timtak's past comments

  • -5

    timtak

    Gosh I care. I am so in love with the legal system and low rate of crime in Japan. I can hardly feel safe walking around during the day let alone at night in my hometown (London). Amnesty internation says that Japan should come into line with "International Standards." As CH3 has demonstrated, Japan is already in line with the US. But perhaps the US is outlier among Western countries (which is what "international standards" often means). In Korea http://www.unafei.or.jp/english/pdf/RSNo60/No6011VE_Kim.pdf When the police detain a suspect, the suspect must be released if not transferred to the public prosecutor within 10 days. After the completion of the investigation, the police transfers the suspect to the public prosecutor’s office. The public prosecutor can detain the suspect for 10 days. The 10 days detention in police custody and a further 10 days detention under the public prosecutor are granted by a detention warrant. If more investigation is necessary, the judge can grant detention of an additional 10 days by the public prosecutor’s request.The maximum term of pre-prosecution detention is thus 29 days.

    Korea also has very low crime rates (see the above link).

    Posted in: Amnesty Int'l criticizes Japan in 2014/15 human rights report

  • -6

    timtak

    timtak - I don't expect the Japanese people I know now to apologize for the atrocities committed by some of the Japanese in the early 20th C, so an apology from you, and the fact you are not speaking for the majority of Americans...well, I hope can see how much your apology is worth.

    I am British and I speak for myself only. Very few allies and their descendents that I have met express sorry (such as yourself). As someone who has lived half my life in Japan, and feel a bit Japanese too, I would also like to apologize for grief caused to Chinese Koreans and other East Asians, but I think it was largely a reaction to the palpable evil -- the opium wars are like woah, maybe 100 million dead -- of my forebears, on whose behalf I apologize from the bottom of my heart. I wonder why aliexpress suppliers are so nice to me.

    timtak (again) - As for Nagasaki itself, the people in the town (and Hiroshima, and a bunch of other places) were warned more than a week in advance that bombings were coming. The J gov had ample opportunities to surrender, but they didn't.

    So we incinerated a town full of children. Oh my god. I cry. I am sorry.

    Posted in: Sorry seems to be the hardest word: Abe’s time for atonement?

  • -6

    timtak

    Japan still has not come to terms with its actions during WWII, especially in regard to relations with its immediate neighour (sic) China and South Korea. This was the topic at a roundtable discussion on the “70th Anniversary of the end of World War II and Japan’s Future,”

    i think that ordinarily, from a Japanese perspective, the Japanese would simply forget about its actions in the past. Even if it were true that "Those who cannot remember the past, are condemned to repeat it," the Japanese generally believe in natural cycles and their positivity rather than any guilt that they need to get over. Repeating the past is generally considered to be a good thing.

    While I believe most Japanese approve of the peace constitution and abhor war, I think that most Japanese believe, rightly or wrongly, that if folks from small archipelago - Europeans last time - or somewhere nearer to hand, were to invade the whole world again encroach upon Japanese sovereignty and blockade its supplies then Japan would go to war again because that would be the sad, but only appropriate response. Obviously parts of the past were deeply regrettable, but is it possible to pick and choose? With counterfactual tenses and counterfactual thinking, Westerners are inclined to believe in the possibility of say, if the United States had not dropped the bomb on Japan.

    From a Japanese perspective I think, it is people that keep dredging up the past (kako wo mushi kaesu過去を蒸し返す) who are doomed to repeat it. As a result of this belief in the past as something that really is past, and should therefore eventually be forgotten, the Japanese also tend not to be recriminatory regarding others. With regard to the atomic bombings for instance, while they mourn their dead, I have never once heard anyone Japanese call out us allies and demand an apology. The forgiving nature of Japanese views of the past has a lot to commend it.

    I apologize by the way. The bombing of Nagasaki while the Japanese had not yet had time to react to Hiroshima was in my humble opinion, especially, and utterly abhorrent and I am sorry that we have not apologized more.

    Posted in: Sorry seems to be the hardest word: Abe’s time for atonement?

  • 6

    timtak

    the full text is here http://www.mitsuhashitakaaki.net/2015/02/13/mitsuhashi-198/ The title is "Allow them in while maintaining an appropriate distance" She says that looking at ISIS and other problems she is reminded how hard it is to understand multi-ethnic societies and people from other nations. At the same time that it will be necessary to accept foreign labor into Japan to care for the elderly especially. And she implies that these foreign workers should be required to accept their residency as temporary, and not overstay. Further taking the example of a white apartheid period apartment building, into which blacks came to live in large numbers, causing the water supply of the building to fail, resulting in the building being abandoned by the whites, she argues that, "as I have always said," doing business, research, and exercise with foreigners is okay, but living in the same place is not a good idea. [sorry if i have misrepresented anything]

    Has she been to Hong Kong?

