing. As soon as he returned, a negative rate was adopted. The trick worked for only a few days, as the yen weakened slightly, and the market bounced slightly. But the fully implications of the negative rate are that Abenomics has failed, and there are no other options left. Interest rates are negative, an enormous amount of the taxpayer's money has been deficit spent, record levels of debt have been incurred, and the government itself is the buyer of last resort for bonds. As a result, the yen has stopped weakening, and the air which is the main substance of the Japanese stock market is leaking out.

    In the end, it looks as though we will be worse off after Abenomics and Kuroda than we were before they came to power.

    Posted in: BOJ says it will disclose findings of probe into negative rate leak

  • 7

    sangetsu03

    The stimulus was an economic policy. The austerity a political one.

    The opposite is true. The stimulus was a combination of vote-buying and favor-currying, the "austerity" as you call the consumption tax increase was the means to force the people to pay for the vote-buying and favor-currying. Politics as usual.

    The money spent on stimulus projects by-and-large did not reach the majority of the people. It went as most such money goes, to the handful of companies in Japan Inc. And if the government spends more on stimulus projects, the money will go to the same place. In return, the politicians who approved the spending can look forward to a cushy job when they retire from politics, or get jobs for their relatives and friends. The government would never give the money directly to the people, as the people would not do anything in return for it. That is how it works. Stimulus spending is never about economics, it is entirely politics, disguised as economics.

    But that is all moot anyway, because Japan's problem is not a lack of liquidity. The main problem facing japan is a high cost of living, and the fact that the average Japanese is educated enough to do basic math. Think for a moment how much things cost in Japan, from food, to clothes, to housing, and yes, to taxes. Think about your gross salary, then subtract what you will pay for income tax, residency tax, pension, healthcare, consumption tax, etc. Then add the cost of tariffs which apply to most of the food you eat. And then think about how the cost of many of the above taxes is added to the things you buy. The tax which truck drivers pay for gas, utility companies, phone companies, and other businesses, these taxes are offset by increasing the cost of goods, or lowering the amount of money spent on labor or investment. What you actually have left over is quite small.

    And because the left over amount is so small, and getting ever smaller, the people have less to spend. And of course as they spend less, those who depend on what they spend earn less, and we end up with stagnation and deflation as the market tries to compensate.

    Then what happens? The government tells us all that the main problem the economy has is deflation, and that deflation is the cause of decreased consumption and stagnation (when the exact opposite is true). So they try to create inflation by printing money, which hits the people hard, as they see the value of their pay and savings decreased, and the cost of goods rise even further. In the end, the problem is made worse.

    What the government will never do is to do what needs to be done to address the problem. And that is to remove control of the economy from itself and the handful of conglomerates, and return the economy to the people, to which it truly belongs. Eliminate the red tape, much of the taxes, the tariffs, fees, bribery, graft, vote-buying, price-fixing, and other problems endemic in the Japanese political/business establishment, and the economy will grow.

    Posted in: Market close to reading last rites over Abenomics

  • -2

    sangetsu03

    For too long, the West has been doffing its cap to this barbaric (let's call a spade a spade) dictatorship.

    The intention of the relationship was to fight fire with fire. We seem to have learned over the last decade that democracy and freedom are utterly foreign concepts in the middle east, and the exercise of brute force seems to be the only method capable of keeping order.

    In places were the brutal regimes have collapsed, i.e., Iraq, Libya, and Syria, we have seen societies descend to levels which are far more brutal and dangerous. The west expected that when the dictators were taken out of he picture, democracy, freedom, and peace would take their place. We know now that this is not the case.

    And as the world's economies are still oil-dependent, it is necessary to keep the region stable, regardless of how barbaric the supported regimes are. If the entire middle east were to collapse, it would disrupt the world's economies to the point that you yourself might end up unemployed. If you think the "great recession" of 2008 was bad, a collapse in the middle east would cause far greater hardships.

    Posted in: Is it time for U.S. to dump Saudi Arabia?

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    Helicopter money is what the economy needs. But again, political considerations won't let that happen.

    Friedman would disagree because the underlying principle for "helicopter money" to work does not exist, that being the underlying potential for economic growth. With a shrinking population, and an business environment which still relies on domestic consumption for most of it's sales, dropping money into people's accounts will not necessarily increase consumption; people would likely hide the money away. "Helicopter money" must still be repaid, and normally it would be recouped as the economy grew, and produced more revenue. Such is an impossibility in Japan for at least the next 5 decades at least.

