Book by killer of British woman to become film

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  • 18

    Nicky Washida

    I feel physically sick.

    He might (might) be giving his profits to "public good" but what about the production company? The actors? The move theaters? Lindsay dies a horrible and untimely death and these - scum - (sorry cant think of a better word) make money from it.

    Sorry if I sound a little personal - being a British woman and a (former) teacher in Tokyo from a town not so far from Lindsays in the UK kind of makes it so.

  • 13

    MeanRingo

    In poor taste. Can't wait to see how they spin this. It'll be like a Japanese version of The Fugitive, only he really is the killer (no one-armed man) and no cops were really chasing him down (she was only a gaijin, after all). Hope he rots.

  • 3

    DenTok2009

    Since the Hawker family declined Ichihashi's offer to give them the royalties, I wonder what Ichihashi's choice of charity will be...

  • 0

    Maria

    The guy heading the movie, Dean Fujioka, can be found on FB, if anyone wants to ask him why he feels this is a good movie to make. Me, I think best-case scenario he wants to make money out of making Ichihashi into some kind of solitary her

  • 6

    Godan

    Couldn't agree more, Nicky! Why this story has to be made into a movie is beyond me! And who wants to see this?! Wannabe Ichihashis? I say picket any theater showing this crap!

  • -1

    naruhodo1

    He compares himself from a character to a book or comic book.

  • 0

    smartacus

    I can't imagine what theater would show it (or why anyone would want to see it). Probably, it will go straight to DVD,

  • 1

    chikasho

    I just threw u.! you dont see movies about the sick local depravities that occur every day. but an internation cast could sell internationally. animals!!!!!!

  • 2

    Weasel

    I can't imagine what theater would show it (or why anyone would want to see it)

    That would be true if people had common sense; however, the concept of common sense died out about 40 years ago.

  • 2

    Newsman

    Why?!

  • -6

    NetNinja

    Oh yes, lets glorify her murder. This is when I feel helpless. Japan constantly striving to change facts and alter history.

    So some no-name actress is going to jump on the opportunity to play this role. She probably won't even come face to face with the Hawker family.

    What's worse is that he'll probably watch it in prison and do his own commentary. I would love to be a bit more imaginative and descriptive but unlike this movie it might be considered offensive. Apparently this is not.

  • 10

    tamanegi

    Hopefully the Jcops will also be depicted in a poor light for being the bufoons who let this scumbag go and then fail to catch him.

  • 4

    CrazyJoe

    Holy ****! This is nothing but disrespect towards the victim's family. Does the producer really think Ichihashi is telling the whole truth in the book even.

  • 3

    Amanda Harlow

    Here is the director/actor's official website with his justification for making this movie..... Dean Fujioka is his name.....

    http://www.deanfujioka.net/en/

  • 0

    afterthequake

    Well said Tamanegi. Didn't the cops stop chasing because they weren't sure how big the drop was on the other side of the wall........USELESS.
    I know that this all seems tasteless, and for a foreigner in Japan it feels very close to home, but at the same time, if it had been the case of a movie being made about a foreigner getting murdered in the UK, I hardly think I would have bothered to click the link. Anybody know how his appeal is going?

  • 2

    Mirai Hayashi

    what a disgrace! Japan rewarding criminals once again! boycott

  • -4

    LH10

    a movie! can't wait to see it ^o^

  • 5

    serendipitous

    I disagree. It's certainly not the first movie to be based on a true story (albeit the killer's version of events). But, come on, there have been movies about 9-11, mass murderers, and serial killers. Having said that, I'm not really interested in seeing a movie about Ichihashi's life but maybe others are. It may actually raise awareness in Japan of the crime. And I wonder who will play the role of Miss Hawker in the movie....

  • 3

    ben4short

    Sorry all you weepers and throw-uppers and picketeers . . . you're all completely out of place on this one. Perhaps because this horrible crime happened in Japan, there might be some over-sensitivity involved, but books/films/art have a long tradition of this sort of thing, so your protests are ill-conceived.

    Yes, of course, perps such as Ichihashi and OJ and others should refuse profits from their books, and courts should order such restrictions. But we're talking about third-parties here, and there is absolutely nothing wrong or unethical or distasteful in an artist (writer, filmmaker, painter) using someone's tragedy as material. Ever hear of the book In Cold Blood by Mr. Capote based on the real-life murder of a family of four? A masterpiece. Or how about Mailer's classic, The Executioner's Song, about the killer Gary Gilmore? How many books/films have been made about Jack the Ripper? The list is endless.

    Point being that every artist in the world, in every field, has the inalienable right in a free society to use any material he so chooses, as "offensive" as it might be to some. Again, pls be clear about the distinction I'm making between the perp and a third-person artist. Go for it, Dean Fujioka, and see if you can bring any new insights or an interesting perspective to this horrific crime.

  • -1

    serendipitous

    or is the movie not about her at all? Just the time he spent on the run?

  • 1

    seesaw1

    Now ... Movie about Miss Hawker. Next .. Movie about Mr Woodford..wonder when is the one about Miss Blackman. Interesting, on how people capitalize on others sufferings .

  • 2

    L4dymercury

    Stay classy, Japan. Profit off of that murder.

  • 2

    wontond

    @ben4short...I agree with you. People have the right to boycott the movie if they find it distasteful (like I do), but they shouldn't harass or censor people like this Dean Fujioka. Have some faith in your fellow human beings. If the movie is as bad as everyone thinks it will be, then no one will watch it and Fujioka's career will be finished and the studio will lose face.

  • 1

    Simon Phillips

    Being British myself I can’t understand why someone would won’t to create a movie on this! And after going to the actor/directors site it appears that this will be his, "Dean Fujioka", debut movie as a director!!

    Utter disgrace to victim’s family, and I like some of the ideas that we should picket the cinemas when it is released!!

  • -2

    ben4short

    Thanks, wontond, for the voice of sensibility. Those protesting, however, aren't concerned about the quality of the movie . . . . they are merely upset that such a movie is being made in the first place, which is totally ridiculous. Sentimental fascism, if you ask me.

  • 2

    timtak

    There are lots of films made about murderers, such as Gary Gilmore (Executioner's Song), Smith and Hickock (In Cold Blood).

  • 1

    smithinjapan

    How much do you want to bet Ichihashi will be made out to be a sympathetic character and 'victim' in all of this? This is just sick.

  • 3

    sau133

    What Nicky said.

    I agree Wontond, there shouldn't be censorship for the director. If he made an unbiased account of the case then that would be fine, but he isn't, he is using an account compiled entirely by the sicko murdering scum that killled an innocent woman, who now by the way, has some crazy Japanese woman cult following and is IN NO DOUBT profiteering from this whole thing. It is a disgrace. And no Afterthequake..if a foreigner was murdered in Britain, the accused would certainly not be allowed to make a film about it and revel in his fame which this piece of crap is now being allowed to do and enjoy...

    This "Dean Fujioka" should be ashamed of himself.

  • 0

    Simon Phillips

    quality of the movie .

    What quality? You sir would love to see this movie I bet?

