sangetsu03's past comments

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Britain was a world leader centuries before the EU, and, hopefully, will remain so for centuries to come. Britain set the many of the standards which are the foundation of western life, and for the prosperity we enjoy today. Britain can be proud of the things it has accomplished, which are far greater than anything the EU has attempted.

    Posted in: Post-Brexit, Britain still torn between nationalism and global leadership

  • -3

    sangetsu03

    The current Scottish leadership has made it clear that is wants to be independent of the UK, i.e. no longer dominated by English politics and policies, but that it wants to remain under the EU umbrella,

    So instead to being dominated by English politics and policies, they can be dominated by EU politics and policies? Scotland is my ancestral homeland, I have a home there, and I am all for an independent Scotland. But being "under the EU umbrella" necessarily requires Scotland to give up a measure of independence for that privilege.

    What's more, though Scotland may indeed benefit from being part of the EU, it will also have to suffer the effects of ECB quackery, and carry part of the burden of those other members who consume more from their membership than they contribute to it. If Scotland would like to be one of these latter countries, then by all means join the EU, and milk it for every Euro you can get, but Scotland is less likely to milk than be milked.

    The point is: Nothing has been decided and the margin is inconclusive. 700,000 votes aren't a mandate to leave and the process hasn't begun to leave.

    How much would it need to be "conclusive"? A majority is a majority, and the UK is a democracy. If the vote had been the other way, and the "leave" camp had lost by 700,000 votes, you would not bring up this issue at all, would you? The decision to leave has been made, and the process was begun before the vote was taken, the vote itself was part of that process.

    If you required a super majority to change policy, you would find that policy would never change, as it is extremely rare that two-thirds or three-quarters of politicians or voters ever agree on any matter.

    The inherent problems with democracy is that the majority is not always right, and that democracy is extremely easy to corrupt and influence. But the alternatives are weaker still, as all political systems are run by human beings, who are fallible.

    Posted in: Turmoil deepens as Scotland threatens to block Brexit; 11 Labour Party members quit

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    Well which is it? Be independent or stay in EU? By being independent you get to be both independent and in the EU. By forcing England to stay in the EU you don't get independence.

    Yes, the irony is obvious. But that is politics; what we wanted yesterday is not what we want today, and what we want tomorrow will not be what we wanted today. At even then, we don't really know what we want; our leaders tend to tell us what we want, and when we want it, pretending that our interests are the same as theirs. But that is very seldom the case.

    Posted in: Turmoil deepens as Scotland threatens to block Brexit; 11 Labour Party members quit

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    America has maintained NATO in this fashion for a reason, and that is to have the loudest voice in NATO policies, and give America the leverage to get other members to do what America wants them to do. The threat of making other members pull more of their own weight is significant, especially in today's economic environment. If America wants NATO support to fight ISIS, or the Taliban, it is more than likely that some of the other members will be a little reluctant to take part, and America will have to twist their arms to get them moving. By requiring other members to carry an equal share of the costs, these other members will have a more equal voice to question America's policies and intentions. The current system exists by unspoken mutual agreement, and Donald Trump would understand that if he knew more about America's fundamental defense strategies.

    Really? The sitting president is irrelevant? Lol okay

    All presidents in the last half of their last term are "irrelevant", and this goes for the likes of Reagan and Bush as well. In the last 6 months in office, a president does little more than keep the seat warm, and exerts authority only in time of crisis or emergency. Obama is in his last 6 months in office, he cannot formulate, or pass any new policies in the limited time he has. He will play golf, travel, and give speeches, but do little else. By this time he is counting the days to the end of his term like a prison inmate counting down to his release date. He will do as little as possible, and pray that nothing happens which requires any action from him.

    Posted in: Obama and Trump agree on one thing - and they're right

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Sangetsu: Your are totally wrong about the australian murder rate since the gun hand in. It has drop from over 300 to 250 victims in 2015.

    I am not wrong, one year does not a trend make. If you look at the annual average since 1996, there is no change. Tell me what the rates were in 1997, and 1998?

    Posted in: In view of the shooting at the Florida nightclub, what is your stance on gun control?

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    Dark and uncertain times are head for the UK. The UK and the politicians have been so focused on the issue of immigration, and they have not thought through the implications on small, medium and large businesses that trade with Europe, and the world. already some of the politicians have started to back peddle on some of the issues IE where some of the money that we give to Europe was ear marked for the NHS, personally I think having this referendum has done us no good and it could put us back into another small recession, money has been wiped of the price of the stock markets, exchange rates have fallen, we have entered uncharted waters with no chance of going back. only time will tell if it was the right decision.

    Another recession is unavoidable, regardless of the "Brexit". Money has been wiped off the price of stock markets, but these markets are greatly overvalued to begin with, and their recent high prices are mainly the result of central bank manipulation of interest rates and money supply, and not the result of increased sales or private sector economic activity. Dark times began when the ECB introduced negative rates.

