timtak's past comments

  • -1

    timtak

    People with tattoos are usually not allowed into hot spas, since people find them intimidating. Atypically, there was a gentleman ("of honour" I presume judging by the type) with tattoos in the hot spa that I visited this morning and my colleagues found his presence intimidating, avoiding the bath in which he was bathing out of fear of arousing his anger.

    If disallowing tattooed people from public spas is permissible for this reason, then preventing public employees from getting new tattoos (note that the 114 that fessed up to having tattoos already did not face disciplinary action) does not seem unreasonable. And it is reassuring to see a politician taking a hard line on such issues, especially in that city.

    It is prejudicial, but at the same time, it is difficult to think of a better solution in a society were "violent groups" are legal. Some folks may think that they are still in Kansas.

    Posted in: Osaka court rules tattoo check on city employees illegal

  • 1

    timtak

    Japan has the least sex in the world http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/condom-maker-reveals-results-of-national-survey-on-sex overall but according to this article, a lot in public places? Why would this be? It reminds me of the Woody Allen sketch about a woman that can only reach orgasm in public places. http://rutube.ru/video/b5d2ebb46c3cda862d660a1b6ddd1075/ "It is the danger my friend. The fear of being caught."

    Posted in: Sex is going public, but decorum is fighting a losing battle

  • 0

    timtak

    Yeah, right, Tim-Tak. I guess you miss the Warai pretty much every night who stick firecrackers against their butt and light them so they can shout "Atsui! Atsui!" .... because "it's funny! and sophisticated!"

    I can see how Japanese jokes would fall flat on non Japanese, but I meant to point out that Western humour, as exemplified in this movie can be just as unfunny to non-Westerners. It is not because Japanese are not sophisticated that they do not laugh at Western humour, it is just that sexual innuendo and canned laughter are not universally funny, just like firecrackers.

    Posted in: Rogen defends satirizing N Korean leader in 'The Interview'

  • 0

    timtak

    Boing

    Posted in: Over 20,000 bras recalled due to injury fears

  • -6

    timtak

    Interesting comment coming from someone on a Japan-focused website, since most "comedy" in Japan consists of people hitting each other and screaming at each other.

    There is quite a lot of culture in comedy. A lot of Western comedy is associated with sex, due to its repression and taboo, and with punning due to the centrality of words in the Western psyche. The trailer makes a sexual pun in its first 16 seconds. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpyVENBPj5c To a Japanese person "Did you just say dong/chinchin," would be too pathetic to be considered "comedy." But then this film is to an extent satirising itself.

    Posted in: Rogen defends satirizing N Korean leader in 'The Interview'

  • -1

    timtak

    Company Warrior Yamazaki (企業戦士YAMAZAKI) a super robo-salaryman that used his business cards as ninja throwing stars.

    Posted in: If The Avengers could have one Japanese superhero, who would it be?

  • 0

    timtak

    It seems that the LDP have won more than 300 seats. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20141214/t10013962541000.html You can see the results in real time here http://www.asahi.com/senkyo/sousenkyo47/

    Posted in: LDP set for big win despite low voter turnout

  • 0

    timtak

    The Japanese feeling highly identified with the visual world and while they can say "I'm stupid" they really do not like looking bad, or visually denigrating things that they like and admire, such as, famously, "stepping stones" (or fumie) used to test whether Japanese were Christians or not. The Edo period authorities new that if they just asked the Japanese "Are you a Christian" they would prevaricate "No, I have given up on that (and will take it up again tomorrow)," "No (but I am still trying to become one)." But if they were forced to stamp on an effigy of the Holy Virgin, they would not be able to do it.

    Posted in: Train station devises new way to prevent roadside bicycle parking

  • 0

    timtak

    As a parent I think it is great that there are so few drugs in Japan.

    Posted in: In Hokkaido there’s weed everywhere, but not a drop to smoke

  • 0

    timtak

    I think that people do vandalism for spite, malice, revenge, urami, and for business reasons too. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vandalism

    Posted in: Tires punctured on 30 vehicles in Sapporo residential area

  • 0

  • 0

    timtak

    This is the blowfish restaurant http://gm.gnavi.co.jp/shop/0120151560/ http://www.azabu-yamadaya.jp/ Blowfish prices start at two man a head.