    If that was my daughter I dont think I would be happy that a movie is being made so soon after jugdment (court trial) of her killer do you? No time has passed and if I am correct its not been a year since the book as been released!!

    quality of the movie!!!! hahahaha, SICK!!

  • -3

    koiwaicoffee

    How sick is this country, really?

  • -3

    Disillusioned

    That will be the end of Dean Fujioka's career. I can just see all the otaku, geeks, dorks and freaks lining up to see this movie.

  • 2

    ben4short

    Charley Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer . . . as I said, the list is literally endless. And the great irony is that the whiners on this post have certainly read some of these books.

    "Sick" is the facile, catch-all answer to anything someone either doesn't understand or is too lazy to intellectually question.

    All I am saying (and can't believe it needs repeating) is that I totally, unequivocally defend Mr. Fujioka's artistic right to make ANY film he chooses, as painful as it may be to friends/family of the victim. Personal feelings have never trumped art.

  • 2

    jforce

    No surprise here. People make movies about stuff.

  • -1

    Al Stewart

    This is just going to make him look like a hero. With all the people in JP that already are fans of this man, it going to be crazy.

  • -2

    Simon Phillips

    @ben4short i have no problem with the artistic rights or any thing else that this man wants to do with his time.... all I am saying is that it has not been long since the court judgemnt was given and not even a year sice that book was released. The artist wants a quick way to become rich and famous and to me it is a cheap shot at best.... if he really cared about the victims family he would have waited a few years!

    Thats all

  • 4

    Newsman

    Let this sentimental fascist see if he can explain his feelings a little less succinctly than before. In Cold Blood and The Executioner's Song were third-person accounts that attempted to come to grips with why people kill, and you can't even begin to answer the "why" without knowing exactly what happened. Mailer's book had the additional distinction of explaining in some detail the process of applying the death penalty. Both books have horrific events and unpleasant personalities at their core, but I don't have any problem with either one, nor with any other media that derive from them.

    But Ichihashi's book is a first-person narrative -- it is his own point of view. Even more problematic, the title of the book is "Until the Arrest -- The Blank Two Years and Seven Months". Presumably, once the murder to open the story is dispensed with, we will be treated to a Hitchcock-like story about a man on the run, a will-he-or-won't-he-be-caught bit of melodrama that will encourage the viewer to root for his escape again and again just when he looks like he will be found out. Thematically, that's the only way I can see how the story of him on the run can be made to work -- and that is what I find distasteful. Suppose, instead of Ichihashi, it had been the killer of those eight elementary school children in the Osaka school massacre in 2001 who had been on the lam for nearly three years. Would everyone on this thread be happy with a movie, told from the killer's point of view, about how he succesfully disguised himself for so long and avoided capture? This is someone I'm supposed to feel sympathy for when he is finally caught? Get real.

    And as far as "freedom of expression" and "let the marketplace decide" go, sure -- nobody's telling Fujioka he can't make his slimy movie. We're just trying to save him the trouble of making it by letting him know now that we think the idea is a piece of

  • 2

    yildiray

    SmithinJapan

    How much do you want to bet Ichihashi will be made out to be a sympathetic character and 'victim' in all of this?

    Yep, I think you are right (taken from Dean Fujioka's website)

    I may be able to shed some light on an angle that may not have yet been explored. The forces in society that may have distracted this man to make him what he is..

    If there is any justice, this move will end his movie career as it is clear he just wants to ride the controversy.

  • 0

    yildiray

    Feel free to say hello to him as well :-)

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DEAN-FUJIOKA/201419699914535?sk=wall

  • 1

    BurakuminDes

    @ yidiray - Oh, I may just drop by and drop Dean a few "pleasantries" along with everyone else...

  • 11

    DS

    The murdering scumbag has the right to write his book.

    The movie company has the right to make a movie about it.

    The general public has the right to ignore it.

    Pretty simple really. It doesn't matter if he glorifies himself, or if the movie is accurate or not. The best way to sabotage the project is to ignore it. Let it sink into obscurity. The more rage and publicity is generated, the more people will become curious and buy/watch/read it. If you take the time to complain to the studio or to the actor, they will be pleased. After all, there is no such thing as bad publicity.

  • 2

    The Munya Times

    God knows, I rather read Goethe and Shakespeare and watch nice classic movies.

    Movie producers and directors work hard to make money even by poisoning societies with sick, crappy things but they only can do that until disgusted people pay for the rubbish that sicko Ishihashi and fellow sicko Sedic International create together.

    Not a nickel from me to Ichihashi. Everybody can make their own choices, for me Goethe is O.K.

  • 1

    TheMistressLore

    @Disillusioned : I am a geek, and I would not want to read this book or watch the movie.

  • 4

    Chinchan Zu

    sick

  • 2

    TigersTokyoDome

    This is a big test for Japanese society. If they had any shame over this then nobody would want to see it and there should be public outcry. I remember years ago when an artist showed an image of child murderer Myra Hindley at the Sensation Young British Artists exhibition at the Royal Academy. There was huge public uproar. Maybe not here..

  • 6

    zichi

    Under British Law, and probably other countries too, convicted criminals can't profit from the crime. Should be same here too. I think that would be my biggest objection to this film production.

    My second objection would be whether it will be a work of truth or fiction, and since they will use material provided by Ichihashi, there'll be some element of fiction and fantasy.

    Now Ichihashi is jailed for life, are the book and film his way of fantasizing about his murder?

    There should be concern at least from the film production company about sensitivities for the Hawker family.

    I followed the original case. I kept his picture in my wallet in case I spotted him. Even came to Kobe. I didn't buy the book, and I won't be watching the movie.

    Both the book and the movie give him some kind of power.

  • 0

    tmarie

    It is one thing to make a movie out of it, it is another to make a movie based on his book which means he'll get money for it.

    The public here thought this was just another foreign women being killed and didn't care until her parents made an issue out of it. Then he became some sort of sick hero to some. Disgusting but not surprising.

    I'm wonder if the producer with sympathize with Ichihashi or make him out to be the sick individual he is.

  • 3

    Elbuda Mexicano

    I have to say, this guy should GET THE DEATH PENALTY ASAP and then they can write the book. Howz that??

  • 3

    Reckless

    As long as the last scene is hanging his skinny ass, then I have no problem.

  • 10

    presto345

    How sick is this country, really?

    Come on, coffee, it's not the country. It's just some individuals, the like of which can be found anywhere on this planet.

    Personally I think it is much too early to produce a movie about this sadistic crime.

  • 2

    WilliB

    Simply disgusting.

  • 0

    Jan Claudius Weirauch

    Why give so much press to this guy, it will be a victory for him after all.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    ben4short: "Charley Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey Dahmer . . . as I said, the list is literally endless. And the great irony is that the whiners on this post have certainly read some of these books."

    Making a movie based on the story of a serial killer (or just murderer) is one thing, but part of what's disgusting about this situation is that it's based on the AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT of the murder and subsequent running from justice. Is that the case with the examples you cite?

