sfjp330's past comments

  • 3

    sfjp330

    Also the increase in nominal Consumer Price Index has been almost solely due to higher energy costs. That’s because a weaker yen increases import costs and Japan needs a lot of energy as it isn’t self sufficient. More importantly, it means costs are going up and wages are only keeping pace. In other words, real wages aren’t growing, stuck at 0%. With real wages going nowhere and a consumption tax hike, it doesn’t make for a bright picture. And the bigger problem is that government debt is continuing to rise. Why is this an issue? Well, when you have government debt at 24x government revenue and interest expenses taking up 25% of government revenue, it becomes a very big issue. Rising interest expenses mean Japan has less to spend on other things, such as social security for its ageing population.

    Now, the government has several choices to fix the problem. It can cut the debt, but that would induce an immediate recession or worse. Or it can seek to raise revenue and GDP. This is what the government has chosen to do. Increasing nominal GDP is easier said than done though in a country that’s been going through two decades of deflation. To give you some idea, current nominal GDP is at the same level as it was in 1995.

    Posted in: Gov't cuts economic view after sales tax hike

  • 5

    sfjp330

    Japan would be foolish to accept this deal. I can understand them having to deal with American pressure in a lot of areas. But, these are not stupid people. I can not understand their seeming desire to obligate the nation to America’s regulatory regime and open the nation. Even the J-government itself indicates the estimate of GDP increase during the first decade will only be marginal. Japan’s own math shows hardly any economic benefits to be had from joining the TPP, and yet proponents of the trade pact depict it as a boon for manufacturers. In other words, the TPP’s potential for growing Japan’s exports and expanding its economy is so small as to be negligible.

    Posted in: Stalemate remains in Japan-U.S. talks on TPP

  • 0

    sfjp330

    melonbarmonster Apr. 19, 2014 - 05:15AM JST China, the two Korea's and ALL the surround Asian countries have historically and contemporarily call it the East Sea. Facts become inconvenient when you're trying to twist the truth.

    After the foundation of The PRC, China continued to use the geographical name of The Sea of Japan. In China, it has been held that The Sea of Japan means the marginal sea of The Pacific Ocean. it was located in between The Continent of Asia and The Archipelago of Japan. You don't see China complaining about the name "Sea of Japan".

    Posted in: Addition of Korean name for Sea of Japan becomes law in Virginia

  • -1

    sfjp330

    Frungy Apr. 19, 2014 - 04:57AM JST I wrote "companies", not "a company". A company can't learn. Their competitors and partners however can learn. When they see a few big companies cut down they'll quickly realise that it isn't profitable to break the rules.

    This is why most large companies have board of directors who also performs audits on whether directors are executing their assigned duties in accordance with the basic policy determined by the board of directors. The number of corporate directors will clarify the management accountability of each director. In order to enhance management transparency and soundness, many companies appointed outside director(s) with no ties to the company. Companies has to establish an internal audit system in order to strengthen internal control and regularly perform internal audits on the appropriateness and efficiency of operations as well as on the status of compliance.

    Posted in: When big companies look like they are going under, should governments use tax money to bail them out?

  • -3

    sfjp330

    @Fox Cloud Lelean

    Sure, many Chinese military aircraft flying over international waters near the island chain, but legal. Remember, Japan does not own the international waters. If you didn't know, U.S. and all other countries including Japan do the same thing.

    Posted in: Japan to send 100 SDF troops, radar to remote western island

  • 2

    sfjp330

    LostinNagoyaApr. 18, 2014 - 08:20AM JST yes, rest the ugly, cheap-looking plastic case. LOL.

    The Samsung Note 3 faux leather looks professionally better than the iphone 5s. The 5s is better for socializing for average people. The Note 3 is alot more productive than the Iphone 5s. Larger screen, faster processor, ease of use, functionality. Iphone can't even use flash for technical analysis of economic data where in note you can run flash plug in. You can transfer files via SD card too.

    Posted in: Study: Samsung phone durable, but iPhone has edge

  • 0

    sfjp330

    bass4funk Apr. 18, 2014 - 07:30AM JST There is NOT one thing you can tell me where Blacks have benefitted or become more prosperous these last 5 years.

    Hispanic and African American women are the fastest growing entrepreneurial segments in the U.S. for the past 5-10 years. They represent more than two million of the roughly eight million women-owned businesses in the country. African American and Hispanic women are three to five times more likely to start a business compared to whites. For most minority women, the problem isn’t entrepreneurial appetite, it’s sufficient financial and social capital resources to lean on. The impact of single parent households is a significant impediment to many entrepreneurial black women.

