zichi's past comments

  • 0

    zichi

    Heda_Madness

    So what do you suggest for the former residents who lived in the no-go zones of Date, Namie, Iitate, Nahara, Minamisoma, Futaba (all of which is a no-go zone) or those residents were the radiation levels are now above the legal 20 millisieverts per year. These people should be offered support to move to a new area and move on with their lives.

    The same should apply to any former resident where their village is zoned off into different radiation levels. People should not be forced back to those communities but if residents want to return the final decision is theirs and not the Tokyo government. You seem to think people should be made to return to their communities.

    The actions of the Tokyo government are like I said in my previous comment, to force the public opinion of the extent of the nuclear disaster in its drive to restart the reactors. But then that's another point you support.

    Where are you living again? Tokyo, Minamisoma, Fukushima, Japan, no not even close, no thousands of miles to the very south of the world.

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 4

    zichi

    When it comes to building massive structures like stadiums, bridges, nuclear power plants, the eventual costs always seem to double, triple and even quadruple.

    Posted in: Japan faces Y5.9 bil loss over scrapped Olympic stadium

  • 3

    zichi

    Star-viking

    does the Sandai NPP have installed backup generators, I couldn't actually find any info on that, just the truck generators?

    The Niigata NPP failed to pass the IAEA inspection, 100% and actually the reasons are also the same as at it Fukushima NPP. Yoshida, the Fukushima NPP manager in his testimony to the Diet stated lack of training, since no one believed a nuclear disaster possible, lack of comprehensive safety and emergency manual.

    listen to outside agencies.

    which ones would that be?

    Posted in: Nuclear power

  • 10

    zichi

    Mitsubishi is making great efforts to amend and apologise for its past, an example to be followed by the PM Abe government and others, especially this being the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII which probably killed a 100 million people.

    Posted in: Official: Mitsubishi may extend WWII apology to others

  • 3

    zichi

    Heda_Madness

    No I wasn't suggesting that Minamisoma be closed. What I was saying is that former residents should not be forced to return to their communities if they can not enjoy the same levels of freedoms and public services they enjoyed prior to the nuclear disaster. If people decide they don't want to return they should be given support to move to new areas.

    In places like Minamisoma, Iitate and Date there are no go zones. There are zones with radiation greater than 20 millisieverts per year. This makes it very difficult for returning residents. While Minamisoma is a larger flat area both Iitate and Date have much less flat land and more mountainous areas. While about one-third of Minamisoma is mountainous more of Iitate and Date is mountainous.

    What I said in my previous comment was,

    "Iitate is a mountain place, probably more than 80% is mountainous with some peaks up to 1,000 meters. Date is to the west and Minamisoma to the east. All of these areas had serious radiation contaminations. Mostly farming areas which will be difficult if not impossible for returning residents to restart."

    That remains true today.

    Iitate radiation zoning is divided into 3 zones. Less than 20 millisieverts per year declared safe for residents to return. Second zone with radiation 20 but 50 millisieverts per year. Access to the third zone is prohibited.

    Mostly, the decontamination work was for homes and roadsides but not farmland. Food grown in Iitate must be tested for radiation before going to market. Most of anything grown is not actually being sent to market even when the radiation levels are below 100 becquerels per kilo.

    In 2014, in northern Iitate a roadside hotspot measured 75 microsieverts per hour (652 millisieverts per year)

    http://fukushimaemergencywhatcanwedo.blogspot.jp

    How much cesium remains in the trees and the soil on mountain sides and what would happen for instance with a forrest fire. The Ministry of the Environment wedsite claims that 100% of the forrest has already been decontaminated. That's actually impossible to achieve. They mean only about 25% of the total land in Iitate has been cleaned. In other words, of the 200 km2 of Iitate Village only 56 km2 are targeted for decontamination.

    The country has been completely nuclear-free for nearly two years, thanks in large part to significant public opposition, in spite of the massive pressure from nuclear utilities and the Abe government on local city governments. However, these utilities are massively powerful and the Abe government is wholly in bed with them. In an effort to reduce public opposition, Abe has been pushing the pro-nuclear agenda to normalize the Fukushima nuclear disaster. If the public can be convinced that mere years after the worst nuclear disaster in a generation, citizens can go home and return to life the way it was before the disaster – with no additional health risks – then that is a powerful argument against those opposed to nuclear restarts.

