zichi's past comments

  • 0

    zichi

    turbotsat

    Just what does your comment have to do with Sendai area of Kyushu?

    Posted in: Nuclear reactor restarts unlikely this year

  • 0

    zichi

    If that were even remotely true, the president would have closed down the border and banned all flights coming in from West Africa, until further notice.

    The WHO has declared Nigeria to be free of Ebola victims after no new cases for 6 weeks. The death toll was 6 people.

    Posted in: Americans 'can't give in to hysteria or fear' over Ebola, says Obama

  • 0

    zichi

    turbotsat

    Important parts of the Fukushima like the emergency generators and the sea water cooling pumps were at or below sea level. The location of the Sendai plant is different and the history of tsunami is less than one meter.

    Posted in: Nuclear reactor restarts unlikely this year

  • 0

    zichi

    Frungy

    When you almost hit someone with your car you were at fault and driving at a speed were you were unable to control your car in that environment even if you were within the speed limit. A speed limit is only a limit when drivers know it's safe to do so. If there were children in the middle of a road with a speed limit you would still slow down. Whenever a driver of a vehicle hits and kills a pedestrian, then they are in the wrong. The same also applies if it happens with someone riding a bicycle.

    Kill someone with your car, you are guilty of vehicular manslaughter.

    You also have the choose not to drive a car which isn't needed in city's.

    If you read up on crimes with people leaving an accident scene, a hit and run, a high number is because they had been drinking.

    When a person is sent to prison for killing someone with their car, it usually involves a period of labor too. If a person knowingly gave alcohol to a driver could also be prosecuted and given a prison term.

    Posted in: Man killed in hit-and-run in Aichi

  • 0

    zichi

    Frungy

    So, because he's dead he's automatically guiltless? ... that is the least logical thing I've ever seen. I've just figured out how to commit the perfect crime in Japan.

    Yes that right, whenever a driver of a vehicle hits and kills someone, they are always guilty and in Japan if found will be sent to prison for at least five years. The reasons for hit and runs are usually because the driver had been drinking alcohol and over the limit. Additional prison time will be given for leaving the crime scene and not reporting it to the police. Guess you don't live or drive here then otherwise you would be aware of the laws? The fleeing driver has committed many serious offenses.

    Posted in: Man killed in hit-and-run in Aichi

  • 1

    zichi

    Hold on a second. Was a blood alcohol test done on the victim? Was he wearing dark or reflective clothing? Where was he hit, on the sidewalk or on the road? Was he at a crossing point or jaywalking?

    yes, blame the victim!

    Posted in: Man killed in hit-and-run in Aichi

  • 0

    zichi

    Only available in America.

    Posted in: Will Apple Pay be the next iRevolution?

  • -1

    zichi

    Sacrificed by the Edo old boys network who believe women have no place in the Diet let alone being ministers.

    Posted in: Trade, justice ministers quit as Abe loses 2 of his 5 women ministers

  • 1

    zichi

    bass4funk

    Sorry, doesn't mean it can't mutate or get worse or become airborne, it's in a different environment now, of course it can. Thinking it wouldn't would be considered totally ignorance.

    I didn't say that. I said currently, Ebola isn't an airborne virus, like SARS but if it becomes one then it be will be thousands of times more deadly, But at the moment it isn't and many more people are dying from other illness and disasters than the Ebola victims. Ebola is a terrible way to die but death only comes once to everyone."

    Posted in: Aid agency Oxfam says Ebola could become the "definitive humanitarian disaster of our generation." Do you agree?

  • 0

    zichi

    No! Although a serious disaster and disaster which would worsen if it ever became airborne but every year more than 500,000 people die from malaria.

    Posted in: Aid agency Oxfam says Ebola could become the "definitive humanitarian disaster of our generation." Do you agree?

  • 3

    zichi

    Some aspects of the LDP never seem to change even though there's a long history of them. Here today, gone today. The LDP, Obuchi and Justice Minister Midori Matsushima are having meltdowns.

