South Korean cinema leads nominees at Asian Film Awards

FILE - In this Saturday, May 14, 2016 file photo, director Park Chan-Wook poses for photographers during a photo call for the film The Handmaiden at the 69th international film festival, Cannes, southern France. South Korean cinema has fared well in the nominations for the Asian Film Awards. Director Park Chan Wook's erotic period drama, "The Handmaiden," received six nominations, including Moon So-ri for best supporting actress. Five nominations went to the zombie film, "Train to Busan," including Ma Dong-seok for best supporting actor. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau, file)

HONG KONG —

South Korean cinema has fared well in the nominations for the Asian Film Awards.

Director Park Chan Wook’s erotic period drama, “The Handmaiden,” received six nominations, including Moon So-ri for best supporting actress. Five nominations went to the zombie film, “Train to Busan,” including Ma Dong-seok for best supporting actor.

Chinese director Feng Xiao Gang’s social justice drama “I Am Not Madame Bovary” also received five nominations including best film, best director and best actress for Fan Bingbing.

The other nominees for best picture were South Korean supernatural thriller “The Wailing,” Taiwanese crime comedy, “Godspeed,” Japanese family drama “Harmonium” and South Korean action thriller “The Age of Shadows.” Best-director nominees were Na Hong-jin for “The Wailing,” Koji Fukada for “Harmonium,” Derek Tsang for “Soul Mate,” Feng Xiaogang for “I Am Not Madame Bovary” and Lav Diaz for “The Woman Who Left.”

Chinese director Jia Zhangke, who is this year’s jury president and unveiled the nominations Wednesday, saw a “diverse and balanced” nomination list based on the previous year’s films.

The “Mountains May Depart” director believes that it is reflective of the vibrancy of the Asian film industry, “Every year the creativity is different but in 2016, I think we saw many films from different genres that went head to head. There are art house films or commercial films that presented a lot of creativity,” Jia said.

The nominations include 34 films from 12 Asian countries. Under the leadership of Jia, a panel of film experts including Hong Kong actress Karena Lam, will select the winners in 15 categories.

A best-actress nominee a year ago, Lam said she’s thrilled to return as a jury member and she’ll use her instincts as an actress when the jury votes.

“I will consider the background of the film, but also exchange with the other jury members. I can learn a lot in this process. When we sit down to meet, there are jury members from different parts of the world, you can get 10 different opinions for just 1 film. I think it’s great. It’ll be an opportunity for me to learn as well.”

The Asian Film Awards will be handed out on March 21 in Hong Kong.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • 0

    papigiulio

    The handmaiden was good but not THAT good. Train to Busan was great.

  • 0

    commanteer

    The Age of Shadows was a very entertaining spy story that centers around a Korean who works for the Japanese in hunting resistance members in the 30s. Kept me guessing until the end.

  • 3

    Thunderbird

    for obvious reasons... maybe japanese movies are only good for japanese people, any other asian or western could only see them as pure bad acting. You can be watching Godzilla, you will fall asleep at some point. It reminds me of a comment I saw here before:

    Every movie seems to have the following scenes:

    Guy: Stands zombie like with a vacant look on his face. He then starts shouting at the girl. he then starts crying to the girl. He then say's sorry and they make up.

    Girl: Stands there zombie like with vacant look on her face. She then starts shouting at the guy. She then starts crying at the guy. She then say's sorry and they make up.

    Little girl or boy: Is in hospital or has some incurable illness. Cries throughout the whole movie. may have a few cutie scenes just to show how cute they are.

    The tough guy: Shouts and rolls his R's throughout the movie.

    Everyone else: Just stands zombie like in the background of every scene. Contributing nothing to the storyline. But much like TV shows Japanese feel a certain comfort in numbers.

  • 0

    1glenn

    Have seen some wonderful Japanese and Chinese films, but lately the Koreans have dominated in both TV and movies, IMO. That is not to say that everything coming out of Korea is wonderful, but much of it is. I find it interesting that many American movies are remakes of movies first made in Korea. Some Korean movies are, unfortunately, too daring for the American market, even if they are brilliant.

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    General rule is Japan dominates in animation, and somewhat in horror (recently Korea is doing pretty well with those, too). Hong Kong has it down for martial arts and similar action movies, China often has the mafia movies down (aside from Beat Takeshi), and Korea often has great human dramas (vague, I know) and period pieces. There are exceptions in all departments and genres, of course, and I still think one of the best directors to come out of Asia was Kurosawa, but I have to agree with 1glenn that in general South Korea seems to be dominating these days.

  • 0

    Kenny

    I hope "Train to busan" and "the age of Shadows" will win ????????????

  • -2

    Pukey2

    The Asian Film Awards will be handed out on March 21 in Hong Kong.

    And the irony is that HK probably doesn't even have one movie nominated.

  • -1

    smithinjapan

    Pukey2: "And the irony is that HK probably doesn't even have one movie nominated."

    It has a total of 13 nominations, including for best director, best actor/actress, supporting for both, best newcomer, best screenwriter, etc.

  • 0

    ThePBot

    China often has the mafia movies down

    Really? I'd like to know of some that you recommend, because for me, every time I want to see an Asian period movie, I normally go for Chinese movies (my all time favorite is Hero). I thought mafia type of movies are known in Hong Kong and Japan.

  • 0

    smithinjapan

    ThePBot: Perhaps Hong Kong would be better as an example of mafia movies (involving the Triad). Election, Internal Affairs, The White Storm, Brotherhood (I think, there's a Korean movie of a similar name), No Man's Land, Kill Zone, Firestorm, and several others. Andy Lau alone (and Tony Leung) are fantastic.

    Yeah, China does a number of period movies as well, and like I said there are exceptions. I find a lot of the Chinese one's to be mixed in with fantasy, or epics like Sangokushi. I like the more pastoral, country-side dramas from China and Vietnam, like those by Tran Anh Hung.

  • 0

    turbotsat

    Googled 'mainland china triad movies', first hit was a list of 10 movies that had 2.5 probably mainland or Taiwanese and 7.5 probably HK (Cantonese names). 2 were "No Man's Land" and "Lethal Hostage". The split China/HK movie was Drug War with Louis Koo.

    http://www.theworldofchinese.com/2014/01/top-ten-chinese-gangster-movies/

    "The Missing Gun" was OK, as far as I remember, it's been a long time since I saw it. But maybe it's just a crime movie, not mafia.

    I thought I read somewhere that "Hero" was kind of targeted at USA in an attempt to get an Oscar, so it was reportedly a great disappointment for the director to lose out to Brokeback Mountain that year.

Login to leave a comment

OR
Top Jobs in Japan, Jan 20-26, 2017

Top Jobs in Japan, Jan 20-26, 2017

Japan Today CareersJobs

Kagoshima Tour Ep.4

Kagoshima Tour Ep.4

Ms GreenTravel / Hotels

Undergraduate: Information session (January 22)

Undergraduate: Information session (January 22)

Temple University, Japan CampusContinuing Education / MBA

Special Offers

Work
in Japan

Search the Largest English Job Board in Japan.

Find a Job Now!

More in Entertainment

View all

View all

Find Your
Apartment
in Japan

10,000’s of properties available today!

Search