timtak's past comments

  • 0

    timtak

    It is amazing how SITE Intelligence group got the news first again. There are only three employees apparently. They are rather reminiscent of "Intel Center" who used to release footage of Bin Laden http://infowars.net/articles/september2007/100907BinLaden.htm at particularly opportune times apparently http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&prev=search&rurl=translate.google.co.jp&sl=de&u=http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/july2007/160707dubioustape.htm&usg=ALkJrhjM1a9BAk25-g1xYAdX_G00bp65dw

    Posted in: IS claims it executed Japanese hostage

  • -1

    timtak

    Keeping your mouth shut in the face of obvious evil isn't the right choice.

    I think that it is very likely that these two men will be killed alas, as others were killed in the past and it makes me very depressed to think of their fate. My heart goes out to their families. At the same time, I wonder about the extent to which ISIS may be being used politically.

    Iran is accusing the West of involvement in ISIS. Are the Iranians simply batty?

    As long as the West and its allies can be seen to be victims, and have righteousness on their side as they bomb the Middle East, that is to say as the West are allowed to bomb the Middle East "righteously", then they can bomb anyone that uses anything other than their currency to sell oil, and by this means, have an oil standard for their currency, which based as it is upon this most wanted commodity, can then be printed indefinitely, without hyper-inflation (though oil may become cheaper), allowing the West and its allies to purchase goods from the rest of the world for nothing, and in that sense enslave the rest of the world. Whether this is going on or not I can not say, but it would be both consummate evil and consummately profitable. No one knows whether skyscrapers really do fall down like that or not, but it gave the US the excuse to bomb the only oil supplier that was not using dollars. Nobody knows what caused the "Arab spring", but the revolutionaries stopped mid-revolution to set up a new Bank of Libya that used dollars and not gold to sell oil. Skyscrapers and Revolutions are fraught. In order to present evil as righteousness, and have a carte blanche -- freedom to print money ! -- all one needs is a very few tragic victims, and a guy in a desert with a Youtube link and a knife.

    Posted in: Bad news

  • 0

    timtak

    How are his knees?

    Posted in: Honda cautions against overconfidence at Asian Cup

  • 0

    timtak

    Ouch. Anticipation. Ha. So much for omotenashi! The much vaunted omotenashi often seems to be an excuse for cutting the channels of communication, and simply providing service that the service provider wants to provide rather than getting embroiled in serving individual needs. For example every time I go to the same checkouts in the same supermarkets I am asked by the same staff whether I have a discount card, and I am offered a bag and a receipt (under my change) both of which I refuse, and even refusing these things with my checkout mantra, (no card, no bag, no receipt) I am then required, by the same staff, to reconfirm my refusal of these things since they are completely on autopilot and are not anticipating anything other than subservience to their service ritual on the part of their customers. Receipts can be a pain for Japanese people too http://youtu.be/AFtvJKMDxvY?t=1m50s http://tasuichi.ocnk.net/product/102 and omotenashi can even be a disservice to foreigners https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihonbunka/15996023245/ This is the featured company's research web page http://www.yamatogokoro.jp/research/

    Posted in: Revitalizing the inbound tourism market

  • 0

    timtak

    @ Ricky Kaminski Oh, right. "Only the WKF is recognised by the Olympic committee." That is a shame. I have had a look at WKF Karate video and it doesn't look the same, more like fencing. Folks are celebrating a win while their opponent is not even hurting:-) And they are doing a thing that looks like kata practice in a competition situation. But hold on. The Japanese Full Contact Karate Association is campaigning to be included in the Olympics, as a second set of rules. http://fullcontact-karate.jp/signaturecollectingcampaign/ This is what it looks like, though I am sure you know. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2YCIWbbKGw What ever you are doing seems to be keeping you well according to my fb stalk. @Novenichama thumbs up.

    Posted in: Karate bidding to be included in 2020 Olympics

  • 3

    timtak

    Strange case indeed.