    I've eaten Fugu, it doesn't taste anything special, people eat it because it's dangerous, why risk your life even if there is a 1% chance you might die for something that tastes so bland.

    I agree with you but humans are famous for doing things that are dangerous but do not kill them, from extreme sports, and roller coasters to foods that contain poisons, such as blowfish and the snakes popular in Taiwan. Along the same continuum are foods which are just painful, so called benign masochism foods http://journal.sjdm.org/12/12502a/jdm12502a.pdf Which we eat to get the feeling of "mind over body" -- we can do and eat things that are dangerous or painful. Challenges would be another way of putting it. I say "kimodameshi" foods to my students.

    Posted in: Blowfish, 'washoku' win Michelin stars as Tokyo keeps gourmet crown

  • 0

    timtak

    WEsterners do a fair bit of revering too, even when they are not encouraged to do so by the state. Many European children have been named after kings and queens, princes and princesses as are seven American states, and Richard Nixon and three of his brothers. My mother wanted to name me Rupert, after the bear, but eventually chose a Christian name, Timothy or Timorous of God, or God-fearing.

    Posted in: N Korea forbids people from using same name as leader

  • -1

    timtak

    The other thing about Osech, containing black beans, fish eggs, burdock root (gobou), steamed minced fish sausage (kamaboko) and various other fried fish, fried egg, pickled vegetables, rolls of seaweed, is that it is pretty low in calories compared even to standard Japanese food, and even to some of the tastier Western things that can be frozen.

    The New Year, held after extensive cleaning of the home, is the festival of the Mirror Goddess who is consumed and internalised with the mirror rice cake eaten somewhere between the 4th and 20th of January, at which time the Japanese want to look their best. So in that sense, osechi may also be calorie-controlled, diet food.

    Posted in: Why don’t young people in Japan like eating traditional New Year’s dishes?

  • 3

    timtak

    The DPJ is incapable of carving out an ideologically distinct platform b/c all these empty suits are simply of different factions, with the same underlying philosophies. “I've never seen a country, a world power, so lacking in intelligent people with varying ideas on how to get things done…”

    I don't think that the Japanese are into ideologies and ideas. They are into real world action. This is why the politician that gets up earliest, bows at the most street corners, makes the most noise, puts up the most posters, sends his sound truck to most places, and has the most real world connections, will be more likely to get in that the politician that makes a well reasoned election speech and manifesto, since to many Japanese, "ideaology" and "ideas" are just a lot of words (rikutsu) and probably later to become lies to boot. There is no generalised other in Japan, no super-addressee, no supposed or real, ear of the Other. The only people listening are voters and they know that politicians speak a lot of faff.

    Posted in: Opposition, too weak to take power, aims to dim Abe's luster

  • 3

    timtak

    I think that osechi was designed more to give the most important person in the Japanese household (mummy) a well deserved New Year break, rather than to be delicious to eat. Osechiis* hozonshoku* food to be preserved, like canned, dried or pickled food in the West. If Westerners ate baked beans, crackers and pickled onions at Christmas it would not be all that popular with the young folks either, but the person who does the cooking would be able to put their feet up.

    Posted in: Why don’t young people in Japan like eating traditional New Year’s dishes?

  • 3

    timtak

    @Mr Bloom

    (ianfu) coined at the time as a euphemism on purpose by the then J-govt under Imperial Palace, and it was meant for internal communcatrion only

    Ianfu 慰安婦 was used in recruitment adverts in Korean national newspapers, along with the salary at ten times that of a nurse or front line soldier. I think that it was a euphamism to protect not the Japanese government's dirty scheme (which was plain and in your face to any adult that read the recruitment advert) or subsequently the Korean government (or NPO) who used exactly the same phrase during the Korean war to recruit prostitutes to provide "comfort/relief" to US soldiers. The phrase was a euphemiism, imho, to protect a little of the dignity of those that that were responding to the adverts.

    The problem is that even Ikuhiko Hata book details tha,t as you say, many of young women, did claim at least to believe that they would not be prostitutes but holding hands and otherwise comforting.

    And deception is (from a Western perspective at least) equal to coercion.

    It is also known that the Japanese goverment sent back some women when it found it they had been decieved, and the famous proof that the army was involved (published by Asahi in 1998) was an army memo saying "beware, some recruiters are coercing women."