    And once again the trial, since the sentence has been appealed, is still under way. So you're going to have a movie painting Ichihashi the victim of circumstance which can literally affect the outcome. They'll get some doe-eyed Arashi singer to play the lead and young girls across the nation will fall in love with the guy (again... some talked endlessely about how 'good looking' Ichihashi was when caught).

    As with others on this thread, I hope it ends the director's career.

    yildiray: "I may be able to shed some light on an angle that may not have yet been explored. The forces in society that may have distracted this man to make him what he is.."

    Thanks for the quotation from his site. I think you're right -- he's merely trying to profit from the controversy, and sadly he probably will. More sadly still is that it will probably damage relations between Japan and some people abroad. Whether that's right or wrong isn't the question, just that it will probably happen.

  • 6

    Foxie

    They should wait at least 10 years before making a movie out of this story. Some people are still grieving, it just shows no respect.

  • -2

    TumbleDry

    Simply disgusting? Feeling sick? Wait, movies about mass murderers, killers etc have been made in the past. What about the respect for those victims too? Who told you it will a movie about an innocent Japanese hiding from the authorities? Maybe in 10 years it will more appropriate? Maybe 20 years? Come on...

  • 4

    sojherde

    As ben4short and his comrades stated already, there do exist other movies on similar stuff.That much I concede, but the conclusion is utterly wrong. So let him make one more sick movie?Do we not really have enough of that tasteless stuff? I would do what I could to stop that nonsense!

  • -6

    j4p4nFTW

    I don't think it's fair to say that this is glorifying the murder. Fujioka san has a lot of important material to focus on, mostly being problems with the police and their investigative methods. I think it would be a good thing for the public to see how the police react to such a crime and the mistakes that were made in pursuing the case. There is also the problem of fetishistic treatment of the murder of a foreigner when many, many murders of ordinary domestic people go unreported every day. So, it is similar to Natural Born Killers perhaps in it's ability to examine the media and the ways it represents crime and nationality. But unlike that film, here we have a true event and a case study that could provide fodder for interesting discussion.

  • -3

    ben4short

    The real point is, despite smithinjapan's ridiculously presumptuous ability to predict the movie, that nobody . . . repeat NOBODY, including probably Fujioka himself, knows what the final version will look like, what its POV will be, its perspective, its sympathies, so all talk about the contents of the film itself is utter nonsense.

    How many films have we seen that were radically different from the book upon they were based, even though they shared the same title? If making any movie were as simple as literally, linearly, and chronologically filming the words on the page, heck, we'd all be Scorcese's. But none of us know to what extent Fujioka is going to probe Ichihashi's psyche, especially the parts that Ichihashi himself never touched upon in his book, ti what degree Fujioka is going to speculate and possibly add a few interesting twists, etc, so please stop all this prejudgmental, presumptuous nonsense.

    Let the artist create his art and then judge it upon completion. Or give in to your narrow mindedness and boycott it. Or make you own film about the hazards of teaching English in Japan.

  • 1

    Maria

    Some really good points y'all. You're quite right that freedom of speech, expression of views etc. is paramount; though I would argue that consideration for the family is, too - barely a year (?) since Ichihashi was sentenced. And of course, countless books and films have been made of murders, many showing sympathy for the murderers; though how many of them are based on books BY the murderers themselves? I wonder how Fujioka's film will show police incompetence, if it's telling the story of the man on the run? A poster above suggests the film may touch on : " ...the problem of fetishistic treatment of the murder of a foreigner when many, many murders of ordinary domestic people go unreported every day..." This is an interesting comment - how was her death fetishised? Because the British press paid attention? Because British women in Japan paid attention? Because her parents came over to keep awareness of their daughter's murderer? What does j4p4nFTW mean?

  • 1

    just-a-guy

    Will the Japanese people 'rethink' about their popular cultures all over again? It was so 'sick'!

  • 3

    qazwsx

    I may be able to shed some light on an angle that may not have yet been explored. The forces in society that may have distracted this man to make him what he is..

    Sounds like excuses for Ichihashi already. Of course there have been a ton of movies about true criminals/crime, but the big point here is that this movie is being made from Ichihashi's own book, therefore netting him some profits..Disgusting

  • 3

    smithinjapan

    ben4short: Hey! I'm good at predicting movies!! :) Anyway, I quoted a quotation above that implies the director is going to play up a sympathetic angle... he himself said he has a chance to explore elements of society that LED to Ichihashi doing what he did -- meaning the excuses probably mentioned in the book itself.

    TumbleDry: "Wait, movies about mass murderers, killers etc have been made in the past."

    As I asked ben4short, and will ask again, were these movies based on AUTOBIOGRAPHIES?

  • 0

    Elbuda Mexicano

    I think all of the $$$$ should go to the victim and her family and some kind of find for victims of these horrible sex crimes and not one YEN, not one cent should go to any actors, movie studios etc..ALL TO THE VICTIM/S!!

  • 5

    Yardley

    There was a horrific murder in my family. Newspaper stories and books, but no movie (yet), thank god. I won't presume to speak for Lindsay's family, but one of the worst things for us is that we have NO control over how our loved ones are written about or portrayed. Once an "artist" takes an interest, the lives and deaths of our innocent loved ones are turned into entertainment, or "art".

    Let the artist create his art and then judge it upon completion

    Really? I don't agree with state-sponsored censorship, but just because someone has the right to do something doesn't mean they should. I hope Dean Fujioka will do the decent thing and find a different "art" project.

  • -4

    ben4short

    smith, I don't know why you persist in splitting the same irrelevant hairs of autobiography vs. 3rd-person writer's story because it really makes little difference to the point under debate: Fujioka's right to use the Hawker tragedy as material for his film. In both cases, the filmmaker's task is to transform the written word into visual images that convey to the viewer something of interest, insight and originality, regardless of the book's author. A good filmmaker will filter the book through his own experiences, knowledge, artistic standards, etc and produce a work that will be either interesting or boring to watch.

    Yardley,

    I don't agree with state-sponsored censorship, but just because someone has the right to do something doesn't mean they should. I hope Dean Fujioka will do the decent thing and find a different "art" project.

    Incredible double-talk: Having the right to do something . . . but not exercise that right. Hmmm, let's see, I have the right to free speech but because what I say might offend someone, I should repress my right. Got'cha. Makes sense. And for someone who doesn't "agree with state-sponsored censorship," (which is clearly not true), you have no qualms at all about dictating to Mr. Fujioka what the "decent" thing do is.

  • 4

    gogogo

    too soon... not very classy Japan

  • 4

    yasukuni

    Seems pretty straightforward to me. He is appealing the sentence. He doesn't want life in jail - he wants to get out. He probably figures that with a movie presenting himself as a flawed individual who made a mistake, but who afterwards suffered living on the run, and offered to give the proceeds of a movie to the victims family as a great act of remorse - or to a charity (wait for tears from people involved in the recipient charity ... then maybe his sentence will be reduced. And when he gets out, he probably figures he can make more money.

    Given that the gruesome details, of what he did, the fact that he didn't turn himself in (lots of Japanese do), and the fact that he is appealing his sentence, as well as writing a book that makes his life sound exciting - I think this scumbag has no remorse. It's outrageous. And even worse that some people have some kind of admiration for him.

