voiceofokinawa's past comments

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    lincolnman,

    The Ospreys carried 37 tons of supplies because that was what was requested to be lifted by the Government of Japan (based on needs at the cut-off sites) and could fit within the aircraft - each Osprey carried its max cabin load of two 463L pallets of supplies.

    Thank you for the information. Probably, you are in a position to ask for information from the Marine authorities off hand.

    But a question still remains. If a total 37 tons was the amount the Japanese government requested to be transported to cut-off areas, was it necessary to deploy 4 Ospreys plus 2 C-130's for starters? Couldn't JSDF deal with the problem all by itself? And indeed this was the initial reaction Abe made when he heard about a U.S. offer to help.

    Relief supplies in the amount of 20 tons were delivered on the first day. So the remaining 17 tons was transported by 4 Ospreys for the period of 6 days.

    As I said elsewhere, a most difficult problem awaits when the reconstruction of infrastructure starts in a full swing. The amount of reconstruction money may know no bounds, I’m sure. So it's surprising that despite the quake disasters in Tohoku and Kyushu no one here who proclaim themselves to be philanthropic and humanitarian says anything about host-nation support Japan has to pay to the U.S. coffers (annual $1.56 billion) and expected $15 billion Japanese taxpayers are supposed to pay for the construction of a new base in Henoko, Nago City.

    In my opinion, that relief effort for reconstruction is more humanitarian than merely sending in four Ospreys.

    Posted in: U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds with quake relief flights

  • -3

    voiceofokinawa

    smithinjapan

    You haven't answered the question I posed. Unless you can explain and clarify the discrepancy I pointed out between the 4 Ospreys’ full loading capacities (560 tons = 20 x 4 x 7) and the actual loading they carried out (37 tons), you cannot blame me by saying I'm simply playing politics. If you insist on saying I'm playing politics, then you must answer the question first and foremost.

    Posted in: U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds with quake relief flights

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    smithinjapan,

    Let me repeat the last paragraph in my post above with the question part deleted. I said:

    “Note an Osprey's maximum loading capacity is 20 tons and yet the four carried a total 37 tons of load in the week-long operations, each carrying 9.25 tons in the average.”

    The figure 9.25 (tons) divided by 7 (days) is 1.32 (tons per diem). In other words, each aircraft transported 1.32 tons of relief supplies, or only one twentieth of their full capacity, to disaster areas each day. What's your explanation of this discrepancy?

    Posted in: U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds with quake relief flights

  • -6

    voiceofokinawa

    The article is incorrect as to the number of Ospreys that were deployed. The actual number was 4, not 8. In addition to the 4 Ospreys, 2 C-130 Hercules were also deployed to transport SDF members and military vehicles. Thanks to this, a total 37 tons of relief supplies were transported to quake-stricken areas. But can't the SDF deal with such relief operations all by itself without the help of the U.S. and also without requesting the use of Ospreys?

    Note an Osprey's maximum loading capacity is 20 tons and yet the four carried a total 37 tons of load in the week-long operations, each carrying 9.25 tons in the average. Doesn't this mean they were deployed merely for political demonstration?

    Posted in: U.S. Ospreys win Japanese hearts and minds with quake relief flights

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    The U.S. Marines' relief operations in Kumamoto ended yesterday in which Ospreys and C130 transport airplanes were mobilized, transporting a total 37 tons of relief supplies to the quake-affected areas, lasting from April 18 - 24.

    Meanwhile, Washington and Tokyo are attributing to each other calls for the use of Ospreys came from the other side. This clearly shows that mobilization of Ospreys was politically motivated.

    Posted in: Abe orders extra budget to rebuild quake-hit Kyushu region

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    Of immediate urgency are of course humanitarian operations to rescue victims in quake-stricken areas. But a real problem awaits afterwards when reconstruction work begins in a full swing. P.M. Abe estimates several hundreds of billion yen is needed for that purpose.

    Can't the expected budged for the construction of a new base in Henoko in northern Okinawa be appropriated for the reconstruction of disaster areas? Can’t Washington take that into consideration and Futenma be returned unconditionally? The Marine base has no place for the defense of Japan anyway.

    Posted in: Abe orders extra budget to rebuild quake-hit Kyushu region

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Fadamor,

    War zones where Ospreys are supposed to be used have no paved facilities for landing and take-offs always.

    I hear their use in Iraq and Afghanistan is quite limited compared with traditional helicopters because of both countries' dusty conditions. Is that true?

    Article Unavailable

  • -3

    voiceofokinawa

    lincolnman,

    If there's no U.S .bases in Japan (in Okinawa, in particular) and thereby no host-nation support of that magnitude (an annual 1.56 billion dollars), your lambasting of others may hold water. But it doesn’t.