    Posted in: South Africa slams newspaper column praising apartheid

  • 1

    timtak

    Toronto has winters with "cold snaps at" −10 °C.

    You can have nature and beaches within Japanese cities, such as West Fukuoka. Safe, near beaches good shops. Friendly, fun place. https://www.google.co.jp/maps/@33.613295,130.239092,3a,75y,90t/data=!3m5!1e2!3m3!1s38684489!2e1!3e10. I also recommend Yamaguchi, https://www.flickr.com/search/?text=Iwaya&sort=relevance&user_id=64015205%40N00 if you don't mind shopping online.

    Posted in: If you could live in any city in the world, other than where you live now, which one would you choose and why?

  • 3

    timtak

    I like my job.

    Posted in: Japan eyes compulsory 5 days' paid holiday a year

  • 1

    timtak

    Lynchings and public executions have often been seen as "events" and one of the first causes for tourism. It is not how I see them. It can take decades before a death row inmate is executed, as in the recent cases where an inmate was acquitted after 30 or 40 years on death row. That was probably because that inmate always claimed his innocence and the evidence against him was not strong. In cases like this where guilt is cut and dried and there are grieving relatives who want to get closure in a permanent way, it is likely to be within the next 2 to 5 years, as was the case with the man who knifed infant school children likewise with the reported intention of committing suicide by state hanging.

    Posted in: Death sentence upheld for man convicted of killing 7 in Akihabara

  • 0

    timtak

    He is now 32 years old. I think he was 25 at the time.

    Posted in: Death sentence upheld for man convicted of killing 7 in Akihabara

  • 3

    timtak

    timtak; there is never a good reason to kill someone except in self defense. i think I agree (and disagree with the death penalty). 

    But in the same way that some advocate greater equality as a means to reduction in violence http://www.equalitytrust.org.uk/resources/spirit-level/violence Perhaps something could be done to address marginalization and stigmatization. I am not sure what exactly. I am not suggesting that the Japanese become Westernize themselves to believe that "mere appearance" does not matter. One approach might be to go the whole hog and define baldness as a disease and allow people to get weaves on prescription, which might have prevented this tragedy http://livedoor.blogimg.jp/joshisokuho/imgs/d/5/d573314c.jpg. Another way might be to promote the chonmage again, such as for all civil servants. It was the Japanese answer to baldness (make everyone bald) in the past. https://www.google.co.jp/search?q=chonmage&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo

    That's interesting ! I have heard just the "opposite"... Yes. Here's to the testosterone. But if one watches enough adverts like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_VlG1sP6Yw a large of people will associate baldness with a complete loss of self-esteem. Indeed, I know people who have thought their baldness to be the bane of their lives, claiming that it prevents them from gaining employment, which may well be true. http://articleimage.nicoblomaga.jp/image/64/2014/e/5/e51a033614a980a1523d6d40c9b550292bbeb56c1390966651.jpg

    Posted in: Death sentence upheld for man convicted of killing 7 in Akihabara

  • 2

    timtak

    One of Kato's main reasons for murdering people was that he would never get a girlfriend because he felt he was ugly and called ugly (busaiku) online. It was when he was called "busaiku" that he lost the plot. And yet, the only ugly thing about him, as far as I am aware, is that he was going bald at a young age.
    http://shocker.matrix.jp/999/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kato_tomohito4.jpg http://shocker.matrix.jp/999/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/kato_tomohiro1.jpg I would prefer to have hair, especially in Japan weave manufacturers encourages people to worry about being bald, and for the general public to view baldness as a general loss of vigor, or a disease, and even more ugly than imho it is. In a country where visual appearance is considered to express essence, at least more than words, greater attention should perhaps be paid to how human appearance may be marginalized and stigmatized.

    Posted in: Death sentence upheld for man convicted of killing 7 in Akihabara

  • 1

    timtak

    mollycoddled

    There is a lot of literature about this mollycoddling or "indulgence," since the earliest western visitors to Japan. There are lots of interesting hits for "Indulgence, Japanese, children" at Google books for instance.

