sfjp330's past comments

  • -1

    sfjp330

    Jeff HuffmanNov. 21, 2014 - 08:18AM JST Perfect example being the second assembly plant for the 787 in S. Carolina. They've had nothing but problems. They are slow and Boeing's had to send engineers and assembly people from Everett to set things straight. But even before that, the perceived need to subcontract sections of the plane have resulted in fit problems.

    But Boeing is no stranger to subcontracting. And while outsourcing can certainly lead to problems, I’m not convinced it’s the cause of these problems. The issues the plane has been facing have much more to do with Boeing’s decision to treat the design and production of such a radically new and different aircraft as a modular system so early in its development. In the creating any new product, it is almost a big advantage to start out as integrated as possible. Why? Well, put simply, the more elements of the design that are under your control, the more effectively you’re able to radically change the design of a product, and you give your engineers more degrees of freedom. And, as a result, you don’t need to ask suppliers to contract over parts that haven’t been created yet. Instead, you can put employees together and tell them to solve the problems together. Many of the problems that they are encountering would not have been possible to anticipate Boeing should've design all the relevant pieces of the puzzle itself first. But with the 787, it appears that Boeing tried a very different approach, rather than having the puzzle solved and asking the suppliers to provide a defined puzzle piece, they asked suppliers to create their own blueprints for parts. The puzzle hadn’t been properly solved when Boeing asked suppliers for the pieces. It should come as little surprise then, that as the components came back from far-flung suppliers, for the first plane ever made of composite materials, that those parts didn’t all fit together. It’s easy to blame the outsourcing. But, in this instance, it wasn’t so much the outsourcing, as it was the decision to modularize a complicated problem too soon.

    Posted in: Toray to supply carbon fiber to Boeing in $8.6 bil deal

  • 12

    sfjp330

    How can Japan goverment be so blind. The sales tax increase had a bigger braking effect on the economy than expected, reducing consumer spending and blocked out the fragile recovery. Abe is clueless. There is only one reason Abe is calling for election now is the fear that things will be only worse if he waits. If he keeps going to Yasukuni, fragile trade with China will get much worse for Japan.

    Posted in: Voters to Abe: Why call an election now?

  • 0

    sfjp330

    Molenir Nov. 21, 2014 - 07:36AM JST The CONGRESS passes the law. The President can veto that law, but if that veto is overridden, he then is required to execute the law, regradless of whether or not he likes it.

    An override vote is a momentous step and difficult to win. In recent years the mere threat of a veto has been enough to convince members not to proceed with provisions that the president doesn't like.

    Posted in: Obama to unveil plan to fix 'broken' U.S. immigration laws

  • 1

    sfjp330

    In Japan, the tax levied on “proper” beer remains high, about eight to ten times higher than the U.S., and about double the rates in the UK. This makes it difficult for consumers who appreciate the real stuff to enjoy it as often as they might elsewhere, a frustrating situation for beer purists, who see their ambrosia increasingly diluted as brewers divorce themselves from malted barley. In the end, there’s nothing to do, really, save sit back and watch as the tax warfare and clever evasion plays out. Enjoy the spectacle, and sip a domestic as you do and try not to picture the first half of your glass draining into Japan government’s coffers.

    Posted in: EU urges Japan to open up its beer market

  • 3

    sfjp330

    Shumatsu_SamuraiNov. 21, 2014 - 06:04AM JST It's difficult for prosecutors. They're under pressure to prosecute more rape allegations, but at the same time it can be one person's word against another.

    In this case, how can you convict with no physical evidence? Something is wrong wtih Japan's 99 percent conviction rate and somebody should be accountable for damages done to innocent victims. Individuals who were wrongly imprisoned should be compensated. It seems incredible to me that there could be an argument against it. They can't just pick up where they left off. They lost careers, jobs, families, the ability to build a career. Their lives were, in essence, destroyed. If found true, this women should be in jail for false testimony under oath.

    Japan goverment should implement wrongful conviction compensation statutes, and says each should offer a minimum of $50,000 for each year a person spends in prison. People who plead guilty or were coerced into confessing should not be restricted under these statutes. Japan goverment should reimburse the defendant's attorney fees, make subsistence funds available immediately and offer a range of social services, including mental health services, medical and dental care, and access to housing and education.

    Posted in: Man jailed for rape released after accuser's testimony proven false

  • -1

    sfjp330

    5petals Nov. 19, 2014 - 08:50AM JST There may not even be any legal foundation for Okinawa to consider independance.

    A 2011 poll found only 4.7% of Okinawans were pro-independence. Majority do not want independence, but a greater voice for future of Okinawa.