    From the press conference on November 6th https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fnl5YL_T0A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wGOJX1t27Q The reconstruction photos in the 15th minute of the first video can be seen towards the end of this page http://logmi.jp/27561 Tomita's lawyer does not deny that Tomita took the camera but that 1) A strange smiling man put it in his bag from behind, so that he only saw the man very briefly 2) The reason why Tomita was able to keep the camera in his bag was because he perceived it to be a broken camera that was unwanted, that the man had wanted him to throw away... 3) When the Korean police found the camera in his room, took photos of the camera in that (broken) state so this should be provable but it transpires that "broken" refers to an expensive (7000-8000usd) Canon EOS 1-DX http://logmi.jp/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/gazou171.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS-1D_X which was only "broken" in so far as it did not have a lens attached. Since Tomita claims he had only seen cameras with lenses attached, he presumed that this cameras lens had broken off and was therefore rubbish. (Is this possible? He is twenty five years old.) 4) When the police picked him up he was told to confess so to theft lest he not be allowed to return to Japan with his team-mates. 5) As shown in police photos Tomita had left the camera in full view of his room-mate. He was able to do this because he thought it was a broken camera.

    The prosecution shows frames from the video including this one http://livedoor.blogimg.jp/girls002/imgs/1/8/1807b6fb.jpg which they claim show him removing the lens and putting the camera into his bag.

    I guess it is conceivable that a strange man put a camera in his bag, and that he thought an expensive camera were rubbish but my sentiment is that it was a case of "ma ga sashita" ("the devil made me do it," the Japanese expression for a brief loss of moral sanity, rather than possession) followed by the inability to own up to doing something so crass, in the face of fathers, coaches, sponsors saying "Please say you didn't do something that utterly crass, did you?" The biggest thing in his favour is that, representing ones country at an international event, bristling with cameramen and cameras pointed at oneself, who steals a camera? But then perhaps this says more about the tension of being an international sportsman and the weird things that one can do under that sort of stress.

    Posted in: Swimmer Tomita appears in S Korean court on camera theft charge

  • 0

    timtak

    There is probably some drug company with a memory improving drug and a checklist asking, Have you become absent minded? Yes of course. Then you have dementia and must take our drug till you die (cash register sound). Drugs are one of the things that Westerners are better at. But Asians have been here before so they should be able to recognise that this is, imho, in a sense, Opium War III.

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  • 1

    timtak

    I do hope so. It would be very Japanese. The host nation should pick up a medal or two. It is a lot more interesting to watch than squash. It seems to empower smaller people from watching Yotube videos, since the Shinkyoku-shin rule allowing only kicks but not punches to the head means that acrobatic ability can beat brute force. But lack of punches to the head does make it a bit strange to watch, and recent style seems to concentrate on a succession of rather dull low kicks to destroy the opponents legs. But remember Andy Hugg? Not big, but a beautiful Karate warrior.

    Posted in: Karate bidding to be included in 2020 Olympics

  • -2

    timtak

    Anyone who can cut Japanese bureaucrats is a hero. As Japan sinks under astronomic debt and his competitors print money to pay for more bureaucrats (they are hiring at my institution) is a hero. I'd like to move to Osaka, and get citizeship to vote him in.

    Posted in: Hashimoto says he won't seek re-election if merger referendum does not pass

  • 1

    timtak

    This happens quite a lot even in provincials towns such as my one (Yamaguchi). If the authors had continued at that pace, they would have consumed 32 cakes in the hour but even then at about 50 yen per cake, I don't think that the shop would have made a loss on ingredients. The good thing is that Japanese can still see themselves, and know that nothing tastes better than skinny feels, so I predicted American style obesity will not arrive for quite a while. In order to have American style obesity you have to learn to praise, and love, yourself for being yourself. In the past this was called "pride" but now it is lauded as self-esteem. Fortunately the Japanese do not do the self praise for no apparent reason thing, whereas Americans are learning to praise themselves more and more with explosive effect. See statistics I compiled recently below https://www.flickr.com/search/?details=1&w=64015205@N00&q=obesity

