sfjp330's past comments

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    sfjp330

    China find it frustrating that they have to buy U.S. Treasury securities to protect themselves from capital flow volatility that is in part due to U.S. fiscal and monetary policies. They are trying to diversify into other currencies and other assets. But the reality is that there are no other financial markets that give them both safety and liquidity to the extent the U.S. can.

    If China moves ahead with financial market reforms and liberalizes capital flows so foreign investors can acquire renminbi denominated assets, China’s renminbi could become a major reserve currency. But that wouldn’t be enough to make the renminbi a safe haven currency that would challenge the dollar. For that to happen, China would have to undertake significant reforms to its political, institutional and legal frameworks. That is needed for foreign investors to invest with confidence in China’s markets, for safety rather than just high yield.

    Posted in: Japan denies plan to join China-led development bank

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    sfjp330

    JeffLee Mar. 31, 2015 - 06:57AM JST Because owners of cars with 660cc engines and smaller get tax breaks in Japan.

    Problem is that Kei-car owners now have to pay higher sales tax, higher gasoline tax and a 50% increase of Kei-car tax, narrowing their tax difference with regular-size vehicles. To make matters worse, these cars are not manufactured for export, due to its small size that fails the strict safety standards in Europe and the U.S. Selling Kei-cars only in Japan means manufacturers can’t justify spending more for research and development on such cars. It's all about net profit and it's a matter of time before Japanese car manufacturers abandon Kei-cars.

    Posted in: Mini Honda

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    sfjp330

    nigelboy Mar. 28, 2015 - 12:27AM JST No. The numbers are based on two different parameters in which there are deaths immediately after and those who died later (Dec 1945) as a result of the wounds inflicted.

    The 1946 figure of 90,000 dead seems about right. Deaths after Dec 1945 evidently were not very numerous. The survey found that approximately 75% had died by Dec. 1945, and that an additional 5-6% had died between then and 1950. Interestingly, the latter death rate is slightly above 1 percent a year, almost exactly the normal mortality rate for the Japanese population. Counting deaths as of the end of 1945 must have captured essentially all of them.

    Posted in: Abe's advisers split over how to describe Japan's WWII actions

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    sfjp330

    @nigelboy

    You implied that China knows the true number is much lower, but inflated it for the purpose of cultivating anti-Japan feelings (domestic propaganda). Consider the number of casualties for A-bombing in Hiroshima. The number Americans most often hear is 70-80K, while the number Japanese people most often hear is 140K. Is the Japanese number a political propaganda, intended to create anti-America sentiment? No sensible people would argue like that. The most likely explanation is simply that a victim tends to believe the highest possible number available. It’s just a human nature. Why would Chinese people be any different?

    Posted in: Abe's advisers split over how to describe Japan's WWII actions

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    sfjp330

    scipantheist Mar. 27, 2015 - 05:00AM JST You are criticizing Japan (1% of GDP on military spending) when you have no problem with China (2% of GDP on military spending). And because it is a non-democracy, we can never know how much China actually spends.

    You have to remember that China has 10 times more population than Japan, but spends approximately four times more than Japan. If you based on per capita spending, it's still only a fraction to Japan.

    Posted in: Abe expected to skip China's Victory Day parade

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    nigelboy Mar. 27, 2015 - 12:27AM JST It changes the narrative completely from indiscriminate killing of civilians to capture of capital city and mop up operation gone bad. There is a reason why "300,000" is constantly advertised by CCP and is displayed in their memorial.

    The exact number of casualty doesn’t matter in understanding what happened in Nanjing. Lives are not numbers. It’s absurd to even think that murder of, say, 40,000 innocent people isn’t as bad as killing of 300,000 people. To understand the Nanjing Massacre, one would have to learn what was going on, not just in Nanjing but throughout China. That understanding is far more important than the number of casualty, which is essentially an academic topic.

    Most of those IJA soldiers did not consider Chinese people as humans. Chinese women were to be killed anyway, so why not rape them before killing them? That kind of mentality was so wide-spread that an incident like the Nanjing Massacre was already happening all over the place just in smaller scales. Dehumanizing your enemies is not just restricted to Japanese soldiers though. Americans, Germans, Russians, all dehumanized their enemies.

    Posted in: Abe's advisers split over how to describe Japan's WWII actions

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    sfjp330

    jerseyboy Mar. 26, 2015 - 07:52AM JST Abe should just show some moral backbone, and put his big-boy pants on, and stick to the Murayama statement and not try to hide being this panel to weasle out. Again, IMO, any Japanese person, or person who loves Japan, should be embarrassed by this melodrama and hope that Abe does the right thing.