    Posted in: Obama says right to vote under threat in U.S.

  • -2

    sfjp330

    bass4funk Apr. 18, 2014 - 04:38AM JST Most Blacks are going to vote Democratic NO Matter what, which is sad, as Blacks are suffering most from Democratic policies. Chicago, Philly, Detroit, L.A. And other liberal controlled city or state, Blacks and Hispanics are doing poorly in these areas and as long as they believe, the only way to achieve prosperity is by sucking the tit of big government, they will always destined to be poor.

    Obviously social programs should be more efficient, but that’s not the fault of the poor, but of the rich who administer these programs and create insane bureaucracies in an attempt to squeeze the most money for themselves out for these programs, and give the least to poor people, as possible. By far the biggest recipients of welfare are corporations, the rich, and the military who get trillions per year and hide their cash in tax havens.

    The biggest welfare program in the U.S. is the national debt. Taxpayer and their representatives have been duped into delegating the nation’s sovereign authority to issue its own currency and paying hundreds of billions each year for corporate currency. Over a two decade period, the cost of the currency, the interest on the national debt, equals the debt itself. Privately owned, corporate currencies like Federal Reserve System Currency rob people of the value of the work and property, inevitably resulting in increase of national debt, social inequality and economic injustice.

    Posted in: Obama says right to vote under threat in U.S.

  • 1

    sfjp330

    Frungy Apr. 17, 2014 - 10:32AM JST The customer isn't ALWAYS right, but equally the business isn't always right either.

    Majority of unsatisfied customers will never come right out and tell you they're unsatisfied. They simply leave quietly, later telling everyone they know not to do business with you. So when a customer complains, don't think of it as a nuisance, think of it as a opportunity to change that customer's mind and retain his or her business. Let customers vent their feelings. Never argue with a customer. Never tell a customer "You do not have a problem." Share your point of view as politely as you can and immediately take action to remedy the situation. Promising a solution and then delaying it only makes matters worse. If you don't feel comfortable doing this, make sure they have you or another manager handle the situation.

    Posted in: The secret language of Japanese hotel staff

  • 2

    sfjp330

    This is only a speculation. Where is the evidence? Any sample of DNA? If they want to convict him, the Japan's police interrogation for many days and nights will automatically result in false confession and 99 percent conviction rate.

    Posted in: Man in his 30s being questioned over murder of 7-year-old girl in 2005

  • 0

    sfjp330

    JoeBigsApr. 17, 2014 - 08:18PM JST Money makes the world go round and this is exactly what South Korea wants. South Korea wants Japan to officially accept their terms hands down so it doesn't have to live up to the 1965 Treaty. They want Japan to pay what South Korea agreed to pay back then.

    However, Japan has not always held its current position. The Japanese government had the intention to compensate those forced into labor individually and to treat their right to claim separately from that of Korea. The Korea-Japan negotiations in 1961 shows that the Japanese PM Ikeda at the time, suggested such measures to former President Park Chung-hee. Ikeda is quoted as saying that his government was willing to apply the same standards it was using to compensate Japanese nationals to Korean victims. Ikeda is also on record as saying that his government would consider providing pension and consolation payments to those who had returned to Korea. Japan will not disclose the part that contain the Korean government’s response. If those parts are disclosed, the fact that the money they provided in 1965 was not for conscription victims will be made clear. If those parts are revealed, it might show that Japan told the Korean government not to give that money to the victims. Diplomatic records are usually made public after 30 years. It has been 50 years since the negotiations, and the fact that Japanese government are unwilling to open the records even today might proves that they know just how much wrong they did. The reason Japan goverment might be keeping the remainder of the documents secret was that the records would prove that the victims had not been compensated, which would in turn lead to huge costs.

    Posted in: S Korea, Japan hold rare 'comfort women' talks

  • 5

    sfjp330

    Japan’s economic problems result from its social problems, their solution will require changes in Japanese attitudes toward women’s roles, immigration and sustainable resource use. What makes the problem so serious in Japan is the refusal to do what other countries have done by admitting immigration of younger educated people from overseas. It is very difficult to immigrate to Japan, and even harder to obtain citizenship. This rejection of immigration not only bodes ill for the future of Japan’s retirement system, but also deprives the country of the pool of workers, artists, scientists and inventors that immigrants represent for the U.S., Western Europe and Australia. While immigration creates big problems, lack of it creates bigger ones.