    Keynes developed his economic theories back in the days when the world's populations, industries, and consumption were exploding. Governments could in fact deficit-spend significant amounts of money (though not indefinitely) because first, in those days government spending was a very small part of national GDP's, and second, the private sector economy would grow enough to repay government debt in short order.

    Nowadays the situation is different. Populations, industry, consumption, and such have more or less peaked in developed countries. In addition to this, public-sector spending is about triple what it was in Keynes' time. And much of this public spending is for entitlements, most of which are structured in a way that in order to remain solvent they must enroll ever-greater numbers of people every year.

    Businesses and corporations of course move to places where the cost of doing business is lower. They outsource less because of the cost of labor, but because of the cost of taxes. They cannot avoid paying tax, but they can compensate by paying lower wages, or hiring fewer people, or by using foreign labor.

    In regards to Abenomics, the only necessary arrow was the third one. The first two arrows have done nothing but buy a little temporary prosperity. The money spent on this temporary prosperity will be a burden on future taxpayers who will necessarily enjoy less prosperity as a result.

    Posted in: Market close to reading last rites over Abenomics

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Well, don't they teach why in police academy? There are several theories of drug use and abuse if you care to look them up. But, hey, why would people prefer to think of the long term viability of their bodies than their short term pleasure? Perhaps it also has something to do with the way the world is consuming the long-term viability of its societies and life for the short term benefits of those who run the show. Our societies are completely at odds with the human spirit and few feel any stake in them because they are run by a few on the basis of fear, not inspiration. The addicts are the fallout from that evil. And sadly the police are mostly its handmaidens.

    It is very easy to rationalize stupidity and personal irresponsibility, and easier still to reassign blame from abusers and criminals to corporations or politicians. But in the end, regardless of any argument, each person bears the sole responsibility of his actions, or the lack thereof.

    As for our modern society, which you seem to some dislike, we live longer, eat better, and live in far greater safety and comfort than any society in human history. What do people have to fear nowadays? Not being able to buy the car they want? Or to get a new iPhone? Fear has long been a tool of control by those who run the show, because if people had nothing to be afraid of, there would be no sense in electing a political class to protect them. New fears are spewed out of the political/business establishment all the time, such as climate change, and now, income inequality.

    Well, don't they teach why in police academy?

    No, they don't. But after working for a decade in "vice city", I know far more about the "why" than you do. The social pressures which lead to drug addiction don't come from corporations or government conspiracies. They come from the simple concept of "misery loves company". During my high school and university days, I was often handed a joint or a pipe, or invited to "party". I always said "no, thanks". Society at large does not force people at gunpoint to inhale, sniff, or inject drugs into their bodies. That is a personal act of stupidity. Your typical drug user or addict takes that first hit with his or her friends in order to be cool, or fit in. Sometimes it ends there, often it doesn't. People seldom take a moment to think about the consequences of their actions, and how the quality of their lives is based entirely upon the personal decisions they make. A successful person considers the results of a decision before making it, evaluating the risks carefully. An unsuccessful person makes decisions without much or any forethought.

    Kiyohara made his choice, and it was incredibly stupid and foolish. For the sake of preventing others from making the same decision, he must be soundly punished. He was a man with money, fame, and respect, as well as children who look up to him. He had much to risk by his drug use, and he made his choice. Now he has to live with the consequences of that decision. It his his fault, and no one else's.

    I hope you never do anything that requires the forgiveness of others.

    I had better not, because if I did, I would be my own fault, and as such, I would have no business asking anyone to forgive me.

    No just drunken salarymen, office workers, college students, and others who drink and can't handle it. Go to any train station after 9PM.

    But you don't have to worry about these people breaking into your car or home to steal or rob, nor do you have to worry about rival bartenders, liquor store owners, and alcoholics with no money shooting, beating, or stabbing each other (and a few innocent bystanders) on a regular basis.

    Posted in: Kiyohara tests positive for drugs, but keeps silent on source

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    The government, or the police, has the right to tell Kiyohara, or anybody else, what he can or cannot put in his body in the privacy of his own home.

    Then if he and other drugs users become addicted to the point that they can't work or support themselves, they had better not ask the taxpayers to support them, or pay for their rehabilitation. If we have to pay the financial consequences of what people do in the privacy of their own homes, then it is no longer a private matter, right?

