sangetsu03's past comments

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    Actually Obama made it VERY clear that in exchange for security assurances, he demanded that trade restrictions be eased. This is all about the TPP, nothing more nothing less.

    Nonsense, even Obama is not that stupid. The existing treaty covers the Senkaku islands as they were under American administration (after the Japanese surrender) until being specifically returned to Japan. As these islands are officially recognized as Japanese territory by America, they fall under the defense treaty obligations. Obama cannot try to leverage a trade deal by modifying a treaty which, as he says, was wrtiiten before he was born.

    Posted in: Obama says Senkaku islands covered by security treaty

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    If TPP passes in Japan, any corporation can SUE the Japanese government if laws hinder corporate interests.

    This ability to sue works both ways, and it is necessary to provide recourse if any party reneges on the agreement. Japan has a long history of finding ways to get out of complying to treaties and agreements they have signed. Japan refused to abide by the Geneva convention (which they signed) in the second war. After a trade agreement lowering the tariffs on imported cars, Japan immediately implaced additional inspection and distribution fees on imported cars. When Japan lost a WTO case to America regarding the import of rice, Japan imported the rice, and then let it sit at the port until it began to rot. When the 1986 moratorium on commercial whaling was implemented, Japan stopped doing "commercial" whaling, and began whaling for "research" purposes instead. Now that the high court has ordered Japan to stop it's "research" whaling, Japan's diet is now trying to enact legislation to either disregard the world court's order, or to once again change the terms used to describe their whaling operations to get around the ruling. Unless there is a way to make Japan honor their agreements, Japan will always find a way of getting around them.

    Obviously Japan does not care much about rulings from the world court, or WTO, and this being the case, how do you expect to enforce the terms of the treaty if Japan signs it?

    Posted in: Obama, Abe under pressure to salvage TPP pact

  • 7

    sangetsu03

    Scrap TPP it's a total rip off for everybody but the superrich who skim money off the rest of us.

    And the 800% tariff charged on rice is not a ripoff? The The tariffs, duties, expensive hurdles on imports, and the lack of competition in the domestic market which further drives up prices is not ripping off or skimming money from all of us?

    Is the fact that Japanese spend over 12% of their income for food, while America and Europe spend only 5% is not a ripoff? Is the fact that I have to pay 25% more for a Sony television in Tokyo than I would in New York not a ripoff?

    Don't you understand the clear and simple fact that the "superrich" in Japan use tariffs to rip off every single person living here? Don't you see the cozy relationship that the agriculture lobby, big Japanese corporations, the bureaucracy, and the elected polticians share? and how all of us are being ripped off by them? Who profits from tariffs? Who pays for them?

    Posted in: Obama, Abe under pressure to salvage TPP pact

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Free trade is essentially a system by which multinational corporations exploit differences in labor and regulatory costs between nations to boost profits. It gives weaker economies the ability to file grievance against stronger economies in order to force them to drop trade barriers, which means that Japan will likely see many of its manufacturing and agricultural jobs disappear.

    So you would rather have all countries close their markets to foreign competition? Japan has done this for the past fifty years, and look where it has got them. The population is shrinking, agricultural and industrial jobs are still disappearing aren't they? Japan's national debt is hovering at catastrophic levels, and the shrinking economy is only going to decrease the odds that this debt, and the social obligations that it has been financing, will ever be paid.

    Tariffs benefit politicians and corporations who enact them to limit competition, and to buy votes. How much money has been given to politicians over the last century by business lobbies to enact duties to give their trades a competitive advantage? This extra money the costs are raised by are paid for by consumers like you and I.

    Free trade benefits everybody, except those special interests and governments who won't or can't compete on a level playing field. If you have been living in Japan, it is rather obvious that Japan's overprotection of their markets has backfired, and Japan right now is the biggest example of why free trade must be seriously pursued.

    Unless you like the prices you pay to be set by politicians and corporations rather than being determined by what you think is fair, they by all means oppose free trade. If you think that others know what is better for you more than you yourself know, then by all means obey them.

    Posted in: Should Japan join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact, which seems to be stuck over differences between Japan and the U.S.?

  • -2

    sangetsu03

    Not really, Japan's debt is domestically held, and has thus far been sustainable.