  • 0

    Ai Takahashi

    Who wants to watch the movie?

  • 2

    honey

    I think that this case has been one disgrace after another for Japan.I can't imagine their image could get much worse.No-one with any class would watch such a film.

  • -6

    j4p4nFTW

    When I was younger I looked up to some of the western ideals such as free speech and freedom of religion and thought they were noble things to aspire to. But, the Internet has brought with it an age in which we can see the opinions of the average person, and what I find is that westerners do not seem to believe in free speech or freedom of religion at all. They believe in freedom of their speech, but when a Japanese director decides to tackle a difficult social issue, suddenly he is attacked and we hear about the "limits" of free speech. But if there are limits, is it truly a right?

    The idea that a film is going to either portray Ichihashi as a hero or somehow trick the seemingly gullible Japanese into thinking that he is a hero smacks of Orientalism. This is the kind of subtle racism that paints the Japanese as a people unable to understand morality or what is right or wrong. And it has to stop.

  • 1

    NinjaDave

    However disgusted we may feel this film will go ahead.Complaining will make it more popular with the kind of idiots that like this kind of thing.

  • 2

    Maria

    j4p4nFTW: You wrote: "There is also the problem of fetishistic treatment of the murder of a foreigner when many, many murders of ordinary domestic people go unreported every day. "

    But is it not a Japanese actor/director who, by choosing to make a film about Ms Hawker's murderer (Ms hawker herself just an ordinary person who was trying to liver her life), is fetishising it? Why hasn't he chosen to make a film about the murderer of any number of poor Japanese victims, thus raising awareness of the unreported deaths of "domestic people" and the incompetence of the Japanese police? Why is Fujioka pandering to this "subtle racism" by focussing on the poor Caucasian victim, when there have been so many poor Asian victims? Why does he need to crib from Ichihashi's book?

  • -6

    ben4short

    Who wants to watch the movie?

    Anyone with an inquisitive mind interested in criminal psychology and the human capacity for evil, which clearly excludes 90% of the posters here who prefer that criminals be one-dimensional and with easy labels such as "sick" and "nutjob" and "disgusting," among others. Summon forth the courage to look deeply into these "monsters" and you're certain to find parts of yourself.

  • 2

    Maria

    Ben4short: Have you read the book?

  • -4

    ben4short

    Maria, no, but so what?

  • 2

    Maria

    Just curious - you seem to think it's a story worth knowing and retelling; I figured you must have read it. Why wait for the film, as the book is straight from the horse's mouth, as it were?

  • -3

    ben4short

    you seem to think it's a story worth knowing and retelling

    If this is what you think, then I'd suggest either rereading all my posts or enrolling in a remedial reading class. The story and details are completely irrelevant to what I've been saying, whether the subject is Ichihashi or Eichmann. For the final time, my point is that nothing, absolutely nothing, no matter how offensive some people might find it, is off limits to the artist. Period. One of the benchmarks of a free society is the complete absence of all restrictions to artistic integrity. Capish?

  • 1

    Maria

    Oh dear lordie! Ben you did make me larf with that! Thank you - your post scored one for the Luvvies and artists, especially that wonderful bastarded movie-mobster spelling at the end - wonderful! But seriously now - no I can't be bothered to read all your posts, especially overwrought ones. But you did most recently write that "Anyone with an inquisitive mind interested in criminal psychology and the human capacity for evil" would want to see the film, so stands to reason they'd want to read the book. Not you then? And it is as much my right to complain about the bad taste and incredibly poor timing of a project like this (even if it is by an real, ahem, Artist) as it is his right to make it, m'kay ducks?

  • 3

    Maria

    Dammit - poor editing messed up my grand retort...of course I meant "bastardised, movie-mobster spelling". I should've just stuck with "wrong" or "lazy". Like the recent spate of people misspelling "Voila" as "Wallah". I mean, really, what's the online dictionary for anyway?

  • 5

    Blair Herron

    @j4p4nFTW

    what I find is that westerners do not seem to believe in free speech or freedom of religion at all. They believe in freedom of their speech, but when a Japanese director decides to tackle a difficult social issue, suddenly he is attacked and we hear about the "limits" of free speech.

    I think freedom of speech is it's free to disagree and say it to the person involved whether he/she is weterners, Asians, or Africans. The director is suddenly attacked by westerners? Maybe you read only JT posts. You should read the comments by Japanese people toward this movie. Yahoo Japan News, for example, there were 1500+ comments. I have read top 100 (that got 22,000+"like") and all of the comments are against the idea of making this movie. Even the last 30 comments are mostly against the idea.

    http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/cm/main?d=20111123-00000020-sph-ent&s=points&o=desc

    You could try 2channel, too. There are more swear words & threats by Japanese people against the director, the actors...

    http://blog.livedoor.jp/ranisoku/archives/67096860.html

  • -2

    j4p4nFTW

    Maria, yes, those were some of the same questions I was thinking of. Part of the answer, of course, is that not many (Japanese) people would be interested in seeing a film about an average Japanese person simply being murdered, nor of the common criminal on the run. I don't think the director is the one necessarily with the fetish here, but he is certainly playing to that fetishization of the role of the foreigner in our society. He knows what will get attention and what will not.

    Whether or not Fujioka takes this film to the next level and asks Japanese society to take a good look at itself is another question. Most people don't like to look at or think about the dark side of their society.

  • 1

    Maria

    He knows what will get attention and what will not.

    So he's doing it for the money then, not for any deeper social agenda, to point out the shortcomings of the police, as you wrote before. Capitalising on the murder of a young girl because she was a foreigner, and that's more sensational, bums on seats. Just for the money. That's a pretty dark aspect of society right there.

  • -6

    ben4short

    And more totally uninformed, presumptuous guessing, half-empty-glass Fujioka bashing, huh Maria?

  • -1

    Maria

    Yep, that's me. But really, have a read of j4p4nFTW's posts, where s/he contradicts her/himself a lot. Super-fun reading.

    • Moderator

      Readers, no more sniping at each other please. Focus your comments on the story and not at each other.

  • 1

    Godan

    Thank you for sharing your post, Blair! Just goes to show that common decency and an understanding of what is right and what is wrong can transcend nationality. TBH, I am not surprised by the opinions shared on Yahoo Japan. The insensitivity of everyone involved in this "project" to the feelings of Lindsay's family is quite sad.

  • 0

    Jacob Buchner

    Bring on the movie! Like to see what`s the story behind this guy.

  • 3

    Maria

    I wonder why Fujioka didn't choose Joji Obara's story? Covers all the bases and more - drugs, rape, murder, foreign as well as Japanese victims, the seedy world of hostessing, police incompetence,dismemberment and concrete... I mean, there's one crazy-ass criminal whose psyche is worth probing, and the film would at the same time "asks Japanese society to take a good look at itself ". Plus much more time has passed, the case is closed, the facts are in. ... Oh wait, I know why - Obara hasn't been good enough to write a book from his perspective, that can be easily remade into a script. Fujioka would have to write the pesky thing himself (or pay someone to do it), and why do that when you have Ichi The Killer's take on things? (hey, cool title eh).