    In Feb. 2015 16 journalists from 10 countries visited parts of Iitate.

    Mr. Tao explained how radiation levels change depending on whether trees are conifer or deciduous, and showed how the radiation jumped to 6 or 7 microsieverts in the ditch to the side of the road.

    http://fpcj.jp/en/useful-en/earthquake-en/p=29916/

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 3

    zichi

    Minamisoma's evacuation zones were reclassified into three. One of them is with radiation levels below 20 millisieverts per year. The number of residents in this category stands at 12,740 of 3,850 households in the city's Odaka and Haramachi districts. The second is with radiation levels between 20 and 50 millisieverts per year, where residents' visits are still limited. The number of residents in this category comes to 510 from 130 families in Odaka and Haramachi districts. The third category comprises areas where radiation levels exceed 50 millisieverts per year and are expected to remain at or above 20 millisieverts over the next five years. The number of residents of the area in this category is just two, from one household in the Odaka district's township of Kanaya.

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 5

    zichi

    nigelboy

    11 comments and not a single word about the actual contents of the post. Mitsubishi apologising to the American POW's for being used as forced labor?

    Posted in: Japanese company apologizes to U.S. POWs for WWII forced labor

  • 0

    zichi

    Yes no keyboard on Apple watch just dictation I was meaning dictation in general rather than watch.

    Posted in: Time will tell if Apple Watch catches on

  • 0

    zichi

    Siri can really only be used in the language the device is set to. Using both English and Japanese without changing the settings is near impossible and anyway, using Siri in English can be a problem too. Dictation works well by changing the keyboard settings.

    Fun bit, ask Siri what is zero divided by zero.

    I won't be buying an Apple watch since I don't use the iPhone, but I won't be buying any smart watch since I've not even owned a watch for more than 40 years.

    Posted in: Time will tell if Apple Watch catches on

  • 6

    zichi

    So how will Abe explain to the nation about TPP, using "down on Maggie's Farm?"

    Posted in: Abe mocked on Twitter over use of props to explain security bills

  • 3

    zichi

    Parts of Minamisoma are no-go zones and likely to remain so into the future. Other zones allow people to continue with their business but not to stay overnight. But you know all of this already, yes?

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 7

    zichi

    So I understand now. Self-defense is using the SDF to defend the country. Collective self-defense is sending Japanese firefighters to America. Guess Abe will have to have firefighter bases there otherwise the houses will have burnt down by the time they get there?

    Posted in: Abe mocked on Twitter over use of props to explain security bills

  • 4

    zichi

    Abe’s Coup in Seven Simple Steps

    http://shingetsunewsagency.com/tokyo/?p=1450

    Posted in: Abe defends security legislation

  • 18

    zichi

    "Now children, are we sitting comfortably, then lets begin!"

    Posted in: Abe mocked on Twitter over use of props to explain security bills

  • 2

    zichi

    @Kazuaki Shimazaki

    So you have decided to ignore the constitutional scholars, law experts and other academics?

    If self-defense and collective self-defense are the same and don't violate the constitution, then why is there a need to change, with the introduction of Abe's security Bills?

    Professor Hasebe Yasuo, a scholar of constitutional law now at Waseda Law School, on June 4, testified before a Commission of the Lower House Diet about the security Bills, and argued that it was unconstitutional.

    http://www.iconnectblog.com/2015/06/hasebe-yasuo-interview-with-the-kochi-shimbun/

    The LDP is not happy with how the press has reported the criticism of the bills. At a June 25 “study meeting” held at party headquarters, four members made remarks blaming the media for weak public support for the national-security legislation. One suggested, “We should punish the media by putting pressure on their advertisers. Cut off their funds.” There were also suggestions that two newspapers opposing the military bases in Okinawa should be “crushed and put out of business.”