    Debt is debt, no matter who is holding the note. The only way to teduce the debt is to increase growth, the only way to increase growth is to increase economic activity. The only way to increase economic activity is to remove the barriers which are hindering it.

    Japan's debt is growing ever more quickly, and has nearly reached the point of equalling the amount of cash assets held by the domestic banks. Once it surpasses this level, it is less and less likely that the debt will remain sustainable. How can you possibly expect to repay a debt when said debt is greater than all of the cash assets your country possesses? And while debts are accruing at a greater rate than GDP growth? Added to this are the trade deficits which Japan has been incurring since the nuclear plants were shut down, these trade deficits are quickly burning asset reserves which Japan cannot afford to spend.

    Japan needs to get it's economy growing again in a very bad way. Japan needs TPP far more than any other country in the agreement by a country mile.

    Posted in: Should Japan join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact, which seems to be stuck over differences between Japan and the U.S.?

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    But since the price is well known, any new theaters that open simply set their price at the known price. This is not price fixing, and not a violation of the law.

    Utterly and absolutely absurd. Who determines the "known" price? In every developed country in the world, the ticket buyers determine the known price, but not Japan. Can you honestly believe that among the thousands of theaters around Japan, none have thought about trying to attract more viewers by lowering their prices by one or two hundred yen? And, on those special days when theater tickets are discounted, don't you think it requires a certain amount of collusion for all theaters owned by the various companies to reduce their prices by the same amount on the same day?

    Posted in: Should Japan join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact, which seems to be stuck over differences between Japan and the U.S.?

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    (the worst case sees TPP completely undermining Japan's national health-care system to the point of bankruptcy).

    Japan's national deficit is two-and-a-half times GDP, the national healthcare and pension plans are well underway to bankruptcy already, aren't they?

    TPP is a scheme to benefit the 1% at the expense of the 99%.

    Tariffs and import duties benefit the 1% at the expense of the 99%. Do you think the top 1% cares that Japanese spend three times as much for food as Americans, and twice ws much as Europeans? And that lack of outside competition in the Japanese domestic market has caused the prices of Japanese goods to be as mych as 1/3 more expensive than they are in America? Who does having to pay 80% more for domestic goods hurt more? The top 1%? Or the bottom 90%?

    I don't know at this point. To me, it's unclear if the TPP is anything more than the US enforcing it's will on weaker countries.

    The other countries in TPP wanted a free trade agreement with zero tariffs, and that is still what they want. These agreements were reached long before Japan decided it wanted to join TPP. The US and other countries involved are not enforcing their will against Japan, as they had already agreed to the terms, it is Japan who is enforcing their will by demanding that Japanese products get zero tariffs, while not promising to do the same with foreign products. Let's not forget that the other countries involved are mainly agricultural producers, and if Japan will not budge on agricultural products, then they don't belong in TPP.

    Also, TPP is not simply a free trade agreement. It is a set of structural reforms that will hamper Japan's ability to regulate its business community. It will force Japan to adopt US-like patent restrictions on intellectual property, as well as an Investor-State Dispute Clause that will allow foreign businesses to sue the government if any laws created are perceived to affect their competitiveness in Japan's domestic market.

    Japan does not regulate business, business regulates Japan. Why do you think price-fixing in all Japanese markets is so rampant, and is never punished? Go out to the movies tomorrow and tell me whch theater has the lowest price for a movie ticket. You will find that every theater in the country, regardless of the company which owns it, charges the exact same absurdly expensive 1800 yen per ticket. This is a flagrant violation of Japanese law, but it is never punished.

    Next, foreign businesses must be allowed to sue if they find that parties in the agreement are not abiding by the rules, or are bending the rules to be uncompetetitive. Japan has done this several times in the past by erecting non-tariff barriers to increase prices on goods when actual tariffs are lowered or removed. The tariff on Australian beef has just been lowered by about 9%. Go into any store in Japan and tell me if the retail price for Australian beef has been reduced by a like 9%. It hasn't, and it never will be. What can Australia do about this? Nothing. The international court recently ruled that Japan must stop "research" whaling. Japan is already looking for loopholes, and is trying to enact legislation to get around the ban. Japan cannot be trusted to abide by any trade agreement they sign unless the agreement has teeth.