  • 6

    zichi

    When I was following this tragic brutal crime I was shocked or surprised that there was nothing or very little out of the parents of Ichihashi, both wealthy doctors? No apology to the Hawker family?

  • 2

    herefornow

    I feel physically sick

    The first post, and IMO, the only one needed.

    And, timtak, your usual sematics to try to defend a indefensible activity is more than just annoying in this case. It is downright insulting. This is not a movie "about" a murderer. It is a movie written BY a murderer. And, as a result, in some manner, will make him more sympathetic and human than he deserves. Anyone who supports this movie by helping to produce it, distribute it, or go see it, needs to check their moral compass -- big time. My only hope is that women's rights groups will organize and have mass picketing at any theatre that chooses to show it, like the right-wing groups do when a movie is produced that they don't like. But, we are talking about Japan here, so that will never happen as this was a foreign woman who was the vistim, and all the Japanese women are too busy shopping for the latest LV bag to be concerned about movies that makes a "hero" out of a killer and rapist.

  • 4

    WilliB

    smithinjapan:

    " Making a movie based on the story of a serial killer (or just murderer) is one thing, but part of what's disgusting about this situation is that it's based on the AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT of the murder and subsequent running from justice. "

    Exactly. Plus, the case is not over yet, and the scumbag in question is still pulling all levers to get out of jail. this self-glorifying autobiography being part of the scheme.

    I rarely agree with any of your post here, but in this case I do 100%.

  • 5

    Nifty

    To all of the commentators saying that this is no different than all of the books and movies out there about Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, or Jeffrey Dahmer:

    The US enacted "Son of Sam" laws in the 70's and 80's which prevent criminals from profiting from their crimes in the form of royalties from interviews, books, or movies. If a convicted killer does write a biography, then he will never see one red cent from it. Publishers also face a tremendous amount of public pressure (and legal pressure from families/victims in the form of civil litigation) when they attempt to publish certain works that glorify killers or their crimes.

    There is a profound difference between a documentary and a movie. This director has told us who the "villain" will be in his MOVIE; not Ichihashi, but the "society" and "environment" that "created" him.

    It is common in murder cases for the victim to be forgotten while the accused, who we still see living, breathing, and talking every day, takes their place as the only living person for us to relate to or care about. This movie will attempt to humanize Ichishashi as the "victim" because the real victim, Lindsay Hawker, is no longer able to speak for herself. It is an injustice that this novice "director" settled for because it is easier for him to work with a living actor than a dead one.

    If this was the US or UK, Ichihashi would not have any control over these royalties. It is an injustice that this movie is being made, and Japan should be ashamed that it allows Ichihashi to profit from it.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    Ben4short: "smith, I don't know why you persist in splitting the same irrelevant hairs of autobiography vs. 3rd-person writer's story because it really makes little difference to the point under debate: Fujioka's right to use the Hawker tragedy as material for his film."

    No, this is YOUR debate, not the various issues the article brings up. In fact it's funny you talk about irrelevancy because YOU have taken a number of issues and insisted the whole thing is simply about artistic integrity. If it were solely a debate on artistic freedoms/integrity then this would be in the entertainment section with few comments, but we both know it's not only about Fujioka's vision (or lack of... you're at least right that we'll find out).

    "In both cases, the filmmaker's task is to transform the written word into visual images that convey to the viewer something of interest, insight and originality, regardless of the book's author."

    Agree with the first part, and while the book's author in name may not necessarily matter, the genre does when concerning an autobiography outside of documentary, bottom line. The guy is going to make a fictional movie based on a murderer's personal writings.... may well be interesting, but it's still wrong -- especially given that the court case is still ongoing and the whole thing JUST happened.

    "A good filmmaker will filter the book through his own experiences, knowledge, artistic standards, etc and produce a work that will be either interesting or boring to watch."

    How is the person a 'good filmmaker' if what they produce is boring to watch? :)

    WilliB: "Exactly. Plus, the case is not over yet, and the scumbag in question is still pulling all levers to get out of jail. this self-glorifying autobiography being part of the scheme."

    I'm glad we agree (and I agree it's rare that we do). I'm not sure he's trying to weasel his way out of jail so much as he's trying to show himself as a victim in this. I think he would gladly do a reduced sentence so long as he felt the public felt sorry for him, and maybe even worshipped him.

  • 0

    Yardley

    @ben4short

    Incredible double-talk: Having the right to do something . . . but not exercise that right. Hmmm, let's see, I have the right to free speech but because what I say might offend someone, I should repress my right.

    I don't see how it's double-talk. There are many rights we all have that we don't always choose to exercise for the good of others or society as a whole. I have the right to own a gun, but I might choose not to exercise that right if I have young children in my house. I have the right to say I think too much attention is paid to breast cancer research when more women die from heart disease and related illnesses, but I might choose not to say that in front of a woman I know is fighting breast cancer. A publisher has a right to print grotesque war or disaster photos, but he may choose not to do so in consideration of his readers' or the victims' family members.

    And for someone who doesn't "agree with state-sponsored censorship," (which is clearly not true), you have no qualms at all about dictating to Mr. Fujioka what the "decent" thing do is.

    I think it's quite clear that I don't agree with state-sponsored censorship. I am not a state. I am an individual. I am not advocating that Mr. Fujioka be officially stopped in any way from making this or any movie. I am also not dictating what he should do, I merely expressed the hope that he might think again about pursuing the project in order to spare the feelings of Ms. Harker's family and to avoid giving any further publicity to a murderer. If Mr. Fujioka is an artist, surely there are any number of other subjects he could turn his attention to that would be entertaining, challenging, and financially remunerative.

  • 0

    Yardley

    Ms. Harker's = Ms. Hawker's

  • 0

    Chris Jacques

    This is truly horrible, but hardly limited to Japan. We as a global society feed off of sensationalism, especially whe it concerns sex or violence. This has both. It's very, very sad.

  • 2

    Chris Jacques

    More than anything, the BOOK should not have been made.

  • 1

    zichi

    He was able to write the book because he did it before being found guilty of his crime.

  • 0

    NinjaDave

    Zichi, you sure about that? He wrote after arrest and before trial.

  • 1

    zichi

    pamelot,

    what I read at the time was that the book agreement was made before his conviction. Convicted criminals can't write books.

  • 3

    zichi

    TIMELINE

    Mar.24 2007. Tatsuya Ichihashi murders Lindsay Ann Hawker.

    Mar.26 2007. Police visit Tatsuya Ichihashi's apartment. He escapes and goes on the run.

    Nov.10 2009. Tatsuya Ichihashi arrested.

    Tatsuya Ichihashi writes book while in the detention center.

    Jan.26 2011. Book published.

    Jul.21 2011. Sentenced to life imprisonment.

  • -4

    ben4short

    Thanks for the valuable bit of info, zichi. I hope it will silence a few of the whiners. Ichihashi will not see one yen from either the book or the movie. He had absolutely nothing to do with the film. The book's publisher, Gentosha, simply sold the film rights to Sedric International. Sedric then hired a screenwriter and staff to make the film. No connection to Ichihashi.