    Posted in: Obuchi resigns over misuse of political funds; justice minister also resigns

  • 2

    zichi

    turbotsat I thought the height was 35 m from Google Earth but from checking I know see it's actually 13 m.

    http://www.kyuden.co.jp/library/pdf/en/ir/initiatives_for_ensuring_safety_in_nuclear_power_stations_201304.pdf

    Posted in: Nuclear reactor restarts unlikely this year

  • 2

    zichi

    Tsunami old not be a problem since the plant is 35 m above sea level. There are other problems and concerns.

    From a report I came across, from The Nuclear Regulation Authority Citizen Watchdog Group.

    Kyushu Electric has a shocking plan in the event of a serious accident involving loss of coolant and loss of power. The company plans to abandon cooling of the reactor vessel and instead will switch to pooling water at the bottom of the containment vessel and having the molten fuel which has breeched the reactor vessel fall into the pooled water. The company claims that this would not lead to breech of the containment vessel nor hydrogen explosions, but its claims are only based on computerized analyses.

    The so called Town Hall meetings are rigged and the invited people are the one supporting the restarts. It's just a game. More local people seem opposed than in other locations with NPP's.

    Posted in: Nuclear reactor restarts unlikely this year

  • 1

    zichi

    Frungy

    And if you read the paper you'll notice that volcanic ash shorting out electrical systems IS a real concern.

    Except there are no exposed electric circuits because they are always inside cabinets with rubber sealed doors.

    You claim to be an electrical engineer. If you were you'd be aware that volcanic ash + moisture is highly conductive and is known to short out systems.

    I will ignore your personal insults but I'm a highly qualified and very experienced electrical engineer and measurement and control engineer and instrumentation engineer and microscopist.

    As for the system being closed, the diagram of Fukushima daiichi published by Asahi shimbun disagrees with you, several articles on nuclear power station cooling systems disagree with you.

    The reactors at Fukushima were BWR and the Sendai PWR. A little research and you would discovered that too.

    Your only "evidence" is your claim to be an electrical engineer... one who isn't aware of a common danger to electrical systems in volcanic countries.

    I'm a British trained engineer and to my knowledge there are no volcanoes there ot at least active so it didn't come up in my training or uni but again I'll ignore the personal insults.

    It is guaranteed. You're simply not in possession of all the facts, like that volcanic ash + steam = problem.

    None of us are in possession of all the facts since none of us have been to the Sendai plant and we need to reply on what is available by news articles and other material published. It could be better and obtaining sensitive documents about nuclear plants is difficult in any country but there again this is only a message forum and not some science based site?

    Read the article. Volcanic ash is a real risk. One that you are unaware of despite your claim to being an "electrical engineer".

    That's the third time you have challenged by qualifications in a single post post so I'll make this the last reply to.

    You're arguing from a position of ignorance. Similar facilities covered in ash have shown the dangers of your type of thinking.

    Just which nuclear plants have been covered by volcanic ash? I know of none. Also no one actually knows when the next eruption will occur just like what happened recently at Ontake. But I would like to see the NRA ensure that at least the reactors can be cooled in a shut down condition because like I have already stated it would take a long time to remove all the nuclear fuel from the plant. I have finished responding to you. Good day, sir!

    Posted in: Expert says 2 Sendai reactors in danger from active volcano

  • 8

    zichi

    The total amount of power entering the grid system from solar and other renewable energy is very small compared with the total amount generated and its bull that the grid system can't handle it or the fluctuations and is just another attempt to justify restarting the reactors.

    Much like when they were saying we would all suffer black outs during the summer peak demand but never actually happened and this summer gone there were no power cut backs. The power demands never exceeded more than 90% of total power available, even without a single reactor working.

    But there's ¥50 trillion of profits locked into the reactors so the power utilities will try everything to encourage the restarting of them.