    Posted in: Okinawa vote a blow to Japan-U.S. ties, say analysts

  • 1

    sfjp330

    In Japan, the number of lifetime jobs has been declining for decades and part-time positions make up almost 40 percent of the workforce. These jobs also earn substantially less per hour than full-time positions. In the past decade, majority of employment offers were for temporary positions. The rise in part-time economy, the average pay has consistently fallen, dropping 15-20 percent in the last two decades. It’s a permanent, low-wage existence. Parents don’t want their daughter to marry temps, banks won’t give them home loans, and employers don’t want to spend money training them.

    Posted in: Abe adviser calls for stimulus after 'shocking' GDP

  • 0

    sfjp330

    Japan government has borrowed almost all its money from their own people in Japanese currency. The goverment desperately wants to end deflation, but still thinks it needs to raise taxes before investors fear it will inflate aways its debts by printing money. Instead, it should be using that fear to convince people of what's otherwise hard to is that inflation is going up. The only thing Japan has to fear is the fear of more inflation. It would mean a better recovery and less debt. But instead, Japan is back in recession because nobody ever ended a depression by being responsible.

    Posted in: Abe set to call election, delay tax hike

  • 1

    sfjp330

    Article states:"Besides the relatively high cost, buyers will have to contend with finding fuel. Only a few dozen hydrogen filling stations have been built worldwide, though governments are subsidizing the construction of more."

    Hydrogen car is a great innovation. However, I doubt oil companies will allow hydrogen filling stations. The oil companies are reluctant to embrace the new fuel, which will eventually compete with gasoline. The gasoline powered vehicles have become more efficient, and they will be here for another century or more. There is no replacement for large diesel trucks. I doubt any of hydrogen gas or electric vehicles can pull 40 foot trucks.

    Posted in: Toyota to start sales of fuel cell car next month

  • 0

    sfjp330

    scipantheistNov. 19, 2014 - 05:42AM JST Two things: 1.) the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security gives Japan the right to terminate it, alone, if it should wish and all bases would be removed,

    Japan already tried but U.S. won't let them. In 2009, when Hatoyama became a PM of Japan, the Obama administration was aware that there was a section of politicians in Japan who sought distance from U.S. Even many Japanese people started to view Japan’s policies as being dictated by the U.S. and described their own country as “America’s colony”. The right-wing nationalists vouched for reducing reliance on the U.S. and argued that Japan must not be afraid to take a confrontational position in foreign policy. Hatoyama was probably articulating his foreign policy with the national mood but at the end it proved disastrous. The Obama administration was instrumental in Hatoyama’s ouster from office because of the l handling of the Futenma base relocation issue. In 2010, Obama snubbed Hatoyama and weeks later Hatoyama resigned and was replaced by the more U.S. acceptable Kan. Kan immediately confirmed that the Futenma base issue would proceed according to the U.S. desire. No wonder, when the leaks surfaced, he declined to comment and said that the announcement of information was “not legitimate”. The J-government succumbed to the U.S. pressure to follow its line of thinking. Okinawa may be a problem for Japan but getting out of this is likely to be messy. Japan has no alternative than to preserve its alliance relationship with the U.S. for the foreseeable future.

    Posted in: Okinawa vote a blow to Japan-U.S. ties, say analysts

  • -3

    sfjp330

    Japan should reduce corporate and payroll taxes. Japan is overtaxed and their corporate tax rate is one of the worst in the world. For their citizens, Japan’s payroll tax is also a mess. The combined employer/employee rate of almost 30%. Even worse, unlike the U.S. Social Security deductions, Japan’s has no salary cap. Everything one earns on the job is hit with severity and it’s expected to rise even further in few years. At the least, these increases should be stopped.

    Posted in: Abe calls election; delays sales tax hike

  • 0

    sfjp330

    In_japanNov. 18, 2014 - 12:19PM JST Please research before you speak non-sense like this. Japanese govt pays for all the on/base housing building plus maintenance. J govt pays for all the J-employes working on base. J-govt pays for on/off base electricity bills, gas bills.

    For years Japan’s defense spending only averaged one percent of the GDP. U.S. spends 4 percent of the GDP in defense. Japan itself would not have an easy time if Japan has direct confrontation with China. Japan would be forced to turn to the U.S. for support under the mutual security treaty. Moreover, Japan has done little to prepare for a military confrontation, instead relying on U.S.to take up the slack.

    Posted in: Okinawa vote a blow to Japan-U.S. ties, say analysts

  • -4

    sfjp330

    John Galt Nov. 18, 2014 - 07:54AM JST Why should Okinawa have to bear the burden of "hosting" 62% of the 47,000 US servicemen when Okinawa is a mere 0.6% of Japan's land area?