    Posted in: Tokyo cafe offers all-you-can-eat cake

  • 0

    timtak

    Very beautiful! In my country there are girls half her age that look twice her age.:-)) In Japan faces such as this one, and Hello Kitty, and people's bodies have continuity and longevity, whereas narratives, theories, phrases, and words are fly by night fads. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihonbunka/16115910701/in/photostream

    Posted in: Japanese beauty pageant for women over 35 crowns winner

  • 3

    timtak

    Obviously, a new store means you need new employees to work there, but you might be surprised by just how many are necessary. It turns out that the average Japanese convenience store needs about 20 people on its roster. With 4,000 new stores, that means roughly 80,000 new workers are needed.

    I have no doubt that convenience stores are more convenient, and efficient, but are they really creating a new market? Convenience stores sell fruit and vegetables, toys, books, postage stamps, meat, fish, alcoholic drinks, and can, do, have put grocers, toys shops, book shops, post offices, butchers, fishmongers, off licences (liquor stores) out of business. The proprietors of these former specialist shops may not have earned any more per hour, but may have had the job stability to have a family. I like my local convenience store but the I feel sorry for my local grocer - whose shop looks more and more dilapidated - and try to purchase from him when I can. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKEa99MRi-I

    I worked as a cameraman's assistant, carrying the tripod and batteries, in a local (山陽放送) TV company. It was hard work but a great way to learn Japanese.

    Posted in: Looking for a job in Japan? Try a convenience store

  • 1

    timtak

    The Japanese throne is held in deep respect by much of the public, despite being largely stripped of its mystique and quasi-divine status in the aftermath of the war.

    I read a book (Akasaka, 1990, Shouchou Tennou to iu Monogatari) a long time ago which suggested that the current constitutional definition of the emperor as "symbol of the Japanese nation", may not strip but reinforce the quasi-divine status of the emperor. Elohim says of himself, I am am the one who is" but also, according to John, He is also "the word". Japanese deities rarely speak but if they did they might say "I am the one who is symbolic," or just wave and smile.

    Pictures of the Emperor such as adorn this page, called "true shadow" (御真影), were in the past highly valued objects of veneration in Japanese homes being treat as equivalent to his imperial personage. There are no words that define the Japanese, no constitution, no creed, but the Japan may in general share the possession of, and certain way of seeing the above 'true shadow'.

    Japanese deities have long served as symbols of communities, though these days they have largely been replaced by mascot characters (YuruKyara), such as Kumamon, who imho bears some resemblance to his imperial majesty, may he reign till moss grows. Today alas Shinto is waning popularity but other symbols, such as Spectre Watch "medals" -- small round pieces of plastic depicting a character from the wildly popular, bi-cultural (?) Pokemon-successor anime "Youkai Wacchi" -- are traded at up to 350 dollars each.

    Posted in: Emperor celebrates 81st birthday

  • 1

    timtak

    I hope he wins. It seems to me that Japan is sinking under the weight of its democracy.

    At Japanese universities there are more and more bureaucrats. They feel their job is to supervise the teaching staff. There is almost no provision of secretarial, technical, support other than by students who are employed part time. Increasingly the front end counter positions are also staffed by students employed part time while bureaucrats retreat into back rooms where paper is pushed from desk to desk. In Japanese parks and swimming pools the facilities are sometimes unusable due to cost cutting (e.g. no hot water for the showers, or no life savers in the pool) while there are rooms full of bureaucrats supervising the unused facility. And Japanese university students, or at least some of mine, say openly that they want to become bureaucrats so that they can avoid working hard. The higher the ladder one is within the system, opined one of my seminar students, the greater the chance that one may be able to put ones feet up since one will only deal with other bureaucrats as opposed to sometimes irate members of the general public. Once mighty Japanese electronics manufacturers are likewise full of people pushing paper in dark rooms. I believe that that the popularity, and moral acceptability, of bureaucrats is based upon the supervisory nature of mothers in Japanese families. Japanese all want to look after the finances, supervise, become mum. It is going to take quite an "innovation" to turn things around. Good luck, and Godspeed Mr. Hashimoto.