  • 3

    Nicky Washida

    Lets face it - this is nothing more than a pathetic attempt by a failed model and some-time "actor" (known it seems only within Taiwan and even then not very well) to get his name known and make a bit of fame and money for himself by picking up a controversial project he knows is going to get lots of attention.

    If he was the "artist" some claim him to be, he would have written the script himself, or at the very least gathered material from ALL parties involved, rather than just lifting the book, further glorifying "Ichi-samas" status - right around the time that his appeal will be coming up.

    Am I right in my understanding that he is casting HIMSELF as Ichihashi? Well theres a surprise. I can just see the reviews now: "Fujiokas sympathetic portrayal of a tortured young man...blah blah blah"

    I am quietly impressed by the number of Japanese protesting against this project on other websites. They obviously have the sense to understand that this does their countrys image no favours at all.

    Artistic license is one thing. Common decency is obviously another.

  • 0

    NinjaDave

    Let us get the facts correct. Convicted criminals can write what they like but may not get be allowed to publish and cannot make money from writings while still inside.

    Mr Ichihashi is allowed to keep money ffrom his book and film of his book if he wishes to. He can only have money on his release though.

  • -4

    ben4short

    Nicky, again, facts before emotions please:

    this is nothing more than a pathetic attempt by a failed model and some-time "actor" (known it seems only within Taiwan and even then not very well) to get his name known and make a bit of fame and money for himself by picking up a controversial project he knows is going to get lots of attention.

    Fujioka did not simply "pick up" this project . . . Sedric Int'l hired him to direct it and act in it (and possibly write the screenplay, we don't know at this point).

    If he was the "artist" some claim him to be, he would have written the script himself, or at the very least gathered material from ALL parties involved, rather than just lifting the book,

    He may have written the script himself. He may have also done research into criminal psychology. He may have a friend or family member who's been murdered. Nobody knows anything about this fellow and/or his intentions, so to prejudge him and his project is simply foolish and narrow-minded.

    Am I right in my understanding that he is casting HIMSELF as Ichihashi? Well theres a surprise. I can just see the reviews now: "Fujiokas sympathetic portrayal of a tortured young man...blah blah blah"

    No, again you are not right. The film company, Sedric, cast him as Ichihashi. As for reading future reviews, you and smithinjapan should join forces and form a fortune-telling company.

    **Spamalot ** a bit surprised by the low level of your non-response.

  • -3

    timtak

    We have agreed that films are made about convicted killers. Some use material from the killers (e.g. those about Aileen Wuornos) some do not. Some are sympathetic, some are not. The important point is how this movie will portray Ichihashi and the events. From the Japan Times: [The production company] Sedic International's Kensuke Zushi said. "We have no intention of casting Ichihashi in a positive light."

  • 0

    dolphingirl

    Let us get the facts correct. Convicted criminals can write what they like but may not get be allowed to publish and cannot make money from writings while still inside.

    Exactly.

    Mr Ichihashi is allowed to keep money ffrom his book and film of his book if he wishes to. He can only have money on his release though.

    Do you know this for a fact? I am also curious if Japan does have similar laws to the US's Son of Sam Laws. Anyone know?

  • 0

    zichi

    Convicted criminals can write what they like

    I don't think prison inmates would get much time for writing a book, or even provided with materials. Even the number of letters they can can write, if any, would be restricted. Inmates time is strictly controlled from wake to sleep.

  • 2

    Ed O Jidai

    Wait until our antagonist gets cut loose and becomes more of a visible gadabout celebrity like our favorite murdering cannibal Issei Sagawa. This tune is beginning to sound like a painfully familiar refrain (murderers becoming celebreties): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Issei_Sagawa

    Looking at the director/star's website I laughed when he said about his connection to the killer:

    "...me and this main character 'a convicted murderer of a violent crime' both share growing up in the same generation...."

    Yep, that certainly happens with me all the time. I feel the most profound connection with and understanding of every single person I meet who happens to be born plus-or-minus ten years of my own birth year. Oh, well, he had to write something. What's a guy to do?

    Instead of just telling his story, some dramatic conflict could be added to the movie by showing serious attempts at finding him (there were, weren't there?) that are thwarted (Drat!), until his ultimate and victorious capture. Pursuers as protagonists, Ichi the Killer as antagonist. Isn't this what a lot of the conflict is about? No one wants to see him as the protagonist, as he was in his own book.

  • 1

    NinjaDave

    To Zichi; prisoners in the regular regime have 21 hours a week to do things such as writing.Those in solitary may have unlimited depending on the rules of each prison.

    Please try not to speculate.

  • 0

    zichi

    NinjaDave

    Prisoners are permitted to receive and send letters only to members of their immediate family, and everything is censored.

    Prisoners are allowed radio, and TV, but all monitored by the prison. Books are allowed up to two, and one notepad, two pens are permitted. however, these may be taken away for no given reason.

    I still think it would be very difficult for a convicted criminal to write a book while in prison.

  • 0

    Yardley

    Mr. Fujioka's Twitter page:

    http://twitter.com/#!/deanfujioka

    The movie production company:

    http://www.sedic.co.jp/

  • 0

    kurisupisu

    @zichi Yet this warped killer did.Now he'll be consulted on the film script no doubt?

  • 2

    hoserfella

    I love the following two posts involving Ben4short's pontificating about the ethics, morals and legal ramifications of the book;

    Maria -

    Ben4short: Have you read the book?

    Ben4short -

    Maria, no, but so what?

  • 0

    hoserfella

    I still think it would be very difficult for a convicted criminal to write a book while in prison.

    zichi - as has already been established, the book is written, and he did so while in police custody or prison. So let's stop worrying about that bit of trivia and ask; Where will the blood money go? To Ichihashi's parents, who were uncooperative in helping police find him while he was on the run?

  • 0

    zichi

    hoserfella,

    you are not reading all the comments. He wrote the book while in a detention center which isn't a prison. I was replying to another comment.

  • 1

    zichi

    kurisupisu,

    you are confusing detention centers ( not convicted people) with prison (convicted criminals)?

  • 0

    hoserfella

    zichi - as I mentioned, what does it matter? It's been written.

  • -3

    ben4short

    Hoser old fellow, gomen. Mere typo. Zichi makes a valid point. You obviously don't read all posts, for if you had, you wouldn't have attacked me for not reading Ichihashi's book. Here's a little piece of information you might have missed: the discussion is about the MOVIE, not the book. So no, I have not read the book and the question is irrelevant.

  • 1

    Blair Herron

    Zichi, Yamato Mitatsu, imprisoned for murder, wrote books while in prison.

    http://nbrforums.nbr.org/foraui/message.aspx?LID=5&pg=15&MID=38031

    I don't know the detail about the law.

  • -3

    ben4short

    Why is it necessary to read a book about which a movie is being made in order to defend the moviemaker's right (artistic integrity, call it what you will) to make a movie about the book?

    Taking your illogic one step further, why not call those who don't want to see the movie made "hypocritical and ignorant" for not having read the book, too?

    Point being, reading the book or not reading the book is irrelevant to the ethical question of making a movie about it. Can you get your head around that simple statement?