    I find drug use (follwed by smoking and alcohol abuse) to be the greatest example of utter human stupidity possible. That people ingest chemicals into their bodies, debilitating their minds and senses, and risking addiction all for the sake of temporarily feeling good. It boggles the mind that people could be s moronic.

    Holland has very liberal drug laws yet there is no mayhem on the streets. The police isn't doing their job when they are wasting my tax dollars on following a "suspected" drug USER, not pusher, producer or distributor, for months or years even. They are wasting my money. By the way alcohol is a drug, so is nicotine. Yet they are totally legal even though they are more addictive, especially nicotine, than many of the so called "hard"drugs. Difference is the government makes money by selling booze and cigarettes.

    Three wrongs don't make a right. And Holland has a large problem with addicts, whom are generally helpless, and unable to take care of themselves. Their desire to feel pleasure puts as great a burden on a society which has to treat, feed, and house people who are healthy in body, but who are mindless, and incapable of supporting themselves. Would you rather have your money spent preventing addiction? Or treating addiction? We all know that prevention is the greatest cure; it is far better that people not become users or addicts, and the best way of doing so is denying them the means.

    Drug abuse kills nearly 50,000 people in America each year, almost three times as many as gun violence. And many of those killed by guns die in drug-related shootings. 30,000 die annually from alcohol abuse. Worldwide, about 250,000 die each year from drug abuse. The last thing we need in Japan is easier access to drugs. And if so many people die when drugs are illegal, and difficult to find, how many more would die if drugs could legal, and easy to find?

    As for mayhem on the streets, there is no neigborhood in any part of Japan that I cannot walk in safely at any hour of the day or night. Such is not the case in Holland. I would prefer Japan to do as it has done, and that is to be merciless in the arrest and prosecution of drug offenders.

    Posted in: Kiyohara tests positive for drugs, but keeps silent on source

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    The government and Japanese institutional investors have manipulated the rates of JGB's to be so low that they "defy gravity" (to quote a Tokyo University economics study). The current low rate does not reflect the soundness of the Japanese economy, or potential risks of investing in JGB's.

    I know Jose Canseco personally, and he is a great guy. Normally I wouldn't consider asking him for economic advice, but in this case he seems to know what he is talking about. With yields at almost zero, and the main buyer being the BOJ itself, it seems superfluous to bother issuing and selling bonds at all.

    Posted in: Bank of Japan should call them willie wonka bonds 'YOU GET NOTHING. yOU LOSE!'

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    "Stimulants" is a bit vague. But with a sensitive enough detector you could no doubt find them everywhere, even on household trash of those who have never touched them. Are the police in the habit of rifling through innocent people's rubbish?

    Unfortunately, Kiyohara has a bit of history with drugs, not to mention purported ties to the yakuza; he is not what the police would consider "innocent". And in 2016 the police have the technology available to discern one substance from another, I doubt they found residue from diet pills or cough drops in his trash.

    0.1 grams of some unspecified stimulant found after rifling through his trash? Do the Police not have proper police work to do? This is getting ridiculous, what a poor guy!

    No, the police are doing their work, and few jobs are more important than keeping the scourge of drugs out of Japanese society. At least we aren't tripping over addicts in the parks and alleyways, nor are we having to deal with all the crime associated with drug addicts stealing or worse in order to pay for their drugs. I used to work as a police officer in one of the more dangerous parts of a large American city, and most of the troubles we had in our district were the result of drugs.

    Japan is one of the few countries in the world which does the right thing when it comes to keeping drugs out: they have strict anti-drug laws which are vigorously enforced.

    You can be sure that the police didn't check Kiyohara's trash on a random whim, someone has obviously given them credible information about his drug use (which has been publicly rumored for some years now), and the police did the right thing and acted on it.

    One of the main reasons that Japan is such a safe place is because it doesn't have the drug abuse problems of other countries, and the destruction of lives, the crime, violence, and murder which comes with it.

    Posted in: Kiyohara tests positive for drugs, but keeps silent on source

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    0.1 gram? What's the point? Oh, I mean, how much is that?

    Enough to be arrested for drug possession. Japan has absolutely zero tolerance for drugs, and I agree with this policy. It is better to arrest and punish drug violators quickly and mercilessly than let drug abuse evolve into a serious national problem. Japan has enough social problems already without adding drug abuse to the list.