    What Japan should be pursuing is individual trade agreements instead which would allow it to maintain some protection over its domestic market, and structural reforms for its agricultural, business and commercial industries.

    Japan is, and has been trying to pursue individual agreements, the latest lf which was Australia. Look at the deal with Australia, and tell me who got the better part of it. It is because of Japan's duplicitous trade practices that TPP was formed. Almost all of the countries involved in TPP already have old trade deals with Japan. Obviously, they are not happy with these previous deals.

    Posted in: Should Japan join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact, which seems to be stuck over differences between Japan and the U.S.?

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    So weaker yen is killing me and Japan as well :P . So whats up with govt? why do they want cheaper yen?

    The yen is not cheap. Were you being killed in 1996 when the exchange rate was 130 yen to the dollar? Or how about 1983 when it was 300 yen to the dollar?

    The government wants a weaker yen for two reasons; first, it makes Japanese-manufactured imports cheaper overseas, and second, they need inflation to occur in Japan. With the national debt now at over one quadrillion yen (one thousand trillion) and the government spending record amounts of money this year, and for the next many years, there is no hope getting a handle on the debt unless they can inflate some of it away, as the national debt is not tied to the rate of inflation.

    Posted in: Japan's trade deficit quadruples on-year in March to Y1.45 tril

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    No, Japan should not join. Japan has never made a free trade deal with any nation, except in those cases when Japan got free trade for Japanese products, while not having to do the same for foreign products. The Japanese trade lobby which works in Washington and many other capitals has long been of the largest and most well-funded lobbies in the world.

    To expect that Japan could abide by any free trade deal would be like expecting Japan to enforce it's laws against price-fixing, allow women equal opportunity in the workplace, etc.

    Japan needs it's tariffs because they are great tools of coercion, oppression, and maintaining the firm grip the bureaucracy and big-business have on the ordinary Japanese people, and help maintain the monopolies many companies have on the domestic market.

    Japan entering the TPP unconditionally would be as big a deal as the Meiji restoration.

    Posted in: Should Japan join the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) free trade pact, which seems to be stuck over differences between Japan and the U.S.?

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    It's pathetic that our govts and central banks and bending over backward for these billionaires. Time to hike the corporate tax.

    Central banks and governments are not bending over for billionaires, billionaires and those of us who work for them are gettimg bent over by central banks and governments. When the corporate tax is raised the cost will be immediately passed to the lower classes. People still don't seem to realize that a tax on any part of the economy is actually paid by every part of the economy. This is a very basic economic principle which politicians understand clearly, yet always fail to mention when telling the people how they will tax the rich to help the middle or lower classes. And of course the middle and lower classes end up paying.

    The rich and the large companies do not like to hoard money. Money which is just sitting around is quite useless, so in normal times this money is immediately invested into other businesses, more staff, new machinery, etc. Most rich people do not actually have very much cash, their assests are mostly made up of investments. I have a pretty high net worth, yet the average Japanese family likely has more cash in their savings account than I do, as almost everything I have is invested in my capital stock.

    The reason companies are hoarding cash is because of lessons learned during the financial crisis. In 2008, those companies which did not have a reserve of cash on hand either went bankrupt, or had to be bailed out by the government. Those who were bailed out had to cede control of their businesses to the government, or accept increased regulation in exchange for the money. GM was bailed out. Ford had accumulated $27 billion in cash savings before 2008, so they got through the crisis unscathed.

    Right now businesses are hoarding money because they see the risk of getting a return is too high. Large companies and businesses have a better understanding of the world's economy than regular people do. They have seen little or no recovery over the last five years. They understand that it has been government stimulus and rampant money printing which has been fueling the economy for the last five years, and not private sector economic activity. They see a very good chance that this poorly thought out policy may backfire in the near future, and they want to have enough money on hand for their companies and workers to survive.

    Most companies look at the goverment economic figures and laugh. The government does not apply the same accounting rules to itself as it does to private companies. If GM or GE were to use the government's accounting methods to compute their growth or employment figures, they would be shut down, or put in prison.