    Posted in: Hashimoto, Matsui step down as Japan Innovation Party execs

  • 5

    timtak

    Accordign to Japanese reports such as http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20141220/k10014150291000.html the culprit did not have a driver's licence.

    Ms. Ishii's parents....

    Posted in: Student dies after she is hit by car being chased by police

  • -5

    timtak

    4ge3uua3uaxuhhaq.onion

    Seriously more forgettable than anonimous.

    Posted in: Japanese activist challenges secrets law with whistleblower website

  • 3

    timtak

    Looks like an inspiring movie. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrjJbl7kRrI All the Japanese reviews I have found say so too. If you search long enough you can find some one in a country the size of Japan to say anything. Then you can publish it as being representative of the nation as a whole. And keep making films about Japanese POW guards. Last year it was "The Railway Man," (2013) but there have been lots, generally with the same type of fanatical, brutal prison guard."The Purple Heart" (1944) "Bridge Over the River Kwai" (1957), "The Secret of Blood Island" (1964) "Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence," (1983, JP-UK) "Three Came Home" (1950), "Seven Women from Hell" (1961), "Empire of the Sun" (1987), "Paradise Road" (1997), "To End all Wars" (2001). The Second World War was a long time ago and there are really bad things going on right now. Sure the Japanese don't go in for guilt, nor unlike us, do they go in for recrimination. There are plenty of Japan as victim films, but I have yet to see one that makes the US or UK soldiers out to be despicable, despite there being ample material imho.

    Posted in: Angelina Jolie's 'Unbroken' strikes a nerve in Japan

  • -4

    timtak

    People with tattoos are usually not allowed into hot spas, since people find them intimidating. Atypically, there was a gentleman ("of honour" I presume judging by the type) with tattoos in the hot spa that I visited this morning and my colleagues found his presence intimidating, avoiding the bath in which he was bathing out of fear of arousing his anger.

    If disallowing tattooed people from public spas is permissible for this reason, then preventing public employees from getting new tattoos (note that the 114 that fessed up to having tattoos already did not face disciplinary action) does not seem unreasonable. And it is reassuring to see a politician taking a hard line on such issues, especially in that city.

    It is prejudicial, but at the same time, it is difficult to think of a better solution in a society were "violent groups" are legal. Some folks may think that they are still in Kansas.

    Posted in: Osaka court rules tattoo check on city employees illegal

  • 1

    timtak

    Japan has the least sex in the world http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/condom-maker-reveals-results-of-national-survey-on-sex overall but according to this article, a lot in public places? Why would this be? It reminds me of the Woody Allen sketch about a woman that can only reach orgasm in public places. http://rutube.ru/video/b5d2ebb46c3cda862d660a1b6ddd1075/ "It is the danger my friend. The fear of being caught."

    Posted in: Sex is going public, but decorum is fighting a losing battle

  • 0

    timtak

    Yeah, right, Tim-Tak. I guess you miss the Warai pretty much every night who stick firecrackers against their butt and light them so they can shout "Atsui! Atsui!" .... because "it's funny! and sophisticated!"

    I can see how Japanese jokes would fall flat on non Japanese, but I meant to point out that Western humour, as exemplified in this movie can be just as unfunny to non-Westerners. It is not because Japanese are not sophisticated that they do not laugh at Western humour, it is just that sexual innuendo and canned laughter are not universally funny, just like firecrackers.

    Posted in: Rogen defends satirizing N Korean leader in 'The Interview'

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