    Which brings up a good point. It's one thing for Abe to repent on behalf of the Japanese people for their sins during WWII, but are the Japanese people truly sorry? Even if Abe makes a courageous statement, even when his own people disagrees, the apology could greatly damage political career. But isn't that a hallmark of a great leadership, leading your people the right way regardless of the political consequences? Personally, only few, such as Merkel made repentant statement from powerful world leaders. Abe should work feverishly to avoid such an unparalleled calamity with neighboring countries. Japan's point of view is that Allies were just as guilty as Japan was, is popular among Japanese. Japan rewrite history in order to glorify, or at least excuse, Japanese atrocities is obscene and dangerous reasoning.

    Posted in: Abe's advisers split over how to describe Japan's WWII actions

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    sfjp330

    MarkG Mar. 26, 2015 - 06:33AM JST Point number 2, while USA has very good education available the public school system is terrible. A recent poll of 16 nations USA ranked 14th in math!

    Fifty years ago, U.S. educated mostly working-class kids and up, and we did not expect those at the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder to graduate. Now we educate all students, including the very poorest and otherwise disadvantaged. And we expect them all to graduate. Compounding this shift, a large and growing proportion of U.S. students students live in poverty and even concentrated poverty, have a disability, and/or are learning English as a second language.

    Posted in: Why doesn’t the U.S. adopt the metric system?

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    sfjp330

    The reality for many commercial planes is that they have been in service for few decades and show it. The Airbus A320 was 24 years old, and was pushing the edge of an airplane’s lifespan. The fuselage is most susceptible to fatigue, but the wings are too, especially on short hauls where an aircraft goes through pressurization cycles every day. Just like a car, the older an airplane gets the more maintenance it requires.

    Posted in: 2 Japanese among 150 killed in German plane crash

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    sfjp330

    scipantheist Mar. 18, 2015 - 07:18AM JST The US collects all of the profit on those items you mentioned.

    Yes, U.S. "companies" collect all the profits. Problem is that U.S. companies are stashing over $2 trillion overseas to avoid taxes. Japanese companies are following the same footsteps of U.S. companies.

    Posted in: Foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury debt hit $6.22 trillion

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    sfjp330

    bam_boo Mar. 17, 2015 - 07:20AM JST So then please help us a bit... where can we find those public expressions of empathy of the Japanese society towards the foreign victims of WW2? Where are the monuments for foreign victims, where the public museums that clearly depict the Japanese atrocities and when were there any public events in Japan where empathy was expressed directly addressing the foreign victims?

    If you remember few year ago, two Japanese goverment officials visited Palisades Park, New Jersey, and they wanted local administrators to remove a small monument from a public park. The monument, a brass plaque on a block of stone, was dedicated in 2010 to the memory of so-called comfort women, tens of thousands of women and girls, many Korean and Chinese, who were forced into sexual slavery by Japanese soldiers during WWII. The Japanese authorities wanted Korean memorial removed. The consul general said the Japanese government was willing to plant cherry trees, donate books to the public library and do some things to show that we’re united in this world and not divided. But the offer was contingent on the memorial’s removal. The town officials rejected the request, and the delegation left.

    The second delegation arrived few weeks later with four J-goverment reps. Their approach was less diplomatic. These Japanese politicians, tried and asked that the monument be removed, to convince the Palisades Park authorities that comfort women had never been forcibly conscripted as sex slaves. They said the comfort women were a lie, that they were set up by an outside agency, that they were women who were paid to come and take care of the troops. Downplaying of history still continues.

    Posted in: Murayama says Abe risks alienating neighbors if he dilutes war apology

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    sfjp330

    The real issue arises when Haafu children grow up and start looking for a job. Many conservative Japanese firms are still reluctant to hire Haafu, especially those who obviously look mixed. It doesn’t matter if they speak perfect Japanese, many companies feel that for a position that requires you to deal with Japanese customers, you must also be Japanese.

    Posted in: 'Haafu' to represent Japan at Miss Universe 2015

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    sfjp330

    jerseyboy Mar. 17, 2015 - 11:26PM JST First, the fact that the U.S. economy is so big and vibrant that it can be the market for all these imports is a good sign, right?

    China is the largest foreign holder of U.S. debt, and they are in a difficult spot. It has accumulated the world’s largest foreign reserves, about $3.5 trillion. The Chinese government bought exporters’ dollars from them in a bid to keep the Chinese currency competitively low. U.S. is the only place large enough to absorb all the dollars they have accumulated.

