sangetsu03's past comments

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Will he give the same speech about how "Abenomics is working!" that he gave in Europe a few months ago?

    Posted in: Abe to address U.N. General Assembly in New York next week

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    There should be two options. Either stay out altogether and let the locals settle things, or go in 100% and make Iraq the 51st state of America. We already know "regime change", and "peace-keeping" don't work, too many people are killed "keeping the peace", and the new regime is often as bad or worse than the one which was toppled.

    Going into the middle east gives muslim leaders a target to direct their followers against. Leave them alone, and they can then fight against each other. With any luck, most or all of them will find the martyrdoms they are seeking.

    Posted in: Top general: U.S. ground troops possible in Iraq

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    “There is no way we are turning out a profit in, say, five or 10 years,”

    Which means the taxpayers will make up the difference by way of government subsidies. Those of us who cannot afford 7 million yen for a fuell cell car, or buy hydrogen fuel will be coughing up subsidies for those few who can. Japan is certainly an adherent to corporate welfare.

    Posted in: Safety worries cloud Japan's dream of carbon-free hydrogen society

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Absolutely. We do not need a centralized world government, or centralized regional governments. There is too much disconnect between places like Brussels and Barcelona, or London and Glasgow. There is enough local bureaucracy, regulation, and taxation without adding yet another layer on top. We can have free trade, free travel, and a level field of regulation without adding another layer of government and it's associated cost.

    Posted in: Should Scotland be an independent country?

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Traditionalists, especially numerous in but not confined to the Islamic world, cling to the conviction that human existence should be God-centered human order. Proponents of modernity, taking their cues from secularized Western elites, strongly prefer an order that favors individual autonomy and marginalizes God. Not God first, but we first - our own aspirations, desires and ambitions. If there’s a core problem afflicting global politics today, that’s it.

    Nonsense. The leaders of the Islamic world use the same modus operandi as leaders on the west, they use fear, and/or hate to control their followers. Religion has been a tool of control for centuries. In the west, religious belief has slowly declined, but the leaders of the west have replaced religion with other forms of ideology, or "isms". The Islamic leaders divide their followers from the west the same way western liberal or conservative leaders divide their followers from each other. No matter where they come from, or what their cultural background, people want to "believe" in something. If you are a leader who can provide some kind of belief system to you followers, you can easily control them.

    Posted in: Obama picking his targets in Iraq and Syria while missing the point

  • 9

    sangetsu03

    He will certainly pass the increase in th tax. He will do so so that he can spend another 5-10 trillion yen to "stimulate" the economy to counteract any "negative effect" of the tax increase. It's already 100% certain that there will be a negative effect, so Abe is guaranteed to spend these trillions of yen on projects which will favor his friends and political allies.

    Politics as usual, politicians spend, and we pay.

    Posted in: Abe says he is 'neutral' on whether to raise sales tax to 10%

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Perhaps :) I'd guess Kuroda is looking at unemployment data trends and the stock market, which closed at an 8 month high yesterday.

    The problem is that the official unmployment numbers are generally pulled out of a hat, and the falling population will prevent much, if any, incresse in unemployment. As for the stock market, it is over-leveraged, the record high yesterday was merely the result of further weakening of the yen. As usual, companies didn't report any improvement in sales or orders. The only positive thing in the current situation is that I am paid in dollars.

    Posted in: BOJ ready to do whatever is needed to achieve 2% inflation target

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Much of the govt borrowing and spending are to compensate for the private sector's refusal to hire, pay raises to match labor productivity gains and invest at home,,,rather than in China.

    Nonsense. The private sector hires and gives raises when there is demand. There is no demand in Japan, Japanese businesses rely mainly on the domestic market, which is rapidly shrinking. The reason the population is shrinking is the high cost of living in Japan. The reason the cost of living is high is because Japan's domestic market is more or less closed to foreign competition. For median net income, Japan rates 22nd on the OECD list of developed countries.

    Businesses exist to earn a profit. For each yen they spend, they need to get more than one yen in return. They cannot borrow endlessly like the government does, though Japanese companies have been trying. You have mentioned that Japanese companies are 'sitting on piles of cash." This is not the case, almost without exception, Japanese companies are sitting on piles of debt. They cannot hire more people when they are already overstaffed, they cannot give raises when their number of customers and amount of sales continue to fall.

    The government cannot continue to intervene by trying to stimulate an economy in which the population continues to decline. All of the stimulus spending so far has done little or nothing to help the economy. It has been spent on public works projects which have little benefit to the public, but great benefit to contractors and the friends of politicians. The monetary easing perfomed by the central bank benefits no one. It is allowing the governement to slide more deeply into debt, and allowing companies to pad their portfolios by borrowing from the central banks at low rates to buy back and drive up the value of their own stocks.