    Companies can look at their own balance sheets and get a very clear idea about how much economic growth there really is. They are looking right now, and what they see is not as rosy as what the politicians are telling us. As most of these companies are publicly owned, the cash they are supposedly hoarding does not belng directly to them, it belongs to their shareholders, and they cannot simply spend their sharholder's money just because politicians tell them to do so. If they thought they could get a reasonably safe return on the spending, they would spend in a heartbeat, but they don't, so they aren't.

    Isn't it ironic that governments have placed rules requiring banks and financial institutions carry more cash and invest less, while at the same time telling other companies to do the opposite? Governments are clueless about business and economics, were this not the case, we would all be much better off now. Spending money is not, and has never been a solution to any problem. Earning money is the solution. But the governments do not earn, they simply take and spend, and therefore have little or no idea of the virtue and importance of earning, or investing.

    Posted in: Cash-rich global firms face calls to crack open war chests

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    True free trade deals, which have no tariffs whatsoever, are difficult to approve because they remove power and influence from both regulators and special interests. The subsidies governments provide to farmers are not provided to protect the farmers, they are simply money exchanged for votes. In case no one is aware, there is a formula used in Japan when counting votes. Votes from farmers and those who live in rural areas are worth more than votes from city dwellers. And as the older people who live in the country vote more frequently than those who live in the city, they have a disproportionate amount of power.

    Before Japan became involved, TPP was a simple free trade agreement between the member states, with zero tariffs on goods. Japan was never considered for membership in the program, indeed, no other country wanted Japan involved. Even America did not support Japan entering TPP, mainly because everyone knows from long experience that Japan has never supported free trade in any way, shape, or form, except of course if it is free for Japanese goods, and does not apply to foreign goods.

    I wonder who in the powerful Japanese trade lobby in Washington twisted Obama's arm to let Japan into TPP? The US needs to be as inflexible as Japan has been for the last 50 years. If Japan cannot agree, then they should be quickly shown the door. All other countries involved are ready to conclude the talks, only Japan is haggling. Japan must be told that either they sign the agreement as is agreed to by all other parties right now, or get the hell out. For Japan's sake, I hope they sign, for everyone else's sake, I hope Japan leaves the talks.

    Posted in: Stalemate remains in Japan-U.S. talks on TPP

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    And I don't entirely disagree with you. Full-employment is best for Japan's citizens by a country mile and Japanese society will better served by their current system than the one that will come under TPP, as congress envisions it.

    TPP was not startedy congress or Washington, indeed, the US congress does not support Obama's allowing Japan to join TPP.

    Full employment is causing a precipitous decline in the quality of life in Japan. Japan ranks at the bottom of the list in purchasing parity among developed nations, and the cost of subsidies to offset other costs has saddled Japan with a national debt which is two and a half times GDP.

    TPP was originally designed to be a zero-tariff agreement between the countries involved, and that is still tbe goal for most members.

    Posted in: Stalemate remains in Japan-U.S. talks on TPP

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    TPP is not good for Japan. Better to make its own individual FTA deals with its neighbors than to sign this POS and sell out its own citizens to American companies.

    The rules apply to all involved, other countries (such as Japan) may extend their patents, or sue when the details of the trade agreements are breached. This clause is necessary mainly because of Japan, and Japan's policy of erecting non- tariff barriers or simply ignoring details they previously agreed to.

    The Japanese companies have been sellin out Japanese people for decades by forcing them to pay more for food, clothing, energy, services, etc.

    But I agree that Japan should pull out. No other country in TPP wants Japan involved, due to past experiences involving trade deals with the Japanese. Japan will not change it's practice of taking all it can in trade agreements, and giving little to nothing in return.

    Posted in: Stalemate remains in Japan-U.S. talks on TPP

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    Policymakers and private-sector analysts expect a temporary dip in economic activity in the current quarter due to the sales tax rise to 8% from 5% on April 1, before returning to moderate growth in the following quarters.

    There is nothing "temporary" about the "dip in economic activity". With the population falling rapidly (nearly half a million in 2012, and hundreds of thousands last year) there are fewer and fewer people to fuel the so-called moderate growth they are optimistically predicting.

    Posted in: Gov't cuts economic view after sales tax hike

  • 5

    sangetsu03

    Just wish Japan would nix these talks, and start doing individual deals with its neighbors instead. They'd get a better deal if they did that and would dodge the TPP bullet.