    • Moderator

      Readers, you are going around in circles. Please stop repeating yourselves.

  • 3

    hoserfella

    127 posts could have been whittled down if someone had said from the start; Although the film makers have a legal right to make the movie, is it morally reprehensible to make a movie that will inevitably be seen as a mea culpa, and pay out blood money?

  • 0

    zichi

    NinjaDave, Blair Herron,

    I accept the fact that a convicted criminal in prison could write about crime including murder, although I think achieving it would be difficult but not impossible.

  • 3

    hoserfella

    ben4short - Very moving. But doesn't excuse your snide commentary to the likes of Maria who simply had the cojones to say in a nutshell; "No, this is unethical", instead of skating around the issue with a lot of hot air about what is legal to do

  • 1

    hoserfella

    Although the film makers have a legal right to make the movie, is it morally reprehensible to make a movie that will inevitably be seen as a mea culpa, and pay out blood money?

    And yes, JT mods, I know this will surely be your next question of the week. All I ask in return for my inspiration are beer coupons.

  • -5

    ben4short

    So now we can add hosefella to the growing list of omniscient posters who have spent time inside the director's head, know all about his past experiences, and exactly how his movie is going to turn out. Wow, I'm envious of such prescience. As for blood money, you're wrong again, horse. Family members are also restricted from any financial gain while the criminal is incarcerated.

    Regarding the claim that's been made that the case is still going on, only Ichihashi's life sentence has been appealed, not the actual verdict. And we all know that there's slim to no chance of the sentence being reduced.

    Roll the cameras, Fujioka, and let's finally see what you're made of.

  • 1

    Nicky Washida

    ben4Short: you are absolutely right, I have totally changed my mind, I am certain Fujioka and the production company are making this movie out of a drive to increase understanding of criminal psychology, perhaps even tapping into personal deep-seated emotional pain in the process.

    How wrong and narrow-minded of me to have suspected otherwise. Im sure Dean Fujioka is a hugely gifted artist, much like yourself. I guess not being an artist myself, i just dont have any understanding of these things.

  • -6

    ben4short

    Now now, Nicky, flattery will get you nowhere.

    I've never made any of the claims you attributed to me. All I've said from the very beginning is to not prejudge Fujioka's ability or motivation, and to give him the benefit of the doubt.

  • 1

    hoserfella

    ben4short - And once again, you avoid the question put forth; Is it ethically right? Its debatable that his family will see proceeds, its a fact that the filmmakers will. So, ben, now that the movie is being made for the fact-starved Japanese populace while it's so fresh in their minds, is it? This wouldn't be a cynical move by Fujioka et al to get their stalled careers off the ground, would it? You're not so scared of scorn from one side or the other that you'll refuse to make a judgement, are you?

  • 1

    hoserfella

    ben4short - sorry pal, but Nicky nailed you to the wall just like Maria a few days back.

  • -5

    ben4short

    Hoserfella, Nicky's little sarcasm has been adequately dealt with.

    Regarding your question, I have no problem at all . . . . shall I repeat it? . . . I see absolutely nothing ethically wrong with Sedic Int'l making money from their movie. NOTHING. Does that answer your question?

    • Moderator

      Readers, from here on, posts that are repetitive will be removed.

  • 3

    Yardley

    I see absolutely nothing ethically wrong with Sedic Int'l making money from their movie. NOTHING.

    Perhaps you are unclear about what "ethical" means:

    "Schools of ethics in Western philosophy can be divided, very roughly, into three sorts. The first, drawing on the work of Aristotle, holds that the virtues (such as justice, charity, and generosity) are dispositions to act in ways that benefit both the person possessing them and that person's society. The second, defended particularly by Kant, makes the concept of duty central to morality: humans are bound, from a knowledge of their duty as rational beings, to obey the categorical imperative to respect other rational beings. Thirdly, utilitarianism asserts that the guiding principle of conduct should be the greatest happiness or benefit of the greatest number." -Oxford American Dictionary

    Some other synonyms: irreproachable; righteous, high-minded, virtuous, honorable, respectable, noble, worthy; praiseworthy, commendable, admirable, laudable

    Can you still say the company is acting ethically?

  • -4

    ben4short

    Oh Jesus, Yardley, gimme a break. I don't need you or Oxford or anyone else to tell me what ethical means. So I'll repeat myself once again: nothing wrong with Sedic making a buck from their film. If you accept the premise that they have the right to make such a film, which I do, then it follows that they have the right to profit from it. And that is perfectly fine with me. I feel as horrible as the next person about Lindsay's awful murder and know that her family's grief will never end. But that is the nature of loss and tragedy, dude, and the world cannot stop because someone's feelings might be hurt. That might sound cold to some, but stop and think about it. How do we define "family?" Just her parents and siblings, or do we have to consider cousins, aunts, uncles, nieces etc? And how about her friends? How "close" does a friend have to be for us to place his/her feelings into the equation? You see, it's all quite arbitrary, isn't it? Ichihashi did a horrible thing. He should spend many years in prison. He wrote a book about his crime and time on the lam. An independent company bought the film rights to the book and is in the process of making a movie. None of us knows how the movie will turn out, how sympathetic it might or might not be, or what we may or may not learn about the criminal mind, or the mind of someone on the run for over 2 years. So what is the problem? If the movie turns out to be offensive to me, I will condemn it at the time. Sedic and Mr. Fujioka are free and perfectly ethical in using this tragedy as material for a film. Judgment will be reserved until the fruit of their labor is actually viewed. Not before.

  • 2

    luckshines

    Does Ichihashi get to have copyrights? Freedom of speech? I can't see why he should. He is a prisoner after all. Part of being a prisoner is loss of rights, and just freedom of movement.

    There is no reason why his writings should have been released, nor should he have any contact with the outside world except for lawyers and family. And they should all be barred from passing on his communications except to report possible abuses of him as a prisoner. To let him glorify his crimes is inexcuseable. If he is proftitting, that is also inexcuseable.

    If someone unrelated makes money and film about him and his crimes we have to accept it, even though it would be nice if the people making this film had the decency to wait a few years more. Charles Manson's autobiography came out about two decades after his crimes.

    I will also say that interest does not necessarily reflect on Japan, but only the people who are interested and glorify this fiend and his ilk, such as Issei Sagawa, because we had the same with Jack the Ripper and Ted Bundy. But as far as the law letting such evil gutter dwellers have money and glory, that does reflect on Japan.

  • 0

    Serrano

    I hear Dean Fujioka is going to direct the movie as well as star in it.

  • 0

    Maria

    Here's another book, for comparison - one of The Guardian's Books of the Year:

    People Who Eat Darkness (Jonathan Cape) by Richard Lloyd Parry is a chilling account of the murder of Lucie Blackman in Japan 11 years ago. Parry shows a rare compassion and a refusal to judge: despite the horrors of the crime, almost the most upsetting feature of his story is the blameless ordinariness of the life Blackman left behind in England.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/feb/27/people-who-eat-darkness-lucie-blackman-review

    Why doesn't Fujioka want to play him, or indeed Sagawa? Is he too pretty?

