sangetsu03's past comments

  • -3

    sangetsu03

    Good God man! You think Vietnam was a "mere skirmish"?

    Yes, I do, because in the large scale of things, that is all it was. Do you know anything about the scale of the cold war? The two superpowers spending huge amounts of money influencing countries around the world, always trying to tip the scale in their favor? The hundreds of missile silos, manned 24 hours a day, 365 days per year? Nuclear bombers orbiting in rotation at all times? Itchy fingers on triggers that could wipe out the world in less than half an hour? Billions of lives were at stake, under a nuclear sword of Damocles.

    I am a veteran myself, and am the son and grandson of other veterans. I have been to the weapons labs at Los Alamos, I have visited their bomb shelters, which are as deep below ground as the taller buildings in Tokyo are high. I remember the attack drills in school, where we were instructed to hide under our desks (as if that would do any good) when the alarm sirens rang. These sirens sounded just like the sirens in London during the second war. But I suppose you have the luxury of not having to have heard them.

    No one appreciates the scale of the victory in the cold war, or the consequences of losing it. No one knows the energy, effort, and money spent, and how the war was won with remarkably little loss of life. And people did die, not just in Vietnam and Afghanistan. There were running skirmishes around the world, in many countries. Far more people died in the cold war than most people know, yet compared to the potential of the cold war going "hot", the numbers, including Vietnam, were miniscule.

    Posted in: There was a time when the United States was considered the world's police officer who often became aggressively involved in maintaining peace and stability in the world. However, observing the presidential election, it appears the United States is moving further and further to a more inward-looking approach.

  • -1

    sangetsu03

    How long has it been since Clinton ran or worked for a company? Oh, wait, she never has. Yet she thinks that she has more business or economic experience than Trump? This is the wrong issue for her to be pursuing, because as bad as she makes Trump out to be, she is far less knowledgable than he is.

    In the meantime, Clinton'r former campaign organizer, and now govern of Virginia, Terry McAuliffe, is being investigated by the FBI for accepting illegal contributions from a Chinese businessman. This same businessman has donated millions to the Clinton foundation. I also like Clinton slamming Wall Street, while at the same time accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in speaking fees from Wall Street banks.

    Trump may not be the solution to America's problems, but Hillary is certainly one of the main causes of these problems.

    It is funny to see Bernie doing so well in the primaries. He is not doing well because he is a deft politician, or that his support is that strong, he is doing well because Hillary is a far weaker candidate than most people believe. Anyone here should listen to one of Hillary's campaign speeches on Youtube, and tell us what you think. Americans are not the brightest people in the world, but few of them would find anything Hillary said to sound sincere or believable, and I doubt few would be able to watch an entire Hillary speech without changing the channel, or looking for another video to watch.

    Posted in: Clinton: Trump could bankrupt America like his companies

  • -6

    sangetsu03

    Not all of America's actions were bad, the opening up of Japan was a result of these policies. And as bad as incidents like Cuba and Vietnam were mere skirmishes in the much larger Cold War, which America did indeed win. Few people nowadays realize the extent of the danger the world lived under until the fall of the Soviet Union. It would take only 18 minutes for an ICBM to reach it's target after launch. In the long run, Vietnam has returned to capitalism, and so will Cuba once the bearded-one dies. China is slowly evolving away from socialism, leaving only North Korea to carry the torch.

    But the Middle East is in a period of collapse, and rather than advancing and evolving, the opposite seems to be occurring. Bush bears much of the blame for this, Obama bears the rest, as squandered his chance to influence things for the better in the so-called "Arab Spring."

    The world does need a policeman, though it looks as though America is not up to the task. But Russia and China look more than happy to fill the void. As bad a job America may have done, I doubt Russia or China could do better.

    Posted in: There was a time when the United States was considered the world's police officer who often became aggressively involved in maintaining peace and stability in the world. However, observing the presidential election, it appears the United States is moving further and further to a more inward-looking approach.

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    A robust set of trade data from Japan had the yen back on the rise on Monday...

    I'm curious what data they are talking about. Exports fell 10%, imports fell 23%, explaining the trade surplus. This was the sharpest drop in three years. The data was indeed robust, robustly bad.

    One can't look at the current exchange rate data and easily compare it to the rates of the 70's, and 80's, because there are new currencies like the Euro, and Chinese Yuan, and other currencies which are no more, like the mark and the franc. If you formulate these currencies into the math, you end up with the relative rate. When the exchange rate last year was 120 yen to the dollar, that was actually the equivalent to the 200-plus yen to dollar rates of the early 80's.