    You make the dangerous mistake of thinking that the current government has any interest in the people and the private sector. Politicians care only about getting into power, and staying in power, and spending as much of the people's money as they can borrow, print, or steal. Corporations are saints in comparison.

    Posted in: Japan stands at crossroads of further yen weakness

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    mbrella, last May you said "I see 140 to 150 yen to the dollar by September or even earlier"

    The timeline was a little optimistic. But if the FED and ECB were to stop printing money, it would certainly be possible. If Japan's bond rates get pushed up, 150 yen to the dollar might be just the beginning.

    Posted in: Businesses in Japan are growing concerned about the yen weakening further. What would you like to see the yen-dollar exchange rate stabilize at?

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    "Change we can believe in", was that how it went back in 2007? I said back then that change for the sake of change wasn't necessarily a good thing.

    Everyone wanted a new kind of president, and it seems they didn't care who it was. So they picked a good-looking and good-speaking career academic who had no professional, economic, diplomatic, or military experience. Now we are suffering from a poor business environmment, a weak economy, relations with other countries are strained because of NSA spying activities, and violence is quickly spreading throughout the middle east.

    The job of president is not to be given to an out-of-touch, inexperienced person.

    I remember Obama's inaugeration, the music played by Yitzhak Perlman, and Yo Yo Ma, and the huge crowds who came to see the agent of "change" they had elected. They were all fooled. Few times in America will be remembered with as much regret.

    Posted in: Obama says U.S. will attack IS inside Syria for first time

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    You have no idea what you are talking about. President Obama's administration has deported over two million people

    Sorry, the majority of those deported during the Obama presidency were done so under policies enacted by Bush. There is a lag time between cause and effect. Many of these policies have been nullified, and we are seeing deportations decrease greatly. Deporations of young illegal immigrants have stopped, due to wide application of the DREAM act, which isn't even law yet. And we are seeing mass dumpings of young immigrants in cities across America, as those caught crossing the border illegally are not instantly deported, but are allowed to stay, and given notices to attend court hearings to determine their status. We have outbreaks of TB, because immigration agents are not allowed to ask medical history questions, or conduct medical screenings. Anyone who thinks illegal immigration has decreased under Obama is incorrect.

    Posted in: How John Lennon affects U.S. immigration fight

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Funny. On the day the iPhone 5s came out, I simply went to Bic Camera and bought one. No lines, no waiting.

    Posted in: Japanese fans already lining up for Sept 19 release of iPhone6

  • 5

    sangetsu03

    There are positive and negative factors coming from the weaker yen, but I would say the achievement of the 2% inflation target should be a prioritized, as deflation has been the worst issue for the Japanese economy over the past 17 years,” said Junko Nishioka, chief economist at RBS Securities Japan.

    Funny how a highly paid economist who works at an international bank is so ignorant. He has the cause and effect completely backwards. It isn't deflation which is causing the economy to decline, but a declining economy which is causing deflation. Is the whole world stupid? No wonder RBS had to cut down it's investment bank, and cut 30,000 jobs.

    Posted in: Japan stands at crossroads of further yen weakness

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    I've asked this question for years and no one has ever been able to give me a satisfactory answer. Why aren't exchange rates pegged? How would it be bad for economies if the exchange rates were pegged? I'm not an economist, so can anyone explain it to me simply please?

    When the exchange rate is pegged to a certain value, the amount of currency is usually fixed, which limits the ability of governments to tinker with the value of their currencies by tightening (decreasing) or loosening (increasing) monetary policy. The gold standard followed by the US until Nixon was in office was an example of a pegged currency. The dollar became the benchmark currency of the world when it was backed by gold. In it's heyday, America possesed nearly 3/4 of the world's gold reserves. But as Japanese and European exports increased, the majority of dollars in circulation were held outside America, and the cashing in of these dollars would reduce or deplete America's gold reserves, so the gold standard was abandoned. A fixed-currency system is difficult to maintain if much of your set amount of currency gets sent overseas when you buy many imported goods, but the country exporting buys less of your exported goods.

    Right now a floating exchange system is used, and the market nominally controls the value of the world's currencies. But the floating currency system allows governments some control over the value of their currencies by increasing or decreasing the money supply, or buying/selling other currencies to increase or decrease their value. In the past, Japan bought a lot of US dollars in order to keep the dollar strong, and therefore keep the yen weak. If a country's money supply runs low, it can issue more currency to keep things going.

    But recent excesses by central banks of many governments are showing the weaknesses of the floating currency system as they flood the markets with currency to pay their bills, try to create deflation, or otherwise "stimulate" the economy.

    Posted in: Businesses in Japan are growing concerned about the yen weakening further. What would you like to see the yen-dollar exchange rate stabilize at?

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    I expect thumbs down as I know most of you on here are on fixed salary paid domestically and the effect you see is only higher prices, but really I do not care about some thumbs down on a forum, when in reality both my thumbs are UP !