    Article Unavailable

  • -7

    voiceofokinawa

    The U.S. Marines have already drawn a plan to maneuver Okinawa-based Ospreys all across Japan which they cannot do on the small of Okinawa. The Japanese public is concerned about this because of the Osprey's faulty records since its development stage. The Marines and their fan club are frantically trying to deny it like mad.

    On the other hand, Tokyo has succumbed to Washington's blatant sales initiatives to purchase Ospreys and finally decided to buy 17 of them. But Tokyo faced a problem as to where to regularly deploy them. It was under such circumstances that Saga Air Port was decided on as the best candidate site. Saga residents took no time to vehemently oppose the plan and as the result the Saga deployment plan has become stalled for now.

    So Tokyo and Washington are in concert with each other to actively use Ospreys in these relief efforts to palliate the fears the Japanese public have about the aircraft whereby one can safely say there's a political motivation behind the Marines' "humanitarian" efforts.

    N.B. Saga is a prefecture next to Kumamoto.

    Article Unavailable

  • -5

    voiceofokinawa

    Rather than offering to help rescue quake victims as a gesture of good will, the U.S. should suggest lavish host-nation support Japan bears be used for the reconstruction of disaster-affected areas.

    There's no doubt about individual U.S. soldiers' expected hard work and dedication when their relief operations begin in a full swing. But there should be no mixing-up between each soldier's good will and his government's policy lines based on a different motivation.

    The Japanese taxpayers shoulder an annual $1.56 billion for the maintenance of 88 U.S. bases in Japan.

    If the U.S. voluntarily offers that money can be used for the reconstruction of disaster areas, that will certainly be most highly appreciated As is known well, the Tohoku region is still struggling and even languishing under the devastation caused by the triple disasters in 2011.

    Posted in: U.S. help arrives

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    One photograph exhibited in the Hiroshma Peace Park museum still remains vivid in my memory: A man evaporated instantly leaving only his shadow on the stones of a building entrance like on a negative film. History tells men committed atrocities of various kinds but they pale before what atomic bombs can do.

    So let’s call on the leaders of nuclear-armed countries to visit Hiroshima and take a moment to think about what should be done for future generations.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    To deepen understanding of the issue, I recommend all posters here to read articles about the experience Harry Truman's grandson had when he visited Hiroshima, one on the April 12 Japan Times, "Harry Truman's grandson backs possible Obama visit to Hiroshima," and the other on the April 12 Washington Post, "Harry Truman's grandson wants Obama to go to Hiroshima."

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    CyburneticTiger, you say:

    ... Imperial Japan did some bad things and their aggressiveness angered the allies. Therefore, the US and other Allies as victors required, Japan to sign the San Francisco Treaty and in conjunction the Security Treaty as part of reparations for Japan's war time actions and insurance for a sovereign Japan's continued renouncement of the use of War. However, in order for there to be a disarmed Japan someone would need to provide the country with security as the while the threat of Communism grew in Asia. Signing the Security pact was more out of necessity.

    So in your opinion, the security treaty the Japanese delegate signed on September 8, 1951, the same day when the San Francisco Peace Treaty was signed, had some retaliatory factors imbued in it? To prevent the genie out of the bottle? All these bases on Okinawa exist for that purpose? If so, then it shows all the more that the treaty was a farce. You know the Japanese delegation spearheaded by Shigeru Yoshida, then prime minister and an ambassador plenipotentiary, wasn't shown the draft of the security treaty until one day before the signing of it.

    Funny, people on the Japanese side who are visceral pro-U.S. bases and hence the most ardent pro-Henoko relocation are the so-called "neto-uyoku" chauvinists (fanatic Internet right wingers) whose ideological ancestors or predecessors were the very people responsible for starting that war.

    Certainly, you must find nothing wrong and unusual in these people.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    Wording in my post above is corrected.

    Emperor Hirohito stopped short of an apologizing to his own people at the said news conference. This is what shocked me because the war was fought in his name. But I don't think the general public is expecting any apology from a U.S. president.

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Emperor Hirohito came short of an apology to his own people at the said news conference. This is what shocked me because the war was fought in his name. But I don't think the Japanese public is expecting something in kind from a U.S. president.

    Article Unavailable

  • -4

    voiceofokinawa

    "we're upset and offended that Secretary Kerry didn't go down and grovel at our feet and endorse our narrative that Japan was the only the victim of WW2."

    If that's the feeling the general public in Japan have, then, yes, you can retort by saying, "Look at what Japan did during the war. Look at Pearl Harbor, the Nanjing massacre, Bataan Death March, Unit 731 and such.

    Emperor Hirohito replied, when asked how he felt about Hiroshima and Nagasaki during his first news conference held in 1978, that it was something that couldn't be helped. I was shocked to hear that and I'm sure many people, especially hibakusha or the victims of the bombs, were, too.