    Posted in: Japan's population shrinks as elderly make up 25%

  • 11

    sfjp330

    CrazyJoeApr. 16, 2014 - 08:14AM JST One of the major reasons for the decrease in birth rate is that more Japanese women delay marriage or choose to stay single to pursue higher education and greater economic independence.

    It might be, but the average Japanese workers have not received a "raise" in 15 years. It has alot to do with economics. If men cannot support a family, he will also delay or never get married. Majority of new jobs created in Japan is partime. How can you support a family?

    Posted in: Japan's population shrinks as elderly make up 25%

  • 4

    sfjp330

    @titaniumdioxide

    The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 with 5.7 inch screen makes IPhone 5s look like a toy. The Note 3 is a nice smartphone. Great battery life, a gorgeous screen, sharp 13 megapixal camera and powerful software makes this the most versatile smartphone on the market. One of the perfect devices to use for work and take notes. Can't say the same about the Iphone 5s.

    Posted in: Study: Samsung phone durable, but iPhone has edge

  • 4

    sfjp330

    In truth, the taxes coming in aren’t quite covering retirement benefits now. Put another way, the longer the Japanese politicians wait to address the shortfall, the sharper the cuts will be for younger folks and probably the better off too. The burden will still fall most heavily on the young and better off, but those nearing or in retirement now would likely carry at least some of the load.

    Posted in: Japan's population shrinks as elderly make up 25%

  • -1

    sfjp330

    U.S. politics have become image based rather than content based. We need to know how candidates are going to make citizens respond to them and their ideas. And what their plan is to turn the country around. U.S. economy is slowing and still facing a slow recovery from the recession that ended few years ago. U.S. can expect substantial increase in federal budget deficits in less than decade because of weaker economic growth. U.S. have the potential to growth around 2 percent per year over the next decade. What U.S. needs is a pro-growth strategy for the economy. U.S. need to move forward on the Keystone Pipeline in a safe, responsible way. Plus a fix for the healthcare bill involving free market principles, including the opportunity to buy insurance across state lines.

    Posted in: 2016 presidential race off to an early start

  • 0

    sfjp330

    The problem appears to be that Japanese police culture is inadequate to the task of caring for itself on an emotional level. That has not been its function. The function for police culture has been to protect and serve the citizens and property of the community. There is an emotional price to be paid for individuals who take to that task, personally, socially, and professionally. Until the Japanese police culture recognizes that reality with heavy training, and learns to destigmatize the expression of emotions through continued education, police officers are going to keep having problems at a rate much higher than the rest of us.

    Posted in: Drunk police officer arrested for intruding in store

  • 2

    sfjp330

    JoeBigsApr. 15, 2014 - 08:11AM JST Corporation should be allowed to die-off and let the chips fall where they may.

    You are making an assumption without looking at the global picture. What happens in this situation is what’s referred to in the business world as loss mitigation. The path sometimes taken by the goverment is the path that presumably will result in the most minimal losses. If you’re going to have losses anyway, you may as well minimize them as much as possible. In the case of GM, the loss mitigation plan was successful. Workers kept their jobs. Unemployment benefits did not have to be paid. Workers did not lose their houses, which in turn did not put any pressure on the lenders who financed those houses. Which in turn did not result in any failed financial institutions, which in turn did not require any regulatory action, which did not result in a resolution by the FDIC, which did not require that agency to hire more employees to deal with the situation. And since the auto workers still have a paycheck, they can still patronize local businesses, who can then earn enough to pay their employees, and so on and so forth.

    Posted in: When big companies look like they are going under, should governments use tax money to bail them out?

  • -2

    sfjp330

    OssanAmerica Apr. 15, 2014 - 07:15AM JST Koreans were members of the Imperial Japanese military, some 240,000 in total serving willingly and making use of the Comfort Women System.

    Whre is your facts on 240,000 in total serving WILLINGLY? That funny, by the year 1944 in Korea, many Koreans by the thousands were forced recruited by the Japanese military.

    Posted in: Japan, S Korea to discuss 'comfort women' issue

  • -2

    sfjp330

    @Vincehwr

    Looking at this period from today's perspective, it was an interesting time for a part of humanity, as a period of peace and flourishing culture. During most of the Edo Period, Japan was closed off to the world, suffered no invasion from the outside, and had virtually no exchange with other countries. For the most part, it was a peaceful period, with almost no war inside the country, and marked a remarkable time of development in the economy and culture of Japan.

    Posted in: Foreign correspondents 'blindly swallowing' anti-Japanese propaganda, writer alleges

View all