voiceofokinawa's past comments

  • 3

    voiceofokinawa

    I've seen this man on a footage of Channel Sakura Okinawa of Henoko demonstrators in front of Camp Schwab sitting in against the Henoko relocation, leading a group of pro-Henoko Japanese right wingers with one man brandishing a big Stars and Stripes.

    Japanese right wingers thus identify themselves with the U.S. very affectionately, and so they and the U.S. establishment, or at least Japan hands in Washington, are all part of the same gang. They even organize a tour to Yasukuni Shrine for U.S. service members stationed in Japan.

    Posted in: Obscure at home, 'Texas Daddy' is a right-wing darling in Japan

  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    Correction of wording:

    "then U.S.-occupied Okinawa" in my post above should be "then U.S.-administered Okinawa" because Okinawa is still being virtually occupied by the U.S. military even today. .

    Article Unavailable

  • -2

    voiceofokinawa

    AADV123:

    I'm flabbergasted you didn't understand the analogy I offered. Let me repeat it here again.

    If a troublesome tenant is asked to move out, can he retort to the householder by saying, "Find me a new house to move to in another land plot of yours. Until you build one there, I won't move out either from here or any place."

    takeda.shingen1991`gmail.com:

    You ask, "Why should Okinawa have more say than any other prefectures?" We often hear Kasumigaseki bureaucrats, complain to the same effect, saying: "Don't let Okinawans have their own way; don't spoil them."

    But what happened in Gifu and Yamanashi Prefectures in the 1950's? They resorted to violent demonstrations so that the central government had to ask Washington to move the Marines stationed there out to then U.S.-occupied Okinawa. Can you dare say Okinawa should not be treated too leniently and not allowed to have any say about this excessive U.S. military presence?

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  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    takeda.shingen.1991@gmail.com

    Takeda Shingen was a famous war lord reigning over a region called Kai or Koshu, roughly the present Yamanashi Prefecture, during Japan's Warring States period. So the poster code-named takeda.shingen.1991 must be a Shingen enthusiast whose frame of thinking doesn't go beyond war games.

    I want to ask him then why, from a strategic perspective, the Henoko relocation plan is the best solution as the central government keeps saying.

    BTW, a Marine unit stationed in Yamanashi Prefecture had to move to Okinawa due to fierce anti-U.S. base movements that stormed there in the 1950's.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    smithinjapan,

    I doubt if AADV123 and Schopenhauer are satisfied with the answer you volunteered to provide for them.

    Let me recapitulate my question: Why is it necessary for the function of U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma to be maintained the same as always in Okinawa and so its replacement built at Henoko in northern Okinawa? To this you answer: "Because you need a new place to put the people and things before the old one can go, and until it does it needs to be maintained."

    This is a ridiculous answer, indeed. If a tenant is asked to move out, can he retort to the householder by saying, "Find me a new place to move to in another plot you own. Until you build a new house, I will not move out from here."

    The fundamental question is: Why the function of U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma's function must remain in Okinawa and so its replacement be built at Henoko in Nago City,

    Article Unavailable

  • -3

    voiceofokinawa

    AADV123,

    Of course, Onaga is not a George Washington. He is not calling for people to rise up to arms and fight against the U.S. to remove all 33 U.S. bases and facilities from Okinawa. Never. He's merely saying he will do his utmost to prevent another base from being constructed within Okinawa with a strong backing from the majority of Okinawans. And you call this a "radical" stance on Onaga’s as well as Okinawans’ part?

    Your suggestion to fix the situation is very interesting. You suggest that the U.S. government reign in its own people (i.e., U.S. service members) so that they may not commit crimes such as "very serious cases of rape and atrocious behavior," thus making sure that those U.S. bases "no longer pose threat" to Okinawan society. Okinawans, on their part, must discard "[t]his hard-headed approach," you want to say.

    Do you really believe that these measures from both sides will solve the Futenma issue to the satisfaction of both sides? Can't you see absurdity and nonsense in your argument?