    I get paid in dollars, so my salary has increased by nearly 40% over the last three years. If the yen crashes, I won't be entirely immune, but at least I won't see my personal savings erroded by inflation.

    I personally don't mind if the yen drops to 120 where it was prior to the Lehman shock, and back then we didn't here all this rattle and noise about the weak yen, it was the norm and most had no idea.

    The problem with this anology is that the dollar and euro have both declined in value as well, do to monetary easing and economic mismanagement in America and Europe. The effective exchange rate is now about the same as it was in 2007.

    People should be outraged that their governments are borrowing and spending so heavily, driving down the value of their country's currencies, and robbing the people of the value of their labor and savings. Almost all the benefits of these easy-currency policies are going to the stock market, and the politicians themselves.

    In 2008 we had a collapse due to poor banking policies inflating the housing market, and people called for the banker's heads. Now your governments are doing the exact same thing in a slightly different way, and which is likely to cause the same results. Instead of a housing bubble, we now have a stock bubble caused by an over-leveraged market funded by money borrowed at low interest from the central banks. The money borrowed was printed out of thin air, but when the house of cards falls, it is the taxpayers who will be stuck with the losses.

    Posted in: Japan stands at crossroads of further yen weakness

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    BS. The government and businesses are too "united" as it is. This is why Japan's economy is still more or less closed to competition from exports, why corporate collusion and price-fixing are never punished, and why former bureaucrats get high-paying senior postions in Japanese companies when they retire from government work.

    We need to get rid of these geriatic old goats who are strangling the economy with their selfish and outdated thinking. We need much less of this "joining of forces" which benefit thr few at the cost of everyone else.

    Posted in: This is the time that political and business communities should join forces to revamp the Japanese economy.

  • -2

    sangetsu03

    Obama's commanders told him in 2008 that it would be necessary to leave 20,000 US troops in Iraq to prevent the problems we are now seeing. Obama overruled them, and removed all the troops. It appears the commanders were right, and Obama was wrong. Obama is a politician first, and a leader... somewhere around eighth, or ninth?...

    Posted in: Obama says U.S. will attack IS inside Syria for first time

  • 13

    sangetsu03

    Look no further than the Apple Store to see the "blessing" of a weak yen. The prices for iPhone 6s are up significantly compared to the iPhone 4/4S a few years ago. Yet the price in US$ for those new iPhones are no more expensive than the previous iPhones.

    During the strong yen years back in 2010 and 2011, there was no import boon for the Japanese. When the yen climbed 30% against the dollar and euro, there was no decrease in the price of imports, a pair of Levis, a BMW car, or package of Australian beef cost no less in 2011 than it did in 2007, as Japanese distributors pocketed the extra profit, and did not pass currency exchange discounts to their customers; another example of the price-fixing so common in Japan.

    The only company which lowered prices as the yen strengthened was Costco, they even lowered the prices of the pizza and hot dogs sold at their snack bars. No Japanese retailer did this. I feel sorry for the Japanese who get ripped off by their countrymen every time the go shopping.

    Posted in: Japan stands at crossroads of further yen weakness

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    For about 90% of the stuff in most supermarkets, this is simply untrue. The cost of groceries in Japan is no more expensive than it is in my home country (Canada) and for a lot of items prices are considerably cheaper.

    Americans pay an average of 4.6% for food, Europeans spend 5.9%, in Japan the number is over 12%. Median income affects the numbers, Japan's median income is $26,000 per year. After purchaes of staples, Japan rates 22nd on the OECD scale of median income

    It is quite fun paying 6 or 7 times as much for rice, buying an apple which costs as much as a bag of apples in America, or a loaf of 6 slices which is half the size as an American loaf, but costs 1/3 more. Here I pay as much for 1/4 of a watermelon as two complete melons in America, or paying 1/3 more in Japan for a cheeseburger at McDonalds.

    I don't know about Canada, but I wish If 90% of the things I buy in Japanese markets were as cheap as they are in America or France.

    Posted in: Demographic crisis empties out Japan's rural areas

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Simply reduce the cost of living in Japan. People aren't having children because they can't afford to feed and raise them. Food costs two-to-three times in Japan what it does in Europe and America, thanks to food tariffs of up to 700%, and Japan applies consmption tax to food, making it even more expensive. Then add the extra costs incurred by price-fixing for goods and services, and import restrictions of many cheaper imported goods, it is simply too expensive to raise a family.

    The high costs have resulted in delfation in recent years as the reduced demand of the market has driven prices down. The natural result of overly high costs is delfation. But then the government tries to cause inflation to balance it's books, which makes raising children more expensive.

    We don't need any subsidies for families, we just need need to get rid of the high tariffs, poor business practices, and other things which make raising children too expensive.

    Posted in: Demographic crisis empties out Japan's rural areas

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