sangetsu03's past comments

  • -2

    sangetsu03

    Science has been lacking at the IPCC as the world fails to get warmer. Here are some quotes from The Guardian in 2009:

    The world faces record-breaking temperatures as the sun’s activity increases, leading the planet to heat up significantly faster than scientists had predicted for the next five years, according to a study

    The hottest year on record was 1998, and the relatively cool years since have led to some global warming sceptics claiming that temperatures have levelled off or started to decline. But new research firmly rejects that argument.

    The research, to be published in Geophysical Research Letters, was carried out by Judith Lean, of the US Naval Research Laboratory, and David Rind, of Nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies.

    The study was published, but how much warming occurred from 2009 to present? None at all. The "new research" which "firmly rejects that argument" turned out to be wrong, didn't it? Even the most ardent believer in climate change cannot argue against that fact.

    Since the science doesn't seem to be panning out, the IPCC is moving away from facts (or the lack thereof), and moving more toward public relactions:

    The United Nations is looking for a young woman to, as BBC put it, be the ‘Malala’ of the climate change movement, serving as a voice that will energize this September’s climate change conference

    The organization has put out a call for a woman under 30 to speak at the opening session of the 2014 Climate Summit, which is being held on September 23 in New York City. The woman has to be from a developing country and must have a background that includes advocacy on climate change or work on implementing climate mitigation or adaptation solutions. So far, the call for applicants has drawn 544 women, who emailed short videos of themselves persuading world leaders to act on climate change to the Secretary-General’s office

    In the meantime, it is already snowing in Wyoming, and the summer months have seen further accumulation or arctice sea ice.

    Posted in: Will global warming make Japan more vulnerable to tropical diseases?

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    Going to North Korea and not expecting something to happen is like going to Hell and not expecting to get burnt. These guys should serve out their sentences, and return afterward, and their experiences should be a lesson to others who are thinking of visiting North Korea.

    Posted in: Americans detained in North Korea call for US help

  • -5

    sangetsu03

    Gotta love it. Just like certain nations having to prove they have no WMDs. Get ready for Japan to single handedly derail talks with NK again just to try and scrape up a few lost popularity points for Abe and Co.

    You've hit the nail on the head.

    Posted in: Japan to seek return of all its citizens held by North Korea

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    The current events are Obama's baby, not Bush's. The seeds to the 2008 recession were planted in the 70's. The Iraq war was Bush's baby, Sept 11th was Clinton's baby.

    Obama has done a poor job with the economy, which is not surprising, considering that Obama had no professional or business experience before being elected. He never ran a lemonade stand, or even worked behind the counter at McDonald's.

    Obama failed to act during the "Arab Spring", and when Putin began maneuvering toward the Crimea and Ukraine, but then again, Obama had no diplomatic experience before being elected. In fact, prior to the election, Obama had never held a US passport, and had never been outside America. We all remember how shocked the Emperor and Empress were when Obama bowed to them on his first visit to Japan.

    Obama has had trouble with Iraq, Afghanistan, and the rise of the Islamic State, which is not surprising, as Obama had no military experience whatsoever before being elected. When you look at the picture of the situation room when Bin Laden was killed, which person in the photo looks the least "presidential"?

    If Obama's legacy suffers as a result of his deficiencies, it is not his fault, he is what he is. The fault lies with the people who were foolish enough to vote an unqualified and ineffectual man to be president of the United States.

    Posted in: World events endanger Obama legacy

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    The judge who issued the suspended sentence should be charged as an accessory to murder of a child, or at least disbarred. Since there was a sentence from the death of the elder child (albeit suspended) there was obviously a conviction, yet the judge allowed the mother to care for other children?

    Posted in: 3-year-old boy dies after being thrown against wall by mother

  • -3

    sangetsu03

    That is a badly biased analogy. Cattle ranchers are not experts in dietary health so you wouldn`t ask them that question in the first place.

    The anology is entirely accurate. Scientists are no more noble than cattle ranchers when it comes to obtaining funding. Climate change is a multi-billion dollar industry, championed by politicians (the least noble class of people known to humankind) and funded by consumers and taxpayers. Climate "science" is not being held to the same rigorous standards as other sciences. Doesn't it alarm you that not one, single, climate model or prediction has proven even remotely accurate? We still cannot accurate predict weather more than 48 hours in the future, despite a full array of weather satellites and super computers being used by meteorologists. If we do not have the means to predict short-term weather, then we certainly don't have the means to predict long-term climate, period. It should come as surprise that every single last one of the IPCC's global warming predictions have failed to occur.