    Why must the function of Futenma be maintained the same as always and so its replacement constructed at Henoko in Nago City?

    I ask you the same question as I asked Schopenhauer above:

    Explain your thought about why U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma's function must remain in Okinawa and so be moved to Henoko. Explain, concretely, how they contribute to Japan's safety and security.

    Article Unavailable

  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    Smithinjapan,

    When George Washington led freedom fighters to fight against the British Army, did all American colonists at the time support his cause? Did Washington fight the war because he believed the majority of Americans supported him or because he believed it was a just thing to do?

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  • -1

    voiceofokinawa

    Schopenhauer,

    You call Gov. Onaga an insolent man? Because he is trying to correct the central government's wrong policy of forcing ahead with the Henoko relocation plan merely to please Washington?

    Explain your thought about why U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma's function must remain in Okinawa and so be moved to Henoko. Explain, concretely, how they contribute to Japan's safety and security.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    Adm. Harry Harris said, "We will clearly defend the Senkakus if they were attacked by China." In a similar spirit, the retiring commander of USFJ, Lt. Gen. Bruce Wright, wrote in his farewell essay published on the Feb. 26, 2008 Japan Times that U.S. service members in Japan were always ready to sacrifice their life to defend Japan.

    Nice words pleasing to the ear. Taking them at face value, the Japanese government has squandered Japanese taxpayers' money on maintaining 88 U.S. bases in Japan, of which 33 are in Okinawa.

    Note what the newly struck Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Defense Cooperation stipulates. It says, "The Self Defense Forces will have primary responsibility for conducting operations to check and repel ... invasions." The USFJ (including the Marines, of course) play only a supporting role.

    So it turns out that Harris is merely opining his personal, "extemporaneous" comment, as Cogito Ergo Sum says.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    It's too early for Prime Minister Abe to gloat over the outcome of Ginowan City's mayoral election. Here's why:

    Sakima won 27,668 votes against 21,811 for the rival candidate Keiichiro Shimura, who echoed the governor’s opposition to the Henoko project. But a Kyodo News exit poll showed that 56 percent of Ginowan voters oppose the relocation of Futenma base to Henoko, compared with 33 percent who support the plan. While 77 percent of the opponents of the Henoko plan voted for Shimura, the remaining 23 percent backed the incumbent. The gap in the election outcome and people’s position toward the base issue reflects the complexity of local sentiments over the plan to relocate Futenma base (From the Jan. 27 editorial of The Japan Times).

    Article Unavailable

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Futenma must be closed immediately. That's a consensus all parties share. But why must it be relocated to Henoko, Nago City, Okinawa?

    One pundit, who I happened to watch on television, "BS Fuji Prime Time," answers this by saying that Okinawa is geo-strategiclly well located so that the Marines can deal quickly and effectively with any contingencies that may occur in East Asia, such as in South China Sea, Taiwan Straits and on Korean Peninsula, or maybe in Middle East. So that's the reason why the most active core elements, 4,900 of them (Oct. 1, 2015 Marine Corps Times, "Marine identify units that will move from Japan to Guam"), can move to Guam, leaving 10,000 combat support service members (logistic units) behind in Okinawa?

    That the Marines are not necessarily tasked with the defense of Japan is written out in the newly struck Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Cooperation, which stipulates that "[t]he Self Defense Forces will have primary responsibility for conducting operations to check and repel ... invasions," with the USFJ playing only a supporting role. Under such circumstances, where does the geo-strategic superiority Okinawa is supposed to have come to play? And why must Futenma's function be relocated to Henoko? Can anyone answer this?

    There's an answer to this question in another article, "Anti-U.S. base candidate loses Ginowan mayoral election," posted Jan. 25 aalso on JT. It says, "Tokyo is keen to keep its crucial security ally the United States satisfied." Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga has repeated to the same effect by saying that Japan-U.S. relations are very important.

    This raises a suspicion that the U.S. side might have had the Henoko relocation plan in mind ever since they started negotiating the return of Futenma. The Marines had already had a blueprint to build a new base in Henoko's coastal waters which is strikingly similar to today's plan.