  • 0

    Sasoriza

    Well then, lets UK make their movie about Lindsey's murder.

    Hire Tom Hooper as director,get Keira Kinghtley as Lindsey and some really good Asian actor as Ichihashi, and see which movie will get more attention around the world.

    BTW,Sedic have produced so far Okuribito, 13 Assasins, Space Battleship Yamato, Sukiyaki Western and the Ichi movies, so they are pretty rich and strong company.

  • 0

    Maitake

    Outrageous!!

  • 3

    choiwaruoyaji

    This movie would be just plain wrong.

    I think merciless killers should, to some degree, have their human rights deliberately revoked.

    I don't think they should have the right to publish works freely.

    Where's the punishment in allowing a merciless killer the opportunity to write and publish to his heart's content. I think many killers would enjoy and get pleasure from such an opportunity. Why should they be allowed such a pleasure when their poor victim has had all opportunities cruelly extinguished.

    If monsters such as this scumbag do produce some worthless piece of cr@# then, at the very least, the authorities should ask the victim's family what they want to be done with it.

    And perhaps the authorities could also provide a toilet to flush it down because, let's be honest, that is what most victim's families would want done with it...

    That's what I want done with it, and then we wouldn't have to have any of this sick nonsense about making it into a movie...

  • 1

    Kuroyama

    I dont see any good outcome here. Did anyone here see Natural Born Killers by Oliver Stone? Remember how the two serial killers Mickey and Mallory were treated as celebrities and idols? Well... OS was out of his mind on drugs during that project, but Ichihashi was given the same star treatment as those fictional characters when he was caught. Girls swooned and offered themselves up to him citing his cleverness and undeniable charm. The media covered it all and glorified this rapist-murderer. It made me wonder if I was on drugs...

    So... For the same culture to make a movie based on his book... Unfortunate yes, but I think the true shock here is how unsurprising this is. Particularly for foreigners who live in Japan for any real length of time. There is beauty in elements of Japanese culture, but like amakudari, black sound trucks, ijime, celebrated racism, and "little emperors"... This ISNT it.

  • 2

    LifeIsPain

    Why should they be allowed such a pleasure when their poor victim has had all opportunities cruelly extinguished.

    More to the point, why should he be allowed to inflict such pain on the family of the victim?

  • 1

    Dennis Bauer

    welcome to japan were serial killers and murderers become "talento"

  • 1

    ctskelly

    I suggest writing the producer about how upset we all are.
    Sedic has a mail page at: http://www.sedic.co.jp/html/reference.html

    You might put it on your Facebook page as well and invite your Japanese friends to write.

  • 1

    Nessie

    There are lots of films made about murderers, such as Gary Gilmore (Executioner's Song), Smith and Hickock (In Cold Blood).

    @tikmak

    These were not based on books by the murderer.

  • 6

    BlueWitch

    According to 2ch...

    There are several angry protests against the making of this distateful film...

    被害者家族のことを考えろ!

    Have regard for the victim's family!

    儲けるためには何でもやるんだな

    Anything in the name of money gain.

    道徳とか法律とか規制概念とかを全て取り払って答えてほしい

    Take aside thed moral, law and restrictions and give an answer.

    悪趣味。 他人の不幸をビジネス化するなんてさ 監督は日本人か。同じ日本人として恥ずかしい。被害者はもとより、ご遺族に申し訳ない。 イギリスの人たちが、この事件をどう思って日本をどう評価しているのか、わかってるのだろうか?

    Bad taste. Others' unhappiness is made business. Is the supervisor Japanese?It is shameful for the Japanese indeed. Apologize to the bereaved family for having no respect for the victim. How are the people of U.K. going to think about the Japanese once this sort of behavior is revealed?

    すげえ市橋、殺害は1人だけだから 死刑になる可能性は低いし 無期懲役だったとしても20年以内で出所できる

    Unfortunately these is also some comments like the one above that suggest that this scumbag would be released within 20 years as he only killed ONE person, not several.

    Personally, I am COMPLETELY against such film. It's extremely disrespectful to the victim and her family. The people involved in this are low and without any morals. Just thinking about making money. They even suggest the possibility to make this scumbag murderer "innocent and human". I will always hate them and never forgive them. This is an insult to my Foreign friends. Dean Fujioka's career will be over and tarnished for life. He will be deeply hated by many people in this country. I reccomend he quit this awful project. Back down.

  • 1

    aeho11

    Unbelievable... If they depict Ichihashi as the the guy from "Akunin" the director should be put in the same cell as Ichihashi and be left there for some years to rethink his ideas of making money...

  • 1

    MaboDofuIsSpicy

    Rape is horrible. Accidentally killing could possibly be true, but the battered body? That says it all. The guy is scum.

  • 4

    BlueWitch

    From Yahoo....

    そこまでしてカネが欲しいのか? Are you willing to go that low in order to make money?

    市橋は早く死刑にしろ 税金でメシ食わせるのももったいない

    Execute Ishihachi now! To keep feeding him is a waste of tax money.

  • -1

    BlueWitch

    sorry for my grammar errors, incuding the scumbag's lastname. screw the smegmaball anyway.

  • 0

    gelendestrasse

    I won't be going. I won't buy the book. But I think Ms. Hawker's parents should get all the proceeds from both.

  • 0

    oginome

    I agree that people should have the right to be make a movie of this if that's what they want... doesn't stop it from being unbelievably callous and opportunistic though.

  • 1

    ojiiu812badboy

    I say, no movie, no DVD, no coming attractions, and a total boycott, at least from us teachers. This is the last time I will entertain any article about this punk unless its about Japan's decision to "fry" him. What value Japan? Is this going to feed the sick minds of other punks or western wannabe copy cats? It was sickening enough to have dealt with this in the so called news. Totally disgusted!

  • 0

    Rose Kina Kina

    i think its unfair for the Lindsays. He should serve his sentence for the rest of his life and not to glamorized his crime committed and become a hero instead. Is this the way He wants to gain sympathy and to erase in the minds of the people who will watch this movie to be. God forbid. Justice should be served accordingly. Let him rot in that cell. Write a book about henious crime such as this and how it was solved and publish it for reference for students who takes criminology and civil laws than making it a movie.

  • 0

    ReformedBasher

    This guy should not be writing a book unless it's with his fingernails on a jail cell wall. Shame on anyone who has anything to do with him.

    He detailed in the book how he traveled across Japan, from a tiny southern Okinawan island, where he lived on fish and snakes, to the western city of Osaka, where he worked on a construction site.

    Great. Feed him the same while in jail, and seeing he is fit and healthy, make him work his ass off.

  • 0

    ReformedBasher

    Execute Ishihachi now! To keep feeding him is a waste of tax money.

    Then again, this is even better.

  • 2

    amerijap

    I'm getting sick and throwing up as this scumbag's ugly fixed-face re-appeared on the surface of national/local media. And now, my stomach is churning up--and it's getting so nasty--as a stupid J-film company makes a shameless profiteering out of this man's disgusting story while the trial is still going on. This is gonna make me suffer from diarrhea.

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