    Posted in: Former baseball star Kiyohara arrested over drug possession

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    If China wants to issue sanctions then there's not a lot the US or anyone else can do about it.

    Except watch China collapse spectacularly as a result. Walmart can get their junk made in Myanmar or Vietnam, or a dozen other places. China has far more to lose than America or other countries which already have developed economies.

    Posted in: China threatens sanctions against U.S. companies: Is this the future?

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    The two 'gentlemen' above have both admitted to hit in run which resulted in a fatality. Their names should be posted in the news.

    Their names would be posted whether they admitted to what happened or not. If you read the news here, you can see that every fatal accident results in the arrest of the driver, and the posting of his name, whether he admits to the accident or not.

    Posted in: Two men arrested over fatal hit-and-run in Chiba

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Someone (Nigelboy?) once posted a stat about the number of people arrested for driving accidents and the number of people sent to the prosecutors and it was a very low number (less than 20% if I recall).

    But those arrested get their names posted in news, like the two gentlemen in the story above. There will never be a story published in the news telling us if the police decided not to prosecute these men. And if you are talking about accidents involving fatalities, I am sure that more than 20% of those cases are prosecuted.

    Posted in: Two men arrested over fatal hit-and-run in Chiba

  • 6

    sangetsu03

    If this is the case, the US has a strategic interest in preventing China's economy from growing any further, and becoming large enough to exert too much pressure on international commerce. But China is doing a pretty good job of doing this on their own, and without America's help.

    China appears to be in the midst of it's own bubble, pumped up by record levels of public and private debt, and endless government intervention in it's markets. America, Japan, and European companies are already leaving, as they don't want to get too bloodied when the burst comes. Even Chinese (those who can), are moving their assets, or converting them while they can.

    China's main threat is not Taiwan, nor Japan, nor America; China's main threat is itself. It can try to divert the attention of the Chinese people by blaming other countries, but that can only work for so long. China has land, resources, and industrious people; what it doesn't have is an efficient and effective political system. The people may learn what is holding them back, and take steps to free themselves.

    Posted in: China threatens sanctions against U.S. companies: Is this the future?

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    When the tourists increase in number where will the government have them stay?

    The hotels in Tokyo are already booked up for the most part. I wanted to spend a week at the Disney resort in Tokyo, and stay at the hotel by Disney Sea, but it was fully booked up, nearly 5 months in advance. We ended up going to Hawaii instead.

    Those who can't get a decent hotel will have to settle for a business hotel, hostel, or something similar, but staying in places like these will not encourage many return visits.

    Japan as a country gets two million less visitors than the city of Miami, which is a fraction of the size of Tokyo. Large European cities get two or three times as many annual visitors as the entire country of Japan. These American and European cities reap huge amounts of money from visitors each year, and the ability to rent homes, apartments, sub-let timeshares, etc has allowed them to absorb these large numbers of visitors.

    Tourism is one of the most profitable of industries, and one of the most beneficial to the state. The visitors spend lots of money, but consume nothing in the way of public services. The state gets the benefit of the economic activity of millions of people, but without having to worry about their medical care or pensions. That Japan has not been far more active in trying to attract tourists makes little sense. Ota ward's "legalization" of renting out private homes is far to little, decades too late.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    The result of Third-World style, near-zero protection for pedestrians (and cyclists), who must compete for real estate with motor vehicles, from urban streets to fast country roads and even at traffic signals.

    On the other hand, in Japan an accident resulting in injury is considered a crime, which is not the case in other developed countries. The intention is to make the consequences of accidents serious enough that drivers take more care. But the negative consequence is that the laws are so severe that a driver who gets into an accident and hurts or kills someone is automatically arrested, even if the accident was entirely "accidental". The harshness of the penalty is enough to encourage drivers to flee if they hit someone.

    In America I was a police officer and traffic accident investigator, and I had been called to countless fatal accidents. Seldom are drivers who cause the accident arrested, not unless they are drunk, or unlicensed. Hit-and-runs still occur (mainly drunk or unlicensed drivers), but most people will not.

    Posted in: Two men arrested over fatal hit-and-run in Chiba

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    As of today, there are more than 8,000,000 vacant homes in Japan, and as the population continues it's downward slide, there will only be more and more. These homes cannot be sold or rented out to long-term tenants because there are no buyers or renters.