    It's sad to see the Abe government is so frantic to forge ahead with constructing the Henoko base only to satisfy and please the U.S.A. Awaken, the nation. Relocating the Marine base to Henoko has nothing to do with Japan's defense and security.

    Article Unavailable

  • -3

    voiceofokinawa

    The central government-backed Sakima camp cunningly avoided making the Henoko relocation an election issue, stressing instead that a dangerous Futenma must be closed and must not be fixed at the present site forever. No one disputes that Futenma must remain at the current site forever. But if you suggest it can be relocated to Henoko, then Futenma's function will remain in Okinawa forever, thus making Okinawa a permanent U.S. military colony together with all other bases

    Prime Minister Abe expressed his satisfaction with the election result, which means he is quite satisfied with an Okinawa to be occupied by a foreign military forever.. What a sovereign nation Japan is, Mr. Prime Minister!

    Posted in: Anti-U.S. base candidate loses Ginowan mayoral election

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    Tokyo goes for broke to win Ginowan City's mayoral election? Why are Prime Minister Abe and his cohorts so frantic to win it and to move U.S. Marine Air Station Futenma to Henoko? Because it benefits Japan's security and defense as well as because a U.S. think tank, CSIS, says in its January 19 report to the Pentagon that the Henoko relocation is the best solution?

    As I wrote on another thread, there's no raison d'etre for Futenma's function to be in Okinawa, for the Marines are stationed here not necessarily for the defense of Japan. A USFJ top brass's boasting that his troops are ready to sacrifice their lives to defend Japan is nothing but shenanigans pleasing only to the ear.

    The Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Defense Cooperation signed last April stipulate primary responsibilities for Japan's defense rest with the SDF. To quote the Guideline in part: "The Self-Defense Forces will have primary responsibility for conducting operations to check and repel such invasions." In all cases the USFJ plays only a supporting role for the SDF.

    So Prime Minister Abe, why are you so frantic about moving Futenma to Henoko? Answer us, please.

    Posted in: Voting under way in Ginowan mayoral election

  • 3

    voiceofokinawa

    Both candidates are for the Futenma air station to be closed as soon as possible. But their stances are sea-different as to where its replacement should be built. Keiichiro Shimura takes the stance that it must be closed and returned to the local control unconditionally while Atsushi Sakima says he doesn't care about where its relocation site may be as far as it is removed from Ginowan City immediately. In a nutshell, Shimura is against the Henoko plan while Sakima is for it.

    Quite mindful of the coming Ginowan mayoral election, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe mentioned in an answer at the House of Representatives' budgetary meeting on Jan. 12 that security-related matters should be decided on by the state, not by a locality based on the outcome of an election.

    National security may indeed be a matter that falls within the state's exclusive jurisdiction, as Abe says. Even so, a question remains: In what way is the relocation of U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma to Henoko relevant to the defense and security of Japan? Without giving a clear answer to this question, no one can say security matters fall within the state's exclusive jurisdiction.

    The Futenma air station is a leftover from the Occupation period, so that allowing it to relocate to Henoko in Nago City, Okinawa means Okinawa's plight as a U.S. military colony may well continue just the same as always. So Ginowan City's mayoral election is essentially contested over whether Okinawa remains a permanent U.S. military colony or not. Ginowan citizens' wise mandate is thus well looked forward to.

    Article Unavailable

  • 2

    voiceofokinawa

    Strangerland,

    Thank you for the correction. A septuagenarian, I'm still struggling to learn correct English - no end in sight to perfect it.

    Posted in: Okinawa countersues Japanese government over U.S. base move

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    lincolnman,

    So much time, effort and money being wasted on something that has no chance of succeeding.

    In your native state in the U.S., is there an administrative section exclusivelyt dealing with foreign military bases which take "[s]o much time, effort and money"? In Japan, the prefectures that host U.S. military bases all have such sections -- including Tokyo, Kanagawa, Yamaguchi, etc. Among them, Okinawa is the most conspicuous because 74% of U.S. military bases in Japan concentrate here. How much time, effort and money does Okinawa Prefecture have to waste because of this?