    Constant whining from Japan. Close down all of U.S. military bases in Japan and save the money. U.S. has to reduce spending somewhere and paying for the Defense of Japan is a good place to start cutting spending. If the Japanese goverment actually wants U.S. military there, then their goverment should be paying all of the costs of having U.S. military there Instead of U.S. taxpayers footing the bill for protecting Japan. U.S. spends close to $700 billion annually in defense, and it's not sustainable in the future. Let Japan defend themselves.

    For the U.S. base in Japan, how much of it is honestly still necessary, what is just plain obsolete, and what can be done away with, without really missing it? The military is the military, one thing they could do, is make these U.S. military facilities in japan into closed posts, no fraternization, no association, fly in, fly out, and that's it. For that matter, you could replace some of the facilities with an aircraft carrier or find someplace where no one lives to begin with.

    Posted in: Okinawa vote a blow to Japan-U.S. ties, say analysts

  • 2

    sfjp330

    In Japan, there is no imminent threat of a debt crisis. Yields on Japanese government bonds are as low as ever. The market for JGBs is still dominated by loyal Japanese savers and institutions. At some point, however, action will be needed. The cost of servicing it eats up over half of tax revenues. Japanese savers ability to step in and reliably soak up new debt each year will start dwindling in the near future. An ageing population means a falling savings rate as people retire and draw down income. But as Japanese firms choose to invest more, company cash balances are set to fall too.

    Posted in: Japan machinery orders jump, giving economy much needed boost

  • -3

    sfjp330

    smithinjapan Nov. 15, 2014 - 09:06AM JST If it's "illegal", why don't the police simply start enforcing the law?

    Unfortunately, police must focus on criminal activity and therefore can't focus solely on jaywalking. Police have better things to do than ticket pedestrians. They know that distracted walking, whether young or old has become a growing problem. The law should concentrate on reducing vehicle speeds on some areas and more red-light cameras at intersections. It's more about expanding pedestrian safety education and enforcement efforts.

    Posted in: Signs put up to discourage elderly from jaywalking

  • -1

    sfjp330

    Pukey2Nov. 15, 2014 - 08:01AM JST You should do some research. Try looking up UK VAT on wikipedia. It's only 20% for certain things.

    The cost increase is a combination of things and it effects everybody. Problem for Japan is that consumers are paying 10 percent more for their utilties. Other factors are Japan imports 60 percent of their food and it cost more for importers and wholesalers due to weaker yen. Japan also imports 99 percent of the oil. New sales tax rate doesn't help either.

    Posted in: 72% of Japanese firms want Abe to delay tax hike

  • 2

    sfjp330

    SimondBNov. 15, 2014 - 07:27AM JST I find it incredible how some American politicians campaign on reducing or totally removing the health coverage for millions of their fellow citizens.

    These politicians can ask for more, but in reality they are looking for citizens to pay more of their share, which means higher deductable health insurance. If you compare citizens between 50-64 (before medicare), most are paying 5 to 10 times more than citizens that are on retirement medicare. Goverment knows it's not sustainable.

    Posted in: Obamacare 'stupidity'? New energy for repeal push

  • 0

    sfjp330

    5petalsNov. 14, 2014 - 09:20PM JST Wasnt Toyota investigated for deciet about their acceleration problems not so long ago as well? Is this a cultural pattern or just coincidence?

    But there was conflict of interest with Toyota investigation at the time of the investigation, U.S. goverment owned majority of GM. The goverment should've set-up independent investigaton on Toyota. How can you have fair investigation when you are a competitor of Toyota?

    Posted in: U.S. Senate committee to hold Takata air bag hearing

  • -1

    sfjp330

    Kansas City has played over 200 games this year, including the spring training, regular season schedule, playoffs, AL Championship Series, and World Series. Can't believe Jeremy Guthrie, a pitcher of Kansas City Royals would accept the goodwill tour. It has been a long season for them. I would rest my arm for next year and not risk millions in future earnings.

    Posted in: MLB support for Fukushima

  • -1

    sfjp330

    Of course, Australia and Japan have already strengthened military ties, including a possible Australian purchase of Japanese submarines that is worth many billions. But the significance of the meeting may be less about the substance of talks and more about the visible reaffirmation of the three-way alliance, with less determination to keep the meeting from Chinese attention. But China is an increasingly important economic partner of Australia for the resource-rich nation as the Chinese get richer. China’s demand helped Australia from a recession following the 2008 global financial crisis. Australia has growing economic reliance on China.

    Posted in: Abe wants more defense ties with U.S., Australia

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