    The idea seems to be that rather disciplining children, the Japanese are indulgent but at the same time let them see what happens if they behave selfishly in groups; children are socialized by their peers and wider society rather than by parental or teacher discipline. But if teachers are hitting children, or going absolutely NUTS at the students, then this system is breaking down.

    Could it be the emphasis now placed upon stamping out bullying? The instances of bullying have also increased but mainly I feel due to the push to have staff and children aware of being bullied which was previously endemic. For example, if a child comes late a teacher might say "It is a shame that this class does not assemble on time since i can't start the lecture" encouraging the late child to feel mentally, and at times even physically the social pressure to come on time. This use of the group dynamic may have been outlawed.

    The use of non-corporal forms of teacher discipline, such as detention, or academic demerit often depend on a degree of cooperation on the part of the student who would need to have have been taught, through parental discipline, that punishment is the just retribution of bad behavior.

    Since Japanese university students have, however, been indulged, and not disciplined they seem to be extremely capable of non-conforming with teacher instructions in class. For example, in English conversation classes, one teacher of my acquaintance insist that students ask follow up questions that the students make themselves rather than simply reading out the questions on the handout. Since making their own questions is a drag, students often refuse to conform and respond with a withering smiles when faced with a repeat request. So rather than repeating his requests, or giving up, when he reaches a student that is not following his instructions, he remind the whole class of the instruction. But in so doing he is in a sense encouraging the student to be bullied, to the extent at least of being the subject of attention of the whole class. As this sort of tactic becomes untenable, and there is yet to be a culture of parental discipline, it is not surprising that education should become frayed at the edges.

    Posted in: Record number of teachers disciplined for corporal punishment

  • 1

    timtak

    It is amazing how SITE Intelligence group got the news first again. There are only three employees apparently. They are rather reminiscent of "Intel Center" who used to release footage of Bin Laden http://infowars.net/articles/september2007/100907BinLaden.htm at particularly opportune times apparently http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?depth=1&hl=en&prev=search&rurl=translate.google.co.jp&sl=de&u=http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/july2007/160707dubioustape.htm&usg=ALkJrhjM1a9BAk25-g1xYAdX_G00bp65dw

    Posted in: IS claims it executed Japanese hostage

  • 0

    timtak

    Keeping your mouth shut in the face of obvious evil isn't the right choice.

    I think that it is very likely that these two men will be killed alas, as others were killed in the past and it makes me very depressed to think of their fate. My heart goes out to their families. At the same time, I wonder about the extent to which ISIS may be being used politically.

    Iran is accusing the West of involvement in ISIS. Are the Iranians simply batty?

    As long as the West and its allies can be seen to be victims, and have righteousness on their side as they bomb the Middle East, that is to say as the West are allowed to bomb the Middle East "righteously", then they can bomb anyone that uses anything other than their currency to sell oil, and by this means, have an oil standard for their currency, which based as it is upon this most wanted commodity, can then be printed indefinitely, without hyper-inflation (though oil may become cheaper), allowing the West and its allies to purchase goods from the rest of the world for nothing, and in that sense enslave the rest of the world. Whether this is going on or not I can not say, but it would be both consummate evil and consummately profitable. No one knows whether skyscrapers really do fall down like that or not, but it gave the US the excuse to bomb the only oil supplier that was not using dollars. Nobody knows what caused the "Arab spring", but the revolutionaries stopped mid-revolution to set up a new Bank of Libya that used dollars and not gold to sell oil. Skyscrapers and Revolutions are fraught. In order to present evil as righteousness, and have a carte blanche -- freedom to print money ! -- all one needs is a very few tragic victims, and a guy in a desert with a Youtube link and a knife.

    Posted in: Bad news

  • 0

    timtak

    How are his knees?

    Posted in: Honda cautions against overconfidence at Asian Cup

  • 0

    timtak

    Ouch. Anticipation. Ha. So much for omotenashi! The much vaunted omotenashi often seems to be an excuse for cutting the channels of communication, and simply providing service that the service provider wants to provide rather than getting embroiled in serving individual needs. For example every time I go to the same checkouts in the same supermarkets I am asked by the same staff whether I have a discount card, and I am offered a bag and a receipt (under my change) both of which I refuse, and even refusing these things with my checkout mantra, (no card, no bag, no receipt) I am then required, by the same staff, to reconfirm my refusal of these things since they are completely on autopilot and are not anticipating anything other than subservience to their service ritual on the part of their customers. Receipts can be a pain for Japanese people too http://youtu.be/AFtvJKMDxvY?t=1m50s http://tasuichi.ocnk.net/product/102 and omotenashi can even be a disservice to foreigners https://www.flickr.com/photos/nihonbunka/15996023245/ This is the featured company's research web page http://www.yamatogokoro.jp/research/