    If you say Okinawa shouldn't waste "time, effort and money" on base affairs, then the U.S. should take all these bases off the prefecture and let the prefectural government pay more or 100 percent attention to the welfare of the people and the betterment of their life.

    Posted in: Okinawa countersues Japanese government over U.S. base move

  • 4

    voiceofokinawa

    Defense Minister Gen Nakatani repeated the central government's official line that Futenma must be relocated to Henoko "to remove the danger of the Futenma air station as well as concerns of local residents as soon as possible."

    If the elimination of the danger Futenma poses to local residents is the reason for Futenma to be relocated to Henoko, then I suggest the quickest solution for it is to remove it to the U.S. then and there, either Hawaii or the U.S. mainland. That's all there is to it.

    Tokyo should demand that be done, but they don't have guts to do so, saying relations with the U.S. are importand and must not be impaired. What an independent sovereignty, what a "beautiful country (P.M. Abe's catch phrase)"!

    Posted in: Okinawa countersues Japanese government over U.S. base move

  • 0

    voiceofokinawa

    It"S ME (Dec. 24, 2015 - 04:47PM JST):

    Thanks for your kind advice, but ....

    The Japanese version of the article was distributed by Kyodo Press and Jiji Press, and was published by a number of local papers. The Dec. 24 Tokyo Shinbun ran it on page 2, The Okinawa Times on page 1 as well as on the op-ed page as a special feature and The Ryukyu Shinpo on page 1 and printed on page 7 the whole text of the appeal together with the list of signatories with their titles and positions.

    See also the Dec. 23 "Peace Philosophy Centre" blog for more information.

    Article Unavailable

  • 1

    voiceofokinawa

    For your reference, all posters here:

    Here are some names of the 70 U.S. citizens who signed the document criticizng Ambassador Caroline Kennedy's disappointing statement:

    Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Daniel H. Garrett, Former US Department of State Foreign Service Officer; Senior Associate, The Asia Institute

    Morton H. Halperin, Political Scientist (Who served in the Johnson, Nixon, and Clinton administrations; was a member of the U.S action team to negotiate Okinawa's reversion to Japan in 1972)

    Dud Hendrick, Member of VFP 2015 delegation to Okinawa

    John Junkerman, Documentary Filmmaker

    Peter Kuznick, Professor of History, American University

    C. Douglas Lummis, Visiting Professor, Okinawa Christian University Graduate School

    Kenneth E. Mayers, Major USMCR (Ret’d), Member of the VFP 2015 Delegation to Okinawa

    Katherine Muzik, Marine Biologist, Kaua'i (Who worked with Okinawa's environmentalists to call attention of WWF and preserve the Shiraho, Ishigaki Island's precious coral reefs in the 1980's.)

    Oliver Stone, Academy Award-winning Filmmaker

    Article Unavailable

  • 6

    voiceofokinawa

    Yubaru, You can't discuss the Futenma and Naha Airport issues on the same plane. Naha Airport is a civilian airport but Futenma is a foreign army's air base, a carry-over from the Occupation.

    Naha Airport has become highly congested in recent years due to the increasing number of tourists and amount of trade, domestic and international. So there is a reason for its expansion.

    On the other hand, there's no raison d'etre for Futenma's function to be in Okinawa, for the Marines are stationed here not necessarily for the defense of Japan but for their own sake and convenience.

    The Guidelines for Japan-U.S. Defense Cooperation signed last April stipulate primary responsibilities for Japan's defense rest with SDF. To quote the Guideline in part: "The Self-Defense Forces will have primary responsibility for conducting operations to check and repel such invasions." In all cases the USFJ plays only a supporting role for the SDF.

    No wonder the U.S. Marines are teaching their know-hows about amphibious warfare to SDF personnel.

    Yubaru, can you explain why the Marines must be deployed in Okinawa and also why Futenma's function must be relocated to Henoko?

    Article Unavailable

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