    Despite the yen weakening to such levels, there has not been a corresponding increase in exports or export-related profits. Exports and profits did increase, but much less than they should otherwise have. But once again, we have to take into account the burden of the state, which absorbs much more of what people and companies earn nowadays, leaving less to spend an invest. It is not the exchange rates, interest rates, or liquidity which is the issue, it is the non-productive public sector taking so much that there is too little left over to fuel private sector growth.

    Posted in: Post-G-7 yen gains halt dollar rally

  • 6

    sangetsu03

    Like his predecessor, Masuzoe has done something to upset his masters, so they have pulled the carpet from under his feet. No one becomes a high level politician in any country without having had a few strings attached. These strings come in the form of bribes, favors, and overlooking minor (and major) misdeeds. If you fail to jump when your masters tell you to, then these strings are pulled, and things are leaked to the press.

    The press in Japan is far more subservient to industry and the government than in other countries, and stories like this can be easily covered up if those in charge want them covered up. Since this has become public, it looks as though someone is unhappy with Masuzoe, and is rubbing his nose in his mess. More than likely, Masuzoe will end up resigning, and a more obedient puppet will be put in his place.

    This is one of the reasons honest people avoid careers in politics, they value their integrity too much to accept the strings. And those honest people who do run find they have no chance of winning unless they are willing to sell their integrity and accept a bag or two of cash, a sweet job for their son-in-law, or overlooking a previous brush with the law.

    Gotta love the system.

    Posted in: I will engage in sincere reflection in order to win back the trust of Tokyo metropolitan residents through my work.

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    in return manufacturers will just move more Japanese production to cheaper overseas factories, meaning less (decent paying ) jobs , less tax revenues.

    This is already happening, but for reasons opposite of what you have stated. By manipulating currency to keep local manufacturers running, especially in a country with no natural or agricultural resources, prices of all goods are increased. High prices mean less consumption, population decline, and the movement of industry to overseas factories, with less decent paying jobs, and less tax revenue.

    A stronger yen would mean that imported goods (and most things in Japan are imported) should mean lower prices for consumers, who then have more money to spend on other things. Increased spending and consumption leads to more decent paying jobs, and more tax revenue.

    But Japan's economy and government are controlled by a small group of industrial conglomerates and farmers who are more interested in the BOJ and LDP using our money, and the value of our money, to pad their profits.

    Posted in: Post-G-7 yen gains halt dollar rally

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    No more than anyone else. In an equal and free society, no person or group of people should receive more protection than anyone else. If a celebrity wants more physical protection, they can provide it and pay for it themselves.

    Posted in: How much legal protection, if any, should celebrities have from paparazzi?

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    The above news is an example of how the currency trade market levels the playing field between countries. When outsourcing or moving manufacturing to low-labor cost countries (which is what Japan was until the 70's), the advantage of these low costs fades away as currency strengthens, and wages increase.

    If everything is left alone, eventually wages become stable from country to country, and the flow of trade becomes stable as well. Unfortunately, these things are seldom left alone, as countries love to cheat to keep their advantages, by tariffs, restrictions, and currency manipulation.

    But the market cannot be defied for long, if a country tries to cheat it's way to maintaining an economic advantage for too long, then that country eventually has the problems which Japan faces nowadays.

    Posted in: Post-G-7 yen gains halt dollar rally

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    He seems to believe his only work is to spend other people's money. That being the case, it would be better for us all if he simply stayed home and did no "work" at all.

    There is a big difference in the way the private and public sectors use money. The private sector uses money to create as much return as possible, and this return is used to create further returns. The public sector uses money to create a much loss as possible, because losses in the form of unnecessary spending, cost overruns, and subsidies create more opportunities for graft, favors, and vote-buying.

    Posted in: I will engage in sincere reflection in order to win back the trust of Tokyo metropolitan residents through my work.

  • 0

    sangetsu03

    Sad to see Gap and Old Navy leave, but they won't be the last.

    It isn't the variety or quality which drives Uniqlo's success, but the locations of it's outlets, which are in all major shopping centers, train stations, and other places. Having kids, I like having more options for clothes, not fewer. It seems Uniqlo wants to be the Walmart of apparel in Japan.

    Posted in: Gap to close 75 stores outside North America, including all 53 Old Navy stores in Japan

  • 15

    sangetsu03

    The crooks probably chose Japan because withdrawal limits here are very high. In America, there is a limit to how much you can withdraw from an ATM each day, usually $500. I have withdrawn $5000 at a time from my various Japanese accounts with no problems.

    The banking system here in Japan is rather silly. Employers often use ATM machines to deposit and transfer payroll to their staff and other accounts, rather than have the bank do it automatically. And Japan's internet banking system is still not as easy to use or efficient as American internet banking was back in the 90's. Because going to the bank branch can be time-consuming, and internet banking can be even more time consuming (especially for the elderly), people do much of their banking at ATM's, which means that these ATM's must allow large transactions. This is also a reason why it is easy for scammers to get the elderly to withdraw and send them money.