    However, it was known by millitary individuals at least that the women were at least "partially decieved."

    I think Hashimoto would draw a line between systematic, documented acceptance of coercion (of which I am unaware) and individual soldiers awareness of coercion.

    But is this really a point at which a line can be drawn? If a large number of soldiers knew what was going on and yet the army continue to accept the services of decieved young women, then wasn't the army, and the government complicit in the deception?

    I would have to jump through some pretty difficult conceptual loops to defend the way in which Hashimoto and other right wingers might draw a distinction between physical cooercion and deception but, in this land of honne and tatemae, true meaning and the put up front, I think there are even different attitudes towards linguistic deception. I could imagine a Japanese defense along the lines of "They were told a lot of euphamisms, sure, but in their heart of hearts they knew what they would be doing," but this translates to "They were lied to. They were coerced. They were slaves."

    Posted in: Yomiuri apologizes for using term 'sex slaves' in English edition

  • 0

    timtak

    @excellentadventurer

    In some cases, the weight of evidence is so huge that international scholars more or less unanimously agree on the version of events.

    It seems to me that there are two versions of events.

    1) There are those that believe that Japanese government systematically and deliberate rounded up and forced women to become sex slaves, based in part on the testimony of Yoshida Seiji who claimed to go on a human hunt (人間狩り), or by lying to the women about what they would be doing. This view is represented by Hicks. http://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Women-Japans-Enforced-Prostitution-ebook/dp/B00IMVZQS0/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1417320022&sr=8-5&keywords=comfort+women

    2) There are those that believe that the Japanese government encouraged civilians to set up brothels in war zones using indentured sex labourers, with even more tragic exceptions where individual soldiers abducted women such as in the case of Jeanne Ruff-O'Herne and several others. This view is presented by Soh, who spares no detail describing the misery it caused. http://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Women-Violence-Postcolonial-Sexuality/dp/0226767779/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417320272&sr=8-1&keywords=Soh+comfort+women

    Which view is the one that is agreed upon? People like Hashimoto claim that this difference matters "mattaku betsu na mondai" because while the latter might be settled with a peace accord and the Kono apology, the former is so abhorrent, so evil, that - like the Holocaust - it can not and should not be laid to rest by a peace treaty.

    Posted in: Yomiuri apologizes for using term 'sex slaves' in English edition

  • -1

    timtak

    Should newspapers refer to the Asian "trainees" (kenshuusei) who are brough to Japan by the ship load to be "trained" in manual labour, today, as slaves? Some say they should be http://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/aging-japan-struggles-to-make-immigrants-feel-at-home

    As far as I am aware both the "trainees" and the women refered to in this article were not free, since they are required to repay an upfront sum. The trainees borrow it. while the women's families generally paid. Ms.Jeanne Ruff-O'Hearne being a well documented exception, released by the Japanese during the war. The mass abductions claimed by Yoshida Seiji are now, by the Asahi Newspaper at least -- and this is one reason why the editor was relieved of his post -- thought to have been false. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seiji_Yoshida#Memoirs_controversy

    And alas it is claimed that in Japan in Kabukicho in the twenty first century, "Many of them were trafficked into the country and indentured by debt. The economic slump means that it takes them up to a year to buy back their freedom." http://articles.latimes.com/2002/dec/29/news/adfg-sex29

    Intendentured labour can cause great suffering. But the belief that women were rounded up by the government in trucks is the one that Abe and Hashimoto are attempting to rebuff since it would be a crime so horrendous, of holocaust proportions, the responsibility for which would continue forever (e.g. Hashimoto, in Japanese, below) http://youtu.be/hKD6uLbpn2Q?t=1h24m24s He says something like paraphrasing, 'There are things that can be resolved by a peace accord and there are things that are not. Asahi Newspaper brought this issue into that area of the abbominable, which no peace accord can lay to rest. '

    Posted in: Yomiuri apologizes for using term 'sex slaves' in English edition

  • 0

    timtak

    There is no word for "vandalism" in Japanese except the rare, academic neoligism "hakaikoui"(destructive behaviour) because it is so rare that when it occurs it makes national news, as in this case.

    Posted in: Tires punctured on 30 vehicles in Sapporo residential area

View all