    Since there has no global warming for one-and-a-half decades, how can climate change be causing an increase in the numbers of disease-bearing mosquitos? Simply stated, it can't, so the news article above is nonsense.

    Posted in: Will global warming make Japan more vulnerable to tropical diseases?

  • -2

    sangetsu03

    No. If that were the case, you wouldn't find 99% of the scientists studying the matter in agreement.

    Actually, the correct figure is 97%, not 99%. The survey which determined the "97%" figure was conducted by the University of Illinois in 2009. To arrive at the 97% figure, 3146 scientists were surveyed. In order for their answers to qualify for the survey, only climate scientists were selected. Out of that pool, only those scientists whose work was more than 50% involved with climate change were allowed to take part in the survey. This amounted to 79 scientists. When polled, 77 said they believed climate change was occurring, 2 did not. So out of 3146, it takes only 77 to get a 97% concensus. But whenever there is news about the subject, we hear the quote "97% of the world's scientists agree that manmade climate change is happening." Funny how 77 scientists suddenly become "97% of the world's scientists", isn't it?

    The survey provides the same results you might get if you asked a group of cattle ranchers if beef is good for you.

    Posted in: Will global warming make Japan more vulnerable to tropical diseases?

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    I have a nice, modern bathroom. When I open the door, the lid of the toilet opens automatically, and a light on the toilet illuminates the seat in case I am too plastered to find the light switch on the wall, or figure out which of the 4 buttons turns on the light. The control panel to the toilet is on the left, the first two buttons are the flush buttons, "big" for the mornings after Thai food and lots of drink, "small" for business as usual. The next two buttons regulate the lid and seat independently. The lower buttons are for the washlet functions, big spray, or small spray, with buttons to regulate pressure and temperature. Setting both to maximum is good for laughs when visitors get curious. The best function is that the toilet has negative air pressure, and vents to the outside, so one can do business without making the bathroom smell bad. If Al Bundy were to use my toilet, he would probably never get off of it. On the bad side, such a toilet doesn't come cheap, my first car cost much less.

    What most foreign visitors are confused by in Japan are not the modern toilets you find in hotels and and nice department stores, but the old style "Turkish" toilets which are still commonplace throughout the city, and universal out in the countryside. I have seen my friends try to figure out which way to squat, how to balance themselves, or pull their pants out of the way to provide clear access. Wiping while in this position is also an art which many westerners do not possess. It's hard to imagine how high-tech astro-toilets and turkish toilets co-exist in the same country.

    Posted in: Navigating a Japanese bathroom

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    All Amari, Kuroda, and Abe have left to use is words. But words have no substance, and the Japanese economy needs much more than verbal encouragement to recover. Like many Japanese, Amari, Kuroda, and Abe are afraid to actually make substantive decisions, they are merely spending more of the taxpayer's money, and pushing the inevitable into the arms of their unfortunate predecessors (and the rest of us).

    As bad as things were, the medicine they have prescribed is only going to make the economy worse. When the fall comes, these guys has better get out quick, lest they end up tarred and feathered.

    Posted in: Amari: No need to be so pessimistic about household spending

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Get ready to welcome recession number 2. All we get for adding trillions of yen to the debt for "stimulus" spending are fat contracts for construction companies, and fat retirements for bureaucrats and politicians.

    I can't wait to see what the politicians have up their sleeves after the economy collapses again, it certainly won't be the phantom "third arrow". They can't borrow, print, or spend anymore than they already have. I am glad I get paid in dollars.

    Posted in: Japan's economy stalls as incomes, spending languish

  • -7

    sangetsu03

    Our "Community-Organizer-in-Chief", who never possessed a passport before 2008. A man with no real-world professional, economic, or military experience, yet he was somehow elected to be president of the United States? Hadn't we learned anything after Bush? Who will we elect next? Larry the Cable Guy?

    There was a windfall of opportunity for the middle east, and it was all squandered, because no one knew what to do it, except for the likes of the IS. Obama once stated that "America was not the world's policeman", and now we get to see the results of America sitting on it's hands. As long ago as the Monroe administration, it was known that the safety and success of America depended upon international influence and diplomacy, but then again, we no longer elect leaders like Monroe to be president, we elect empty-headed mouthpieces with good hair and not too much dirt hidden under the rug.

    Posted in: IS executes scores of Syrian troops; Obama admits he has no strategy

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Yeah, and by "big" I mean size. DHSS has about 75,000 employees. the US military at least 1.4 million. For every 100 military guys, there's only 5 DHSS employees.