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/japan-protest-movement-against-growing-militarism-are-these-the-last-days-of-japans-prime-minister-abe/5463017

    Posted in: Abe defends security legislation

  • 3

    zichi

    Around 3,100 residents in the city of Fukushima are demanding ¥18.3 billion in damages related to the crisis at TEPCO's nuclear ground zero. 3,107 residents of the Watari district want an out-of-court settlement for their psychological distress, including health concerns due to radiation exposure.

    If the nuclear refugee's can't return to the type of community they had prior to the nuclear meltdowns because of radiation or the lack of public services then those residents should not be forced to do so and should instead be given sufficient compensations to allow them to leave their communities and move to a new area.

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 5

    zichi

    @Kazuaki Shimazak

    From a purely grammatical structure point of view, "collective" and "individual" self defense are subcategories of "self defence". Thus, the day when the court says Self Defense is permitted, to insist they had excluded collective self defense is to twist the court's words to your own needs.

    From reading up on "self-defense" and "collective self-defense" they are not the same. This is mostly the view taken by about 26 governments/cabinets and prime ministers since the Constitution. I'm not twisting anything for my needs.

    Also hundreds of constitutional scholars and more than 10,000 academics also disagree over collective self-defense.

    The Supreme Court judgement on the Sunagawa Incident made no mention of collective self-defense. It judged that the presence of the U.S. military bases didn't violate Article 9. But now the PM Abe and his government are twisting that judgement in saying it includes collective self-defense.

    Personally, I don't think the security Bills are needed nor any change to Article 9 or how the SDF works to protect the country. For 70 years there has been peace and that's what is important.

    Posted in: Abe defends security legislation

  • 5

    zichi

    Star-viking

    I don't understand your last comment.

    Before the nuclear disaster people travelled from A to B in a straight line but now in that part of Fukushima isn't always the case because of the number of no go areas. Radiation in Iitate in 2011 reached more than 50 microsieverts per hour. I don't know the exact zoning without checking but I think the highest levels of radiation were in the south part of the town.

    Iitate is a mountain place, probably more than 80% is mountainous with some peaks up to 1,000 meters. Date is to the west and Minamisoma to the east. All of these areas had serious radiation contaminations. Mostly farming areas which will be difficult if not impossible for returning residents to restart.

    Near impossible to decontaminate the mountain areas and totally wrong to tell residents not to go into them to collect wild foods or whatever.

    The evacuations of Iitate didn't happen until about one month following 3/11. I think because the mayor hid the radiation levels and didn't want to evacuate.

    I too have lived in similar areas. I lived in the Japan Alps for 10 years and went all over the area, including climbing alps mountains to find my best painting places. If these areas were now off limit because of radiation levels it would make me sad enough to not want to return to live there again. We also frequently went into the mountains to collect wild foods like mushrooms and bamboo. That's all part of living in the countryside.

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

  • 4

    zichi

    Kyuden seem to have revised their defenses to deal with a 9.1 magnitude tsunami. That seems prudent.

    "9.1 magnitude tsunami." No such event, 9.1 magnitude earthquake yes, but tsunami are usually measured in wave height and not magnitude. There are no NPP constructed or with safety updates to deal with a direct 9.1 magnitude earthquake.

    What it says in the report I linked was

    The standard tsunami has been reevaluated to cover tsunamis stemming from an interplate earthquake (Mw 9.1) in the Ryukyu Trench, to a generator (in the vicinity of the sluice gate) maximum high-water mark of around 5m above sea level (at high tide).

    Back-up generators are a requirement.

    That could mean on trucks too which appears to be the case at Sendai which could topple over in a powerful quake. Volcanic eruption could topple the main offsite power lines and the truck generators. What then?

    The major lessons of the accident have been learned. That's what I meant by post-disaster.

    Last week the IAEA issued its report on its inspection of TEPCO NPP in Niigata and was critical in some areas, so are you really sure on "The major lessons of the accident have been learned." I would think the major learning will go for many more decades to come.

    Posted in: Nuclear power

  • 5

    zichi

    Star-viking ≥There are plenty of villages in Tohoku which could cope with not having access to one third of their area. In fact, some places are trying to limit the populated areas to cut down on the expenses of maintaining access to services in winter.

    You are talking about places which aren't contaminated from radiation.

    Posted in: Nuclear refugees face dilemma over returning home

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