    The psychological shock of a default, however, could lead to major changes in the longer term. Even a temporary default would have a very deep impact on the Chinese goverment thinking about the creditworthiness of the U.S. government. And while diversifying investments might be hard, a U.S. default might lead many Chinese companies to buy American companies instead of American bonds. It would make the Chinese government change the way it manages foreign exchange, reforming Chinese capital markets. The government would encourage firms to invest them abroad themselves.

    Posted in: Foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury debt hit $6.22 trillion

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    sfjp330

    turbotsat Mar. 17, 2015 - 05:50AM JST The leaflets unequivocally said to evacuate the cities, and thousands were dropped over the targeted cities in July, predating the atomic bomb drops. The exact technology to be used for the atomic bomb drops may have not been described in the July leaflets, but they were descriptive enough.

    The fact that Hiroshima, Kukouro, and Niigata were not on the Le May list, can be explained by the fact that they were not being targeted for conventional firebombing. To list them and to continue to not bomb them would diminish the credibility of the leaflet. For this reason, I suspect Nagasaki was not on the list. It is not credible to expect 12 cities to evacuate in three days, the pace of atomic bombing apparent to Japanese aware. The Le May leaflet, if followed, would have depopulated Japanese cities. How would all these homeless people have survived? Perhaps this had something to do with the fact that no one took them seriously.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

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    sfjp330

    turbotsa tMar. 17, 2015 - 02:40AM JST The USA even had leaflets dropped, that surrendering soldiers could use to declare their peaceful intentions, and some nicknamed after LeMay that warned Japanese to get out of cities to be bombed soon.

    These leaflets certainly warned of bombing and destruction. They were not warnings about atomic bombs, though, but firebombs. Does the distinction matter? They are, if anything, the closest thing to any kind of “real warning” that was given to Japanese civilians.

    So Nagasaki did get warning leaflets… the day after it was atomic bombed. Well, that’s a grim clarification. The leaflets specifically warning about atomic bombs were created, but they weren’t dropped on either Hiroshima or Nagasaki before they were atomic bombed. The first Truman Library document was the first draft, that was never dropped. The second one was the second draft, and was dropped, but only after the bombs were used.

    So what do we take away from all of this? In this case, we’re talking about leaflet drafts, and the context is when they created, why they were created, and specifically when they were used. It doesn’t help, of course, that the library themselves have put incorrect dates on them, but even with a correct date, the context is still not completely straightforward. Context is everything — without it, nothing makes sense, and you can come away with exactly the opposite conclusion from the truth of things.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

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    sfjp330

    @Tamarama

    Whether or not the dropping of second bomb that killed approximately 75,000 in Nagasaki was needed is even more debatable. Why did the U.S. not give the Japanese a little more time to sort out the chaos of the first attack or, after a day or two, communicate an ultimatum? Were the American planners that eager to test the effects of another type of bomb on real people? Some have speculated that the second bomb was needed to prove that the U.S. had more than one such weapon. This implies that the U.S. might have continued to drop atomic bombs until Japan finally surrendered.

    Posted in: WWII firebombings of Japanese cities largely ignored

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    nigelboyMar. 13, 2015 - 06:01AM JST No. The "fact" is China nor Korea have made an issue about them even during the times when "most of Japan's PM has gone to Yasukuni" until later.

    Do Japanese goverment need to be told about common sense and still don't get it? If that is the case, why is that your Emperor doesn't have to be told not to go to Yasukuni? He must be a wise man. Germans figured it out right away.

    Posted in: Murayama says Abe risks alienating neighbors if he dilutes war apology

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    sfjp330

    Japanese immigration is 100% controlled by the privileged Japanese upper classes. All your little arguments about uncontrolled immigration are irrelevant in a Japanese context. Because those are problems the Japanese don't have because they’ve built up this wall around their country, and it’s homogenous. Japan can’t handle immigrants because they scare the locals. Japan take your tourism money, sure, send them in, as long as they get out after few years.

    Posted in: Japan accepts just 11 asylum seekers from record 5,000 applications in 2014

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    sfjp330

    nigelboy Mar. 13, 2015 - 04:59AM JST No. Please dispense with the dramatics.

    Facts speaks for itself. Most of Japan's PM has gone to Yasukuni. Unfortunately for Japan, they are not well developed and backward thinking to improve relations with neighboring countries. Merkel is just rolling her eyes.

    Posted in: Murayama says Abe risks alienating neighbors if he dilutes war apology

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    sfjp330

    Jeff Huffman Mar. 13, 2015 - 04:40AM JST Who cares? If they want to improve something meaningful to 95% of the people who use their airline, try removing a seat in each row and several rows altogether in coach.

    You have choices. If you could afford it, you can always upgrade to business or first class.

    Posted in: United Airlines to upgrade airport lounge experience

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