    Back then the US military had many more people, yet DOD spending was still lower than DHSS. Millions at the time were "on the dole." Right now in America more than 100,000,000 are on some form of public assistance (welfare).

    The Soviet Union's colllapse was economic, their primary expenditure was military defense. The cause of their heavy military spending was to answer any military threat from America. The math is simple.

    Posted in: Vice economy minister: More caution needed on next tax hike

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Reagan got it to work when he handed a trillion bucks to the Pentagon, the world's biggest single government insitution, so that government people could buy government equipment for other government people and to pay government issued wages to government employees.

    Actually, since the 1970's, the Department of Health and Human Services (otherwise known as the "Welfare Department") has been America's largest (by dollars spent) government institution. Back in 1980', the Cold War was in full swing, the Soviet Union had invaded Afghanistan, and was cracking down hard on Eastern Europe. Reagan thought the time to be a "make or break" moment, and he didn't hesitate. He pushed the Soviet Union into economic collapse.

    It wasn't Reagan's spending which got America's economy going again, it was a large program of deregulation, and tax decreases. These were done simultaneously by Margaret Thatcher in the UK, which compounded the global effect.

    Posted in: Vice economy minister: More caution needed on next tax hike

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Which all cars must go thru. NIce try. You asked me for an example of a tariff lifting,

    The shakken inspection process apply to domestic made cars too.

    Nope, Japanese cars are not required to be inspected before they are sold, they go through the process after 2 years. Imported cars must be individually inspected before they are delivered to the dealership. Brand new, imported cars must have their wheels removed and have their brake pad/shoes/rotors measured, tire tread depth must be checked, etc. Is this really necessary for a car which has never been driven? Only if it's a non-Japanese car sold in Japan. Japan has different rules for imports in regards to fuel efficiency and safety, the rules for imports are more stringent.

    Posted in: Japanese companies need to regain the animal spirit they lost over the past 20 years to lead innovation and sell products abroad. This is something that the government and business have to take more seriously.

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Autos and auto parts. the tariffs were removed in 1978.

    The tariff was removed, but it was replaced by an even more expensive non-tariff barrier in the form of individual inspections. Each and every new car imported into Japan must go through the shakken inspection process, which is expensive in cost, and the amount of time wasted to individually inspect every car. This is why only 7% of cars in Japan are imports. In other countries, only one sample car is inspected, the rest are assumed to be built the same as the sample (which is true).

    Parts are distributed in a limited manner, and minimum prices are set by the distributors, driving up the cost above domestic parts. This practice is strictly illegal everywhere but Japan. Japan has tried to fix prices among their American distributors, most of whom are now in federal prison, while Japanese distributors in China are now under investigation for doing the same thing.

    If you need another example of how Japan defies treaties and agreements, you only need to look at "research whaling". Japan agreed to the moratorium on commercial whaling, and then found a way to get out of their agreement by redefining "commercial" as "research".

    The above practices are why there is a provision in TPP for parties to file for legal action if other parties try to find a loophole to renege on their obligations. And this is why Japan will not join TPP.

    Posted in: Japanese companies need to regain the animal spirit they lost over the past 20 years to lead innovation and sell products abroad. This is something that the government and business have to take more seriously.

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Similar to how it was in the pre-globalization years: growing steadily and stable. Japan's industrial success occurred behind high protective tariffs. As soon as those tariffs started to come down, Japan's economy started to tank, a process that continues.

    Please tell me which tariffs came down. Name a single one, and don't use the recent example of Australia where the tariff is still double-digits in favor of Japan.

    Since the end of the war, Japan's economy has been based on foreign trade. There were no "pre-globalization" years, because ithe demographics of Japan prevent the country from being self-sufficient. Japan has almost no raw manufacturing materials, little agriculture, and no energy resources. Without globalization, there would be no Japan.

    Japan has the highest tariffs of any developed nation, don't you think this has something to do with Japan also having the highest birthrate decline, and largest national debt of all developed countries? The evidence points directly to the opposite of what you are trying to prove. The birthrate is declining primarily because of the high cost of living, the high cost of living is caused by tariffs which result in the Japanese having to pay twice to three times as much for food as people from Europe and America. It has caused the Japanese people to pay twice as much for clothing, energy, and other staples. Protecting the domestic manufacturers has made them uncompetitive with those of other countries, and right now 70% of Japanese companies are officially classified as "loss producing". High tariffs have been the main cause of all the economic problems Japan is suffering from.

    Posted in: Japanese companies need to regain the animal spirit they lost over the past 20 years to lead innovation and sell products abroad. This is something that the government and business have to take more seriously.