    The power utilities don't want to pay the feed in tariff rates which i think is still around ¥45/Kwh.

    Posted in: Green power floods Japan grid as premium prices bite

  • 3

    zichi

    @Frungy

    Since the nuclear disaster, on JT I have more than expressed my opposition to the use of nuclear energy or restarting the reactors but my opposition to nuclear energy predates the disaster since its a view I've held since the 1960's.

    That's because you've decided there's no problem and are unprepared to even contemplate it. We have adequate proof that the safety systems in these plants have been badly neglected, the personnel under-trained, and some of the safeguards even omitted because of cost-cutting.

    I have never stated there are no problems with the Sendai plant but the question which needs an answer is whether the reactors could continue to be cooled if the plant was hit by ash from a volcanic eruption. There are many unknowns in the question.

    When the eruption occurs which way will the wind be blowing at the time and how much ash will land on the Sendai NPP. If the eruption is from Mount Sakurajima which is the most likely I guess the real concern would be for the residents of Kagoshima.

    You have also stated,

    Even a couple of centimeters would block air inflow vents, the ash could also short out any exposed circuit boards, and water coming into the cooling system will be contaminated and block intakes and filters.

    I don't understand how ash would short out any exposed circuits boards since first they are never exposed and secondly the ash isn't conductive? The PWR cooing systems are closed systems so I don't see how it could be contaminated by ash. In all my years working has an electrical engineer I never saw what you state.

    Pyroclastic flows will inflict immediate damage in the area and prevent access (either ground or air),

    I don't see how a pyroclastic flow from Mount Sakurajima would move across an open sea and then across a mountain terrain to reach the Sendai NPP about 40 km away, which is also about 40m above sea level.

    The current safety systems are completely insufficient for this sort of contingency. The bottom line is that if something like a volcanic eruption happens near these plants then a melt down isn't a possibility, it is guaranteed.

    No its not guaranteed!

    I have read up on how the Sendai PWR's work and especially the cooling systems. These are basically the same type of reactors used in 75 of the American reactors.

    I don't see why the eruption and the ash would cause the loss of the offsite power but if some of it was lost then there are emergency generators and a cooling system which could cool provided the reactors are in shut down position which I would assume would happen if there was any volcanic eruptions.

    The reactors need cooling even in shut down so the question of the ash is a serious one. I also assume at the moment both of the reactors contain their nuclear cores. I think it would take many months to remove all the nuclear fuel from the site even if the plant was decommissioned.

    There could be other problems with the plant not revealed by the post. Everyday, 300 tons of groundwater are pumped out everyday. If the pumps were no longer able to function the water would back up and mix with other contaminated water. The NRA is requiring absolutely no measures to be undertaken to prevent contaminated water from being released into the ocean and other areas in the event of a serious accident.

    Measures to prevent breeching of the containment and hydrogen explosions in the event of a serious accident are inadequate---cross-checking to verify the reliability of the analysis code has not been undertaken

    From a report I came across, from The Nuclear Regulation Authority Citizen Watchdog Group.

    Kyushu Electric has a shocking plan in the event of a serious accident involving loss of coolant and loss of power. The company plans to abandon cooling of the reactor vessel and instead will switch to pooling water at the bottom of the containment vessel and having the molten fuel which has breeched the reactor vessel fall into the pooled water. The company claims that this would not lead to breech of the containment vessel nor hydrogen explosions, but its claims are only based on computerized analyses.

    I do not accept your opinion that in the event of the plant being hit by some level of ash would cause meltdowns in the reactors and you haven't shown enough reasons to back up your claim. But since there has never been a nuclear plant covered with volcanic ash we can't know for sure what would happen.

    Posted in: Expert says 2 Sendai reactors in danger from active volcano

  • 3

    zichi

    @Frungy

    Let's start here, because this is the real sticking point. You've stated your position, and you now find yourself unable to back down, no matter how mistaken your original position is proved to be.