    Though it may seem that immigration and smaller issues are the main driver behind the Brexit, there are other reasons which are less obvious. The main of these is reducing the ECB's influence on the UK's financial system. The ECB (along with the BOJ and FED) has enacted increasingly absurd policies which threaten the foundation of our financial and economic systems. The major stock markets are now almost entirely reliant on the central banks for continued growth, growth fueled by zero rates and the printing of more currency. No longer does the stock market rely on the performance of the companies whose stock they trade; a year of record profits or record losses has less influence on a company's stock value than fractional change in interest rates. This is absurd, worse yet, it creates the potential of economic catastrophe the likes we haven't seen since 1929.

    Banks no longer derive the greater part of their profits from changing interest on loans, and in order to make money, they have to create ever more exotic investment instruments, and invest in ever riskier ventures. And the current lack of real economic growth means very little return on conventional investments, so the only way they can make money is to play the current stock market, which of course is dependent on the central banks for growth, growth fueled largely by borrowed money, or money created out of thin air, and loaned out at the current low rates.

    The UK is wise to remove itself from the direct influence of the clowns running the ECB. And I hope those who are running the banks in the UK do as they historically have, to run their businesses following sound and honest practice. When the economic houses of cards created by central bank policies and government mismanagement collapse around the world, the UK may be the only one left standing.

    Posted in: Asian automakers fret over uncertainty ahead after Brexit vote

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Bernie needs to stay in for two reasons. First, new dirt about Hillary is comong forth every day, her former aides are making deals for immunity, or pleading the fifth amendment (which is invoked when one is likely to be "incriminating"). Hillary is getting closer to a criminal indictment rather than movong further away. Next, even if she were to be the candidate to run against Trump, her likelyhood of winning is much smaller than people might think. Sanders might actually be a more viable candidate. But in the end, I think the Pomeranian headed candidate is going to be the next president. America will have it's own "Brexit" of sorts, and take a step away from conventional politics and politicians.

    Posted in: Sanders says he'll vote for Clinton, but no endorsement yet

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    The Nikkei is overvalued by 40% or so, I am surprised it didn't fall further. But we'll see what happens on Monday.

    Posted in: Nikkei plunges almost 8% in Brexit selloff

  • 8

    sangetsu03

    If the powers that be here realized this as everyone else does, they might be able to move on and do somethinig possible instead of clinging desperately to the floatsam and trying to rebuild the ship.

    They know this, but the worse things get, the more they will be able to spend to try to keep things going. They are like a sadistic doctor who makes his patient more ill so as to squeeze out more money for more severe treatments.

    If they told people the truth, and explained just how bad things are, and how much of hardship genuine reforms would cause, the people woukd not hear of it. The powers-that-be would be tossed out of office, and lose the key to the public's purse. The people want to be lied to, and they always vote for those who tell them what they want to hear. As much as we criticise the likes of Abe, and their inability to improve things, the people have to realize that they put him in office, and failures of the government are caused by failures of the people, who can be made to believe that it is possible to get something for nothing, or less than it's true cost. Those costs are adding up, and it is the people who are responsible for the bill, not the liars they elect.

    Posted in: Brexit shock more bad news for Abe

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Yeah, and higher taxes will make everyone feel happy and confident,eh? The last couple of times the govt took that approach, it triggered two recessions. Let's have a third!

    With fewer people and fewer companies generating tax revenue, and government spending at record levels, what options are there? Monetary easing has not worked, zero interest rates have not worked, stimulus soending has not worked, and helicopter money will not work.

    Increased taxes of course do not work because Japanese people have small disposable incomes. Tariffs, trade barriers, regulations, price fixing, and bureaucracy all add to the cost of living in Japan. Nearly all things consumed of produced in Japan rely on importation. All practices so far have been to raise the price of imported food and finished goods so they don't compete with domestic products. When things are already too expensive, any tax will decrease consumption. Worse yet (as far as the government is concerned), when things are too expensive, people buy fewer of these things, and deflation occurs.

    The entire foundation of Japan's industrial economy and the government it supports is built on sand, and inevitably, it is sinking. The government's solution only adds more weight, and accelerates the speed and depth to which both will sink.

    Posted in: Japanese firms must be relieved at least for the present that the tax hike was delayed. But that doesn't mean they expect it to boost the economy and consumption. They recognize that fiscal consolidation is an issue that can't be sidestepped if Japan wants to eliminate the root of future anxiety.

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    I hope not. The EU can have free trade, free travel, and strong partnerships without paying a third party large tithes and a large part of their sovreingty. It is not the overpaid and underworked politicians in Brussels which make Europe strong, but the unique and individual cultures of the European countries.

    Posted in: Can the EU survive Brexit?

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    It won't. Though it will likely be blamed for the failure of Abenomics, even though Abenomics failed failed two years before the Brexit took place.

    Posted in: How do you think Brexit will affect Japan's economy?

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    As 2020 hosts, Tokyo needs to attend.

    Who says? The hosts of the LA Olympics didn't attend the Moscow games, did they? And the LA games were the most successful in recent times.