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Pointless, anyway, since globalization has scuppered such opportunities,

    If it were not for globalization, what would Japan be like today? Were it not for globalization, there never would have been an "animal spirit" to manufacture, compete, and innovate, Japan would never have become a developed country without globalization. Globalization has created far more opportunities than it has destroyed. Japan owes every ounce of it's past success to globalization.

    A century ago, Britain was the primary manufacturer, half a century ago it was America, now it is Asia. Trade and manufacturing are like the wind and the tide, they change direction on their own, and cannot be resisted, they can only be taken advantage of.

    Why do multinationals move? Back when growth was strong in Britain, America, and Japan, the cost of doing business in these places was low. 100 years ago, tax was less than 15% of GDP. But as business grew, so did government and it's associated costs. Tax in Britain, America, and Japan is approaching 40% of GDP. Tax expenses are now more than payroll costs for most companies,a hd if they are to succeed and grow, they need to move.

    The other option is to nationalize industry, as Britain did back in the 50's, 60's, and 70's. In 1979, 80% of industry was nationalized. This experiment was a disaster, and failed spectacularly. If Britain couldn't make it work, who can? Even socialist countries like China or Vietnam.

    Posted in: Japanese companies need to regain the animal spirit they lost over the past 20 years to lead innovation and sell products abroad. This is something that the government and business have to take more seriously.

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    Nearly 100 companies achieved a capitalization over one trillion yen, 90% of the large corporations increased wages, and 64.5% of the mid-small firms increased wages as well. It's the ONLY way to tackle the 'deflationary' spiral so your above point of "wrong type of inflation" is simply just your opinion.

    Market capitalization increased occurred because of the recent boom in stocks, not from any increase in sales or business. The increase in stock prices has been due to western governments "adding liquidity" to the market, and for no other reason. The stock markets around the world have grown greatly over the last five years, with the Nikkei up over 100%, yet economic growth over the last five years has hovered at an annual rate of 1% pr less. This capalization you speak of is ephemereal, and can disappear more quickly than it apeared. Growth in Japan to date has been .6%, and we mustn't forget that increases in government spending count toward that number, net growth is and has been negative. We are in the miidst of a stock bubble, which has been driven by government manipulation of interest rates, "stimulus" spending (borrowing huge sums at interest from the taxpayers), liquidity-adding programs, and manipulation of growth and unemployment figures. What the big banks did during the subprime mortgage mess was no less bad than what our governments and central banks are doing now, and the amounts lost by the private banks are small change compared to the trillions of dollars, yen, and euros being squandered by our governments and central banks.

    I would like to know which of these companies have increased wages, and how these "increases" are calculated. Has anyone here seen their wages increase? And for those precious few who have, has their raise been more than the collective increase in the consumption tax?

    Posted in: Aides try to temper Abe's security agenda as popularity declines

  • 8

    sangetsu03

    Abe has tackled issues that other PM has avoided for over a decade which domestically involves deflationary spiral

    How has he tackled the "deflationary spiral"? By spending more of the people's money on pork projects which profit his friends and family? By turning on the presses and printing out a few trillions more yen? Abe's current easing policies are giving us the wrong type of inflation, which is simply debasing the currency, and stealing the value of our labor and savings, which will only reduce growth. These policies are like trying to put out a fire by pouring gasoline on it.

    The reforms he promised have not been implemented, indeed, we don't even know yet what they are. TPP was supposed to liberalise trade, but TPP is dead in the water. Employment regulations were supposed to be addressed, but all that has been done is giving a few speeches saying that women should join the workforce.

    The unintended consequences of turning over more of our freedoms, responsibilities, trust, and money to the government are beginning to be felt.

    Posted in: Aides try to temper Abe's security agenda as popularity declines

  • 6

    sangetsu03

    I'm shocked. Japanese companies being accused of collusion...

    People are only shocked when it occurs outside Japan. There are a few Japanese auto parts executives being ogled by their cellmates in US federal prison right now after being convicted of price fixing in America last year. They would never had been charged had they been doing the same thing in Japan.

    Japan's closed economy makes it much easier for this practice to occur, and it is one of the reasons that Japanese goods cost more in Japan than they do in America or Europe.

    Go to the movies next week and see how much a ticket costs, and then see if you can find a theater which charges a lower price. You won't, because all theaters in Japan charge the same price. Were these theater owners in America, they would be bunking with the auto parts executives.

    Posted in: Coming apart: Regulators' sweep threatens auto parts business model

View all