    I don't know what I need to back down about. I understand and agree with you that if volcanic ash were to hit the nuclear plant there could be a problem with any external filters. But I disagree with your comment that the ash would lead to reactor melt downs. There are systems to cool the reactors without the need for external filters or offsite power. Those I believe would prevent meltdowns because the reactors would continue to be cooled if in a shutdown position.

    The isolation condensor system is only present in some models, and it relies on a body of water open to the atmosphere to work... an open body of water that would rapidly become polluted with volcanic ash. That ash would be pulled into the condensor that reclaims the evaporating water from the system and it would become clogged in short order. The condensor system is not effective in a volcanic scenario. and if you've been informed that it would then you have been misinformed.

    The pool of water for isolation condensers are located indoors in the reactor buildings but I retract my comment because I believe PWR's use another emergency cooling system.

    The PWR coolant pumps are located indoors and provided the reactors are in a state of shutdown even without the pump there would be natural circulation flow through the reactors. This alone is sufficient to remove generated heat.

    The auxiliary feedwater system and the steam dump system work together to allow the operators to remove the decay heat from the reactor. The auxiliary feedwater system pumps water from the condensate storage tank to the steam generators. The water is allowed to boil to make steam which can be dumped to the main condenser through the steam dump valves. The water will then condense the steam and take the heat to the environment. If the dump system fails the steam can be dumped directly through the atmospheric relief valves.

    The are emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) to provide core cooling following a loss of coolant accident.

    There are usually two of these systems, one being a backup. These systems can operate even with the loss of offsite power and are powered from emergency diesel generators.

    A volcanic scenario, even without lava anywhere near the station, would be a complete disaster.

    Well, I disagree there would be a complete disaster from the plant being hit with volcanic ash.

    Posted in: Expert says 2 Sendai reactors in danger from active volcano

  • 2

    zichi

    Frungy

    The current safety systems are completely insufficient for this sort of contingency. The bottom line is that if something like a volcanic eruption happens near these plants then a melt down isn't a possibility, it is guaranteed.

    I disagree because the emergency generators are located indoors and the isolation condensers don't require power or air so at least a meltdown would be avoided. Although, there should be a review of the various safety systems after the statement by Professor Toshitsugu Fujii.

    I remain of the opinion that none of the reactors should be restarted.

    Posted in: Expert says 2 Sendai reactors in danger from active volcano

  • 1

    zichi

    @CraigHicks

    All of those cooling methods require active human interaction, without which there is serious disaster. A design which in absence of human interaction, with all machinery failing, still will passively shutdown is required.

    The emergency generators will start with the loss of the offsite mains power. Probably, the isolation condensers need to be turned on but even in a volcanic eruption the operators won't abandon the plant but will have to remain indoors. I think the plant needs to have emergency breathing equipment in case the operators need to go outside to unblock filters. I would agree with you that safety systems need to be able to operate automatically but from experience I would say not without some form of operator intervention. The final decisions must be made by the plant manager.

    The utility also promised to transfer fuel rods to safer areas ahead of time if signs of eruptions are detected — a time-consuming process that experts say is unrealistic.

    I don't know how many fuel assemblies there are in the cooling pools but after 30 years of operating I would guess they are more than 80% full. Two reactor cooling pools and a common pool plus a dry cask storage building would take many months to move all the nuclear fuel.

    Posted in: Expert says 2 Sendai reactors in danger from active volcano

  • 1

    zichi

    Jcapan

    Sorry we haven't used them for the airports. They use to operate vans for the airports but maybe now they only do a shuttle service (some restricted areas). Kobe airport is best via Portliner and Kansai vis shuttle boat from Kobe airport. My wife sometimes uses Itami but I think she takes the bus?

    http://www.mktaxi-japan.com/#!kobe-mk/c1auq

    Posted in: Kansai taxis flout laws in quest for more lucrative business

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