    Japan's neighbors won't agree to any individual deal because all such deals have failed in the past. In trade negotiations with Japan, the Japanese have always been "it's my way, or the highway". Look at how Australia just got screwed in their "free trade" agreement with Japan.

    A main reason that Japan opposes TPP is because clauses in the agreement prohibit non-tariff barriers, including price-fixing. Japan will never give in on this because, despite being illlegal, price-fixing is a widespread cultural practice which permeates business and politics.

    Posted in: Stalemate remains in Japan-U.S. talks on TPP

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    As Earth’s atmosphere warms alarmingly and fills with heat-trapping gases...

    Really? I mean really? There has been no measurable warming on Earth for nearly two decades now, or so admits Dr Phil Jones of the CRU and the UN's International Panel on Climate Change, yet the above garbage article is disingenuous enough to state "as the Earth's atmosphere warms alarmingly"? But facts must never intrude upon hype and fearmongering.

    Posted in: Fuel-careful F1 less of a guilty pleasure

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    The president of the United States never bows to any foreign dignitary, the American flag may never be lowered in salute any other nation or dignitary. This is protocol and custom, not right wing ranting. The emperor knows this, hence the startled (horrified?) look on his face when Obama bowed to him.

    Of course, before 2008, Obama had never possessed a US passport (it says so on his passport application) so supposedly he had never traveled to any foreign country before becoming president. With absolutely no experience meeting leaders and dignitaries in their home countries, it is no surprise he didn't know what he was doing.

    Go back to the opening ceremony of the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. As the athletes of each nation stopped in front of the podium to salute Germany and Adolph Hitler, each and every nation dipped their flag in salute, except for America.

    Posted in: U.S. President Barack Obama will meet Emperor Akihito in Tokyo on April 24. Last time Obama met the emperor in Japan, in 2009, he shook hands and bowed, which upset some members in the U.S. Congress and media. Do you see anything wrong with him bowing to the emperor?

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    No, their success will depend on how many salarymen and housewives they can get addicted to gambling. This is already too big a problem with pachinko and horse racing. The Chinese are more likely to go to Macau or Singapore to do their gambling, which is just as well.

    Posted in: If casinos become legal in Japan, their success depends on how many Chinese people they can obtain as VIP customers.

  • -3

    sangetsu03

    Human rights don't even make your top 200 "real problems"? ... well, enough said really.

    Tell me exactly how Obama has furthered LGBT rights? And after you come up with a few scant examples, tell me about what Obama has done to improve other human rights? How about the right to use the phone, or internet without being listened-in on by the federal government? How about the right to make simple life decisions (like not buying insurance) without having to pay a fine to the government? How about exercising the right to support a poltical party without being audited by the IRS? One of thr few things Obama has done during his presidency is to create more rules, regulations, and red tape than any previous president, no other has added as many pages to the federal register. Exactly how are 81000 pages of rules and regulations furthering human rights? Each regulation is yet another command, telling us what we may and may not do. Is it possible to have human rights when there is no longer any freedom?

    Posted in: 2016 presidential race off to an early start

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    There is a large commercial infrastructure in Japan for the fishing, distribution, and sale of whale meat. Many Japanese are looking at having their livelyhoods taken away, as their shops and restaurants will be forced to either adapt to different dishes, or close up shop. Many of these shops and distributors are located in rural areas, and as rural votes carry more weight than urban votes, like farmers, these folks have a disproportionate amount of power in Japan's political system.

    Also this entire situation is another example of how Japan tries to worm it's way out of legal agreements and treaties. Japan said they would stop commercial whaling, and then found a legal loophole which allowed them to continue whailing unabated. Japan has done the same thing to get around past trade agreements with America and other countries.

    Most likely, Japan will find another way to get around the recent ban by changing their modus operandi slightly to get around the letters of the ruling, and things will continue as they have before. Should Japan sign it's name to other agreements like TPP, it would probably do the same thing to get around allowing duty-free goods to get into Japan

    Posted in: Lawmakers demand gov't 'redesign' whaling program

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    MB Japan 株式会社、埼玉県
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