    With millions of visitors coming to Japan, and many of those wanting to visit places outside the metro areas, many of these homes would be a great option for them. The families who own vacant houses would love to find a way to make some money with them, and the veritable ghost towns were many of these houses stand would love to have some visitors come and spend some money.

    Yes, I do believe that property bought to let should be more heavily regulated, at least from a health and safety perspective. As you say, depending on the scale, this could indeed be the equivalent of operating a (several) small hotel(s).

    The trick here is that homes, hotels, and other structures other than places with kitchens are remarkably unregulated in Japan, compared to America or Europe. There are no zoning regulations for buildings under 3 floors. There are no rules for accessibility, safety, or anything else; how often have you had to climb a narrow, nearly vertical staircase to get to a dinging room in a restaurant in Japan? A ryokan or minshuku is not regulated at all, other than having a license for lodging guests, and the only prerequisite to getting the license is filling out the application and paying the fees.

    Eventually new businesses will sprout up to manage private rentals. Those which exist in America and Europe require rentals meet some minimum requirements for cleanliness and amenities before these properties can be let out. These agencies have also worked with insurance companies to create policies which protect the homeowners in case of problems.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    In other words we will lose many of the "zombie" banks, and end up with a few large "too big to fail" banks, who will have that much more control over the national economy.

    Wonderful

    Posted in: Japan's regional banks to bear brunt of BOJ bombshell

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Of course not. But even if he did, it wouldn't matter, in Japan CEO's never really lose their control over their companies. Any new CEO usually obeys his predecessor.

    Posted in: Takata says CEO has no plans as of now to stand down

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Immigration is the big issue, and that is why Trump chose it. As I said before, Trump is not stupid. He cannot run on his national security or diplomatic expertise, and as a 5 time bankrupt (and judging by many of his comments), he is not very in-tune with macro economics, or even personal finance. Immigration is the issue which has propelled him up in the polls, and nothing else.

    Many Americans are concerned when all of the signs in public buildings are in English and Spanish. They are concerned when they go to their local emergency room, and everyone is speaking Spanish. They are concerned that the wages for construction have been driven down so low by immigrants that minimum-wage work is all that new graduates and students can find. They are concerned that state and federal prisons are full of illegal immigrants, imprisoned not for entering America illegally, but for committing crimes. And after being released from prison, these illegal immigrants are not deported.

    The democrat and republican establishment are both out of touch on the immigration issue. The democrat establishment loves illegal immigrants because they generally become part of the permanent underclass which always votes democrat. The republican establishment loves illegal immigrants because of their low cost of labor. One cannot say that the republican party is against illegal immigration, because such isn't the case; both parties want "comprehensive immigration reform", the only problem is, the voters don't. Any republican or democrat who passes such a law will be voted out of office. If that weren't the case, they would have reformed the law years ago. Obama could have done it when he and his party held both houses of congress, but he didn't, because he knew that he and his party would pay in 2012.

    As long as Trump's main plank is immigration, his numbers will stay strong.

    Posted in: Without Trump, Republican debate has 2nd lowest rating

  • 5

    sangetsu03

    A.N.Other, its not exactly a nightclub, but it is a hotel. If you treat your place as a hotel you should be regulated as such.

    Tens of thousands of homes and apartments around the world are rented out to short-term visitors; when is the last time you heard any horror stories from either the homeowners, tenants, or neighbors?

    Anyone? Anyone?

    The truth is that the guests who rent homes and apartments cause as little or less trouble than guests who stay in hotels. I have rented vacation homes in Nice, Paris, Miami, Los Angeles, and Miami. When I rent one of these homes, there is a small surcharge which covers insurance. I like being able to stay in a real house, usually with a real parking space or garage for my rental car, a real kitchen to cook in, and often other amenities that my family can enjoy. It would be wonderful if Japan could catch up with every other developed country in the world (and most undeveloped countries), and ended this silly, stupid, and protectionist law.

    In Japan the prohibition against short-term rentals has nothing to do with safety, noise, or littering. It is about the hotel industry and real estate agencies who don't want private home owners to make money that these hotels and agencies think belongs to them. And there also is the little point that many Japanese don't want foreigners staying in their neighborhoods. Omotenashi is only extended to those foreigners who spend silly money to stay in hotels, or shop in overpriced stores.

    Article Unavailable

Work
in
Japan

Search the Largest English Job Board in Japan.

Find a Job Now!

View all

Find Your
Apartment
in Japan

10,000’s of properties available today!

Search