    Posted in: Revitalizing the inbound tourism market

  • 1

    timtak

    @ Ricky Kaminski Oh, right. "Only the WKF is recognised by the Olympic committee." That is a shame. I have had a look at WKF Karate video and it doesn't look the same, more like fencing. Folks are celebrating a win while their opponent is not even hurting:-) And they are doing a thing that looks like kata practice in a competition situation. But hold on. The Japanese Full Contact Karate Association is campaigning to be included in the Olympics, as a second set of rules. http://fullcontact-karate.jp/signaturecollectingcampaign/ This is what it looks like, though I am sure you know. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2YCIWbbKGw What ever you are doing seems to be keeping you well according to my fb stalk. @Novenichama thumbs up.

    Posted in: Karate bidding to be included in 2020 Olympics

  • 3

    timtak

    Strange case indeed.

    From the press conference on November 6th https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3fnl5YL_T0A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wGOJX1t27Q The reconstruction photos in the 15th minute of the first video can be seen towards the end of this page http://logmi.jp/27561 Tomita's lawyer does not deny that Tomita took the camera but that 1) A strange smiling man put it in his bag from behind, so that he only saw the man very briefly 2) The reason why Tomita was able to keep the camera in his bag was because he perceived it to be a broken camera that was unwanted, that the man had wanted him to throw away... 3) When the Korean police found the camera in his room, took photos of the camera in that (broken) state so this should be provable but it transpires that "broken" refers to an expensive (7000-8000usd) Canon EOS 1-DX http://logmi.jp/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/gazou171.jpg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS-1D_X which was only "broken" in so far as it did not have a lens attached. Since Tomita claims he had only seen cameras with lenses attached, he presumed that this cameras lens had broken off and was therefore rubbish. (Is this possible? He is twenty five years old.) 4) When the police picked him up he was told to confess so to theft lest he not be allowed to return to Japan with his team-mates. 5) As shown in police photos Tomita had left the camera in full view of his room-mate. He was able to do this because he thought it was a broken camera.

    The prosecution shows frames from the video including this one http://livedoor.blogimg.jp/girls002/imgs/1/8/1807b6fb.jpg which they claim show him removing the lens and putting the camera into his bag.

    I guess it is conceivable that a strange man put a camera in his bag, and that he thought an expensive camera were rubbish but my sentiment is that it was a case of "ma ga sashita" ("the devil made me do it," the Japanese expression for a brief loss of moral sanity, rather than possession) followed by the inability to own up to doing something so crass, in the face of fathers, coaches, sponsors saying "Please say you didn't do something that utterly crass, did you?" The biggest thing in his favour is that, representing ones country at an international event, bristling with cameramen and cameras pointed at oneself, who steals a camera? But then perhaps this says more about the tension of being an international sportsman and the weird things that one can do under that sort of stress.

    Posted in: Swimmer Tomita appears in S Korean court on camera theft charge

  • 0

    timtak

    There is probably some drug company with a memory improving drug and a checklist asking, Have you become absent minded? Yes of course. Then you have dementia and must take our drug till you die (cash register sound). Drugs are one of the things that Westerners are better at. But Asians have been here before so they should be able to recognise that this is, imho, in a sense, Opium War III.

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  • 1

    timtak

    I do hope so. It would be very Japanese. The host nation should pick up a medal or two. It is a lot more interesting to watch than squash. It seems to empower smaller people from watching Yotube videos, since the Shinkyoku-shin rule allowing only kicks but not punches to the head means that acrobatic ability can beat brute force. But lack of punches to the head does make it a bit strange to watch, and recent style seems to concentrate on a succession of rather dull low kicks to destroy the opponents legs. But remember Andy Hugg? Not big, but a beautiful Karate warrior.

    Posted in: Karate bidding to be included in 2020 Olympics

  • -2

    timtak

    Anyone who can cut Japanese bureaucrats is a hero. As Japan sinks under astronomic debt and his competitors print money to pay for more bureaucrats (they are hiring at my institution) is a hero. I'd like to move to Osaka, and get citizeship to vote him in.

    Posted in: Hashimoto says he won't seek re-election if merger referendum does not pass

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