    Japan seriously needs to get it's banking systems up to date.

    Posted in: Y1.4 bil stolen from 1,400 convenience store ATMs across Japan

  • 2

    sangetsu03

    Using Japanese equipment, machinery, and personnel. A great way to disguise corporate welfare; just call it development aid to a less fortunate country.

    Posted in: Sri Lanka to get over $3.5 bil from Japan for development

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    For the vast amount of graft the games create, of course. And the more cost overruns there are, the more graft there is for our leaders to divide amongst themselves and their friends. Scandals? Who cares? committee members are appointees, and unaccountable, and politicians are compulsive liars who make up such great lies that despite catastrophic failures and gross incompetence, most can talk themselves into being reelected.

    Posted in: Why do cities continue to bid to host the Olympic Games, considering that, invariably, costs go over budget, there is some scandal or other, as well as concerns over how the Games will be financed and what will happen to the Olympic facilities afterwards?

  • 7

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Funny, in America these incidents have been brought to court numerous times, and courts have always ruled that spectators should expect the possibility of being hit by a ball, and that if they don't want to risk being hurt, they shouldn't attend babseball games.

    Posted in: High court orders Nippon Ham to pay damages over foul ball accident

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    “With uncertainty over the global economy on the rise, attention will be paid to macro-economic policy, structural reform and measures to deal with tax evasion ...

    Perhaps the G7 should take a look at why people are trying to evade taxes, and why the economy is faltering. Perhaps they should consider ways to correct gross government mismanagement of the world's economies, out-of-control spending, and defrauding their taxpayers. The G7 should realize that as long as they are the main cause of the problem, it is unlikely they can be trusted to provide any solutions.

    Posted in: Japan hopes to steer frank G-7 debate on economy, tax evasion: Aso

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    Interesting the effect a record government spending budget can have on GDP numbers. Subtract this spending, and what would the figures look like?

    I oppose the government adding it's spending to GDP figures because in nearly all cases, public spending creates a negative return, and such spending must be paid for by the government consuming more of what the private sector produces. Seen this way, government spending should be subtracted from GDP, and not added to it.

    But at least Abe can say Japan is not in recession, even if private sector growth is probably -1.5%.

    Posted in: Japan's economy grows at 1.7% annual pace in Jan-March

  • 4

    sangetsu03

    I don't see an issue here. Every Olympic games/World Cup has some accusations of money being wasted. None of the accusations are ever proven in court, and it's not like they're war crimes. Why are people worried about an accusation that a "bribe" might have been made while we have war, genocide and famine going on in other parts of the world?

    The issue is that public funds are used to pay for and promote these events, money which Japan does not have, and which it must borrow from the taxpayers. The corruption in the process greatly increases the costs in hosting the games, and increases the risk of financial loss to the host country.

    Greece lost more than $14 billion hosting the 2004 Olympics. That $14 billion was looted from the Greek nation, and enriched a great number of polticians, promoters, and olympic committee members. Had corruption not influenced the decision to bid for the games, more care would have been taken to be sure the games would not result in a heavy financial loss.

    The $14-odd billion that Greece lost holding the games may still end up resulting in the collapse of Greece, and possibly the EU as well.

    Corruption is the main cause of poverty around the world, as well as a cause of famine and war. Corruption must not in any way be tolerated, and those who practice it must be severely punished. The cultural acceptance of corruption in the third world is the main barrier preventing developing countries from becoming developed.

    Posted in: Do you support Tokyo hosting the 2020 Olympics in view of the scandal concerning a $2 million payment for "consulting fees?"

  • 1

    sangetsu03

    So the democrat party is trying to motivate voters less on Hillary's virtues than Trump's vices? This has been tried in the past, and it has failed. People vote because they like a candidate, not because they hate another. If Hillary is that good of a candidate, then that should be enough if she is not, then you have to play the fear card.

    It seems the powers-that-be are more fearful of Trump winning than they have previously let on.

    Posted in: Democrats use Trump as bogeyman to get people to vote

  • 3

    sangetsu03

    To be totally fair, the veracity of the claim is not totally confirmed yet.

    Investigators visited the office of Black Tidings in Singapore, which was the company which received the $2 million payment. The office turned out to be a decrepit vacant apartment. Black Tidings appears to be a shell company created only for the sake of receiving this $2 million payment. This does not necessarily prove that a criminal act occurred, but it appears far from being an honest payment to a reputable agency.

    Posted in: Do you support Tokyo hosting the 2020 Olympics in view of the scandal concerning a $2 million payment for "consulting fees?"

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