    I don't think the Japanese public is demanding an apology from the U.S. for what it did with those bombs but wishing a close look at what tragedy a nuclear bomb can do to humanity.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    voiceofokinawa

    xin xin & Metthew Harding,

    The oft-cited reason why the Marines are stationed in Okinawa is Okinawa's superior strategic location; that is, they can deal with any contingencies as quickly as possible that may occur in any part of the region. But if a contingency involves that between China or North Korea, Sasebo in Nagasaki Prefecture would serve it much better. Sasebo is way closer to Beijing, Shanghai or Pyongyang than Okinawa. Or if skirmishes ever occur in the Senkaku waters, it is the JSDF that has primary responsibility to deal with them, not the U.S. Marines ("Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Defense Cooperation 2015" ).

    Besides, if the Marines are for dealing with such contingencies quickly, why are 8.000 of them, including the 4,900 most active elements, scheduled to move to Guam, leaving only support units behind in Okinawa (Marine Corps Times: Oct. 1, 2015)? That this is possible means the Marines are stationed here not because Okinawa has a superior strategic location which enables the Marines to respond to such contingencies quickly but simply because the bases in Okinawa are as cozy as can be. All Washington does is keep saying U.S. Marines are in Japan to defend Japan so that Tokyo may squander funds to make their deployment here the most comfortable ever.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    voiceofokinawa

    CyburneticTiger,

    Japan hands in Washington realized towards the end of the 1960's that the U.S. could not maintain bases in Okinawa effectively any longer in the face of mounting demands for Okinawa's reversion to Japan. Okinawa wished reversion to Japan would result in a drastic reduction of the U.S. military footprint as well as the restoration of their dignity as human beings that was denied under occupation and colonization by the U.S.

    CyburneticTiger, when you say the U.S. military presence in Japan, and particularly in Okinawa, is guaranteed by a bilateral agreement, I think you are talking about the Japan-U.S. Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

    But you must know under what circumstances the treaty was signed. Japan was obliged to sign it in order to recover its "independence" and "sovereignty" but, in its stead, had to agree to the continuation of U.S. military presence. This is the reason why I say the treaty was a farce because it camouflaged the reality of ongoing military occupation. This is why I say Okinawa is Japan in miniature as a colony of the U.S.

    This treaty was revised at the behest of Nobusuke Kishi, P.M. Abe's mother side's grandfather, with one provision added: the U.S. must defend Japan. All other provision remained the same as before.

    Any say?

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    Fadamor,

    It was in 1992 that DoD announced Ospreys would be deployed to Okinawa by 2002 while the aircraft were at a development stage with so many accidents recorded as to be called "widow makers."

    Camp Schwab and Northern Training Area (a.k.a. Jungle Warfare Training Center), two major Marine facilities in Okinawa, opened in 1957, 12 years after the end of World War II. The Marine unit was originally stationed in mainland Japan but forced to move to Okinawa because of storming anti-base movements there.

    Now, my question is:

    Japan hosts a large U.S. military presence and provide them with 88 bases and facilities free of charge, believing they would defend Japan. In light of this, why is it necessary to have the Marines use so much land and train their combat skills in tropical jungle warfare?

    Could you explain?

    Article Unavailable

  • 8

    voiceofokinawa

    Takae is an idyllic hamlet in Higashi Village surrounded by lush forests with Okinawa's highest mountain, Yonahadake, overlooking it on the northwest. It was island-within-island boondocks until Prefecgtural Rt. 70 opened in 1980.

    U.S. Marines' Northern Training Area, where jungle-warfare training is routinely conducted, cuts across Higashi Village, brushing Takae District, as far as Kunigami Village, which occupies a total land mass of 78,242 hectares(Data: Ministry of Defense). Now, the U.S. side has offered to return about half of the land to local control, a great boon for Okinawa at least at face value. But there's an insidious problem here, too, as with Futenma's return. In return for half the land mass, Japan must construct 6 helipads with more than 70 meters in diameter for Ospreys to train in the remaining area. These helipads are constructed at sites surrounding Takae, one of them at a stone's throw from the hamlet.

    Note the to-be-returned land is almost an unused area for jungle warfare training is intensively carried out in the remaining area. There's always a suspicion on our side if Jungle-warfare training can contribute to Japan's security and defense.

    If Ospreys' training began in a full swing, Takae's natural as well as living environment would certainly be destroyed to the nail. Protesters have thus been sitting in there for years since the project was announced to prevent the helipads being constructed.

    The essence and nature of the problem is no different from Futenma. What U.S. policy makers always try to do is strengthen the function of bases by tricking the eyes of locals through make-believe measures and perpetuate the U.S. military footprint on the island forever.

    Article Unavailable

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