    The Tokyo assembly no doubt reserved first class tickets, executive suites, and luxury ground transportation, but like in other situations, quoted to the public for cost for less oppulent arrangements. As soon as they arrived, an eager press would no doubt dig up the actual costs, and the assembly would not be able to reconcile the difference. They have probably already discovered that it is too late to downgrade their stay, and rather than get their names splashed in the headlines, and photographed bowing in apology, they have simply (and wisely) decided not to go at all.

    Posted in: Tokyo assembly to cancel Rio Olympics trips over costs

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    Biden is so absurdly, over-the-top, beyond all measurement, a complete idiot. No wonder he became a career politician. I thought Obama knew better than to let Biden open his mouth in front of the leaders of other countries, after Biden's countless examples of verbal stupidity. To think that this fool was (is) one step away from the presidency. He makes Sarah Palin look wise and competent.

    Posted in: Japan could go nuclear 'virtually overnight,' Biden tells Xi

  • 11

    sangetsu03

    “In Japan, while we can expect to see a temporary surge in the value of the yen, the UK’s decision could also bring a halt to the economic recovery that had been underway,"

    What economic growth? There has been no private sector economic growth in Japan during Abenomics if you subtract deficit-spent, public sector spending (stimulus spending, "fiscal spending," record govenrment budgets and supplementary budgets) Japan has never really come out of recession.

    All of us here already know that Abenomics was "dead in the water," and blaming the UK for stopping further lack of growth is disingenuous, to say the least.

    Posted in: Brexit shock more bad news for Abe

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Don't worry. With the collapse of Abenomics, and nothing to look forward to after the Olympic boom, real estate prices will sink as irrevocably as the Titanic.

    Too bad Airbnb isn't expanding more outside the metro areas, where properties are dirt cheap, and real estate prices have not increased at all.

    Posted in: Airbnb takes off in Japan, but the party is over for many seeking to ride the boom

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    the whole point to strength or weaken your currency is to put your currency in the zone that best suits its economy, to weak or too strong isnt good for any economy

    When governments stop tampering with their currencies, the value is determined by the currency trading market, which assigns a realistic value to it. If a country like China or India has lower labor or regulatory costs, and they generate a trade surplus due to higher demand, the acquire an excess of foreign currency. This has the effect of increasing the value of their own currency while devaluing he currencies they own, which in the long run evens the playing field; a stronger currency negates the advantages of lower labor and regulatory costs.

    But governments love to play with their currencies. They give the excuse that a cheaper currency improves exports because it makes their countries' goods less expensive overseas, but the real reason behind weakening their currencies is to devalue their spectacular debts, and allows them to spend more than they otherwise could.

    Japan could easily adjust to a stronger currency, as most goods sold in Japan are imported, and Japan still has a large population. A stronger currency would make food, energy, clothes, raw materials, and such much cheaper, and cheaper goods usually increase demand. But protectionism of the large exporters, and the agricultural voting block (which still has the majority of votes in Japan, despite the scarcity of farmers), and Japan's staggering national debt means that the government will intervene to keep the yen weak.

    The problem with policies like currency manipulation, interest rate manipulation, price controls, and anti-completive measures is that the market always overcomes them. This is the cause of the boom/crash cycle which has caused such economic problems in the world. Every product or service, or currency has a natural value, which is determined, well, naturally, by supply, demand, and natural conditions. Whenever this value is pushed one way or the other, it eventually pushes back. The harder governments try to weaken or strengthen currencies, or control the prices of goods or services, the harder the eventual correction will be.

    I am glad the UK has pulled out, and with a fresh start, I hope it manages itself more responsibly than it's peers and neighbors have been doing.

    Posted in: Asian central banks, policymakers wade in to calm markets after Brexit vote

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    It is not just xenophobia that drove the break. Ever since the ECB introduced negative rates, the commercial banks of England have seen the writing on the wall. The EU is incapable of managing it's economy or just about anything else in a meaningful way, and it is no surprise that the UK was the first to step back. One of the most respectable things about the UK is the integrity of it's financial system; it is the foundation for the stability of the world's fiancial structure. It cannot be allowed to be infected by the irresponsible and foolish policies of the ECB. I for one am breathing a sigh of relief. Though I know we are in for hard times, in the end tne world is better off for the "Brexit."

    Posted in: Asian central banks, policymakers wade in to calm markets after Brexit vote

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    The GPIF shouldn't have invested in the stock market in the first place. It's not their money.

    Investing in the stocks of Japanese companies was just another government tactic to trade favors with Japan Inc. The fund invests a pile of money in the likes of Sharp, Sony, or whoever, the stocks jump, and a few executives and politicians get a big payday.

    Posted in: Japan's pension fund sues Toshiba for Y964 mil over accounting scandal

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    The British pound plummets, the yen jumps, 8% is wiped off the value of the Nikkei, and the market capitalization publicly traded companies, who have just seen a significant amount of the "record amounts of money they are sitting on" evaporate into thin air.

    But it was a good excuse to exchange yen for dollars today, a little bonus for my vacation.

    In the end, I have to say "Bravo" to Britain for having the balls to leave. I wonder who will be next?

    Posted in: Asian central banks, policymakers wade in to calm markets after Brexit vote

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